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					Session 2 Opener Activity
• Save the Agenda into your folder on
  your H drive
• Open Internet Explorer
• Go to www.google.com
• Search for Martin Luther King Jr.
• Click on Martin Luther King Jr. - A
  True Historical Examination
• Do you notice anything unusual
  about this site?
     Untangling the Web
This training makes two basic assumptions:


  Search engines don't always take us
   where we need to be
  Web sites aren't always (surprise,
   surprise) for real
Discussion:
• When you use the Internet as a
  research tool . . .
     What strategies do you use and how
      did you learn them?
     How do you check the information you
      find?




Note: The following presentation was compiled from the slides of
Patrick Crispin, Professor CSULB and our KSD Untangling the Web
website.
  The Grammar of the Internet
Understanding a web address
•  Phone numbers are a type of address that
   can be broken down moving from left to
   right.

  The Kent School District's Customer Support
         Center's number is: 253-373-7030
•  253 represents the area code
•  373 is the exchange (where the number is
   within the area code)
•  7030 is the actual phone line that you will
   reach
The Grammar of the Internet

READ THESE DIRECTIONS FIRST
 and then click on one of the
 following links
   Place your cursor in the address bar
    of Explorer
   Use the backspace key to move
    backwards one section at a time
   Delete the parts of the address
    separated by the "/" and click the
    Enter key (sometimes you may need
    to take the "/" off as well)
Truncating Practice

• http://www.kent.k12.wa.us/KSD/IT/
  TSC/managing/hardware/projectors
  /index.html
• http://school.discovery.com/schrock
  guide/history/histw.html
• http://www.computeruser.com/reso
  urces/dictionary/noframes/nf.domai
  ns
                    Search Engines:
                 What's Under the Hood?
               Are these statements True or False?
• While some search engines are faster than others, they are
  all basically the same.

• The good search engines search everything on the web.

• The goal when searching is to gain the highest number of
  hits.

• Search engines provide the most up-to-date information.

• Search engines provide results in order of importance.
While some search engines are faster
than others, they are all basically the
                same.
    • FALSE. Search engines collect
      information through different methods
      and then categorize that information
      in different ways.
For a quick look at sites with different ways
  of displaying search results, try:

  Hierarchical results: http://vivisimo.com/

  Interactive Results: www.kartoo.com
The good search engines search
     everything on the web.
   • FALSE. While Google searches
     more pages than any other major
     engine, it still indexes less than 1%
     of the entire web.
   • The key is getting to the "deeper
     web" of information contained in
     Databases.
The goal when searching is to gain the
       highest number of hits.

      • FALSE. Of course not. So why are
        we still getting 173 million results on
        some searches?
        We need ways to effectively drill
        down to the information we need
        most.
Search engines provide the most up-
        to-date information.

     • FALSE again. To get the most
       current information use
       http://news.google.com or
       www.rocketnews.com
Search engines provide results in
      order of importance.
   •   Trick Question: TRUE! But just not
       necessarily in order of importance to
       YOU...

   •   Go to www.overture.com
   •   Enter a search term – flowers
   •   Click Search
   •   Click View Advertisers' Max Bids in the
       upper right.
   •   Type in the code you see
   •   Click Search
Search Engines: Increasing the
        Horsepower
• To get more out of search engines,
  start by thinking about what you
  don't want as well as about what
  you do
Google

• Everyone uses it…but how can we
  use it to its fullest potential?
Part Two:
How Google Can Work for
You.
Narrowing the Search
Narrowing with Google -
 www.google.com
  – Boolean Searches
  – Google Scholar
  – Other Google Special Tools
Google rule #1

• Be specific ... because if
  you aren’t specific, you’ll
  end up with a bunch of
  garbage!
Google rule #2

• Use quotes to search for
  phrases.

•“patrick crispen”
Google rule #2a

• Use dashes between
  words to also search for
  phrases.

•patrick-crispen


                  Source: http://tinyurl.com/cpcdg
Google rule #3

• Use the + sign to
  require an exact match.
  [Well, not really.]

•“patrick crispen”
 +tourbus
Google rule #4

• Use the - sign to
  exclude.

•“patrick crispen” -
 tourbus
Google rule #5

• Combine symbols as
  often as possible (see
  rule #1).

