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					                                                            planning report PDU/0138/02
                                                                                10 October 2001

                                  Arsenal FC Developments at Highbury
                              Stadium; Ashburton Grove & Eden Grove/
                                          Lough Road, London N5 & N7
                                                       in the London Borough of Islington
                                     planning application nos. POO/2501; PO1/1500 &
                                                                          PO1/1501


Town & Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended); Greater London
Authority Act 1999; Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order
2000 – strategic planning application stage I referral

Redevelopment to provide a new 60,000 capacity stadium (including a
Learning Centre), an Arsenal shop and museum, bars/restaurants, local
convenience shops, a replacement Arsenal Community Sports Centre
(including 2 additional outdoor five-a-side pitches), 2 gym/health clubs,
573 homes for keyworkers and/or students, 1,835 other new homes
(including other “affordable housing”), 51 live-work units, a new Waste
Recycling Centre, around 24,000 square metres of new business space, 4
community health facilities, 2 children’s nurseries, a new park and an
extension to an existing park.


Context
1      In June 2001 Islington Council initially consulted the Mayor of London on proposals
submitted by Arsenal Football Club (AFC) for the above mixed-use developments on the
above sites. Amended proposals were subsequently submitted on 14 September 2001.
Under the provisions of the Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000 the
Mayor has the same opportunity as other statutory consultees to comment on the proposals.
This report sets out information for the Mayor’s use in deciding what comments to make.

2        The applications are referable under Categories 1A, 1B(c), 1C(1c), 2B, 3B, 3E and 3F
of the Order 2000: “1A(a) development which comprises or includes the provision of more, than 500
houses, flats, or houses and flats"; 1A(b) “development which comprises or includes the provision of
flats or houses and the development occupies more than 10 hectares”; 1B(c), “development which
comprises or includes the erection of a building or buildings outside Central London and with a total
floorspace of more than 15,000 square metres”; 1C(1c), “development which comprises or includes the
erection of a building which is more than 30 metres high and outside the City of London”; 2B “Waste
development to provide an installation with capacity for a throughput of more than 50,000 tonnes per
annum of waste produced outside the land in respect of which planning permission is sought”;

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3B(1)(a), “development which occupies more than 4 hectares of land which is used for a use within
Class B1 (business), B2 (general industrial) or B8 (storage or distribution) of the Use Classes Order;
and 3B(1)(b), which is likely to prejudice the use of that land for any such use”; 3E(1), “development
which does not accord with one or more provisions of the development plan in force in the area in
which the application site is situated and (a) comprises or includes the provision of more than 2,500
square metres of floorspace for a use falling within any of the following Classes in the Use Classes
Order – (i) class A1 (retail); (iii) class A3 (food and drink); (iv) class B1 (business); (vii) class C1
(hotels); 3E(1)(b) “development which does not accord with one or more provisions of the development
plan in force in the area in which the application site is situated and comprises or includes the
provision of more than 150 houses and flats”; and 3F(1) “development for a use, other than residential
use, which includes the provision of more than 200 car parking spaces in connection with that use”.

3     The Highbury Stadium application has been referred under category 1A. The
Ashburton Grove application has been referred under categories 1A, 1B, 1C, 3B, 3E and 3F.
The Eden Grove/Lough Road application has been referred under categories 1A, 1B, 1C, 2B,
3E and 3F.

4        The application is complex and for reasons of clarity, it is described as 3 separate
sites: the existing Highbury Stadium site; Ashburton Grove and Eden Grove/Lough Road.

5      AFC occupies a small stadium dating from the 1930s, with a seating capacity of
approximately 38,000. It has aspirations to compete with the top European teams
(Manchester United, Real Madrid, Barcelona, AC Milan, Juventus) and needs a stadium of
60,000. The existing site cannot be suitably extended to accommodate the increased
capacity. AFC has submitted a planning application for a new, relocated stadium, together
with applications for inter-related developments consequent upon the new stadium. AFC
want to stay local and Ashburton Grove was the most suitable of such sites. The Eden
Grove/Lough Road application is required to accommodate the replaced and relocated waste
transfer station, industrial and storage uses from Ashburton Grove, although it is not clear
why there is a need to provide such a large amount of residential accommodation.

6      If Islington Council subsequently decides that it is minded to grant planning
permission, it must first allow the Mayor an opportunity to decide whether to direct the
Council to refuse permission.

7      The Mayor of London’s comments on this case will be made available on the GLA
website www.london.gov.uk.

Details of the proposal
(See Appendix 1 for full description of development proposals)

8        Below is the summary table that sets out the schedule of the development floorspace.

Proposed                                                          Gross       Net            Units
                                                                  externa     internal
                                                                  l (sq.m)    (sq.m)

Local convenience retailing                                       2,256       1,805

A1 Club Shop                                                      2,540       2,032



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A1 (Retail)/A2 (Professional & Financial Services)/A3   700       560
(Food and drink)

A1 (Retail)/A3 (Food and drink)                         1,397     1,118

A3 (Food and drink)                                     4,010     3,208

B1 (Business Use)                                       14,788    11,831

B1 (Business Use) for Arsenal Football Club             3,255     2,604

B1 (Business Use) for Islington Council                 1,241     993

B1 (Business Use)/B2 (General Industrial) commercial    2,950     2,360
food production

ICSL                                                    14,034    11,227

Residential – new build                                 167,946   133,739   1,820

Residential - refurbishment                             1,404     1,123     15

Intermediate Housing                                    12,382    9,906     573

Live/Work                                               6,475     5,180     51

Stadium (includes open seating areas)                   98,107    78,486

Arsenal Football Club Museum/A3 (food and drink)        1,000     800

Arsenal Sports & Community Centre                       1,645     1,316

Arsenal Football Club boardroom/entertainment suite     520       416

Health Club                                             2,801     2,241

Leisure                                                 2,370     1,896

Ticket collection point                                 210       168

Children’s Nursery                                      1,010     808

Community Health Facility                               4,460     2,248

Opthalmologist/Pharmacist/Chiropodist                   160       128

North London Waste Authority                            6,290     5,032

Civic Amenity Area                                      1,435     1,148

Storage/Covered car parking, of which:                  38,459    38,459

Residential                                                                 1,204


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Commercial, health, etc                                                              854

Surface car parking, of which:

Residential                                                                          12

Commercial, health, etc                                                              15

TOTAL                                                       393,845    320,830



9      See Appendix 2 for table of schedule of total employment floorspace for development
proposal.

Highbury Stadium

10     A hybrid planning application in detail and outline form has been submitted to
incorporate part conversion and part redevelopment of the site.

11      The proposal includes the retention and conversion of two of the existing four stands
(the statutorily listed East stand, and locally listed West stand) to housing. The application
will provide a total of 542 new build residential units with 15 refurbished units, to
incorporate affordable housing of at least 25% (habitable rooms) and up to 35% (subject to
further negotiations about the extent of the planning and transportation obligations
associated with the scheme); new business space (1,812 square metres gross); a community
health facility (1,050 square metres gross); a health club (1,001 square metres gross); and
children’s nursery (630 square metres gross) and associated parking of 528 bicycle spaces
and 486 car spaces including 471 underground spaces (6 for the community health facility, 1
for the new business space, 3 for the children’s nursery staff and 461 for the residential) and
15 surface spaces (3 for the community health facility and 12 for the residential).

12     See Appendix 3 for table of floorspace accommodation schedule for Highbury element
of scheme.


Ashburton Grove

13    A hybrid planning application in detail and outline form has been submitted for the
comprehensive redevelopment of the site.

14       The proposal will include the provision of a 60,000 seat stadium with bar/restaurant
facilities, function rooms, media/community education facility, commercial food production
and associated covered parking; a landscaped podium with stepped and ramped access to a
lower pedestrian plaza adjacent to Hornsey Road /Benwell Road junction with 2 pedestrian
bridges accessing Drayton Park and an emergency access road to Gillespie Road; a
multi-purpose building, 1 to 9 storeys high above the podium comprising a new community
sports centre, 253 key-worker/student residential accommodation units with retail and/or
food and drink uses to the north of the stadium known as the “northern triangle
development”; a series of 3 to 6 storey high buildings containing a community health facility
and 258 residential flats with associated basement car parking and retail and/or food and
drink uses on Drayton Park; to the south of the new stadium, a replacement road (roughly in
the position of the existing Queensland Road) with development either side comprising a

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multi-purpose building (business use, retail, food and drink uses at ground floor level; food
and drink, AFC museum and leisure and assembly uses at first floor level; roof gardens and
four blocks of residential flats comprising 173 units rising to a total height of 10 to 13
storeys) between the new road and the stadium and a 4 storey high, serpentine plan building
comprising business, retail, food and drink and community health accommodation on the
ground floor with 113 upper floor residential units and associated basement parking between
the new road and properties on Bryantwood Road; a mixed-use building adjacent to the
plaza, comprising retail and/or food and drink uses at ground and podium level with a
further 6 storeys of business use accommodation including AFC offices, to be known as the
“Plaza” building.

15    See Appendix 4 for table of floorspace accommodation schedule for the Ashburton
Grove element of scheme.

Eden Grove/Lough Road

16     A hybrid planning application in detail and outline form has been submitted to
incorporate a conversion of part (the former Mount Carmel school) and the comprehensive
redevelopment of the remainder of the site.

