Unit Plan by 1AfH7A

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									    Unit Plan
To Kill a Mockingbird
    by Harper Lee




     Kristyn Heiser
    9th Grade pre-IB
Monday, March 10, 2008
Identification of the Class:         Subject: English
                                     Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                     Grade: 9
                                     Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning       9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                         * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                           literary forms.
                                         * Use literary terms in describing and
                                           analyzing selections.
                                         * Explain the relationships between and among
                                           elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                           setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                         * Explain the relationship between author's
                                           style and literary technique.
                                         * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                           Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                         * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                           the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                           work.
Rationale                            Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                     Rationale: This lesson is designed to get students thinking about the setting of To Kill a Mockingbird
                                     as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee uses in creating setting/atmosphere in the novel. This
                                     lesson is also designed to give students a good understanding of the historical context surrounding the
                                     novel.

Daily Objectives                    1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                    creating setting/atmosphere in the novel, as well as the historical context that surrounds the novel.
                                 1. 2. Having read the first half of the novel outside of class, students will have a good understanding of
                                    and be able to discuss Lee’s setting and character development in the first half of the novel.


Evaluation/Monitoring                Students will receive up to 10 points for a daily grade based on their participation during the lesson. If
                                     students write a paragraph about their town, and participate in the “Think-Pair-Share” discussion, they
                                     will receive full credit for the day.
                                       The “Think-Pair-Share” strategy holds each student accountable for discussion, as well as encourages them to
                                              continue to read so that they can contribute to their partner work. Students also gain different
                                              insight/perspectives from their partner which helps them gain a broader understanding of the material.

Procedures                               1. 1. Begin class by having students write a paragraph description of the town or city where they live.
                                         2. 2. Discuss how authors attempt to capture the feel of a place and why establishing a sense of place is
                                            important, especially in southern literature.
                                         3. 3. Have students read the passage that starts on page 9 of To Kill a Mockingbird (while playing the CD
                                            of the passage) that begins “Maycomb was an old town…” and discuss how Harper Lee captures the
                                            essence of Maycomb.
                                         4. 4. Using the “Think-Pair-Share” strategy, have students answer the following questions:

                                            List three adjectives used to describe Maycomb. How do these adjectives attempt to capture the
                                             feel of the town? Do you think that Harper Lee successfully conveys a sense of place?
                                            When is the novel set? What clues are provided to tip the reader off about when the narrative
                                             takes place?

                                  Students will work with partners during the “Think-Pair-Share” discussion. After a pair has discussed a
                                  question together, they will then share it with another pair and/or the class.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation1. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                               2. 2. To Kill a Mockingbird audio CD

Evaluation of Differentiation                No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                     Students must have read at least the first half of To Kill a Mockingbird prior to class. Students were
                                             assigned the reading assignment two weeks prior and had ample time to complete the reading.
Technology Integration                       No technology is used in this lesson.
Tuesday, March 11, 2008
Identification of the Class:         Subject: English
                                     Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                     Grade: 9
                                     Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning       9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                        * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                          literary forms.
                                        * Use literary terms in describing and
                                          analyzing selections.
                                        * Explain the relationships between and among
                                          elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                          setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                        * Explain the relationship between author's
                                          style and literary technique.
                                        * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                          Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                        * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                          the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                          work.


Rationale                            Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                     Rationale: This lesson is designed to get students thinking about the setting of To Kill a Mockingbird
                                     as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee uses in creating setting/atmosphere in the novel. This
                                     lesson is also designed to give students a good understanding of the historical and sociological context
                                     surrounding the novel. This lesson is also designed for students to attempt to perform a sociological
                                     criticism of the novel in which students analyze “the ways the author is affected by such circumstances
                                     of their time and place such as, class status, gender, and interests, the ways thinking and feeling
                                     characteristic of their era, the economic conditions, and the soical class conceptions, and values of the
                                     audience to which the writer addresses” (Eckert 102).

Daily Objectives                    1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                    creating setting/atmosphere in the novel, as well as the historical context that surrounds the novel.
                                 2. 2. Having read the first half of the novel outside of class, students will have a good understanding of
                                    and be able to discuss Lee’s setting and character development in the first half of the novel.
Evaluation/Monitoring                   Students will receive a completion grade for completing the “To Kill a Mockingbird: Setting”
                                        worksheet and a journal grade for their journal entry.

Procedures                          1. 1. Discuss the historical context of To Kill a Mockingbird. Ask students what was happening in the
                                       American South during the 1930’s. Be sure to cover the Jim Crow Era, segregation, and the Great
                                       Depression.
                                    2. 2. Have students complete the “To Kill a Mockingbird: Setting” worksheet in groups of three. Students
                                       will analyze several quotes dealing with setting from the first half of the novel and recognize what Lee
                                       is trying to establish as these settings emerge.
                                    3. 3. Play the audio CD of To Kill a Mockingbird for the first few quotes to get students started and show
                                       them an example of what they should be looking for and the kinds of things they should be writing
                                       down for each quote.
                                    4. 4. Discuss each quote and its significance as a class. Use the “Think-Pair-Share” method to elicit
                                       responses from different groups.

                                        5. Explain to students what Sociological theory is. (A stance toward a text in which the reader assumes
                                        that to really understand a literary work implies knowing something about either the society in which it
                                        was written or the way it depicts).

