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Federated States of Micronesia

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Federated States of Micronesia Powered By Docstoc
					                  PRESENTATION
                             ON
   INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS
             TECHNOLOGY
                           IN THE
  THE FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA


PACIFIC ISLAND DIGITAL OPPORTUNITY (PIDO)
   RESEARCH COMMITTEE OF SPINF, JAPAN
               TOKYO, JAPAN
            11-17 DECEMBER 2006

                        Jolden J. Johnnyboy
              Assistant Secretary for Communications
     Dept. of Transportation, Communication. & Infrastructure
   Government of the Federated States of Micronesia
                     CONTENTS

• Map of FSM
• Country Profile and General Information
• Regulatory and FSM Telecom Corp. Structures
•Present ICT Situation
Networked Access
Networked Learning
Networked Society
Networked Economy
Networked Policy
Summary Overview and Summary Perspectives
• Global/Regional Strategic Approach
• National Initiatives
• Plan of Action
FSM: MAP
FSM: Country Profile and General Information

 Capital………….Palikir ( Located on the island of Pohnpei)
Area…………....271 square miles (701 square kilometers)
Population….…105, 500 (2002 Census)
Currency……….U.S. Dollar
GDP……………..U.S.$ 203.1 Million
GDP Per Capita…1.909
Original People….Nine ethnic groups of Micronesians,
                  Polynesians and Melanesians.
Language……..… Official Language is English with 8 different
                  languages and 4 different dialects
Culture……….…….Chief System
Religion…………….Pre-dominantly Christians
Literacy Rate…….89 %
Government………Constitutional government with 3 separate
branches in free association with the United States since 1986.
Federal System consist of National Gov’t. 4 State Gov’ts. of Kosrae, Chuuk,
Pohnpei and Yap, with over 80 Municipal Gov’ts.
National Holiday…10 May (1979) Constitutional Day
   FSM: Regulatory and FSM Telecom Structures


I. Regulatory Structure:
 The FSM Communications Act of 1991, mandated the
 Department of Transportation, Communications
 and Infrastructure as the telecom regulatory authority
 in the FSM. The Division of Communication is
 responsible to the Permanent Secretary (Minister)
 for all telecommunications matter which include –
 administration and management of the radio
 spectrum (licensing), development of policy,
 coordination and development of National ICT
 Plan. The Division is also responsible for
 memberships in ITU, APT and other sub-regional
 organizations. The Assistant Secretary of
Communications is responsible for the Division of
Communication.
        FSM: Regulatory and FSM Telecom Structures
II. FSM Telecom Corporate Structure:
The FSM Telecommunications Corporation Act of 1983,established
the corporation as the sole telecom service provider in the FSM.
The Corporation is headed by a CEO/President with managers
supervising various departments. The Corporation has a 5
Members Board of Directors. 4 members are nominated by the
States Governors with State Legislature’s consent. 1 member is
Nominated by the President with Congress consent. National
policies Objectives and planning responsibilities was built into its
charter: To operate on a commercially acceptable practices and
plan for the expansion and improvement of services/facilities
including expansion into the remote islands and un-served areas, in
a manner consistent with commercial reasonableness to promote
economic development, the advancement of education and health
and the preservation of the diverse cultures in the FSM…
It is a government policy not to interfere
 with FSM Telecom business decisions.
 FSM: Network Access
 The minimum necessary condition for e-readiness is access to adequate network
 infrastructure. Access is determined by combination of availability and affordability of the use
 of the Internet, communication network speed, hardware and software and support service.