17      The proposals will include the extension of Hornsey Street to provide a new
cul-de-sac and improvements to the existing Holloway Road/Hornsey Street junction; a
series of 5 to 7 storey high buildings with business use accommodation on the ground floor
and 51 live-work units on the upper floors with associated parking on the northern side of
the extended Hornsey Street; a part 7 and part 8 storey high building with a ground floor
health club and 320 student residential units on the upper floors also on the northern side of
the extended Hornsey Street; 3 mixed-use buildings (2 are linked by a first-floor pedestrian
bridge) between 4 to 10 storeys high with predominant ground floor use for business
accommodation with smaller amounts of retail, professional and financial services, and food
and drink uses and a community health facility (within only one block) will be on the
southern side of the extended Hornsey Street. The upper floors are proposed to be in
residential use comprising a total of 447 flats. Each of the blocks will have associated
parking and external amenity space; the former Mount Carmel School will be converted to
provide 24 residential units with a children’s nursery within part of the ground floor; an area
of public amenity space is proposed between the mixed-use 4 to 10 storeys high building; the
formation of a new cul-de-sac off Caledonian Road including the closure of the existing Piper
Close/Caledonian Road junction; a 10 storey mixed-use building with business use on the
ground floor and 72 residential flats on the upper floors and basement parking on the
northern side of the new cul-de-sac; to the south of the new cul-de-sac there is to be a series
of 4 to 10 storey high mixed-use buildings with ground floor business use,
retail/professional and financial services/food and drink uses, business use on 2 upper floors
and the remaining floors in residential use to provide 103 flats and to the south of the block a
new area of public open space; to the west of the existing electricity sub-station there will be
a 20 metres high multi-functional building to be served by the 2 new culs-de-sac which will
accommodate waste transfer operations, waste recycling, civic amenity facilities, garaging,
workshops and other accommodation for various services operated by or on behalf of
Islington Council; Adjacent to the multi-functional building there will be a series of 4 to 8
storeys high, single-aspect residential buildings that will provide 95 units; the re-ordering
and landscaping of a section of Piper Close; and highway improvements to the junction of
North Road, Hillmarton Road, Caledonian Road and Stock Orchard Street.



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18    See Appendix 5 for table of floorspace accommodation schedule for the Eden
Grove/Lough Road element of scheme.




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Site description
(See maps of the three development sites that are attached to this report)

Highbury Stadium

19     The site covers an area of approximately 3.3 hectares and comprises of four stands, a
museum and shop, the Arsenal Sports and Community Centre (an indoor sports centre,
incorporated within the South Stand, which includes an indoor football pitch and function
room available for hire to the general public) and a number of residential properties. The
stands have a combined capacity of approximately 38,500. The West Stand was constructed
in 1932 and the East Stand in 1936; both are approximately 22.5 metres high. The East
Stand is statutorily listed (Grade II) whilst the West Stand is locally listed. The South
Stand was constructed in 1990 and is approximately 19.1 metres high, while the North
Stand, constructed in 1993, is approximately 23 metres high with support structures rising
higher. The site also incorporates the former Metrocolour site – a small industrial site,
squeezed between the stadium and residential properties to the north on Gillespie Road.

20     There are approximately 105 off street parking spaces underneath the Arsenal Sports
and Community Centre, with access from Avenell Road. There are four main pedestrian
accesses to the stands: from Avenell Road, adjacent to the East Stand; under an arch at
numbers 137 – 139 Highbury Hill; through a gap between numbers 115 – 121 Gillespie
Road. AFC own the properties at 133 – 139, 187 and 191 Highbury Hill. These are
mostly used for residential purposes with 191 providing accommodation for an Islington
Council youth project.

21      The surrounding area is predominantly residential with some local shops and small
pockets of light industry. To the north, the stadium backs onto the rear gardens of 3 storey
houses in Gillespie Road. To the east is Avenell Road, which comprises mainly 3 storey
houses with some 4 and 5 storey blocks of flats and Aubert Court, which rises to 7, 8 and 9
storeys. The 4 storey residential block of Aubert Court adjoins the site to the south; and to
the west is Highbury Hill with its 2 and 3 storey houses. Highbury Hill and Avenell Road
fall approximately 5 metres south to north along the longest axis of the ground. Aubert
Park, in turn, falls approximately 13 metres east to west, down to Drayton Park. Arsenal
Underground Station is approximately 60 metres from the Lower West (Highbury Hill) and
North Bank (Gillespie Road) pedestrian accesses to the stands. Gillespie Park lies to the
north of Arsenal Underground Station.

Ashburton Grove:

22      The proposed development site covers approximately 13.53 hectares. The site
comprises 2 distinct areas, Ashburton Grove/Queensland Road and Drayton Park, separated
by operational railway land. The operational railway land runs north to south and
accommodates Drayton Park Station and 2 railway cuttings, which are approximately 9
metres below Bryantwood Road in the south and 4 metres below Drayton Park in the north.
The cuttings accommodate the West Anglia Great Northern (WAGN) railway line services
between Moorgate and Welwyn. The grassed area between the cuttings has no public
access and is designated by Islington Council as a Site of Nature Conservation Interest of
Metropolitan Significance and accommodates railway-signalling equipment, accessed via
Gillespie Park in the north.




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23      The Ashburton Grove/Queensland Road area is roughly triangular in shape, being
bounded to the south by the rear gardens of residential properties in Bryantwood Road; to
the north and west by a retained railway embankment and Benwell Road/Hornsey Road;
and to the east by the WAGN outer suburban railway line within 2 railway cuttings.
Access to the area is from the west only, where Ashburton Grove, Albany Place and
Queensland Road feed off Benwell Road and Hornsey Road. The railway embankment is
approximately 7.5 metres above Hornsey Road, reducing in height to approximately 5.5
metres above the north-western part of the area. The embankment accommodates a disused
track-bed (designated as a Site of Nature Conservation Interest of Metropolitan Significance
by Islington Council), the East Coast Main Line (Great Northern and Eastern Railway
services between King's Cross and Edinburgh) and outer suburban railway lines (WAGN
services between King’s Cross and Welwyn). The area is currently used for a wide range of
industrial, office, waste transfer and storage operations, together with some residential
accommodation, a multi-media arts centre and a Post Office delivery office. The buildings
are generally 2 or 3 storeys high with the Albany Place Depot rising to a height of 6 storeys.
The area is generally level, although the former railway goods yard in the south-east corner
of the site is approximately 9 metres below Bryantwood Road and Queensland Road. The
environmental quality of the area is poor with undistinguished buildings.

24     The Drayton Park area is a strip of land bounded to the west by the WAGN outer
suburban railway line within 2 railway cuttings; to the north by Gillespie Park; to the east
and south by predominantly residential properties on Drayton Park. The area
accommodates a range of motor repair garages, plant hire, a builders merchants and
warehouse uses together with a London Underground Limited (LUL) electricity sub-station.
AFC’s retailing warehouse is accommodated within the site. Islington Council has
designated sections of the site as being a Site of Nature Conservation Interest of
Metropolitan Significance (the area of land between Gillespie Park and LUL’s electricity
sub-station) and a Site of Nature Conservation Interest of Borough Grade 1 a thin strip of
railway embankment land in the south-west corner of the area).

Eden Grove/Lough Road:

25       The Lough Road area is a relatively flat site and covers approximately 7.35 hectares.
It lies between the major distributors of Holloway Road (a trunk road) and Caledonian Road.
It comprises numbers 263 - 299 Holloway Road; 2 - 60 Eden Grove; 1 – 32 Hornsey Street;
1 – 6 Piper Close; 474 Caledonian Road; the former Central Electricity Generating Board
site; the Pitt and Scott site; the former Mount Carmel School and various industrial
buildings on Eden Grove and Hornsey Street and Railtrack land. The site is bounded on
the north by the East Coast Main Line railway; on the east by Holloway Road; on the south
by Eden Grove, Piper Close and the Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus; and on the
west by Caledonian Road. The Piccadilly Line runs under the length of the site with
stations at each end on the main roads (Holloway Road and Caledonian Road Stations).

26      The land use of the immediate locality is mixed with areas to the north (beyond the
East Coast Main Line railway) and south being predominantly residential. The site
contains some retail uses with parts of the site having remained under-developed and
under-exploited for many years: The eastern end for more than a decade; and the western
end (former British Railways Marshalling yards) for more than twenty years. Other
existing uses comprise a mixture of low employment density industrial and warehousing
premises. The site is located near the Nag’s Head Town Centre (lies to the north-east and
is centred upon Holloway Road and Seven Sisters Road) and other protected local shopping
frontages on Caledonian Road and some other more local roads. The Angel and Camden

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Town Centres are approximately 2 kilometres distant to the south and west respectively.




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Case history
Planning Briefs

27      Islington Council has prepared three separate planning briefs for the three
development sites to help highlight the Council’s main requirements for the development of
the sites and to act as a guide in considering the merits of the development proposals
submitted.

28      The oldest of the three planning briefs was issued in December 1997 for the site
known as Eden Grove/Lough Road. It was done in draft consultation form only and was
prepared primarily to deal with the then identified aspiration for retail use on the site (by
Sainsbury’s); the desire for campus development for the University of North London; the
desire to provide a new access road between Holloway Road and Caledonian Road; and a
desire to make provision for an industrial or distribution facility which incorporated rail use.

29     The other two planning briefs (Highbury Stadium & Adjoining Land; and Ashburton
Grove Area) were formally adopted in April 2000 and August 2000 respectively and
constitute Supplementary Planning Guidance. The planning brief for Highbury Stadium
and Adjoining Land was prepared to provide guidance for the future of the Stadium, if AFC
was to build a new stadium in Ashburton Grove. The planning brief for Ashburton Grove
was prepared to provide guidance in response to AFC’s interest in developing a new stadium
within the Ashburton Grove area.

30     Both the Ashburton Grove area and Highbury Stadium are within the Finsbury Park
Partnership Area, where the Finsbury Park Partnership, established under the auspices of
the Government’s Single Regeneration Budget initiative, is co-ordinating a regeneration
strategy to cover a period of 7 years (1999 to 2006).

Site History

31     A summary of the planning history for Eden Grove/Lough Road from 1964 to 1997
demonstrates a variety of development proposals for industrial; warehousing; external
storage; trade exhibition centre; indoor leisure facility; business units; educational use;
community centre; supermarket with petrol filling station; car showroom; and new road.

32      Woolwich Arsenal Football Club first moved to Highbury in 1913, having secured a
lease for the current site (formerly playing fields belonging to St. John’s College of Divinity)
from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The Club bought the freehold interest of the
ground in 1925 and redevelopment began in 1931, with the construction of covered
terracing at the North Bank. The West Stand, designed by Claude Waterlow Ferrier and
W.B. Binnie, opened in 1936. The south (Clock) end remained as open terraces until the
construction of the south stand in 1990. The area sustained considerable bomb damage
during World War 2 and the North Bank was destroyed, as was the former college buildings
behind the Clock End. These were redeveloped as Aubert Court flats in the late 1940’s to
the designs of E.C.P Monson. In recent years AFC has carried out a number of
developments at the Stadium. These include building an indoor practice pitch and function
room (The JVC Centre) in 1989, the South Stand and boxes in 1990 and the North Stand in
1993.

