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					*
    Jacque Melin - GVSU
*Another Premise of the Workshop
As the United States continues to compete in a global
economy that demands innovation, the U.S. education
     system must equip students with the four Cs:
1. critical thinking and problem solving,
2. communication,
3. collaboration, and
4. creativity and innovation.
*   Ready
*
*
    1.   Awareness
    2.   Comprehension
    3.   Application
    4.   Analysis
    5.   Synthesis
    6.   Evaluation
                  S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011
   *
1. Knowledge in one discipline
2. Application within discipline
3. Application across disciplines
4. Application to real-world predictable situations
5. Application to real-world unpredictable
    situations




                                    S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011
              Levels
Bloom’s
     6    C            D
     5
     4
     3
     2    A            B
     1
          1   2   3    4               5
              Application   S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011
    Rigor/Relevance Framework
    •   Analyze the graphs of the           •    Obtain historical data about local
6       perimeters and areas of squares
        having different-length sides.
                                                 weather to predict the chance of
                                                 snow, rain, or sun during year.



                                                            D
    •   Determine the largest               •    Test consumer products and illustrate

5
4
    •
             C
        rectangular area for a fixed
        perimeter.
        Determine and justify the
        similarity or congruence for two
        geometric shapes.
                                            •



                                            •
                                                 the data graphically.
                                                 Plan a large school event and
                                                 calculate resources (food,
                                                 decorations, etc.) you need to
                                                 organize and hold this event.
                                                 Make a scale drawing of the
                                                 classroom on grid paper, each group
                                                 using a different scale.
3
    • Express probabilities as fractions,       • Calculate percentages of advertising in
      percents, or decimals.                      a newspaper.
2   • Classify triangles according to           • Tour the school building and identify




             A                                              B
      angle size and/or length of sides.          examples of parallel and perpendicular
    • Calculate volume of simple                  lines, planes, and angles.
      three- dimensional shapes.                • Determine the median and mode of
1   • Given the coordinates of a
      quadrilateral, plot the
                                                  real data displayed in a histogram
                                                • Organize and display collected data,
      quadrilateral on a grid.                    using appropriate tables, charts, or
                                                  graphs.


              1               2                   3               4                   5
                                                         S. Gendron, Kentwood presentation, March 2011
http://visualblooms.wikispaces.com
*Before…….
Underline all the adjectives on page 10. Then use at least 8 of
these adjectives in a paragraph of your own about a topic of
your choice.


                                     http://epals.com
After…….
Sit in front of the school and write a paragraph that describes
clearly how the school looks from your perspective. We will
e-mail your description to a student in Alaska, who will draw a
picture of the school as it is described by you. Be as specific
as possible, so that the drawing will look just like your view of
the school.
     *“If an educator keeps
      using the same strategies
      over and over and the
      student keeps failing,




who really is the slow learner?”
                                    Differentiation
C. Tomlinson
                       Is a teacher’s response to learner’s needs

                     Guided by general principles of differentiation


  Meaningful tasks            Flexible grouping            Continual assessment

                          Teachers can differentiate through         Building Community
Quality Curriculum


       Content            Process             Product        Affect/Environment

                            According to students’

           Readiness              Interest         Learning Profile

            Through a variety of instructional strategies such as:
  RAFTS…Graphic Organizers…Scaffolding …Cubing…Tic-Tac-Toe…Learning
Contracts….Tiering… Learning/Interest Centers… Independent Studies…Intelligence
              Preferences….Orbitals…..Complex Instruction…ETC.
          *
              Readiness              Interest                Learning Profile

Content       • Materials at         • Range of materials • Varied teaching
                varied readability     that apply key        modes (e.g.,
                levels                 ideas and skills to a verbal, visual,
              • Spelling assigned      variety of real-      rhythmic,
                by proficiency         world situations.     practical, etc.)
              • Alternate
                presentation         • Teacher               • Video or audio
                methods                presentations           notes for students
              • Targeted small         designed to link to     who learn better
                group instruction      student interests.      with repeated
              • Front-loading                                  listening.
                vocabulary
              • Highlighted text
Process

Product
Step 1   Teacher identifies the new word and elicits
         background knowledge.