                                        6. Tell students that they are to complete a journal response for homework in which they will
                                        look at the novel from a sociological viewpoint. Have students refer back to class discussion
                                        over what was happening in the American South during the 1930’s. In what ways is Harper
                                        Lee affected by the circumstances of this time period? In what ways do class status and gender
                                        play a role in the novel? In general, how did people think and act during the 1930’s? What
                                        effect does this have on the events in the novel? Did economic conditions play a role? Do
                                        these things help you to better understand what is happening in the novel? Why or why not?
                                        Think about the fact that this novel was published in 1960, only 30 years after the time period
                                        it depicts, and during the nation’s struggle with Civil Rights. In what ways is Lee ahead of her
                                        time?
Materials/Equipment/Preparation3. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                    4. 2. To Kill a Mockingbird audio CD
                                    5. 3. CD player
                                    6. 4. Handout: To Kill a Mockingbird: Setting

Evaluation of Differentiation           No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                Students must have read at least the first half of To Kill a Mockingbird prior to class.
Technology Integration           No technology is used in this lesson.



Wednesday, March 12, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class
Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is also designed to get students to encourage students to think from different
                                 viewpoints by analyzing Atticus Finch’s famous quote “You never really understand a person until you
                                 consider things from his point of view. Until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” This lesson
                                 ties into the next lesson on characterization/character development.

Daily Objectives                 1. Given Harper Lee’s character Atticus Finch’s famous quote, “You never really understand a person
                                 until you consider things from his point of view. Until you climb into his skin and walk around in it,”
                                 students will understand the importance of thinking from different viewpoints.
                                 2. Students will be able to engage in group work and use creative thinking skills to consider alternate
                                 point viewpoints.
                                 3. Students will analyze their own viewpoints by completing a journal entry in which they discuss a
                                 time in their lives when they put themselves in someone else’s shoes.

Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will be assessed informally by observation of their group participation. The teacher will check
                                 to see if students are engaged and involved in group activity. Students will also receive a total of 10
                                     points for their journal entries.


Procedures                           1. Play the “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view.”
                                     (Chapter 3) quote from the audio CD of To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                     2. Discuss the significance of the quote to the novel as a whole. Ask students if they have ever heard
                                     the proverb “Before you judge someone, walk a mile in their shoes.” Ask students to consider what the
                                     quotation means. What is the speaker trying to explain to his daughter? What does the speaker mean by
                                     the term ‘point of view?’ What events in the story have lead Atticus to say this to Scout?
                                     3. Have students get into groups.
                                     4. Give each group a shoe from a various collection of shoes.
                                     5. As a group, have students envision the owner of their shoe and answer the questions:
                                           Descirbe the shoe that you were given (What color, size, style is it? How old do you think it is,
                                              had it been worn many times?)
                                           What is the owner’s name and age?
                                           Where does the owner live?
                                           What does the owner look like?
                                           Is the owner married? Does he or she have any children?
                                           What are two personality characteristic of the owner?
                                           What are the owner’s favorite movies, foods, and books?
                                           What does the owner do during their free time?
                                           What is one secret that the owner has that nobody knows?
                                           How do you feel about the owner?
                                     6. Have groups share their responses with the class.
                                     7. Ask students to complete a journal entry in which they write about a time in their own lives in which
                                     they were better able to understand a person by putting themselves in that person’s shoes.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation2.    1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                3.   2. To Kill a Mockingbird audio CD
                                4.   3. CD player
                                5.   4. Various shoes.
                                6.   5. Handout: “Walk a Mile in my Shoes”
Evaluation of Differentiation        No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge             Students must have read at least the first half of To Kill a Mockingbird prior to class.

Technology Integration               No technology is used in this lesson.
Thursday, March 13, 2008
Identification of the Class:          Subject: English
                                      Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                      Grade: 9
                                      Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning        9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                         * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                           literary forms.
                                         * Use literary terms in describing and
                                           analyzing selections.
                                         * Explain the relationships between and among
                                           elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                           setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                         * Explain the relationship between author's
                                           style and literary technique.
                                         * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                           Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                         * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                           the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                           work.

Rationale                             Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                      Rationale: This lesson is designed to get students thinking about the characters in To Kill a
                                      Mockingbird as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee uses in creating her characters. This
                                      lesson is also designed so that students begin examining various characters beyond a one-dimensional
                                      level, as well as examining how Lee uses character development as the novel progresses.
                                      This lesson ties into the next lesson in which each student will create an individual character analysis.

Daily Objectives                    1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                    creating her characters, as well as how these characters develop as the novel progresses.
                                 3. 2. Having read more than half of the novel, students will be able to use support from the text to analyze
                                    Lee’s character development.
                                      3. Students will explore a character in To Kill a Mockingbird by assuming the persona of that
                                      character and exploring that character’s motivation. Students will be able to articulate and
                                      expand on their conception of a character by creating a “bio poem.”
                                 4.
Evaluation/Monitoring                       Students will be assessed informally by observation of their group participation. The teacher will check
                                            to see if students are engaged and involved in group activity. Students will also receive a homework
                                            grade for completing their bio poem.
Procedures                                  1. Have students break into small groups.
                                            2. Assign each group three characters from To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                            3. Have students work in their groups to brainstorm various character traits that their character exhibits.
                                            4. Have groups write down significant character traits and/or quotes from the novel that represent their
                                            character on their large sheets of paper.
                                            5. Hang each large sheet on the wall somewhere in the room.
                                            6. After each group has completed their character, have groups put what they came up with as a group
                                            on the large sheets of paper.
                                            7. Have students return to their desks.