33     Queensland Road (formerly Queens Road) and Albany Place were first developed
around 1840 as predominantly residential streets, with Emily Place and the former Victoria
and Albert Places to the north being developed for housing in the 1850’s. At this time,

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Ashburton Grove remained as fields, crossed by the Hackney Brook. The Drayton Park,
Bryantwood Road and Benwell Road areas were offered for building leases between 1855
and 1870. The Great Northern Railway’s Canonbury spur line, opened in 1874 close to the
west side of Drayton Park, stimulated the development of railway sidings and depots along
Drayton Park, to the west of Drayton Park Station and in the area of Ashburton Grove.
The railway also attracted industry, including a gas works and paper staining works to the
north of Queensland Road. Council depots first appeared in the area in 1937. The area
was heavily bombed during World War 2 and the London County Council compulsorily
purchased land for slum clearance purposes in the 1950’s.

Application History

34      A total of seven planning applications were originally submitted in November 2000
for three sites (Highbury Stadium; Ashburton Grove and Lough Road) to Islington Council
by AFC and were the subject of an Environmental Impact Assessment with an
Environmental Statement having being submitted. Six of the applications were referred to
the Mayor. The seventh application was for listed building consent at Highbury Stadium.
The three main components – a new football stadium at Ashburton Grove, redevelopment of
Lough Road and redevelopment of Highbury Stadium – were proposed to be implemented in
sequence. The first was to have been Lough Road (the Waste Transfer Station and
Islington Council accommodation –an one year building project with the remaining
development being constructed over a two year period); to be followed by the new stadium at
Ashburton Grove (a 26 month building project after the waste transfer station and Islington
Council depot had been completed and decanted from Ashburton Grove); with finally
Highbury Stadium, another two year building project (after the new stadium at Ashburton
Grove has been completed and the use commenced).

35     In May 2001 a report was presented to the Mayor to provide information on the
November 2000 applications and emerging proposals. The presentation was done to inform
the Mayor of the general development proposals and not to reach a decision.       As such, it
was considered to be inappropriate to draw any firm conclusions except to acknowledge the
development proposals’ World-City implications; the complexity of the package of
applications and their interrelationships; the local impact; and the impact on public transport.
Subsequent to that report, a non-prejudicial letter was sent to Islington Council and Arsenal
Football Club to provide an in principle “steer” to help inform the negotiations. The Mayor
recognised the potential opportunities afforded by the development to support and enhance
London’s World-City role. The Mayor concluded that:

   “Having being initially minded to direct refusal, he now recognises the positive regenerative and
    wider community benefits that promise to accrue from the developments; and the significance of the
    developments in ‘World-City’ terms.
   He would welcome an increase in the proportion of affordable housing within the schemes. If no
    increase is made then Islington Council will need to justify this stance with an assessment of local
    needs.
   Given the significant increase in crowds attending the stadium and a requirement to get the
    majority of these people onto public transport, the Mayor expects there to be a significant increase
    in the funding of public transport by the applicant (above and beyond the sum required for the
    improvements necessary to Holloway Road station currently being suggested to ensure that it
    remains open and usable by non-spectators and spectators alike). This should include measures to
    ensure additional improvements at Finsbury Park and Highbury & Islington Stations, and
    further measures to enhance the usage of public transport.


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   There is concern about car parking controls generally and in particular their implementation as
    associated with the use of the football stadium.
   He is opposed to the 30 metres height restriction as set out in the adopted Islington UDP. The
    proposed and emerging Spatial Development Strategy (London Plan) will oppose such blanket
    restrictions. Unitary Development Plans will be required to acknowledge the potential benefits of
    tall buildings, and to include policies to be used in development control to assess whether proposals
    are acceptable or not and to identify areas which are suitable/unsuitable for high buildings. The
    Mayor has no objection to the proposed stadium being higher because there would appear to be no
    adverse impact on neighbouring residents. It is recognised that the roof has been ingenuously
    designed to comply with the height restriction. However, if a more traditional design could be
    used, without adversely affecting the integrity of the design, the construction savings could help to
    fund wider benefits for affordable housing and public transport.
   If there is to be a landmark building at Ashburton Grove near Queensland Road it can be taller
    than the one currently suggested as long as it was more elegant. A slab tower would not fit that
    profile.
   The Mayor is unconvinced by the form and layout of the proposed residential development at
    Queensland Road and Lough Road East and is concerned with its setting and relationship to the
    surroundings.”



36      The revisions that were submitted by AFC to Islington Council in June 2001 resulted
in a reduction in the number of applications from seven to a total of four, including the listed
building consent application.



Draft heads of agreement for planning obligations package under Section
106
37      A draft section 106 agreement has been prepared by Islington Council and is the
subject of negotiations with AFC. The heads of agreement relate to the three sites and
cover the following:

Ashburton Grove:

            Replacement Islington Council depot and offices
            North London Waste Authority (NLWA) waste transfer station
            Relocation of businesses and Queensland Multi-Media Arts centre
            Use of New Stadium
            Selling season tickets to local people
            Selling tickets locally
            Public toilets on concourse
            Arsenal Community Sports Centre
            Community Use Plan
            Learning Centre
            Modal split targets
            Retention of visitors at “major events”
            Holloway Road Underground Station
            Pedestrian Bridge

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            Event day parking scheme
            On-site event day parking
            Drayton Park Station
            Finsbury Park Station
            Pedestrians crossing Seven Sisters Road and Highbury Corner
            Bus Priority Measures
            Stadium Car Parking
            Coach Parking
            Phasing of development
            General Business Space
            Community Health Facilities
            Gillespie Park
            Park Gates
            Environmental Education Programme
            Breeding Bird Survey
            Procurement of Goods and Services
            Rights of Way
            Environmental Safety Audit


Eden Grove/Lough Road:

            Waste & Recycling Centre
            Odour Controls
            General Business Space
            Vehicular Routes
            Coach Parking in Waste Recycling Centre
            Relocation of Businesses
            Community Health Facilities
            Children’s Nursery
            Pedestrians crossing Caledonian Road
            Hornsey Street Extension and Western Access Road
            Rights of Way
            Service Yards & Parking Areas
            Environmental Traffic Management Schemes
            Holloway Road Measures
            Public Open Spaces
            Piper Close
            Compensatory Nature Conservation Measures
            Environmental Improvements
            Phasing of development


Highbury Stadium:

            Future Use
            General Business Space
            AFC Community Sports Centre

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                       page 13
            Artifacts
            Community Health Facilities
            Children’s Nursery
            St John’s Primary School Improvements
            Highway Works
            Access to the former pitch area
            Pedestrian Route
            Rights of Way
            Nag’s Head Youth Centre
            Residents’ Parking Permit
            On-site Parking
            Site Management Scheme
            Protection of trees from development and during construction works
            Mitigation Measures


Common Issues for the three sites:

            Liaison Committee
            Affordable Housing
            Code of Construction Practice
            Education Impacts
            Community Trust
            Construction – Community Programme
            Public Art
            Maintenance Costs – New Public Open Space
            Green Travel Plans
            Health Needs Survey
            TV Reception
            Employment & Training
            Legal & Professional Fees
            Restoration of Land
            Ducting
            Sustainability
            Trophy Architecture
            Novation Clauses


38      At the GLA officers request AFC has submitted information for scrutiny regarding
the viability of the overall scheme including demolition, remediation and infrastructure costs
along with a valuation of the potential benefits of the planning obligation package. The
information is included within Appendix 6.



Relevant strategic planning policies
39       The following strategic planning policy guidance is considered relevant:


S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                    page 14
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 1 (PPG1) “General Policy and Principles”, February
    1997
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 3 (PPG3) “Housing”, March 2000
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 4 (PPG4) “Industrial and Commercial Development and
    Small Firms”, November 1992
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 9 (PPG9) “Nature Conservation”, October 1994
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 10 (PPG10) “Planning and Waste Management”,
    October 1999
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 13, (PPG13) “Transport”, March 2001
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 15, (PPG15) “Planning and the Historic Environment”,
    September 1994
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 17, (PPG17) “Sport and Recreation”, September 1991
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 21, (PPG21) “Tourism”, November 1992
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 23, (PPG23) “Planning and Pollution Control”, July
    1994
   Planning Policy Guidance Note 24, (PPG24) “Planning and Noise”, September 1994
   Regional Planning Guidance 3 (RPG3) “Strategic Guidance for London Planning
    Authorities”, 1996
   Regional Planning Guidance 9 (RPG9) “Regional Planning Guidance for the South
    East”, March 2001
   “Towards the London Plan: Initial proposals for the Mayor’s Spatial Development
    Strategy”, May 2001
   Report of the Mayor’s Housing Commission 2000
   “The Mayor’s Transport Strategy”, July 2001
   “London’s Economic Development Strategy: success through diversity”, July 2001
   “The Mayor’s Draft Air Quality Strategy for public consultation”, September 2001
   “Connecting with London’s Nature: The Mayor’s Draft Biodiversity Strategy”,
    September 2001
   “The Mayor’s Draft Municipal Waste Management Strategy: Assembly and Functional
    Bodies Consultation Draft”, July 2001



Analysis of strategic planning issues
40      The main strategic policy areas relate to world-city role; affordable housing; housing
density; architectural quality and urban design; new public open space and routes; transport;
car parking; impact on the public transport network; impact on the strategic road network;
pedestrian routes; environmental statement; environmentally sustainable development;
waste and recycling; bio-diversity; the loss of existing industrial land and the deliverability
of the scheme.

41      The planning applications represent the largest combined development proposals in
Islington for many years and are strategically significant both in terms of their scale, impact
and regenerative effects for the borough and this part of North London.

42      In terms of sport, tourism and the international recognition of this high profile
Premier League football club, the relocation and improvement of the stadium is a strategic
issue for London in terms of its World City role.


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43      The development schemes combined will have a dramatic effect on the area and is
likely to create large-scale regeneration potential for what is currently a run down part of
North London. Despite some very attractive residential streets, the area and particularly
pockets of Holloway, suffers from environmental, social and economic problems thereby
losing out on development opportunities despite the relative affluence of the south of
Islington. Both the Ashburton Grove area and Highbury Stadium are within the Finsbury
Park Partnership Area, where the Finsbury Park Partnership, established under the auspices
of the Government’s Single Regeneration Budget initiative, is co-ordinating a regeneration
strategy to cover a period of 7 years (1999 to 2006).