Step 2   Teacher explains the meaning of the new word.


Step 3   Students generate their own explanations of the
         new word.

Step 4   Students create a visual representations of the
         new word.

Step 5   Students engage in experiences that deepen
         their understanding of the new word.

Step 6   Students engage in vocabulary games and
         activities to help them remember the word and
         its meaning.
   Research on Imagery as Elaboration
      Students who used imagery to
       learn vocabulary, on average,
                performed
  # of
studies

  6       37 percentile pts. higher   …students who kept
                  than…               repeating definitions.


  4       21 percentile pts. higher   …students who were
                  than…               using the terms in a
                                      sentence.
   Science
                          Energy




                      200 POINTS

               Hypothesis           Electron




            100 POINTS              100 POINTS

   Atmosphere          Experiment              Dissolve




50 POINTS              50 POINTS                 50 POINTS
     http://jc-schools.net/tutorials/vocab/strategies.html
                *Tag Galaxy

  *Visual
Thesaurus

            *
          *
              Readiness              Interest                Learning Profile

Content       • Materials at         • Range of materials    • Varied teaching
                varied readability     that apply key          modes (e.g.,
                levels                 ideas and skills to     verbal, visual,
              • Spelling assigned      a variety of real-      rhythmic,
                by proficiency         world situations.       practical, etc.)
              • Alternate
                presentation         • Teacher               • Video or audio
                methods                presentations           notes for students
              • Targeted small         designed to link to     who learn better
                group instruction      student interests.      with repeated
              • Front-loading                                  listening.
                vocabulary
              • Highlighted text
Process

Product
              *

Questgarden

The Buck Institute
          *
              Readiness             Interest                Learning Profile

Content

Process       • Tiered activities   • Expert groups         • Choice of working
              • Mini-workshops      • Interest centers        conditions (e.g.,
              • Flexible use of     • Supplementary           alone or with a
                time                  materials based on      partner)
              • Learning              student interests     • Tasks designed
                contracts           • Jigsaw                  around intelligence
              • Varied homework     • Independent             preferences
                assignments           studies               • Blogs and vlogs to
              • Learning Centers    • Interest-based          share ideas
                                      application options
Product
          *
              Readiness             Interest                Learning Profile

Content

Process       • Tiered activities   • Expert groups         • Choice of working
              • Mini-workshops      • Interest centers        conditions (e.g.,
              • Flexible use of     • Supplementary           alone or with a
                time                  materials based on      partner)
              • Learning              student interests     • Tasks designed
                contracts           • Jigsaw                  around intelligence
              • Varied homework     • Independent             preferences
                assignments           studies               • Blogs and vlogs to
              • Learning Centers    • Interest-based          share ideas
                                      application options
Product
                          Learning Contract #2
 To demonstrate what I have learned about ____________________, I want to
    _ Write a report                     _ Design a mural
    _ Put on a demonstration             _ Write a song
    _ Set up an experiment               _ Make a movie (Podcast)
    _ Develop a computer presentation    _ Create a graphic organizer or diagram
    _ Build a model                      _ Other
This will be a good way to demonstrate understanding of this concept because
______________________________________________________________

To do this project, I will need help with
______________________________________________________________

My Action Plan is________________________________________________

The criteria/rubric which will be used to assess my final product is _________
______________________________________________________________
My project will be completed by this date _____________________________

Student signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__
Teacher signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__
          *
              Readiness             Interest                Learning Profile

Content

Process       • Tiered activities   • Expert groups         • Choice of working
              • Mini-workshops      • Interest centers        conditions (e.g.,
              • Flexible use of     • Supplementary           alone or with a
                time                  materials based on      partner)
              • Learning              student interests     • Tasks designed
                contracts           • Jigsaw                  around intelligence
              • Varied homework     • Independent             preferences
                assignments           studies               • Blogs and vlogs to
              • Learning Centers    • Interest-based          share ideas
                or Stations           application options
                                    • Anchor Activities
Product
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird

    Exploring Stereotypes
         Think about the power of words and how we tend to label whole groups of
         people, many times unfavorably. In this station, you and your group will
         explore the notion of stereotypes through personal reflection, role-playing
         and group discussion.
    1.   Take an activity sheet, put your name and class period at the top. Read the
         introductory paragraph and directions carefully.
    2.   Choose a label from the Exploring Stereotypes container. If you do not
         understand the term, either ask your group members to help explain it to
         you, or choose another. Take a minute or two to imagine how this person,
         with this label, would think, act and talk. Prepare a brief introduction of
         yourself as that person, making sure to use what you perceive to be
         stereotypical qualities.
    3.   Brainstorm with your group labels and stereotypical categories in which we
         tend to place people. These might be related to race, gender, social class,
         age, etc. Record these on the “graffiti wall” in class. Take time to discuss
         impact and implications of these words/phrases.
    4.   Answer the rest of the questions on the back of the activity sheet
         independently. Your answers will be graded for effort and detail.
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird


    Independent Reading
         Explore a variety of reading materials independently in this
         station: internet sites related to To Kill a Mockingbird, nonfiction
         trade books, newspaper articles, old student projects and more.
         There is no response activity or worksheet, although there is an
         exit task on which you should indicate 1-2 facts from the material
         you read.

    1.   Choose a book or news article at the station that interests you.

    2.   Read independently until the station time allotment is complete.

    3.   Record on a sticky a fact or two from the book or newspaper.
         Put the sticky note on one of your other sheets to turn in. They will
         be collected and displayed at a later date.
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird


    Putting Yourself in the Photo: Exploring Point of View
    As we discussed in class, considering one’s point of view is extremely important when
    interpreting literature. Consider what Atticus Finch says in To Kill a Mockingbird, “You never
    really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-until you climb
    into his skin and walk around in it.”


    Your task for this station is to assume the role of a person in, or as a visitor to, the setting of
    the photographs, and briefly describe what you would be thinking, feeling, saying, etc.,
    based on the situation. Visualize the sights, sounds, and even smells a person in the
    photograph would be sensing when writing your description.


    Folder 1: Jim Crow Laws


    Folder 2: Vigilante/Mob Action


    Folder 3: Protests & Reaction


    Folder 4: Segregation
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird

    Coming to Consensus
         Ready to participate in a thought-provoking activity? This station begins with an
         opinionnaire, a set of 10-15 loaded statements, for which you will be asked to
         indicate your level of acceptance. You may accept or reject a statement, but
         there is no neutral ground. Afterwards, your station group is charged with the task of
         sharing your answers and discussing each statement. Can you build consensus
         through discussion and come to an agreement on a position that you all could
         accept?
    1.   On the top of Opinionnaire activity sheet, write your name and class period.
    2.   Independently read the statements and take the opinionnaire survey. Choose a
         side based on your initial reactions. Neutral ground is not acceptable.
    3.   When everyone is finished, take turns reading each statement aloud and going
         around the circle to share answers. As interesting points or disagreements arise,
         take the time to discuss with your group. Can you come to consensus
         (agreement)?
    4.   In the last few minutes of the station time allotment, independently record any
         personal connections you may have made during the activity, also noting what
         you have learned about yourself and your peers.
    5.   Choose a scribe to record, in tally format, your group’s initial results on the large
         poster so that team results from the day can be analyzed tomorrow.
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird

    Coming to Consensus

    Below are the statements on which students had to give their opinions.


    1.     All men are created equal.
    2.     Girls should act feminine.
    3.     Boys should act masculine.
    4.     Nobody is all bad or all good.
    5.     Some words are so offensive, they should never be written or spoken.
    6.     Under our justice system, all citizens are treated fairly in courts of law.
    7.     A hero is born, not made.
    8.     Speaking proper English grammar shows that a person is educated or smart.
    9.     No one is above the law.
    10.    Some people bring prejudicial stereotypes on themselves.
    11.    When the law does not succeed in punishing criminals, citizens should do so.
    12.    Education is the great equalizer.
*   Stations: Compacting with To Kill a Mockingbird

    Music Interpretation
         Making connections to themes found in literature can often be done by
         experiencing the music or art of the particular historical period in which the piece
         was composed/created. At this station, you will develop an understanding of the
         themes Harper Lee developed in her 1960 classic, To Kill a Mockingbird, themes
         such as: poverty, racism, gender roles, protest and hope.