                                            8. Have students choose a character from the novel that they would like to further explore.

                                            9. Show students what a bio poem is. Provide an example, and show students what they will need to do
                                            to create a bio poem on the character they have chosen.

                                            10. Tell students that they may also choose to write a letter to another character taking on the persona
                                            of the character they have chosen.

                                            11. Give students the remainder of class to work on their bio poems or letters.

                                  12. Remind students that their bio poem or letter will be a homework grade and will be due at the
                                  beginning of class on Monday
Materials/Equipment/Preparation7. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                               8. 2. Large sheets of paper/markers.
Evaluation of Differentiation               Students will have the opportunity to write either a bio poem or a letter to another character.

Required Prior Knowledge                    Students must bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird to class.

Technology Integration                      No technology is used in this lesson.
Monday, March 17, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to get students thinking about the characters in To Kill a
                                 Mockingbird as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee uses in creating her characters. This
                                 lesson is also designed so that students begin examining various characters beyond a one-dimensional
                                 level, as well as examining how Lee uses character development as the novel progresses.
                                 This lesson will take two class periods.

                                 This lesson also introduces students to their class wiki/blog that they will use in order to participate in
                                 online “book club” discussions about To Kill a Mockingbird .
Daily Objectives                       1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                       creating her characters, as well as how these characters develop as the novel progresses.
                                    5. 2. Having read more than half of the novel, students will be able to use support from the text to analyze
                                       Lee’s character development.
                                    6. 3. Students will understand how to use and navigate their class wiki/blog.
Evaluation/Monitoring                  Students will be assessed informally by observation of their group participation. The teacher will check
                                       to see if students are engaged and involved in group activity. Each student will receive 5 points for
                                       posting a response to this week’s “book club” question on the class wiki.
Procedures                             1.Collect bio poems/letters.
                                       2. Ask volunteers to share their poems/letters.
                                       3. Discuss the importance of exploring characters’ motivation and relationships with one another.
                                       4. Explain to students what a wiki/blog is and demonstrate how it works and how they will be using it
                                       for online “book club” discussions in the future.
                                       5. Have students return to their Character graphic organizers.
                                       6. Give students time to begin taking notes on various characters from Thursday’s activity. Students
                                       should have listed qualities/attributes that each character displays as well as find a quotation from the
                                       novel that represents each character and put them on their organizer as well as on one of the large
                                       hanging sheets of paper.
                                       7. Have students go around the room and add to the large sheets of paper things that the groups may
                                       have left out. Tell them to list everything they can think of and try to fill up the paper.
                                       8. Tell students that they are to post a response to the question, “Which character do you think has
                                       changed the most from the beginning of the novel to the end? Give examples from the text that
                                       demonstrate this change. What do you think caused the change in this character and do you think this
                                       character has changed for the better or the worse? Why do you think Harper Lee had this character
                                       change in the way(s) they did?” on the class wiki by midnight.
                                    1.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation9. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                    10. 2. Handout: Characters (graphic organizer)
                                    11. 3. Large sheets of paper/markers.
Evaluation of Differentiation           No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                 Students must bring their knowledge of the characters and events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class.

Technology Integration                   The internet and a project will be used to show students how to navigate the class wiki/blog so that
                                         students understand what it is and how to use it. Students will begin using the class wiki/blog outside of
                                         class as they participate in an online “book club.”
Tuesday, March 18, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is a continuation of the previous lesson which was designed to get students
                                 thinking about the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee
                                 uses in creating her characters. This lesson is also designed so that students begin examining various
                                 characters beyond a one-dimensional level, as well as examining how Lee uses character development
                                 as the novel progresses.

Daily Objectives                 1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                 creating her characters, as well as how these characters develop as the novel progresses.
                                     7. 2. Having read more than half of the novel, students will be able to use support from the text to analyze
                                          Lee’s character development.
                                     8.
Evaluation/Monitoring                     Students will be assessed informally by observation of their group participation. The teacher will check
                                          to see if students are engaged and involved in group activity. Each student will also fill out an exit slip
                                          on their way out of class to gauge understanding/participation.
Procedures                                1. Use character sheets from previous class periods as a springboard for class discussion on character.
                                          2. Remind students that they should be adding information to their graphic organizers throughout the
                                          class discussion.
                                          3. Discuss each character and their significance to the novel, as well as why Lee creates each character
                                          the way she does. Is she trying to make a statement about a type of person/group of people? Discuss
                                          stereotypes, caricatures, one-dimensional characters, flat and round characters (students should be
                                          familiar with these terms as they just learned them during the Romanticism mini-unit). Does Lee
                                          employ any of these types of characters in the characters in the novel? Is Lee trying to make a
                                          statement with any of her characters? What is Lee trying to say about people in general? In which ways
                                          does Lee reflect the history of the time period in her characters?
                                          4. Allow students to lead class discussion, only facilitate to keep students on track or to prompt them
                                          with a question. Also, ask individual students questions in order to make sure that everyone is engaged
                                          in the discussion.
                                          5. Have students fill out an exit slip on their way out the door. Students will write down three things
                                          they learned or noticed about a character or characters today that they had not picked up on before.
                                          6. Hand out “Character Analysis” guidelines and assign each student a character. Explain to students
                                          that they will be completing at 3 page journal entry in which they analyze a character from the novel.
                                          Remind students that they have 2 nights to complete their journal entry.
                                     2.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation12. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                     13. 2. Handout: Characters (graphic organizer)
                                     14. 3. Large sheets of paper/markers.
                                     15. 4. Handout: Character Analysis
Evaluation of Differentiation            No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                  Students must bring their knowledge of the characters and events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class, as
                                          well as their understanding of such characterization terms previously learned (i.e. stereotype,
                                          caricature, one-dimensional character, etc.)
Technology Integration                    No technology is used in this lesson.
Wednesday, March 19, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.7 The student will credit the sources of both quoted and
                                    paraphrased ideas.
                                    * Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism.
                                    * Distinguish one's own ideas from information created or
                                     discovered by others.