44       The schemes, as well as proposing a world class stadium development, has the
potential to create a significant number of new jobs and secure existing ones, despite the
need for displacement and relocation of some smaller businesses. The scale of investment
and size of the developments are such that there would be likely to be significant wider
effects to the surrounding area leading to a potential catalyst for further regeneration.

45      The schemes propose developments containing a mix of uses including: sports,
notably a 60,000 person capacity stadium, leisure and tourism uses, high density housing
plus affordable housing, student and/or key-worker accommodation, restaurants, shops, new
business units, offices, relocated and improved waste transfer station, children’s nursery and
community health facilities.

46      There is potential for further development in the surrounding area and links to
locally established organisations and institutions, including the University of North London.
The London Development Agency has plans, including financial investment, to facilitate
such regenerative work in partnership with Islington Council, local businesses and
communities.

47      A significant issue is the architecture, the scale of buildings and urban design of
the development proposals. This is of paramount importance in ensuring that the need to
significantly improve the quality of the surrounding environment is achieved. There are
pockets of land and buildings that suffer real dereliction and/or visual decline. The
proposed developments offer a significant opportunity in providing a new urban quarter with
real benefits to North London. Islington Council’s well-established Unitary Development
Plan policy of a general embargo on buildings over 30 metres height throughout the
borough is in clear conflict with the Mayor’s vision for London as established through the
proposed and emerging London Plan (Spatial Development Strategy). The existence of
such a policy can clearly help to inhibit the creativity and imagination of the development
industry and if used without flexibility fail to deliver suitably high-quality, high-density,
modern and exciting new development or to maximise the site’s development potential.


48      The schemes provide high-density housing with AFC currently offering an
unspecified amount between 25% and 35% affordable housing, in terms of habitable rooms.
The affordable housing elements will be dispersed and available on all 3 sites. AFC
estimates that there will be a total of 2,459 residential units incorporating 573 intermediate
housing units (key-worker and/or student accommodation), 51 live-work units and 1,835
general housing units. AFC is under the impression that the Islington Council base-line
adopted figure for affordable housing of 25% includes an element of shared equity housing.
Islington Council officers have explained that this interpretation is incorrect and that the
adopted 25% figure relates solely to social rented housing. AFC has not yet committed to a

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                    page 16
final figure of 25% social rented housing and awaits continued negotiations on the overall
planning obligations package and its final cost. The Mayor’s target of 50% affordable
housing is made up of 35% social rented housing with the “additional” 15% being
intermediate housing, including shared equity, key-worker and student accommodation.
The Mayor’s general stance has been to only accept less than 50% where there are
significant other public benefits as part of any negotiated planning obligations package.

49      The proposed new public open spaces and routes at all three sites and their
significant public realm improvements offer significant benefits to the area.

50     The issues of transport including car parking, pedestrian routes, highway safety,
the impacts on the public transport and strategic road networks are dealt with below
within the Transport for London (TfL) section.

51     An Environmental Statement (ES) for the purposes of the Town and Country
Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 1999 was submitted with the
planning applications. This generally takes an integrated approach to the assessment of the
impacts resulting from the developments on the three sites and includes analysis of
cumulative impacts. The ES is comprehensive, including many aspects of best practice and
covers all the potentially significant impacts identified at the scoping stage.

52      The ES was scrutinised by the GLA and officer level technical comments
highlighting omissions, errors and raising queries for clarification were sent to AFC and
Islington Council in April 2001. A number of key changes were made to address the
environmental concerns in the revisions to the initial submission. This resulted in the ES
being substantially revised in May 2001. Most of the GLA officer level technical comments
were addressed and satisfactorily resolved in the revised ES. There are still some minor
areas of concern, for example, the methodology used to assess air quality impacts. This
concern relates to the formation of a base line using a basic monitoring period of 3 months
(July, August and September). This could mean that the predicted air quality levels with the
developments are under-predicted. Data collected for base line monitoring should be for a
period of at least 6 months (3 in winter and 3 in summer) to prevent results being unduly
affected by weather conditions.

53      The overall scheme generally complies with Islington Council’s adopted parking
standards, notably more restrictive than those set out in existing planning guidance. With
the incorporation of sufficient financial contributions towards public transport (to be further
discussed below and agreed with Islington Council and AFC); the enhanced provision of
suitable non-private car modes of transport; the high-density and mixed-use nature of the
development should result in an environmentally sustainable development.

54       The proposed Waste Recycling Centre (WRC) will provide a significantly
improved facility in terms of size and quality. The WRC will allow for the on-site
processing of waste as well as a replacement civic amenity and waste transfer station facility.
The WRC has been designed with sufficient external space to allow the future provision of a
rail freight facility. Islington Council and the NLWA continue to examine the design
specification of the WRC to confirm whether this is possible. There is a long-term benefit
in ensuring that a rail freight facility can be made on the site, where there is a reduction for
the need of and reliance upon road transport. However, the implementation of this facility
will really be a matter for the waste and rail authorities. It is anticipated that the on-site
processing of waste will help to reduce the amount of road transport leaving the site. It will
therefore make a positive contribution in reducing the need for the unsustainable landfill of

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                     page 17
London’s municipal waste and therefore compliance with a chief plank of the Mayor’s waste
strategy.

55      The loss of industrial/warehouse land at Ashburton Grove and Eden
Grove/Lough Road although an important local borough issue is not strategically
important. The London Planning Advisory Committee’s ‘Strategic Employment Sites
Framework’ was established in 1994 and the subject of regular review from 1998. The
framework was established primarily to protect and promote London’s principal locations for
manufacturing and warehouse activity. There are no Strategic Employment Sites within
Islington.

56      The proposal at Ashburton Grove will have an adverse impact on bio-diversity as a
result of the losses of land on the railway embankment (to ensure sufficient circulation space
on the podium around the new stadium to assist safe crowd management); and a section of
Gillespie Park (to allow the new emergency vehicles route onto the podium). These losses
are regrettable but are partly mitigated by the proposed extension to Gillespie Park, as
advocated through the Section 106 agreement.


57      This complex planning application has been subject to independent appraisal by
Sustainable Property Consultants on behalf of the GLA, with particular reference to the
nature and content of the Planning Obligation package being proposed and thus the
deliverability of the scheme. SPC has conducted a detailed review of the proposals with
special emphasis on the financial details, albeit excepting Arsenal’s Business Plan which was
not made available; and a Confidentiality Agreement which restricts the nature of what can
be reported publicly. Having said that, AFC and its advisors, in particular Gouldens
(lawyers) and Hepher Dixon (Planning Consultants) have been open and positive in what
have been lengthy negotiations.

58       The product of those discussions can be summarised as follows;

        Having examined the financial calculations presented by AFC (excepting the
         Business Plan), it appears that the overall scheme falls short of being profitable in the
         short to medium term.

        There are some elements of the Planning Obligation package that could not be
         required by Islington Council and if removed, would offset those losses to some
         (small) degree (for example, public art).

       The affordable housing element based on the lost opportunity cost of open market
        value housing (not being able to sell the housing at open market values) is ill-founded
        and meaningless and has been acknowledged as such in negotiations. The impact of
        real additional costs generated by the inclusion of Affordable Housing is certainly
        less than the sum of £53.7m currently being presented. There are several factors to
        bear in mind;
    a. The figure of £53.7m reflects opportunity cost and not the actual cost of providing
        the affordable housing.
    b. The availability of social housing grant aid would offset this cost to whatever degree
        Islington Council agrees.
    c. Some affordable housing – notably intermediate housing – would generate some
return.


S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                        page 18
    d. Ultimately land values – including Islington Council’s holdings – would reflect these
       factors.

59      However, the most important consideration centres on the timing of the provision of
the affordable housing element. Any deferral of the provision will reduce the real cost
especially over an extended build period. If the affordable housing element was delayed
until the latter part of the build period (5-6 years), then a very substantial discount would
apply to the real cost which would significantly counter real losses. This could equate to a
reduction in value of 30-40% depending on the date of delivery (this reduction presupposes
that there is no grant aid) and would clearly present an apparently loss-making proposal in a
very different light.

60       It is SPC’s view that there is at present insufficient detail attached to the funding of
the affordable housing element for a reasoned evaluation to be made and that further
justification should be required. As a result, the ability of the scheme to pay for other
consequential infrastructure, not least the transport elements (which AFC presently claim
are minimal) cannot be reasonably determined. This is not to suggest that the proposals do
not have merit. They clearly do but the supporting financial calculations are capable of
differing interpretations.


Local planning authority’s position
61     Islington Council proposes to meet on 26 November 2001 to formally determine the
development proposals and would like to receive clear strategic guidance from the Mayor.
Views of other organisations


62     English Heritage has been consulted, solely on the Highbury Stadium scheme and
has given its general support.

63     CABE has written to generally support the proposal. It’s original comments, made
in January 2001were as follows:

“We commend the scale of the club’s ambitions for a new stadium, and welcome the fact that it has
seized an opportunity to redevelop close to the present stadium. We acknowledge the care with which
the jigsaw of planning applications has been assembled. (We should make it clear, however, that the
committee only considered the application for the new stadium on the Ashburton Grove site, and our
comments apply only to this site. We are aware of the wider context of the associated applications for
the Lough Road and Highbury Stadium sites but are not offering any comment on them; this should be
read literally, as ‘no comment’, rather than as an endorsement of those applications).

In our view, the design would in its own right clearly achieve the club’s ambition for a world-class
new stadium in terms of its facilities and the environment provided for players and spectators….It is
clear that the project has the potential to deliver significant regeneration benefits; these will not,
however, flow automatically from the construction of a new stadium.

We recognise the skill and experience which have gone into the design of the stadium building as an
object. The undulating tops of the stands are an elegant and attractive feature, especially as they flow
directly from the logic of the plan geometry. Nevertheless, we think there are ways in which the design
could be improved. While the roof form appears well resolved and elegant within the limits imposed,

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we think it may be over-restrained as a result of a height restriction which was presumably not
conceived with a structure such as this in mind. There is not much point in trying to disguise a
60,000-seat stadium, and we think that a slightly more confident and direct approach to the expression
of the architecture and engineering would result in a better building.