    1.   Choose a listening center and record your name and class period on the top of its
         accompanying activity sheet.

    2.   Notice that your activity sheet is double-sided, one side for the song’s lyrics and the
         other for critical thinking questions, answers and personal connections.

    3.   Listen to the song assigned to each center, reading along with the lyrics. You may
         make any marks and notations on the lyrics as you follow along.

    4.   After listening to the song, answer the related critical thinking questions on the right-
         hand side of the activity sheet.
    5.   If there is time, switch centers with a group member and repeat steps 1-4.
         Complete sheets will be collected and graded.
     *    Stations: Tiering with 6 Traits
Voice Station

Tier 1 - Two Prompts:
1.       Describe a Metallica concert as though you were a 15-year old metal head (fan of
         heavy metal music).


2.       Describe the same Metallica concert as though you were the metal head’s 70-year
         old grandmother who had to drive the teen to the concert.


Tier 2 - Two Prompts:
         You are desperate to get into the exclusive performing arts camp, Camp
         Tapatapatapa. Write two notes from the same person (you) with two different
         purposes/audiences.


1.       Write an email to your best friend, Sally Mander, telling her how much you want to
         get into the camp and why you think you deserve to go.


2.       Write a letter to the camp’s director of admissions, Ms. Ivana Tinkle, indicating your
         interest and qualifications. Include appropriate openings and closings. This should
         be no longer than three paragraphs.
     *     Stations: Tiering with 6 Traits
Ideas Station
Tier 1:
          Look at the following statement: Recycling newspapers is a way to save trees and
          our environment. It is the main idea statement. Open the envelope and examine
          the strips for important and relevant supporting details. Separate the relevant
          details from the irrelevant ones by making two piles.
Examples from paper strips:
•         Each week, Americans throw away over 200 million newspapers, which equals
          about 500,000 trees.
•         Beijing is one of the most polluted-air cities in the world, because it is a leading
          manufacturer of goods and has very little environmental legislation.


Tier 2:
          Listen to the song, “Mammal” by They Might Be Giants while reading the lyrics. Then
          respond to the prompts below.
1.        What is the purpose of this song? In other words, what main idea is being
          conveyed?
2.        Which lyrics support the purpose and main idea you’ve identified? Be specific.
3.        Look at the lyrics in the third stanza. Explain the meaning of “One of us might lose his
          hair/But you’re reminded that it once was there/From the embryonic whale to the
          monkey with no tail.” What ideas about mammals do these lines illustrate?
*    Stations: Appealing to Modalities with Satire


    Whole-Class Activity
    What is satire? It is a device that uses irony, sarcasm, or caustic wit to attack or expose foolishness,
            faults in human behavior and character, or stupidity. Satire is expressed through essays,
            songs, cartoons, tv shows, articles, etc.


    Four Techniques of Satire:
    1.      Exaggeration: To enlarge, increase, or represent something beyond normal bounds so
            that it becomes ridiculous and its faults can be seen.
    2.      Incongruity: To present things that are out of place or are absurd in relation to their
            surroundings.
    3.      Reversal: To present the opposite of or different from the normal order [e.g., the order of
            events, hierarchical (ranked) order].
    4.      Parody: To imitate the techniques and/or style of some person, place, or thing.
    Capitol Steps:
    1.      In the song, what are Capitol Steps satirizing?
    2.      Do you see any of the four techniques being used? Which one(s)?
    3.      Explain how Capitol Steps use the techniques using specific examples from the song. Find
            at least two examples.
    4.      What is the point of view of the person/people who wrote the song on the subject of
            owning SUVs?
   *     Stations: Appealing to Modalities with Satire
Cartoon Station
Look at several of the cartoons. Try to find at least one example of two (2) of the types of
       satire. Choose whichever two you want.
    Technique          Which               Explain how the technique is used.
                      cartoon?