                                 9.8 The student will use electronic databases to access
                                    information.
                                    * Identify key terms.
                                    * Narrow the focus of a search.
                                    * Scan and select resources

Rationale                        Topic: Research
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to introduce students to the research unit that they will begin in the
                                 next few weeks. Students will visit the library to understand how to conduct meaningful research as
                                 well as become familiar with the resources located in their school library. This lesson is also designed
                                 to teach students about the importance of finding credible sources and how to determine if a source is
                                 credible or not, especially with web resources.

Daily Objectives                 1. Students will become familiar with their school library and understand the resources that are
                                 available there.
                                 2. Students will understand how to conduct meaningful research.
                                 3. Students will understand the difference between a credible source and non-credible source.
Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will be assessed informally using the “fist to five” method to gauge their understanding of
                                 source credibility and the research process in general. Students will also fill out an exit slip in which
                                 they will write down one thing they want to know more about in the process of conduction research.
Procedures                             1.Students will go the library.
                                       2. Hand out Research packet that outlines their research project and the process of research in general.
                                       3. Remind students that this packet will be their biggest resource while conducting research and writing
                                       their research papers.
                                       4. Work with librarians to demonstrate the various sources available at the library and how to access
                                       and navigate each one.
                                       5. Ask students if they understand what it means for a source to be credible. Explain the differences
                                       between a credible source and a non-credible source and the ways in which they can determine the
                                       difference.
                                       6. Show students examples of credible web sources and web sources that are not credible.
                                       7. Give students time to start brainstorming ideas for their research projects and to explore the library to
                                       begin the research process.
                                       8.Remind students that they will have plenty of class time in the library in the coming weeks but that
                                       their projects should be on-going and that they should be working on them outside of class as well.
                                       9. Before students leave, have them use the “fist to five” method to demonstrate their understanding of
                                       the concepts they learned in the library.
                                       10. Have students fill out an exit slip describing one thing they want to know more about in terms of
                                       the process of conducting research.

Materials/Equipment/Preparation16. 1. Packet: Research Process

Evaluation of Differentiation          No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge               Students should bring any knowledge they have of the process of research to class (if they have
                                       conducted research in another class or in middle school) but students do not need to bring anything to
                                       class since a new concept and process are being introduced.
Technology Integration                 The internet will be used to demonstrate to students how to conduct online research as well as how to
                                       determine the difference between credible and non-credible web sources and how to find credible
                                       sources.
Thursday, March 20, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to examine the plot structure of To Kill a Mockingbird and the
                                 techniques that Harper Lee uses to create plot development.
Daily Objectives                 1. Students will understand the major events in To Kill a Mockingbird, the significance of each, and
                                 how each relates to other events in the novel.
                                 2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the events in To Kill a Mockingbird by creating plot
                                 diagrams.
Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will receive up to 15 points for their plot diagrams if they include 10 major events and put
                                 them in the correct order.
Procedures                       1. Discuss plot and go over the elements of plot development (i.e. climax, resolution, etc.)
                                    2. Demonstrate to students what a plot diagram should look like and show students an example.
                                    3. Divide students into groups of four and assign them a section of the novel.
                                    4. Have students work with their group to draw a plot diagram of the events that occur in their section
                                    of the novel.
                                    5. When groups are finished, put the diagrams in order in the front of the room.
                                    6. Use the diagram to go over the major events in the novel, why each is significant, and how they
                                    relate to one another.
                                    7. Remind students that they will have to post a response to the online “book club” on the wiki over
                                    spring break and that their responses should be posted no later than March 30.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation     1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                17. 2. Paper and markers
Evaluation of Differentiation       No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                     Students must bring their knowledge of the events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class, as well as their
                                             understanding of plot development (i.e. conflict, resolution, climax, etc.)
Technology Integration                       No technology is used in this lesson.
Monday, March 31, 2008
Identification of the Class:         Subject: English
                                     Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                     Grade: 9
                                     Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning       9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                        * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                          literary forms.
                                        * Use literary terms in describing and
                                          analyzing selections.
                                        * Explain the relationships between and among
                                          elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                          setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                        * Explain the relationship between author's
                                          style and literary technique.
                                        * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                          Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                        * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                          the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                          work.

Rationale                            Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                     Rationale: This lesson is a continuation of the previous lesson which was designed to get students
                                     thinking about the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird as well as to analyze the various techniques Lee
                                     uses in creating her characters. This lesson is also designed so that students begin examining various
                                     characters beyond a one-dimensional level, as well as examining how Lee uses character development
                                     as the novel progresses.