In spite of our generally positive view of the architecture of the stadium itself, there is little in the
design of the lower parts of the exterior which distinguishes this from any other large modern
corporate building. While we acknowledge that the spirit of a football club is not primarily to do
with its buildings, nevertheless we think it is disappointing that it appears that this stadium could be
anywhere and could belong to any top-flight club. This seems particularly unfortunate in view of the
club’s success in finding a site so close to the existing ground, which is so distinctive in its architecture
and its setting.”

64      Following amendments in May 2001 and August 2001 to the original scheme, the
Ashburton Grove scheme was reviewed again by CABE who had previously expressed
concern about the quality of the podium, and its approaches (steps from the south and
bridges from the east) which appeared unresolved and unconvincing as architecture or urban
design. It was felt that the public realm had not been as carefully shaped as the stadium and
as a result would fail.

“We welcome the decisions made in the light of the comments made at the previous presentation to the
committee and by other consultees, particularly relating to the development of the environs of the
stadium to make these areas work on non-match days. The present scheme is far more convincing in
the way it relates to its site and surroundings than the previous version, and in our view it has the
potential to deliver the regeneration benefits that AFC and the local authority wish to achieve from the
development of the stadium. We consider this to be an intelligent plan that will transform this
difficult brownfield site.

We think that this setting is one that can take new architecture with a strong presence. The character
of the housing design will relate it to the stadium. We welcome the fact that the social housing
elements have not been designed to be seen as separate or different, and could be accommodated in any
of the blocks. The regeneration of Drayton Park is a particularly welcome aspect. The landscape
design, planting trees as small coppices rather than a single row along Drayton Park, is distinctive, yet
is within the spirit and principle of providing a boulevard feel to the street. We think that this aspect
of the proposals is a success.

We still have some concerns about the very large area of the podium itself on non-match days. There
is a risk of it appearing very barren, and we think that at some times of day it may not feel an entirely
safe place to be, although the development north of the stadium will certainly help. The isolated
nature of the location makes this a difficult problem to solve, but if the same quality of thinking that
has been applied since we last saw the scheme were applied to this area, it could become a model for
facilities of this kind wherever they are built. We hope that the local authority will continue to look at
this aspect closely.

In summary, we believe that the revised application deals successfully with the points raised after the
previous presentation to the Design Review Committee. The new proposals seem to us to be
appropriate to the nature and to the setting of this high profile project.”

65      The London Development Agency welcomes the regenerative benefits of the
overall scheme and will work closely with AFC, Islington Council, the University of North
London and other organisations within Holloway and the wider North London area to
further secure regenerative benefits.


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66     Transport for London (TfL) continues to express broad support for the principle of
AFC relocating to a site such as Ashburton Grove, which has good public transport
accessibility. However, significant concerns are raised as to the ability of the existing
transport networks to cope with the levels of activity that are projected

67     AFC’s general approach to transport is that there is sufficient capacity to absorb the
additional trips and customers who will use and visit the new stadium development.
However, the scale of the proposals will result in a significant change to the number of users
and thus make AFC’s initial ‘hands-off’ approach unsustainable. The AFC funding appears
to maintain a stand-still situation in some areas and a worsening in others.

68      AFC assumes that 18,000 (30%) of the capacity crowd will remain in (3,000) or
around (15,000) the stadium post-match. These figures appear high and there has been
insufficient evidence submitted to support these assumptions. It may therefore be more
realistic to plan for a figure of 80 to 90% dispersal. In this case, severe constraints exist in
the transport network. It would not be able to move the crowd within the post-match hour.
Using the 70% dispersal figure implies an almost doubling of the numbers of passengers the
Underground will be required to deal with.

69      Some 7,000 supporters are envisaged to use Holloway Road Station in the post-match
hour. This is significantly higher than current peak hour usage, and higher than its
capacity to allow people to move between street and platform level. If no improvements
were made, the station would be likely to have to close for periods in order to manage flows
of people. AFC has made an offer of £5m funding, ostensibly for capacity enhancement at
Holloway Road Underground Station, but for use elsewhere if Holloway Road does not
consume it all. LUL would use this to provide an additional staircase, open up more of the
station entrance and open up currently unused passageways below ground. These combine
to double the current capacity of the station and more importantly to allow it to remain open
when an event is on at the Stadium. Given the complexities of the Public Private
Partnership arrangement, there is no guarantee from LUL that the works would cost this
amount. The cost of the works could vary to be either lower or higher. There is also no
guarantee that the works could be done in time for the opening of the new stadium.

70      Some 14,000 people are envisaged to use Finsbury Park in the post-match hour.
Around 7,000 would use mainline trains and around 7,000 the Underground. This is less
than its current peak hour usage, but the flows occur in different parts of the station. AFC
has tabled £250,000 towards station enhancements at Finsbury Park. This would be the
first phase of a wider and grander Finsbury Park scheme that has yet to be finalised. The
first phase is a £6.7m scheme, with only just over £1m committed from SRB funds. Other
funding, including £3.5m from TfL is not yet confirmed.

71      Some 7,000 people are envisaged to use Highbury & Islington Station in the
post-match hour. This is some 40% more than the current peak hour. Increased
congestion will occur and below ground passageways are the prime pinch-points. The
options for alleviating this are expensive. A scheme to open up another station entrance on
the other side of the road has been estimated at £12,000,000 and whilst it would provide
some relief of crowds crossing Holloway Road, does not provide ideal relief to the in-station
below ground problems. Highbury & Islington Station continues to be the subject of
separate, unrelated development proposals, although nothing is imminent. It is possible
that the entire block containing the station could be redeveloped in the next decade. Such a
scheme would ideally build in capacity enhancements. Islington Council has acknowledged
this with its preparation of a planning brief for the site. The time-scales are such that this

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could be only shortly after AFC’s operations commence at the new stadium. In TfL’s view
it remains prudent to require AFC to contribute to a congestion relief scheme at Highbury
and Islington Underground Station. AFC could contribute to a fund, which if not spent by
a specific time would either be spent elsewhere or refunded. Such an improvement scheme
would be a requirement from AFC’s relocation, although a period without it, due to
complexities of land ownership and other matters, whilst undesirable, may be an unfortunate
reality of the development process.

72      Drayton Park Station, on the doorstep of the new stadium, is not being used. It does
not currently have services on Saturdays, Sundays or week –day evenings (post 8pm).
WAGN, the train operator, is prepared to consider these. AFC now appears to accept that
there is a potential for football ‘specials’ to be run, but questions the need for large
infrastructure improvements.

73      It is understood that AFC has tabled up to £500,000 for enhancements to Drayton
Park Station, but Islington Council is believed to be seeking capacity improvements to the
station that its consultants have identified as costing up to £4,000,000.

74     Arsenal Underground Station is expected to cope with 7,700 people peak-hour
post-match. A level that it can cope with. No financial contribution is offered by AFC or
requested by TfL or LUL at this stage.

75       London Buses remain concerned at possible delays to services, caused either by large
pedestrian flows or by traffic associated with the developments. Additional bus lanes on
Holloway Road, proposed by AFC, as part of their proposals, will help counter this problem,
although the timings of the operation of all bus lanes in the area will need reviewing. There
is also some concern that services will be simply overloaded immediately post-match, but
given the service frequency in the bus corridors here, the problem is envisaged to be only
short-lived.

76       Progress appears to be being made on a match-day Controlled Parking Zone, with
Islington Council and local residents. This would cover between 1-1.5 miles from the
stadium. As regards the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN) and Red Route, TfL
still needs to determine if a match-day type scheme should be introduced, or the hours of
control amended in general, at AFC’s cost.

77     Concern is also expressed at the proposed 600 parking spaces under the stadium.
These could be significantly reduced and coach parking introduced to replace them. This
would help solve some of the coach parking problems. The majority of car parking spaces
should then not be available on non-match days, for the conferences or other events at the
stadium.

78        AFC assumes a growth of 100% in coach use and the issue of coach drop-offs, parking
and pick-ups need clarification. Greater use can and should be made of the area underneath
the stadium but this cannot cope with all the demand. Certain roads in the area that have
previously been suggested are for one reason or another ‘sensitive’, and an ultimate solution
is still required.

79     Crowd management around the stadium is ultimately a police issue, but has an
impact upon other transport modes and is an issue in its own right in terms of pedestrian
safety. AFC suggests that up to 23,000 people will exit onto Hornsey Road with up to
20,000 wishing to cross Holloway Road and approximately 14,000 crossing Seven Sisters

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                   page 22
Road to get to Finsbury Park Station. A match day analysis has recently been provided for
the first time, which needs review in detail. Further information is still awaited from the
applicant.

80      The provision of 486 parking spaces (at a ratio of 0.87 spaces per unit) on the
Highbury Stadium site is greater than desirable. It would be preferable if it was at the
lower end of the Council’s residential standards, and more akin to the approach adopted by
the applicants at the Eden Grove/Lough Road site (less than 0.5 spaces per unit). However,
if taken as a whole, the developments appear to have a residential standard of 0.52 spaces per
unit, which is generally acceptable.

81     The decision to remove the proposed Holloway Access Road (as proposed in the
November 2000 application) from the revised application proposals is both welcomed and
supported.

82      TfL has not received any clarification from the Strategic Rail Authority, Railtrack, or
NLWA that the WRC can be served by rail. Further examination of the ability to, leading
to the actual operation of, rail sidings to serve the site, needs to be carried out.


Legal considerations
83      Under the arrangements set out in the Town & Country Planning (Mayor of
London) Order 2000 and Circular 1/2000 ‘Strategic Planning in London’, the Mayor is
provided with an opportunity at this stage to make representations to Islington Council. If
the latter subsequently decides that it is minded to grant planning permission, it must allow
the Mayor an opportunity to decide whether to direct it to refuse planning permission.
There is no requirement at this present stage for the Mayor to indicate his intentions
regarding a possible direction.


Financial considerations
84     If the Mayor decides to direct refusal and an appeal is lodged against his decision
then a public inquiry is likely to be held. Each party is expected to pay their own costs
except where it is proved that unreasonable behaviour has occurred, for example, failure to
adhere to appeal timetable. However, there are no financial implications at the present
stage.



Equal opportunities considerations
85     There has been and continues to be due consideration to the issue of equal
opportunities due to the complexity and mixed-use nature of the development proposals; and
the on-going negotiations regarding the planning obligations package under Section 106 of
the Planning Act.



