Women of NASA Tahani R. Amer

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					Women of NASA Tahani R. Amer




Ms. Tahani Amer has working for NASA Headquarters- Program
Analysis and Evaluation Office, Independent Program Assessment
Office. Ms. Amer has two functions in the IPAO: one as the Assistance
EAG Manager which is responsible for all the processes in the IPAO
and the other as a review manager in the IPAO. She has led several
reviews in the past two years such as; the Discovery and New Frontiers
Programs PIR, LandSat Data Continuity Mission project SRR/MDR,
and Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12.



Ms. Amer has 17 years of research and project management experience
at Langley Research Center and Newport News Shipbuilding. Mrs.
Amer was the project manager for Langley Research Center’s
Accomplishment and Economic Impact reports for FY2006. The projects
that Ms. Amer has led include the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP)
system and PSP data analysis and software development of PSP data
processes.
                                         Awards & Recognition: 2006 -
                                         NASA Performance Award;
                                         2004 - NASA Administrator
                                         Fellowship Program Award;
                                         2001 - U.S. Patent # 6331075 for
                                         The Thermal Conductivity of
                                         Thin Films System Ms. Amer is
                                         working to complete her Doctor
                                         of Engineering in Engineering
                                         Management from Old
                                         Dominion University. She
                                         serves on several education and
                                         community programs.



                                          Tahani Amer discovered her
                                          natural passion and inclination
                                          for engineering while watching
                                          her father fixing his car’s engine
                                          as she sat inside her small
Egyptian apartment. While her love of math created a clear path for a
mechanical and aerospace engineering future, it was great teachers and
her father that encouraged and guided Dr. Amer. In return, she spends
a great deal of her time to inspire and challenge young women to reach
their potential. Dr. Amer started working at NASA in the
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Branch. By working in this
branch, she gained valuable experience and fulfilled her dream to work
with scientists and researchers in solving real-life problems. She
recalls, “It was a real privilege to work with state-of-the-art technology
and with researchers who love their work.” Then, she landed an
opportunity in one of NASA’s wind tunnels to conduct pressure and
thermal sensitive paint experiments in support of the NASA’s
aeronautical research efforts. This proved to be a valuable experience
from both a theoretical and practical point of view. She has experienced
the excitement of working with large CFD computer codes and climbing
up the ceiling of a wind tunnel to install a velocity probe. Dr. Amer has
invented and patented a system to measure the thermal conductivity of
a thin film. This measurement is used in the thermal modeling of
several techniques for determining boundary layer transition location
on models being tested in wind tunnels. Dr. Amer holds a Bachelor’s in
mechanical engineering, a Master’s in aerospace engineering, and a
Ph.D. in engineering from Old Dominion University in Norfolk,
Virginia.




Hi Everyone! My name is Tahani R. Amer and I am an Aerospace
engineer at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). I work in the
Aerodynamic Measurement Branch, in the area of developing
instruments and sensors that measure the parameters needed to design
new airplanes.



I started my college education by going to medical school in Cairo,
Egypt; but I changed my major to engineering before even starting
school due to getting married at age 17 and moving to the United
States. I obtained a two-year associate degree in Science and at the
same time I had two lovely children. I went back to school to finish my
mechanical engineering degree. In 1992, I received my B.S. I then
decided to obtain a masters degree in engineering by going to school
part time while working and raising my family. It was very difficult.
Therefore, I quit working and went to school full time. I obtained my
M.S. and I had my third child. I am still taking courses, as a part-time
student, to purse a doctorate degree in engineering.
I started working at NASA LaRC in 1992 during my senior year at
college. I worked on my senior project in the Computational Fluid
Dynamics (CFD) area. By working on this project, I gained valuable
experience and I fulfilled my dream to work with scientists and
researchers in solving real life problems. It was a real privilege to work
with state-of-the-art technology and with researchers who love their
work. In 1994, while I was a graduate student, I started working again
at NASA Langley in a wind tunnel on an experiment for my master's
thesis. It was a valuable experience from both a theoretical and
practical point of view. I experienced the excitement of working with
large CFD computer codes. I also did such things as climbing up the
ceiling of wind tunnel to install a velocity probe. It was great!!!

Since the fall of 1994, after completing the experimental work needed
for my thesis, I have been working as an Aerospace Engineer in the
Aerodynamic Measurement Branch of the Experimental Testing
Technology Division. I have done a variety of tasks in both the pressure
and thermal measurement area. At present, I am developing a system
to measure the thermal conductivity of a thin film. This measurement is
used in the thermal modeling of several techniques for determining
boundary layer transition location on models being tested in wind
tunnels. Working at NASA is never boring!!!

Math was and is my favorite subject. I always try to find new methods
to solve my work problems by using math models. I remember when I
came to the U.S.A in 1983 and took my first calculus class. Although I
could not speak a word in English, I made an A in the course. Then, I
knew that an engineering career might not be too bad for me.

I try to help in community service through NASA program, such as
"Day of Caring", and Engineering Week. I am also involved in our
mosque programs teaching Islamic rules and Arabic to young children.

				
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Description: I believe that NASA is a soft ‘pillow’ that allows you to dream of the impossible and then work hard to make it a reality. In 1992, during my senior year of college, I started working at NASA on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) project. By working on this project, I gained valuable experience and fulfilled my dream to work with scientists and researchers solving real-life problems! It was a privilege to work with state-of-the-art technology and with researchers who love their work. Then, I earned the opportunity to work in one of NASA’s wind tunnels to conduct pressure and thermal sensitive paint experiments for NASA’s Aeronautic Research efforts. This proved to be a valuable experience from both a theoretical and practical point of view. I experienced the excitement of working with large CFD computer codes and climbing up the ceiling of a wind tunnel to install a velocity probe. It was great; I was like a little girl in the ‘candy store’ of NASA. Everything seemed possible. - Tahani R. Amer