Daily Objectives                    1. Given the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, students will analyze Lee’s techniques in
                                    creating her characters, as well as how these characters develop as the novel progresses.
                                 9. 2. Having read the entire novel, students will be able to use support from the text to analyze Lee’s
                                         character development.
                                     10.
Evaluation/Monitoring                    Students will be assessed informally by observation of their group participation. The teacher will check
                                         to see if students are engaged and involved in group activity. Each student will also fill out an exit slip
                                         on their way out of class to gauge understanding/participation.
Procedures                               1. Have students go back and look over the character sheets they created as a class before spring break.
                                         2. Use character sheets as a springboard for class discussion on character.
                                         3. Remind students that they should be adding information to their graphic organizers throughout the
                                         class discussion.
                                         4. Discuss each character and their significance to the novel, as well as why Lee creates each character
                                         the way she does. Is she trying to make a statement about a type of person/group of people? Discuss
                                         stereotypes, caricatures, one-dimensional characters, flat and round characters (students should be
                                         familiar with these terms as they just learned them during the Romanticism mini-unit). Does Lee
                                         employ any of these types of characters in the characters in the novel? Is Lee trying to make a
                                         statement with any of her characters? What is Lee trying to say about people in general? In which ways
                                         does Lee reflect the history of the time period in her characters?
                                         5. Allow students to lead class discussion, only facilitate to keep students on track or to prompt them
                                         with a question. Also, ask individual students questions in order to make sure that everyone is engaged
                                         in the discussion.
                                         6. Have students fill out an exit slip on their way out the door. Students will write down three things
                                         they learned or noticed about a character or characters today that they had not picked up on before.

                               3.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation18. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                     19. 2. Handout: Characters (graphic organizer)
                                     20. 3. Handout: Character Analysis
Evaluation of Differentiation            No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                 Students must bring their knowledge of the characters and events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class, as
                                         well as their understanding of such characterization terms previously learned (i.e. stereotype,
                                         caricature, one-dimensional character, etc.)
Technology Integration                   No technology is used in this lesson.
Tuesday, April 1, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to examine the plot structure of To Kill a Mockingbird and the
                                 techniques that Harper Lee uses to create plot development.
Daily Objectives                 1. Students will understand the major events in To Kill a Mockingbird, the significance of each, and
                                 how each relates to other events in the novel.
                                 2. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the events in To Kill a Mockingbird by creating plot
                                 diagrams.
Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will receive up to 15 points for their plot diagrams if they include 10 major events and put
                                 them in the correct order.
Procedures                       1. Discuss plot and go over the elements of plot development (i.e. climax, resolution, etc.)
                                 2. Demonstrate to students what a plot diagram should look like and show students an example.
                                    3. Divide students into groups of three and assign them 4 chapters of the novel.
                                    4. Have students work with their group to draw a plot diagram of the events that occur in their section
                                    of the novel.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation     1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                21. 2. Paper and markers
Evaluation of Differentiation       No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                     Students must bring their knowledge of the events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class, as well as their
                                             understanding of plot development (i.e. conflict, resolution, climax, etc.)
Technology Integration                       No technology is used in this lesson.
Thursday, April 3, 2008
Identification of the Class:           Subject: English
                                       Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                       Grade: 9
                                       Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning         9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                          * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                            literary forms.
                                          * Use literary terms in describing and
                                            analyzing selections.
                                          * Explain the relationships between and among
                                            elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                            setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                          * Explain the relationship between author's
                                            style and literary technique.
                                          * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                            Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                          * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                            the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                            work.


Rationale                              Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                       Rationale: This lesson is designed to wrap up discussion of plot in To Kill a Mockingbird and segue
                                       into discussion/analysis of major and minor themes suggested by the novel.
Daily Objectives                       1. Students will understand the major events in To Kill a Mockingbird, the significance of each, and
                                       how each relates to other events in the novel.
                                       2. Students will analyze various themes suggested in To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                 11.
Evaluation/Monitoring                  Students will receive 20 points for completing their plot diagrams and presenting them to the class.

Procedures                             1. Have students get into their groups from Tuesday and continue working on their plot diagrams.
                                    2. When students have completed their plot diagrams, have them hang their diagrams in chronological
                                    order in the front of the room.
                                    3. Have groups present their plot diagrams and explain to the class why they chose each event as well
                                    as its significance to the novel.
                                    4. Use diagrams to go over the major events in the novel, why each is significant, how they relate to
                                    one another, and what statement Harper Lee is making about theme, etc.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation 22. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                23. 2. Paper
                                24. 3. Pencils, colored pencils, or markers.
Evaluation of Differentiation       No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                     Students must bring their knowledge of the events in To Kill a Mockingbird to class, as well as their
                                             understanding of plot development (i.e. conflict, resolution, climax, etc.)
Technology Integration                       No technology is used in this lesson.
Friday, April 4, 2008
Identification of the Class:           Subject: English
                                       Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                       Grade: 9
                                       Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning         9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                          * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                            literary forms.
                                          * Use literary terms in describing and
                                            analyzing selections.
                                          * Explain the relationships between and among
                                            elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                            setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                          * Explain the relationship between author's
                                            style and literary technique.
                                          * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                            Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                          * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                            the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                            work.