Conclusion

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                     page 23
86     The proposed development package is complex and offers an excellent opportunity to
provide significant private investment within an area of London that has failed to attract
such investment historically. The planning applications represent the largest combined
development proposals in Islington for many years and are strategically important both in
terms of the scale, impact and regenerative effects for the borough and this part of North
London. The application proposals offer significant remediation and high-density
development of a significant area of brownfield land.

87      In terms of sport, tourism and the international recognition of this high profile
Premier League football club, the relocation and improvement of the stadium to a world
class stadium development is a strategic issue for London in terms of its World city role.

88      The schemes offer a significant amount of housing accommodation in an appropriate
high-density manner. The provision of good quality affordable housing with a minimum
25% social rented housing plus intermediate housing will be essential in securing strategic
support for the development proposals. The fact that the affordable housing will be
designed as not being different or separate from the open market housing, and could be
accommodated within any of the blocks is welcomed. Nevertheless, the designs of the new
residential buildings need to be of the highest standard to ensure that there are real amenity
benefits rather than mere numerical ones. The benefits provided by the new public open
spaces and routes are welcomed.

89      It is essential to resolve the issues of transport and thereby ensure that significant
strategic benefits, including environmentally sustainable development, accrue as an integral
part of the development proposals. TfL is still assessing both the merits and impacts of the
scheme. It would appear at this juncture that the financial contribution being offered by
AFC is inadequate to resolve the problems caused by the development. The financial
contribution will need to be negotiated but should cover the stations at Holloway Road,
Drayton Park, Highbury & Islington and Finsbury Park.

90     The methodology used for the Environmental Statement is considered to be robust
and has resulted in a comprehensive assessment of the potential impacts of the proposed
developments. The Environmental Statement is comprehensive, includes many aspects of
best practice and covers all the potentially significant impacts identified at the scoping stage.


91     The proposed Waste Recycling Centre will result in a significantly improved facility
in terms of its size and quality, including its range of operations.

92       The overall section 106 package appears comprehensive and it is important that there
is sufficient balance in its negotiation to ensure that the benefits proffered by the
development proposals are harnessed; that the negative impacts are ameliorated; and that the
scheme is delivered in a timely and effective manner.

93     The applicant, AFC, is required to provide the additional information requested by
the GLA, TfL and Islington Council as it relates to finance, transport, design layout and
other matters in an urgent manner to ensure that both the Mayor of London and Islington
Council are able to carry out a proper and more full assessment of these important strategic
application proposals.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                       page 24
for further information, contact Planning Decisions Unit:
Giles Dolphin, Planning Decisions Manager
020 7983 4271 email giles.dolphin@london.gov.uk
Stewart Murray, Team Leader Development Control
020 7983 4493 email stewart.murray@london.gov.uk
Paul Ricketts, Case Officer
020 7983 4310 email paul.ricketts@london.gov.uk




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)        page 25
                                               Appendix One
Detailed description of proposed developments:

Highbury Stadium Site:

A mixed use development involving:

(a)      Conversion of the East Stand to residential flats and provision of gym/health club
         and B1 accommodation at basement level (detailed application);

(b)      Conversion of the West Stand to residential flats and basement storage (detailed
         application);

(c)      Creation of an underground vehicle parking and storage area between the retained
         Stands; and a landscaped garden providing play space areas and a memorial garden,
         with peripheral walkways, on a platform at approximately the level of the existing
         football pitch (detailed application);

(d)      Demolition of the North Stand and associated buildings and structures, and their
         replacement with (I) a block of residential flats with basement storage and
         refuse/plant accommodation, comprising part 4 and part 7 storeys above the former
         pitch level, and lower ground and basement levels below; (ii) a shared
         pedestrian/light vehicle route and courtyard, linking Avenell Road and Gillespie
         Road; (iii) a ¾ storey block containing residential flats; and (v) a 2/3 storey western
         boundary block containing residential flats and nursery, with disabled parking
         provision outside (outline application);

(e)      Demolition of the South Stand and associated buildings and structures, and their
         replacement with (I) a block of residential flats with basement storage, comprising
         part 4 and part 7 storeys above the former pitch level, and a basement level below; (ii)
         a shared pedestrian/light vehicle accessway; (iii) a 2/3 storey block of mews houses
         (7 No.); a 4 storey building fronting Avenell Road, containing residential flats and a
         community health facility, and with 3 No. car parking spaces for use by medical staff;
         (iv) a 4 storey southern boundary block containing residential flats fronting onto
         Aubert Court; and (v) alteration of the existing cul-de-sac access road within Aubert
         Court, and creation of disabled parking spaces (outline application);

(f)      Construction of a block of 2 No. 3 storey houses between 185 and 191 Highbury Hill
         (outline application);

(g)      Refurbishment and change to residential use of 191 Highbury Hill, 89 Gillespie Road
         and 58 Avenell Road (detailed application);

(h)      Development of a 3 storey house between 81 and 83 Gillespie Road and at 95
         Gilles[pie Road (outline application); and

(i)      Alterations to the external elevation of 133-135 Highbury Hill, and reinstatement of
         original features of the frontage of 137-139 Highbury Hill, both sets of works
         connected with the refurbishment of the existing residential flats. Alterations to the



S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                       page 26
         pedestrian route running under 137-139 Highbury Hill from pedestrian walkway to
         private amenity space (outline application).




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                page 27
Ashburton Grove Site:

Site between the East Coast main line and west side of Drayton Park including all
land either side of Ashburton Grove, Queensland Road, Queensland Place, Albany
Place and Emily Place, London N5 and N7.

Demolition of existing buildings and structures, and comprehensive redevelopment with:

(a)      60,000 seat stadium rising from a landscaped podium. The podium is raised above
         existing ground level across much of the site, and linked (by steps and ramp) to a
         lower level pedestrian plaza adjacent to the Hornsey Road/Benwell Road junction.
         Under the podium and within the stadium building itself are located a full range of
         associated facilities, including restaurants, cafeterias and bars; function rooms;
         Arsenal Football Club’s shop; parking for coaches, outside broadcast vehicles and a
         limited number of disabled and patrons’ cars; a press centre cum community
         education facility; a commercial food production facility. Vehicular access is via
         ramps from Queensland Road and Hornsey Road (detailed application).

(b)      A pedestrian bridge, with emergency/maintenance vehicle access across the
         Moorgate to Finsbury Park railway tracks, linking the podium with Drayton Park
         near to Drayton Park Station; and a pedestrian bridge crossing the same railway
         tracks and linking the podium with the northern part of Drayton Park, the descent to
         Drayton Park being via two flights of steps (detailed application).

(c)      A shared surface route leading from the existing roadway through Gillespie Park,
         across railway land and a new railway bridge, to the northern part of the main
         development site; this being solely used to allow emergency access to the northern
         part of the stadium. Widening of the existing junction of the roadway with Drayton
         Park (detailed application).

(d)      A multi-purpose building located on land to the north of the stadium (known as the
         “northern triangle development”). Rising from 1 – 9 storeys above podium level, it
         will comprise a new community sports centre (the Arsenal Sports and Community
         Centre - ASCC), intermediate accommodation (253 units) plus a small amount of
         Class A1 and/or Class A3 accommodation at podium level (outline application).

(e)      To the west of Drayton Park, between Drayton Park Station and the northern
         pedestrian bridge, a series of 3 – 6 storey buildings containing a community health
         facility and residential accommodation (38 units) at ground floor level; and residential
         flats (220 units) above. Vehicular access will be provided off Drayton Park, opposite
         Aubert Park, and car parking at basement level (outline application).

(f)      Redevelopment of the area to the south of the proposed stadium. A new roadway is
         to be built, in approximately the position of Queensland Road. To its north will be a
         multi-purpose building comprising Class B1, A1 and A3 accommodation at ground
         level; Class A3 and D2 space and the Club’s museum (combined with Class A3 use) at
         first floor level (facing north, onto the podium); and roof gardens and four blocks of
         residential flats (173 units) above (rising to a total height of between 10 and 13
         storeys). To its south, will be a 4 storey building with a serpentine plan, comprising
         Class B1, A1 and A3 accommodation plus a community health facility at ground floor
         level, and residential flats (113 units) above. Car parking will be provided at the
         basement level (accessed from the new access road) (outline application).

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                      page 28
(g)      Adjacent to the plaza, partially bordered by the main access ramp to the podium, a
         multi-purpose building (the “plaza” building). It will have an entrance, ancillary
         accommodation and parking at plaza level (being linked to the service level car park
         of the development described at (a) above) and Class A1 and/or A3 use provided at
         podium level; above these levels a further six storeys containing the Club’s offices and
         commercial office (Class B1) space (outline application).




Eden Grove/Lough Road Site:

Land bounded by the East Coast main line, Holloway Road, Hornsey Street, Mount
Carmel School, Eden Grove, the Electricity sub-station, Piper Close and Caledonian
Road, London N7

Demolition of existing buildings and structures, and development of:

Holloway Road Part

(a)      The extension of Hornsey Street to provide a new cul-de-sac, and the improvement of
         the existing junction of Holloway Road with Hornsey Street (detailed application).

(b)      To the north of the extended Hornsey Street, a series of 5 – 7 storey buildings
         containing Class B1 accommodation at ground floor and first floor level and
         live/work accommodation (51 units) above, with vehicular access and vehicle parking
         (outline application).

(c)      To the north of Hornsey Street and immediately to the east of buildings referred to
         in (b), a part 7 and part 8 storey building providing a health club at ground floor level
         and student accommodation (320 units) above (outline application).

(d)      To the south of the extended Hornsey Street and at the Lough Road end of the
         development area, two ‘D’ plan blocks containing mainly Class B1 (plus a small
         element of Class A1 and/or A2 and/or A3 accommodation, and a community health
         facility) accommodation and residential flats (346 units) above; these are between 4
         and 10 storeys in height. The blocks are separated by an area of public amenity
         space adjacent to Hornsey Street. The blocks are linked by a pedestrian bridge at
         first floor level. In the middle of each block, the semi-basement and raised ground
         floor is occupied by car parking (accessed from Hornsey Street) surmounted by a
         deck which is landscaped as residents’ communal amenity space (outline application).

(e)      Retention of the remains of the façade of an electricity sub-station, located at the
         western end of Eden Grove.