Exaggeration



Incongruity




Reversal




Parody
          *
              Readiness             Interest                Learning Profile

Content

Process       • Tiered activities   • Expert groups         • Choice of working
              • Mini-workshops      • Interest centers        conditions (e.g.,
              • Flexible use of     • Supplementary           alone or with a
                time                  materials based on      partner)
              • Learning              student interests     • Tasks designed
                contracts           • Jigsaw                  around
              • Varied homework     • Independent             intelligence
                assignments           studies                 preferences
              • Learning Centers    • Interest-based        TTT, Menu, Triarchic
                or Stations           application options   • Blogs and vlogs to
                                    • Anchor Activities       share ideas
Product
      Immigration: Choice Board
       (Triarchic Intelligences)

TARGET:
I can explain the meaning of
“melting pot,” “mosaic,” and
“salad bowl” as they relate to
immigration in America.
Analytic    Analyze how and why the U.S. population
            has shifted from a melting pot to a salad
            bowl or mosaic as it has assimilated new
            immigrants. Show your analysis in a
            diagram.

Practical   Think of the population of Grand Rapids and
            Kent County. Is it better for Grand Rapids to
            assimilate new people to this area like a
            melting pot or a salad bowl? Defend your
            position in a Podcast.

Creative    Create a different pair of metaphors to
            characterize how immigrants assimilated in
            the past and how they assimilate today.
            Write an explanation for each or create a
            visual to depict them.
   Story Elements: Tic-Tac-Toe Board
     (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic)


Target:
I can describe the elements
of a story (characters,
setting, plot).
*                                                                                              one activity from each
          horizontal row



    Use Glogster to create a pair of collages     Write a bio-poem about yourself        Write a recipe or set of directions
    that compares you and a character in          and another about a main               for how you would solve a problem
    the book. Compare and contrast                character in the book so your          and another for how a main
    physical and personality traits. Label        readers see how you and the            character in the book would solve
    your collages so viewers understand           character are alike and different.     a problem. Your list should help
    your thinking.                                Be sure to include the most            us know you and the character.
                                                  important traits in each poem.

    Use Animoto and write a motion greeting       Make a model or a map of a key         Make 2 timelines. The first should
    card that invites us into the scenery and     place in your life, and an important   illustrate and describe a least 6-8
    mood of an important part of the book.        one in the novel. Find a way to        shifts in settings in the book. The
    Be sure the verse helps us understand         help viewers understand both what      second should explain and
    what is important in the scene and why.       the places are like and why they       illustrate how the mood changes
                                                  are important in your life and the     with the change in setting.
                                                  characters’.

    Using books of proverbs and/on                Interview a key character from the     Find several songs you think
    quotations, find at least 6-8 that you feel   book to find out what lessons          reflect an important message from
    reflect what’s important about the novel’s    he/she thinks we should learn from     the book. Prepare a Podcast.
    theme. Find at least 6-8 that do the          events in the book. Use a Parade       Write an exhibit card that helps
    same for your life. Display them and          magazine for material. Be sure         your listener understand how you
    explain your choices.                         the interview is thorough.             think these songs express the
                                                                                         book’s meaning.



                  Novel Title: ____________________ Author:_______________________
                  Activities Selected: _______, _____, _____
                  Student: ______________________
Counting Principles & Probability: Tic-Tac-Toe
                    Board
          (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic)



Targets:
•I can write the steps of a math induction proof for a
given series.
•I can apply Pascal’s Triangle to find the coefficients of
a binomial expansion.
•I can apply the Binomial Theorem to expand a
binomial.
•I can find probabilities of mutually exclusive &
independent events.                   V. Thomasma, Kentwood
                              Counting Principles & Probability
                                    Tic-Tac-Toe Board
   Choose three activities in a row (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) to complete. The activities are
   designed to help you relate to and remember probability concepts. They are due at the end of the unit, so
   please work on them after completing daily work in class, or at home. You may work by yourself or with one
   other person on any or all three activities.
         1. Letter of Advice                       2. In The News                3. Graphing Calculator Activity
Write a letter to a friend who is in   Pretend you are a journal reporter in    Create 5 probability problems that
Algebra 2 this year, and going to      the 1600s. (You’ll also need to          are solved most efficiently with a
take Precalculus next year. Don’t      pretend they had TV and reporters        Graphing Calculator. (Hint: using
scare them! Instead, list and          then!) Your job is to describe the       combinations, permutations and
describe four pieces of advice that    controversy over Pascal’s                The Binomial Theorem guarantees
would help them succeed in             Triangle…did Blaise Pascal really        this). Make at least 2 of the
Precalculus. Stretch your brain, and   discover it? Should it be named          problems real-life scenarios.
make at least 2 pieces of advice       after him? Use the internet to           Include the answers as well.
relevant to this unit.                 conduct some research. Plan it out
                                       ahead of time, then create a short
                                       clip (less than 5 minutes) with a
                                       video camera.