Rationale                              Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                       Rationale: This lesson is designed wrap up discussion of plot development in To Kill a Mockingbird
                                       and to begin analyzing major and minor themes suggested by the novel as well as the symbolism
                                       Harper Lee employs throughout the novel.
Daily Objectives                       1. Students will understand the definition of theme and its importance to a novel.
                                       2. Students will analyze various themes suggested in To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                       3. Students will tie theme, character, and plot together to create an understanding of the novel To Kill a
                                       Mockingbird.
                                 12.
Evaluation/Monitoring                  Students will be monitored during class discussion for attentiveness and class participation. Students
                                       will fill out an exit slip on their way out of class in which they write in 2-3 sentences what they feel is
                                       the most important theme in To Kill a Mockingbird.
Procedures                         1.Have students get back into their plot diagram groups.
                                   2. Explain to students that a theme in a novel is basically a message that the author desires to
                                   communicate to the reader and that themes are communicated through design, setting, and character
                                   interaction.
                                   3. Have groups decide what themes emerge in their section of chapters.
                                   4. Have students write down the themes that emerge in their chapters and list any characters or plot
                                   events that exemplify that particular theme.
                                   5. Have students fill out exit slips in which they write 2-3 sentences describing the theme they feel is
                                   most important in To Kill a Mockingbird..
Materials/Equipment/Preparation25. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                               26. 2. Paper/pencils.
Evaluation of Differentiation      No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                      Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird and its characters and major events.
                                              Students may also benefit from any prior knowledge they possess about theme and thematic devices.
Technology Integration                        No technology is used in this lesson.
Monday, April 7, 2008
Identification of the Class:          Subject: English
                                      Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                      Grade: 9
                                      Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning        9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                         * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                           literary forms.
                                         * Use literary terms in describing and
                                           analyzing selections.
                                         * Explain the relationships between and among
                                           elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                           setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                         * Explain the relationship between author's
                                           style and literary technique.
                                         * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                           Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                         * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                           the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                           work.

Rationale                            Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                     Rationale: This lesson is designed to continue Friday’s lesson in which students began analyzing
                                     major and minor themes suggested by the novel. This lesson is also designed for students to begin
                                     analyzing Harper Lee’s life and the effect that events from her life had on the themes and messages she
                                     includes in the novel.
Daily Objectives                 13. 1. Students will understand the concept of theme and be able to determine the major/minor themes in
                                     To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                 14. 2. Students will analyze Harper Lee’s life from a biographical standpoint and assess the effect of events
                                     from her life on the themes and messages she includes in the novel through a journal response.
Evaluation/Monitoring                Students will receive a completion grade for their theme graphic organizers.

Procedures                       4.           1. Have groups share the themes they found emerge in their group of chapters on the plot
                                   diagram.
                                          5.2. Write each theme on the overhead and discuss where the theme emerges, and plot events,
                                   and characters that support each theme.
                               6.           3. Have students fill out a graphic organizer for the major themes presented in the novel, with
                                   examples from the text to support each one.
                               7.           4. Remind students that a theme in a novel is basically a message that the author desires to
                                   communicate to the reader and that themes are communicated through design, setting, and character
                                   interaction.
                               8.            5. Pass out the article “Mockingbird author unveiled to a degree in book at Big Read event”
                                   from the The Sun Chronicle which outlines author Charles Shields’ book Mockingbird: A Portrait of
                                   Harper Lee and how he created Lee’s biography and the controversy that surrounds it.
                               9.           6. Discuss the controversy that surrounds Lee and how little is actually known about her
                                   biographically because of her refusal to do interviews.
                               10.          7. Tell students that they will be performing research of their own in order to determine if there
                                   is a connection between her life and events in the novel and to what effect her life and who she is has
                                   on the messages/themes she conveys in the novel.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation27. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                               28. 2. Article: “Mockingbird author unveiled to a degree in book at Big Read event.”
                                          29.
Evaluation of Differentiation                   No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                        Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration                          No technology is used in this lesson.
Tuesday, April 8, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning
                                 9.7 The student will credit the sources of both quoted and
                                    paraphrased ideas.
                                    * Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism.
                                    * Distinguish one's own ideas from information created or
                                     discovered by others.
                                    * Use a style sheet method for citing secondary sources,
                                     such as MLA or APA.

                                 9.8 The student will use electronic databases to access
                                    information.
                                    * Identify key terms.
                                    * Narrow the focus of a search.
                                    * Scan and select resources.


Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to give students time in the library to research biographical
                                 information on Harper Lee in order to find a connection between her life and the themes/messages she
                                 conveys in the novel. Students will understand that one you have learned to recognize the author’s
                                 voice, it is easier to hear the author’s message and identify the major themes within a given work.
                                 Students will understand that Lee had a purpose in mind and through her novel she communicated
                                 basic ideas about people, life, and living. Students will be able to see that knowing about an author can
                                 make themes within the work clearer.
Daily Objectives                 1.Students will conduct online research in the media center to locate biographical information on
                                 Harper Lee.
                                 2. Students will complete a journal entry assessing the connections between Harper Lee’s life and the
                                 themes she includes in the novel.
Evaluation/Monitoring                    Students will be monitored in the media center and will be expected to follow the rules of computer
                                         use. Students will receive a journal grade for their journal entries.
Procedures                               1. Remind students of the rules of the media center.
                                         2. Give students some websites to get them started in their research on Lee.
                                         3. Remind students to put information into their own words or use quotation marks to demonstrate that
                                         the information they are writing down is not theirs. Remind students to include their sources at the end
                                         of their journal entry.
                                         4. Give students the class period to gather as much information as they can about Lee’s life.
                                         5. Tell students that they are to complete a journal entry for homework in which they take the
                                         information they have found on Lee and on the novel to write an “opinion paper” of sorts. Tell
                                         them they will respond to the following: What parallels were able to find between Lee’s life
                                         and events in the novel? What evidence about Lee were you able to find that supports a theme
                                         or themes in the novel? Can you make any connections between Lee’s life and the themes she
                                         conveys in the novel? What was Lee’s purpose in including the themes that she includes? Use
                                         research that you found as support for your opinion. Do you think that Lee wrote this novel?
                                         Why or why not? And what do you think the reason is for Lee’s refusal to be interviewed?