(f)      To the east of (d), a 4 – 10 storey ‘C’ plan block is proposed, containing Class B1 (plus
         a small amount of Class A1 and/or A2 and/or A3 accommodation) at ground floor
         level and residential flats (101 units) above. In the middle of the block, the
         semi-basement and raised ground floor is occupied by car parking (accessed from
         Hornsey Street), surmounted by a deck which is landscaped as public amenity space
         (outline application).

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                        page 29
(g)      To the east of (f), the main building of the former Mount Carmel School will be
         converted to residential use (24 units), with a children’s nursery in part of the ground
         floor. Rear extensions will be demolished, and replaced with part nursery, part
         residential use and external courtyard space (detailed application).

(h)      Between the buildings described in (d) and (f) a large area of public amenity space will
         be laid out

Caledonian Road Part

(i)      The formation of a new cul-de-sac off Caledonian Road, including closing the
         existing Piper Close/Caledonian Road junction (detailed application).

(j)      To the north of the new cul-de-sac referred to in (I), and to the east of Caledonian
         Road, a 10 storey building providing Class B1 accommodation at ground floor level
         and residential flats (72 units) above. Vehicle parking to be provided at basement
         level, with access from the proposed cul-de-sac (outline application).

(k)      To the south of the cul-de-sac and fronting Caledonian Road, a series of buildings
         ranging from 4 to 10 storeys in height. The ground floor space will be used partly
         for Class B1 and partly for Class A1 and/or A2 and/or A3 purposes; adjacent to the
         waste and recycling centre (see below) there will also be Class B1 accommodation on
         2 additional floors; otherwise, the upper floors will be occupied by residential flats
         (103 units). To the south of this block, it is proposed to lay out an area of public
         amenity space (outline application).

(l)      To the west of the electricity sub-station, a multi-functional building to accommodate
         (1) waste transfer operations, waste recycling and civic amenity facilities; and (2)
         garaging, workshops and other accommodation for various services operated by or
         on behalf of the London Borough of Islington. The building will rise to about 20
         metres above ground level and will be served from both new cul-de-sacs described in
         (a) and (I) above (detailed application).

(m)      Adjacent to, and to the south of, the building referred to in (l), a series of
         single-aspect residential buildings (95 units), ranging from 4 to 8 storeys in height
         (outline application).

(n)      Re-ordering and landscaping of the section of Piper Close, and its continuation
         towards Lough Road, lying to the south of the development described in (m) and the
         public amenity space described in (k) (outline application).

North Road/Caledonian Road junction

(o)      Improvements to the junction of North Road, Hillmarton Road, Caledonian Road and
         Stock Orchard Street (detailed application).




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                      page 30
                                              Appendix Two


Class B Employment Floorspace                                Gross external
                                                             (sq.m)
B1 (Business Use)/B2 (General Industrial) commercial food    2,950
production

B1 (Business Use) for Arsenal Football Club - expansion      1,530

B1 (Business Use) for Plaza Building                         2,580
Queensland Road North                                        2,030
Queensland Road South                                        3,450

Highbury Stadium                                             1,812

Lough Road (Caledonian Road) frontage                        701
Lough Road (Holloway Road) ground floor                      3,535
Lough Road (Holloway Road) North of Hornsey Street           3,260
Lough Road (Holloway Road) live/work – work element          2,595
Sub total                                                    24,443

B1 (Business Use) for Arsenal Football Club - replacement    1,725
B1 (Business Use) for Islington Council                      1,241
Sub total                                                    2,966

GRAND TOTAL                                                  27,409




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                          page 31
                                                  APPENDIX THREE

Highbury Stadium:

Proposed                                                                        Gross 1            Net 2           Units Hab.
                                                                                external           internal              rooms
                                                                                (sq.m)             (sq.m)

Residential – new build                                                         44.843             35,875          542         1707

Residential - refurbishment                                                     1,404              1,123           15          55

B1 (Business Use)                                                               1,812              1,450

Health Club                                                                     1,001              801

Children’s Nursery                                                              630                504

Community Health Facility                                                       1,050              840

Bicycle Spaces                                                                                                     528

Parking/Underground Storage: 3 of which:                                        13,751             13,751

Residential                                                                                                        461

Community Health Facility                                                                                          6

B1 (Business Use)                                                                                                  1

Children’s Nursery                                                                                                 3

Surface Parking:

Residential                                                                                                        12

Community Health Facility                                                                                          3

TOTAL                                                                           64,491             54,343

1. Estimated gross, calculated by adding 5% to gross internal figures.   2. estimated net internal space. 3. parking figure is gross
internal




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                                                            page 32
                                                  APPENDIX FOUR

Ashburton Grove summary floorspace schedule of accommodation:

Proposal                                                                       Gross              Net 1           Units Hab.
                                                                               external           internal              rooms
                                                                               (sq.m)             (sq.m)

Stadium (includes open seating areas)                                          98,107             78,486

B1 (Business Use)/B2 (General Industrial)                                      2,950              2,360
commercial food production

A1 (Retail) Club Shop                                                          2,140              1,712

Car Parking 2, 3                                                                                                  600

Plaza Building

B1 (Business Use) for AFC - replacement                                        1,725              1,380

B1 (Business Use) for AFC - expansion                                          1,530              1,224

B1 (Business Use) offices                                                      2,580              2,064

AFC Boardroom/Entertainment Suite                                              520                416

A1 (Retail)/A3 (Food and Drink)                                                1,030              824

Car Parking for B1 (Business Use)                                                                                 4

Northern Triangle

Arsenal Sports & Community Centre                                              1,645              1,316

Intermediate Housing                                                           3,402              2,722           253          253

A1 (Retail)/A3 (Food and Drink)                                                367                294

Disabled Parking for Northern Triangle                                                                            4

NE Bridge Building

Local convenience retailing                                                    600                480             2

AFC satellite shop                                                             400                320

Ticket collection point                                                        210                168

TOTAL                                                                          117,206            93,765
1. Estimated net internal space. 2, 3. Car park accounts for 14,250 sq.m of floorspace, included in the overall stadium figure. Includes
23 spaces for Arsenal offices.



S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                                                            page 33
Queensland Road Element                                                        Gross            Net 1       Units Hab.
                                                                               external         internal          rooms
                                                                               (sq.m)           (sq.m)

Queensland Podium

AFC Museum/A3 (food and drink)                                                 1,000            800

A3 (food and drink)                                                            2,870            2,296

Leisure                                                                        2,370            1,896

North Buildings

B1 (Business Use)                                                              2,030            1,624

A3 (food and drink)                                                            450              360

Residential                                                                    21,150           16,920      173        476

Local convenience retailing                                                    330              264

Car parking 2, 3 of which:

Residential                                                                                                 137

Commercial                                                                                                  7

South Buildings

A3 (food and drink)                                                            690              552

B1 (Business Use)                                                              3,450            2,760

Local convenience retailing                                                    550              440

Residential                                                                    10,150           8,120       113        304

Car parking 2 of which:

Residential                                                                                                 58

Commercial                                                                                                  3

Community Health Facility                                                                                   3

Community Health Facility                                                      450              360

TOTAL                                                                          52,240           43,232
1. Estimated net internal space. 2. One 160-space car park of 7,200 sq.m serves Queensland Road North and South buildings. Spaces
are allocated as shown on this schedule. 3. Car parking figures calculated in net floorspace.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                                                     page 34
Drayton Park Element                                   Gross      Net        Units Hab.
                                                       external   internal         rooms
                                                       (sq.m)     (sq.m)

Community Health Facility                              1,200      960

Residential                                            25,240     20,192     258   774

Car parking: of which:

Residential                                                                  130

Community Health Facility                                                    5

TOTAL                                                  30,490     25,202




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                               page 35
                                                     APPENDIX FIVE

Lough Road/Eton Grove summary floorspace schedule of accommodation:



Lough Road (Caledonian Rd part) Proposal                                            Gross       Net             Units Hab.
                                                                                    external    internal              rooms
                                                                                    (sq.m)      (sq.m)

ICSL                                                                                14,034      11,227

NLWA                                                                                6,290       5,032

Civic amenity area 1                                                                1,435       1,148

B1 (Business Use)                                                                   701         561

Local convenience retailing                                                         776         621

B1 (Business Use) for Islington Council                                             1,241       993

Residential                                                                         22,608      17,468          268         743

Parking (residential) 2, 3                                                          4,358       4,358           126

Parking (ICSL) 4                                                                                                219

TOTAL                                                                               51,443      41,408
1. Gross internal area given instead of gross external. 2. Car parking figures calculated in net floorspace. 3. Figure includes ramps,
plant rooms and other ancillary accommodation within the main basement floor of the Waste & Recycling Centre. 4. ICSL parking
space accounts for 6,298 sq.m of floorspace, included in the overall ICSL figure.




Lough Road (Holloway Road part proposal                                             Gross       Net             Units Hab.
                                                                                    external    internal              rooms
                                                                                    (sq.m)      (sq.m)

Ground floor A1 (retail)/A2 (professional and                                       700         560
financial)/A3 (food and drink)

Ground floor B1 (Business Use)                                                      3,535       2,828

Opthalmologist/Pharmacist/Chiropodist                                               160         128

Health Club                                                                         1,800       1,440

Children’s Nursery                                                                  380         304

General B1 (Business Use) – North of Hornsey                                        3,260       2,608


S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                                                          page 36
Street

Live/Work – live element                               3,880    3,104    51    153

Live/Work – work element                               2,595    2,076

Intermediate housing (including live/work)             8,980    7,184    320   320

Residential                                            43,955   35,164   466   1377

Community Health Facility                              1,760    1,408

Enclosed parking (calculated in net floorspace): of    9,100    9,100
which:

Commercial                                                               3

Residential (including live/work)                                        292

Surface level parking: of which

Community Health Facility                                                6

Commercial                                                               6

TOTAL                                                  80,105   65,904




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                           page 37
                                             APPENDIX SIX
Town Planning Considerations as set out by AFC


1.         The whole financial model rests upon certain planning assumptions. These are set
           out in Annex 1.

2.         The local planning authority and the Greater London Authority wish to achieve
           substantial planning benefits from the scheme. The ability of the scheme to
           support these depends upon the overall value/cost relationship, and the cost (actual
           or opportunity) of the benefits.

3.         When assessing the scope for planning gain, it is common practice to first assess
           the viability of a scheme on a “clean site” basis, then to deduct the cost of
           remediation of contamination, the installation of basic infrastructure and other site
           preparation costs. For this scheme, these latter items are as set out in Annex 3.