Infrastructure
The telecommunication infrastructure in the main islands of the four states has good
access to telephone services. Despite this good coverage the overall rating is
lowered due to the poor coverage in the outer islands especially in Chuuk and Yap.
There are about 18,000 mobile and 13,000 fixed line phones. This is a teledensity of
about 30%. There are about 90 leased lines.
Availability
There is only one ISP (FSMTC) offering varying packages ranging from dial ups to
leased lines. There are limited facilities for public Internet access. Furthermore
due to lack of communication infrastructure in the outer islands there is a severe
lack of internet access.
Affordability
The dial up packages (fixed voice) are one of the best in PICs especially since
there is no telephone usage charges. Fixed telephone subscribers are charged
a fixed monthly fee. Notwithstanding that the leased line packages are
relatively high and no special consideration for services such as health and
education.
                  Continue FSM: Network Access
Network Speed
Generally, relatively good dial up connections with a few 64Kbps and
128Kbps leased line connections in main islands. There are no high speed
services of 1.5Mbps or more but this could be due to the prices rather
than network capabilities. In addition, GSM network coverage and quality
is good in the main central business districts but still with a few “black
spots”.
Hardware & software
There are a couple of ICT suppliers but mainly to supply ICT equipments. All these
equipments are sourced from abroad. The level of supports and expertise is low.
There is a lack of software, database and web developers. There are a couple of
websites that were developed locally but mainly by expatriates or overseas
companies. There are no websites that uses local languages such as Yapese,
Kosraen, Pohnpeian and Chuukese.
Service
Mainlines still take some time to be installed. Service response time is good but can
be better and be more customer friendly. Despite this there are growing customer
service ethic among service and support providers. ICT supports are available but due
to lack of expertise and experience still need to be improved. There are only a few
software developers and most of them are expatriates. No competitive web
development industry and tech supports are available but mainly in Pohnpei and to a
lesser extent in the 3 other states.
    FSM: Networked Learning
    HRD and capacity building is crucial for ICT development and enable community
    to participate in the networked world. Due to lack of training providers and ICT
    professionals ICT must be incorporated into the learning system to foster, help
    develop local capacity and expertise.

School access
Most of the high schools have computer laboratories especially in Pohnpei, Yap
and Kosrae. Computer laboratories tend to have about 10 computers. Some of
these computer laboratories are networked. There are also computers in some
elementary schools. These labs also have some dial up connections and for outer
Islands especially in Yap and Pohnpei they have “wavemail” which communicated
using radio frequency. There are no email or webservers in these schools. They are
not connected to a WAN and internet connection is only through dial ups. Computer
studies are also taught in tertiary institutions such as College of Micronesia.

Enhancing Education
Teachers (mainly in high schools) use computers like word for preparation of
school materials. Some classes (esp those in computer labs) use projector for
power point presentation. ICT are not integrated into the curricula. High
schools taught computer classes are elective but mainly using a TVET
approach. Due to lack of internet access and skills, class information are still
paper based and distributed manually. World Wide Web are yet to be
incorporated into school works.
              Continue FSM: Networked Learning



Workforce
There is a very limited number of ICT training providers. Certification
courses tend to be done usually in Guam or Hawaii. Some ICT courses are
offered at college (COM six campuses) in basic computing. Due to lack of
available ICT professionals there are limited opportunities for training in
skills development in organizations in government organizations.
FSM: NETWORKED SOCIETY
Readiness depends upon the community’s incorporation of information and
communication technologies into the fabric of its activities in order to maximize
the gains of joining in the Networked world, In the society-at-large, ICTs can
have a profound effect upon people’s professional and personal lives by
providing easier access to information, more efficient ways to communicate
and powerful organizational tools. To understand how a community is using
ICTs, it is important to assess not only how many members of the community
is using ICTs, it is important to assess not only how many members have
access to technologies but also how they are using them.


 People
 Some local businesses and institutions have registered domain
 names. (Need to find specific numbers). Not much promotion for
 ICT/online service providers. There are approximately 1200 internet
 subscribers which roughly equate to 1% of population. Assuming 3 or
 4 uses the same account this number goes up to 4-5%. A lot of
 awareness of ICT/internet is due to use of computers in schools.
 There are a lot of organizations and departments, in state and
 national, that do not have websites.
                        Continue FSM: Networked Society