Materials/Equipment/Preparation30. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels
                                     31. 2. Media Center
                                     32. 3. Internet
Evaluation of Differentiation            No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                 Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration                   The internet and electronic databases will be used by students to gather information on Harper Lee.
Wednesday, April 9, 2008
Identification of the Class:           Subject: English
                                       Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                       Grade: 9
                                       Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning
                                       9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                          * Identify the characteristics that distinguish literary
                                           forms.
                                          * Use literary terms in describing and analyzing
                                           selections.
                                          * Explain the relationships between and among elements of
                                           literature: characters, plot, setting, tone, point of
                                           view, and theme.
                                          * Explain the relationship between author's style and
                                           literary effect.
                                          * Describe the use of images and sounds to elicit the
                                           reader's emotions.
                                          * Explain the influence of historical context on the form,
                                           style, and point of view of a written work.

Rationale                            Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                     Rationale: This lesson is designed to allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the major
                                     themes in the novel. This lesson is also designed to introduce the concept of symbolism to determine
                                     the various symbols Harper Lee uses throughout the novel.
Daily Objectives                 15. 1. Students will understand the concept of symbolism and be able to create meaning from various
                                     symbols found throughout To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                     2. Students will create symbols for themselves.
                                     3. Students will understand the concept of symbolism and be able to create meaning from various
                                     symbols found throughout To Kill a Mockingbird.
Evaluation/Monitoring                Students will receive a daily grade of up to 10 points for creating a symbol of themselves.

Procedures                       11.           1. Check journals and allow students to share their responses.
                                         12. 2. Finish biographical discussion of Harper Lee.
                                         13. 2. Begin class discussion on symbolism by having students create a “symbol” for themselves.
                                         14. 3. Explain what symbolism is, and ask students to share examples of symbolism they see in
                                    everyday life (ex. An dove symbolizes peace).
                                15.          4. Explain the importance of literary symbolism and why authors include symbols in their
                                    writing.
                                16.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation      1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                                    2. Paper/pencils
Evaluation of Differentiation       No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                       Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration                         No technology is used in this lesson.
Thursday, April 10, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning
                                 9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                     * Identify the characteristics that distinguish literary
                                      forms.
                                     * Use literary terms in describing and analyzing
                                      selections.
                                     * Explain the relationships between and among elements of
                                      literature: characters, plot, setting, tone, point of
                                      view, and theme.
                                     * Explain the relationship between author's style and
                                      literary effect.
                                     * Describe the use of images and sounds to elicit the
                                      reader's emotions.
                                     * Explain the influence of historical context on the form,
                                      style, and point of view of a written work.
Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed to allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the major
                                 themes in the novel. This lesson is also designed to introduce the concept of symbolism to determine
                                 the various symbols Harper Lee uses throughout the novel.
Daily Objectives                 1. Students will understand the concept of symbolism and be able to create meaning from various
                                 symbols found throughout To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                 2. Students will understand the concept of symbolism and be able to create meaning from various
                                 symbols found throughout To Kill a Mockingbird.
Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will receive a completion grade for their symbolism graphic organizer.

Procedures                       1. Continue symbolism discussion from previous day.
                                 2. Have students break into groups to play a symbolism game in which students match symbols in To
                                 Kill a Mockingbird to their meaning. (Students will receive index cards with either a symbol or a
                                  meaning written on one side. Students will then work in groups to match up the various symbols with
                                  their meanings).
                                  2. Go over the correct match up of symbols and meanings and finish discussion of symbolism.
                                  3. Have students fill out symbolism graphic organizer.
                                  4. Pass out paper assignment and rubric and remind students that their papers are due on Thursday,
                                  April 17.

Materials/Equipment/Preparation   1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                                  2. Symbolism game index cards
                                  3. Symbolism graphic organizer.
Evaluation of Differentiation     No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge          Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration            No technology is used in this lesson.
Friday, April 11, 2008
Identification of the Class:      Subject: English
                                  Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                  Grade: 9
                                  Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning    9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                      * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                        literary forms.
                                      * Use literary terms in describing and
                                        analyzing selections.
                                      * Explain the relationships between and among
                                        elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                        setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                      * Explain the relationship between author's
                                        style and literary technique.
                                      * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                        Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                      * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                        the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                        work.
Rationale                         Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                  Rationale: This lesson is designed to review for the unit test students will take on To Kill on
                                  Mockingbird the following day.
Daily Objectives                  Students will review the events, characters, major themes and symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird by
                                  playing Jeopardy.
Evaluation/Monitoring             Students will be assessed on their knowledge/understanding of To Kill a Mockingbird the following
                                  day on their unit test.
Procedures                        1. Divide students into two teams based on the side of the room they sit in.
                                  2. Facilitiate the TKAM Jeopardy review game.
                                  3. Remind students that the unit test on To Kill a Mockingbird will be on Monday.
                                  4. Hand out the TKAM review sheet.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation   1. Jeopardy questions and game board
                                             2. Review sheets.
Evaluation of Differentiation                No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                     Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration                       No technology is used in this lesson.
Monday, April 14, 2008
Identification of the Class:                 Subject: English
                                             Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                             Grade: 9
                                             Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning               9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                                * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                                  literary forms.
                                                * Use literary terms in describing and
                                                  analyzing selections.
                                                * Explain the relationships between and among
                                                  elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                                  setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                                * Explain the relationship between author's
                                                  style and literary technique.
                                                * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                                  Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                                * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                                  the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                                  work.