• “patrick crispen” –tourbus
  +pepperdine
Part Two: In Summary
1. Be specific ... because if you aren’t
   specific, you’ll end up with a bunch of
   garbage!
2. Use quotes [or dashes] to search for
   phrases.
3. Use the + sign to require. [Well, not
   really.]
4. Use the - sign to exclude.
5. Combine symbols as often as possible
   (see rule #1).
   Activity: Boolean Practice

• Enter the search term Atlantis
  How many results do you get?
• In the search box add -space -shuttle
  Now how many results do you get?
• Now add "lost continent" into the search
  box
  How many links this time?
• Just to the right of the search box in Google,
  click on Advanced Search.
• In the box that reads "with at least one of the
  words," type in Archaeology

  How far have you narrowed your
  search?
                Part Three:
More Stuff No One Tells You
             Google’s shocking
             secrets revealed!
Boolean Default is AND
• If you search for more than one keyword
  at a time, Google will automatically
  search for pages that contain ALL of
  your keywords.
• A search for disney fantasyland
  pirates is the same as searching for
  disney AND fantasyland AND
  pirates
• But, if you try to use AND on your own,
  Google yells at you.
              Source: http://www.google.com/help/basics.html
Boolean OR
• Sometimes the default AND gets in the
  way. That’s where OR comes in.
• The Boolean operator OR is always in all
  caps and goes between keywords.
• For example, an improvement over our
  earlier search would be disney
  fantasyland OR “pirates of the
  caribbean”
  – This would show you all the pages in
    Google’s index that contain the word
    disney AND the word fantasyland OR
    the phrase pirates of the caribbean
    (without the quotes)
            Source: http://www.google.com/help/refinesearch.html
Three Ways to OR at
Google
• Just type OR between keywords
  – disney fantasyland OR “pirates of
    the caribbean”
• Put your OR statement in parentheses
  – disney (fantasyland OR “pirates
    of the caribbean”)
• Use the | (“pipe”) character in place of
  the word OR
  – disney (fantasyland | “pirates of
    the caribbean”)
• All three methods yield the exact same
  results.

                           Source: Google Hacks, p. 3
             OR, She Blows!
                                           • Just remember,
                                             Google’s Boolean
                                             default is AND
                                           • Sometimes the
                                             default AND gets
                                             in the way. That’s
                                             where OR comes
                                             in.



Image source: http://www.phil-sears.com/
Capitalization Does NOT
                  Matter
         The old AltaVista trick
            of typing your
          keywords in lower
           case is no longer
              necessary.
How Insensitive!

• Google is not case sensitive.
• So, the following searches all yield
  exactly the same results:
  disney   fantasyland            pirates
  Disney   Fantasyland            Pirates
  DISNEY   FANTASYLAND            PIRATES
  DiSnEy   FaNtAsYlAnD            pIrAtEs



              Source: http://www.google.com/help/basics.html
Google Used to Have a
Hard Limit of 10 Keywords
• Bet you didn’t know THAT!




                      Source: Google Hacks, p. 19
Google’s 10 Word Limit

• Until recently, Google wouldn’t
  accept more than 10 keywords at a
  time.
  – Any keyword past 10 was simply
    ignored.
• Google now accepts up to 32
  keywords.
  – Stick with 10.

                        Source: Google Hacks, p. 19
The Order of Your
Keywords Matters
• A me life for pirate’s?
For Example
              A search for
              disney
              fantasyland
              pirates yields the
              same number of
              hits as a search for
              fantasyland
              disney pirates,
              but the order of
              those hits –
              especially the first
              10 – is noticeably
              different.
Part Three: In Summary
• Google’s Boolean default is AND.
• Capitalization does not matter.
• Google has a hard limit of 32
  keywords.
• The order of your keywords
  matters.
                Part Four:
Advanced Search Operators

           Beyond plusses,
         minuses, ANDs, ORs,
            quotes, and *s
Advanced Operators
Query modifiers           Other information
    • filetype:             needs
    • intitle:               • stocks:
    • inurl:                 • define:
    • site:                  • Google Calculator
    • synonyms
Alternative query types
    • info:
        • cache:
        • link:
        • related:
Query Modifiers

  Stuff you can add to
 your regular searches
filetype:
                         • filetype: restricts
                           your results to files
                           ending in ".doc" (or
                           .xls, .ppt. etc.), and
                           shows you only files
                           created with the
                           corresponding
                           program.
                         • There can be no
                           space between
                           filetype: and the
                           file extension
                         • The “dot” in the file
                           extension – .doc – is
                           optional.
        Source: http://www.google.com/help/faq_filetypes.html
Google’s Official Filetypes
• Adobe Portable             • Microsoft Excel (xls)
  Document Format            • Microsoft PowerPoint
  (pdf)                        (ppt)
• Adobe PostScript           • Microsoft Word (doc)
  (ps)                       • Microsoft Works
• Lotus 1-2-3 (wk1,            (wks, wps, wdb)
  wk2, wk3, wk4, wk5,        • Microsoft Write (wri)
  wki, wks, wku)             • Rich Text Format (rtf)
• Lotus WordPro (lwp)        • Shockwave Flash
                               (swf)
• MacWrite (mw)
                             • Text (ans, txt)


            Source: http://www.google.com/help/faq_filetypes.html
• filetype:extension

• pirates filetype:pdf
• pirates -filetype:pdf
• minerals filetype:ppt
site:
                      • Using site:
                        restricts the
                        results to those
                        websites in a
                        domain.
                      • There can be no
                        space between
                        site: and the
                        domain.


        Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
      site:domain

pirates site:disney.com
minerals site:usgs.gov
Using site:
• You use site: in conjunction with
  another search term or phrase.
  pirates site:disney.com
• You can also use site: to exclude
  sites.
  pirates –site:disney.com
• You can use site: to exclude or
  include entire domains (and, like with
  filetype, the dot is optional).
  pirates –site:com
  pirates site:edu
• Use an OR search to include or exclude
  hits from multiple sites or domains.
Synonyms
                    • Using ~ before a
                      keyword tells
                      Google to search
                      for both that
                      keyword and its
                      synonyms.
                    • There can be no
                      space between ~
                      and the keyword.


      Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
   ~keyword

pirate ~treasure
minerals ~stones
Alternative Query Types

• Stuff you can use if you want to
  search without using any keywords

• We are going to use the Martin
  Luther King Jr. site

• www.martinlutherking.org/
info:
                      • Using info:
                        presents some
                        information that
                        Google has about
                        a particular web
                        page.
                      • There can be no
                        space between
                        info: and the
                        URL.

        Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
         info:URL

Info:www.martinlutherking.org/
cache:
                       • Using cache: shows
                         the version of a web
                         page that Google
                         has in its cache.
                       • There can be no
                         space between
                         cache: and the
                         URL.




         Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
       cache:URL

cache:www.martinlutherking.
           org/
link:
                      • Using link:
                        restricts the
                        results to those
                        web pages that
                        have links to the
                        specified URL.
                      • There can be no
                        space between
                        link: and the
                        URL.

        Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
          link:URL

link:www.martinlutherking.org/
related:
                         • Using related:
                           lists web pages
                           that are "similar"
                           to a specified web
                           page.
                         • There can be no
                           space between
                           related: and
                           the URL.


           Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
         related:URL

related:www.martinlutherking.org/
  To find out how a site used
  to look or to find one that
  has been taken off the web:
• Web Archive
  http://web.archive.org/collections/w
  eb.html
• Paste in the site's address and click
  on a date to see previous versions
  of the page.
Other Information Needs
          Did you know that Google
         can look up phone numbers,
           stock quotes, dictionary
           definitions, and even the
          answer to math problems?
Google Calculator
                            • Simply key in what
                              you'd like Google to
                              compute (like 2+2)
                              and then hit enter.
                            • Google’s Calculator
                              can solve math
                              problems involving
                              basic arithmetic,
                              more complicated
                              math, units of
                              measure and
                              conversions, and
                              physical constants.

     Source: http://www.google.com/help/features.html#calculator
           3+44
 100 miles in kilometers
     sine(30 degrees)
 0x7d3 in roman numerals
            10 miles in smoots
For instructions on how to use the Google Calculator, see
http://www.google.com/help/calculator.html
What is a “smoot”? Use the
define function
define:         • If you begin a query
                                 with define:
                                 Google will display
                                 definitions for the
                                 word or phrase that
                                 follows, if definitions
                                 are available.
                               • You don’t need
                                 quotes around your
                                 phrases.



       Source: http://www.google.com/help/features.html#definitions
    define:term

    define:smoot
define:barbary coast
stocks:
                        • If you begin a query
                          with stocks:
                          Google will treat the
                          rest of the query
                          terms as stock ticker
                          symbols, and will link
                          to a Yahoo finance
                          page showing stock
                          information for those
                          symbols.
                        • Go crazy with the
                          spaces – Google
                          ignores them!

          Source: http://www.google.com/help/operators.html
stocks:Symbol1 Symbol2 …

        stocks: msft
stocks: aapl intc msft macr
          Part Five:
The Rest of the 70%
      Behind the Google
         homepage
Google’s “Hidden” Search
Options
     Part Six:
More Googles
Data mining for fun
    and profit
Even “More >>” Googles
The Hidden 20% [and 10%
More]
Google Scholar [Beta]
                        • scholar.google.com
                        • Limits your searches to
                            –   Peer-reviewed papers
                            –   Theses
                            –   Books
                            –   Abstracts and articles
                        • A great tool to search for
                          scholarly information from
                            –   Academic publishers
                            –   Professional societies
                            –   Preprint repositories
                            –   Universities and other
                                scholarly organizations



        Source: http://scholar.google.com/scholar/about.html
Special Google Searches




• Topic or site-specific Google searches
• http://www.google.com/options/
  specialsearches.html
   The Last Part:
Google Resources
    Where to get more
      information
Question Everything

When looking at a site that you might
want to use as an information source,
THINK about these questions:

• Is this information fact or opinion?
• Who else is using this site's
  information and for what?
• Who owns the site?
Is this information fact or opinion?

•Can it be found anywhere else?
•Can you copy some of the key text
from the site, do a search for it and
then find it on other credible sites?

 Do it… copy some text from one of
the sites and search.
Who owns the site?

• To find out who owns a site:
• Go to
  http://www.networksolutions.com/en
  _US/whois/index.jhtml and paste in
  the address.
• Scroll down through the page for
  ownership information.
Hoax Sites

				
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posted:7/24/2012
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