     (Interpersonal/Linguistic)                (Bodily/Kinesthetic)                    (Mathematical/Logical)

           4. Poem or Rap                   5. Jeopardy Review Game                            6. Poster
Write a poem or rap about either       Write Jeopardy questions that can be     It is your chance to make a cheat sheet
permutations & combinations,           used to review our Probability Unit.     for your classroom! Design and
Pascal’s Triangle, or The Binomial     Include 10 questions with answers.       make a poster that includes the
Theorem. Be sure to include            Use an index card for each question,     important concepts from this unit.
information that will give your        with the answer on the back. We          Make it colorful, and include at least
fellow math students a clever way of   will use 6 categories, which are the     2 relevant pictures or drawings. It
remembering how to use the             titles of the lessons in your book.      will be displayed in the classroom,
mathematical skill you chose! Your     Write at least one question for each     until test day of course!
work may be either read or performed   category.
for the class.

        (Musical/Rhythmic)                  (Linguistic/Intrapersonal)                     (Visual/Spatial)

       7. Internet Research                       8. Comic Strip                          9. Nature Walk
 Search the Internet to find 5 games   Create a comic strip that highlights a   Take a walk outside to brainstorm
       that use Combinatorics          concept about probability, counting      examples of arithmetic and
  (permutations or combinations).      principles, math induction, or           geometric patterns that occur in
Begin at Mrs. Thomasma’s Math of       another topic from our unit.             nature. You may consider
           Games website:              Include illustrations and dialogue.      architecture also. Record at least
www.mathematicsofgames.pbwiki.co                                                four of your observations. Draw or
                   m                                                            take pictures of them, and explain
    For each game, write a brief                                                which type of sequence each
   description of the game, which                                               exemplifies.
  combinatorics are used, and how
 knowledge of the math might help
             with strategy!
            (Intrapersonal)                       (Visual/Spatial)                           (Naturalist)
                  Midsummer Nights Dream
                          : Learning Menu

Targets:
I can analyze how specific events or lines of dialogue in a story or drama
move the action forward or show me things about characters. (RL 8.3)

I can analyze how difference between the points of view of characters and
readers create effects like suspense or humor. (RL 8.6)

I can write and develop and argument with clear reasons and strong evidence.
(W 8.1)

I can produce writing that is appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience
for whom I am writing. (W 8.4)
          *
              Readiness                 Interest                 Learning Profile

Content

Process

Product       •   Personal goal setting •   Use of student       • Varied formats for
              •   Varied resource           interests in           expressing key
                  options                   designing products     content
              •   Check-in
                  requirements based
                  on student            •   Use of             • Varied working
                  independence              contemporary         arrangements
              •   Providing samples of      technologies for
                  good student work         student expression • Varied modes of
                  at varied levels of                            expressing learning
                  complexity
 *Make
Believe
 Comix
           *Glogster

   *Go
Animate   *Animoto
m.Socrative.com
As a team of educators:

Discuss with your peers the
differentiated instructional
 ideas and strategies that
    you recommend for
implementation in your unit.
*Harold   Melvin and the
           BLUENOTES

   “Wake Up Everybody”
Wake up everybody no more sleeping in bed
No more backward thinking, time for thinking ahead
The world has changed so very much from what it used to be
There’s so much hatred, war and poverty.
Wake up all the teachers time to teach a new way
Maybe then they’ll listen to what you have to say.
They're the ones who are coming up and the world is in their
hands.
When you teach the children,
teach them the very best you can.
The world won’t get no better,
if we just let it be.
The world won’t get no better,
we got to change it..yah.. just YOU and ME.
Thank you for all you do,
  for all the children!

				
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