Rationale                          Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                   Rationale: This lesson is designed to assess students on their knowledge/understanding of the events,
                                   characters, theme, historical context, and literary elements included in To Kill a Mockingbird.
Daily Objectives                   Students will demonstrate and apply their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird by taking a unit test on
                                   the novel.
Evaluation/Monitoring              Students will receive a total of 86 points for their performance on the To Kill a Mockingbird unit test.
                                   Their test will be a written assessment in which they can demonstrate what they learned through
                                   writing and explanation.
Procedures                         1. Remind students that their To Kill a Mockingbird papers are due on Thursday.
                                   2. Pass out To Kill a Mockingbird tests.
                                   3. Give students the entire class period to compete their tests.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation33. To Kill a Mockingbird unit test
Evaluation of Differentiation     No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge          Students must bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration            No technology is used in this lesson.
Tuesday, April 15, 2008
Identification of the Class:      Subject: English
                                  Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                  Grade: 9
                                  Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning    9.1 The student will present and critique dramatic readings of
                                      literary selections.
                                      * Choose literary form for presentation, such as poems,
                                        monologues, scenes from plays, or stories.
                                      * Adapt presentation techniques to fit literary form.
                                      * Use verbal and nonverbal techniques for presentation.
                                      * Evaluate impact of presentation.
Rationale                         Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                  Rationale: This lesson is designed to allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the major
                                  events, characters, themes and symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird by taking part in a mock trial in which
                                  they put the character Bob Ewell on trial for the crimes he commits throughout the novel.
Daily Objectives                   Students will dramatize their understanding of the events and themes of To Kill a Mockingbird by
                                  taking part in a mock trial.
Evaluation/Monitoring             Students will receive 15 points for their participation in the mock trial.

Procedures                        1.Pass out handout: The Trial of Bob Ewell
                                  2. Play trial scene of film version of To Kill a Mockingbird
                                  3. Assign parts and give students the remainder of class to work on their scripts for the trial that will
                                  take place the following day.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation   1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                                  2. Film: To Kill a Mockingbird
Evaluation of Differentiation     No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge          Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration            A projector is used to play the film To Kill a Mockingbird
Wednesday, April 16, 2008
Identification of the Class:                Subject: English
                                            Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                            Grade: 9
                                            Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning              9.1 The student will present and critique dramatic readings of
                                                literary selections.
                                                * Choose literary form for presentation, such as poems,
                                                  monologues, scenes from plays, or stories.
                                                * Adapt presentation techniques to fit literary form.
                                                * Use verbal and nonverbal techniques for presentation.
                                                * Evaluate impact of presentation.
Rationale                                   Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                            Rationale: This lesson is designed to allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the major
                                            events, characters, themes and symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird by taking part in a mock trial in which
                                            they put the character Bob Ewell on trial for the things he does throughout the novel.
Daily Objectives                             Students will dramatize their understanding of the events and themes of To Kill a Mockingbird by
                                            taking part in a mock trial.
Evaluation/Monitoring                       Students will receive 15 points for their participation in the mock trial.

Procedures                         1. Give students 10 minutes to prepare for the trial.
                                   2. Give students the remainder of class to act out the mock trial.
                                   3. Collect scripts from each team. (prosecution, defense, jury/judge/Bob Ewell).
Materials/Equipment/Preparation34. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird novels.
                               35. 2. Mock trial scripts.
                               36. 3. Props for mock trial (brought in by students).
Evaluation of Differentiation      No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge                    Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration                      No technology is used in this lesson.
Thursday, April 17, 2008
Identification of the Class:     Subject: English
                                 Population of Students (general education, gifted, LD, etc.): pre-IB
                                 Grade: 9
                                 Number of Students: between 19 and 23 in each class

Virginia Standards of Learning   9.3 The student will read and analyze a variety of literature.
                                    * Identify the characteristics that distinguish
                                      literary forms.
                                    * Use literary terms in describing and
                                      analyzing selections.
                                    * Explain the relationships between and among
                                      elements of literature: characters, plot,
                                      setting, tone, point of view, and theme.
                                    * Explain the relationship between author's
                                      style and literary technique.
                                    * Describe the use of images and sounds to
                                      Elicit the reader’s emotions.
                                    * Explain the influence of historical context on
                                      the form, style, and point of view of a written
                                      work.

Rationale                        Topic: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
                                 Rationale: This lesson is designed wrap up the To Kill a Mockingbird unit by allowing students to
                                 watch excerpts from the film.
Daily Objectives                 Students will watch the film To Kill a Mockingbird.
                                 Students will look for differences between the film and the novel.
Evaluation/Monitoring            Students will fill out an exit slip in which they critique the To Kill a Mockingbird unit by listing their
                                 favorite part of the unit as well as any improvements or changes they would like to see made.
Procedures                       1.Play the film To Kill a Mockingbird
                                 2. Stop the film periodically to discuss differences between the film version and the novel.
Materials/Equipment/Preparation   1. Film: To Kill a Mockingbird

Evaluation of Differentiation     No instructional modifications or adaptations are needed.

Required Prior Knowledge          Students need only bring their knowledge of To Kill a Mockingbird.

Technology Integration            A projector is used to play the film To Kill a Mockingbird

								
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