4.         At this stage, there is more discussion still to take place about the provision of
           planning benefits. At Annex 4, however, we set out the items which have so far
           been identified as potential candidates, and a preliminary assessment of the cost in
           each case.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                      page 38
                                       APPENDIX SIX: ANNEX 1

Initial Assumptions underlying the AFC financial model

1.       The “intermediate housing” is granted subject to a condition no more restrictive than
         the one reproduced as Annex A.

2.       LBI will apply at least 50% Housing Corporation grant to the affordable housing.
         The grant will cover all costs other than the land.

3.       If the building of affordable housing is delayed or prevented due to factors outside
         AFC’s control, this will not be allowed to delay progress with the development of the
         stadium or market housing.

4.       There will be no impediment to early development of housing on any of the sites.

5.       There will be no impediment to immediate commencement of development of the
         Waste & Recycling Centre (WRC). AFC will use reasonable endeavours to secure
         the building of the proposed housing adjacent to the south face of the WRC and the
         re-ordering of Piper Close at an early date.

6.       Housing development shall not start until an Affordable Housing Scheme has been
         agreed (subject to LBI not unreasonably withholding their consent). The objective
         of the AHS will be to provide for the development of affordable housing generally in
         step with the provision of market housing, and the ultimate achievement of the
         agreed percentages.

7.       The new park off Piper Close will be laid out at the same time as the development
         fronting it.

8.       Whilst AFC will use reasonable endeavours to construct and bring into use at an
         early date the two new access roads and their junctions with Caledonian Rd and
         Holloway Rd, and to put in place funds towards the implementation of the traffic
         calming schemes focussed on Mackenzie and Hillmarton Roads, and the
         improvement of the North Rd junction, construction and operation of the
         WRC/Council depot (and any associated housing development) will not be held up
         subject to satisfactory temporary arrangements being made.

9.       The amount of car parking provision, and its use, throughout the scheme, will be as
         now proposed.

10.      The business/commercial space within the mixed use blocks will be brought into use
         and marketed actively at the same time as the residential accommodation is occupied.
         Otherwise, there will be no requirement for business space to be built before
         anything else.

11.      Once planning permission is granted, there will be no impediment (other than the
         securing of reserved matters approval and other statutory authorisations) to property
         being demolished and new development commenced.

12.      Development (other than that directly associated with the stadium) at Queensland
         Road will not be commenced until a building contract has been let for the building of
         the stadium.

S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                    page 39
13.      There will be no planning restrictions on the operating hours or use of any of the
         proposed Class A1/A2/A3/B1 space.

14.      Non-football events in the main stadium will be limited as provided for in the
         Planning Brief: i.e. a maximum of 6 per year, of which no more than 3 shall be
         musical performances. For this purpose, events are taken as involving an attendance
         of at least 10,000 people.

15.      Where planning permission has been sought for alternative uses, there will be no
         planning restriction on change between these uses.

16.      The WTS at Ashburton Grove will be closed as soon as the new WRC is available
         for use. Similarly, the Council depots will be closed as soon as the new facilities have
         been made available for use. The initial relocation may involve short term premises.

17.      Once licenced, there will be no planning restriction on the opening of the stadium.
         The opening of the stadium could be phased, with the south stand being completed at
         a later date than the rest.

18.      There will be no restriction on the use of the indoor areas of the stadium for
         conferences, exhibitions, banquets and similar events.

19.      There will be no restrictions on the opening and operation of the restaurants and
         other hospitality accommodation within the stadium.

20.      Once fully operational, there will be no planning restrictions on AFC’s ability to play
         football at the stadium, at any time, to its full spectator capacity.

21.      The opening of the stadium will not be dependent upon the carrying out of works at
         railway stations. However, AFC will need to have made appropriate arrangements
         to guarantee their financial contribution, and interim contingency arrangements may
         need to be made through the event management plan for spectator management.

22.      The opening of the stadium will not be dependent upon the match day CPZ being
         fully in force, provided reasonable endeavours have been used by AFC to bring it into
         existence.

23.      After opening, modal split will be monitored annually for an agreed period against
         the target of 80% travelling otherwise than by private car, and AFC will be expected
         to fund reasonable extensions to the CPZ if these are agreed as necessary up to an
         agreed amount.

24.      The stadium will not open until the event management plan has been agreed, subject
         to LBI not withholding their consent unreasonably.

25.      The stadium will not open until the pre-opening package of measures identified
         through the Environment & Safety Audit have been agreed (subject to LBI not
         withholding their consent unreasonably) and implemented.

26.      The stadium will not be opened until satisfactory arrangements have been made for
         coach parking. This may involve temporary sites in the early stages.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                      page 40
27.      No unusual restrictions will be placed on building operations. Night and weekend
         working will be allowed for fitting out purposes, and for essential external work
         (especially where railway land is involved), subject to reasonable measures to protect
         residential amenity

28.      Redevelopment of Highbury Stadium will not start until the new stadium is
         operational.

29.      Once AFC have relocated to the new stadium, and it is operational at its full capacity,
         Highbury Stadium will not be used for major spectator events.

30.      The pedestrian route through the Highbury Stadium central garden area, and the
         memorial garden, will be made available by the time the scheme is completed. The
         public will be allowed to use the route during times broadly corresponding with
         daylight hours. The general public will not have a right to be admitted to the
         garden area, though the Section 106 agreement will provide for local schools to
         request access on an occasional basis.

31.      The developer will offer to plant trees in the gardens of certain properties fronting
         Highbury Hill (subject to a scheme to be agreed), and will effect the planting, before
         the dwellings in the West Stand are occupied.

32.      Reasonable measures will be taken to rectify interference with television signals as
         each phase of the development is built. Satisfactory rectification should be achieved
         within 6 months of the completion of each development.

33.      As and when the buildings are built which contain space identified for healthcare or
         nursery purposes, the relevant service providers will be given a “first refusal” option
         exercisable during a period of 12 months from the commencement of development,
         subject to them paying a commercial rent for their use. They will be offered space
         on a “shell and core” basis.

34.      The land owned by LBI will be sold on a freehold or virtual freehold basis.

35.      LBI will use their best endeavours to ensure that any land which cannot be acquired
         by negotiation, is acquired compulsorily. Similarly they will endeavour to ensure
         that all necessary Traffic Orders, Road Closure Orders, etc are made and confirmed.

36.      AFC will grant a long lease to LBI for the land adjacent to their warehouse on
         Drayton Park at a peppercorn rent. This land is valued at £500,000, reflecting its
         future possible development potential.

37.      AFC will use reasonable endeavours to ensure that the Learning Centre is
         operational within 6 months of the stadium opening at full capacity.

38.      The amounts spent on the items set out in Annex B (or the opportunity cost, as the
         case may be), will be no greater than indicated.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                       page 41
                                       APPENDIX SIX: ANNEX 2

Condition applicable to intermediate housing


Unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Local Planning Authority, the approved
accommodation shall be occupied primarily by:

    (i)      students, including healthcare students;
    (ii)     key workers employed by Healthcare Trusts, the social services, the fire service,
             the police service, public transport providers, and local education authorities;
    (iii)    visiting healthcare students, healthcare workers and healthcare academics, and
    (iv)     and by any other organisation or body in the public or private sectors previously
             approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority.




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                     page 42
                                       APPENDIX SIX: ANNEX 3

Demolition, Remediation and Infrastructure Costs



        Lough Road West
   Site clearance and demolition      £2,985,900
           Junction works             £1,110,000
       Roads and pavements            £1,110,000
              Utilities               £659,000
         Lough Road East
   Site clearance and demolition       £310,000
              Utilities                £979,000
         Ashburton Grove

            Demolition


        Decontamination
       Asbestos removal               £8,800,000
     Ground slab removal
               etc
            Utilities                  £977,000
         Drayton Park
 Demolition and decontamination       £1,500,000
            Utilities                 £748,000
      Highbury Stadium
         Demolition etc               £1,800,000
            Utilities                 £1,235,000

               Total                 £22,213,900




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)           page 43
                                              APPENDIX SIX: ANNEX 4

Potential Planning Benefits


DRAFT (v.2.6)
                                                                   Cost      Sub-total   Notes


A Physical infrastructure to enable the stadium (regeneration catalyst) to operate
  Bridges                                                                                a
  Ramp and podium, inc CCTV                                                              b
  External WCs
  Rectification of television signals
  Signage


B Transportation
  Public transport
  Holloway Rd and Finsbury Pk stations                                                   c
  Drayton Park station
  Bus facilities
  Traffic restraint
  Match day CPZ
  Traffic calming and other off-site road works                                          d
  Traffic monitoring studies
  Contribution to parking controls
  Other
  Road access improvements                                                               e
  Cycle parking provision                                                                f
  Environment and safety audit measures                                                  g
  Public route through HS development                                                    h
  Lough Rd pedestrian route


C Waste Management
  Upgrading waste management, inc allowing for rail access                               I


D Community Benefits
  Health facilities                                                                      j
  ASCC
  Gillespie Park extension                                                               k
  Children's nursery facilities                                                          l
  Open space (LRE)                                                                       m
  Public art
  Upgrading of Ringross Estate environment                                               n
  Training and employment opportunities schemes
  Aubert Court improvements
  Environmental improvements
  CCTV away from podium                                                                  o


  Sub-total


E Affordable housing
                                                                                         p



  Grand Total


S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                             page 44
Notes
a Improved permeability, encouraging walking/cycling
b Large area of public realm space.
c Stadium use just a few days each year; most benefit to people living/working in the area
d Contributes to discouraging car use; improves residential amenity
e Benefits to all road users e.g. better pedestrian/cyclist facilities at Holloway Rd junction
f Encourages cycling
g General improvement to the appearance and safety of the area
h Improved permeability, encouraging walking/cycling
I Much higher environmental standards, recycling capability, rail access option
j Proposals go far beyond what the scheme itself requires
k General community benefit
l Proposals go far beyond what the scheme itself requires
m General community benefit to provide public rather than communal space
n Relates to a particularly debased area of the urban environment
o Will improve security at all times
p Detailed breakdown to be supplied separately




S/Planning Decisions/Cases/0138PR08 (Stage 1 Report)                                             page 45

				
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