Content
Not much local content. There are a couple of news/information websites but are not
updated regularly. Local websites are predominantly in English and none (or very limited)
in local languages. No affordable opportunities exist for web-related training. Check with
FSMTC on number of registered domains.
Everyday life
ICT are used to a limited degree by some members of the community. Public phones are
available in some parts of capitals. Some cybercafé in central business district and
hotels/resorts. Bank of Micronesia doesn’t have credit card payment, online banking or
ATM services. Bank of Guam provide online banking and credit card payments. Limited
number of PCs in homes (based on number of subs for dial up accounts). No local online
shopping sites.
Workplace
Not much interconnection-WAN but most of the big organizations/departments have
LANs. Due to limited connectivity and proper network setup only some employees have
email and web access (mainly Hotmail/yahoo etc).
FSM: NETWORKED ECONOMY
Businesses and governments that are able to effectively employ
information and communication technologies find more
sophisticated and efficient ways of managing their external
relationships and communications. This growing ICT usage helps
form the critical mass of electronic transactions which supports a
networked economy, both in terms of the network size and the
demand for associated goods, services, labor and policy reform.

Employment
Some ICT employment opportunities are there but mainly at junior level.
There are no or very limited ICT Policy, manager, professional jobs.

Business To Community
Some (very few) local businesses operate websites. Very few businesses
post key information on websites (FSMTC). None have introduced online
ordering. Businesses still rely on taking paper based purchase orders,
some using faxes and phones.
    Continue FSM: NETWORKED ECONOMY

Business To Business
Similarly to B2C. Business to business interactions remain inefficient with
little transparency. No online procurement systems. Faxes and paper
orders are still main form of interactions. Signatures are still required.
E-Government
A lot of departments do not have websites. Governments do not manages
relationships with contractors or suppliers online or with other electronic
mediation. Government distributes information about services,
procedures, rights and responsibilities in hard copy. Some employees have
email accounts. Finance and payroll systems are computerized is all
(soon) states and the national government. HESA is also working on a
Health Information Systems for all states, generally hospital statistical
record, etc. No Government WAN.
  FSM: NETWORKED POLICY
  Public policy can be a help or a hindrance to the networked economy.
  The favorable climate that public policy can create for Internet use
  and e-Commerce encourages communities, organizations and
  individuals to invest in and use ICT.

Telecommunication Regulation
Plans for liberalization of telecommunication services are being formulated.
ICT Trade Policy
Trade in equipment for information and communication technologies may be
hindered by high tariff. There is little foreign direct investment. Investment in ICT
sector encouraged? No policy or opening of service sectors related to ecommerce.
ICT Related Legislation
No legislation – computer crimes or spam acts. Key question is if someone hacked or
access your computer without authority can you take them to Court?.
ICT Policy
National ICT Policy and Action Plans are being formulated by Communication
Division of the Department of Transport, Communication and Infrastructure. Yap
government has also formulated a ICT Plan.
FSM: SUMMARY OVERVIEW OF CURRENT ICT STATUS
AT PRESENT, FSM IS EXPERIENCING A VARYING DEGREEE OF ICT
DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE FSM, COMPARATIVELY FROM STATE TO STATE,
ACROSS OFFICES IN BOTH THE NATIONAL AND THE FOUR STATE
GOVERNMENTS, FROM SCHOOLS TO SCHOOLS AND FROM HOSPITALS TO
RURAL CLINICS AND IN THE PRIVATE SECTORS, AS WELL. THIS e- FSM IS
PROCEEDING AT PRESENT ON A PIECEMEAL BASIS, WITH EACH PIECE
FALLING RANDOMLY INTO THE FSM ICT PUZZLE.
THIS “FSM DIGITAL DIVIDE” IS MORE SIGNIFICANT BETWEEN THE URBAN
AREAS AND RURAL VILLAGES NOT TO MENTION THE REMOTE ISLAND
COMMUNITIES.

 Summary in Perspective
  Severe lack of ICT Capacity not only in National/State
   Governments but also in Private Sectors.
  No or limited ICT Infrastructure in Outer Islands.
   no telecom infrastructure in outer islands in Yap and Pohnpei,
   except in Ulithi Atoll.
  Limited ICT infrastructure (some have LANs) in Government
   departments. Need to have proper design, setup, services
   (webserver, email server).
            Continue FSM: Summary in Perspective

   No local software development industry
     (limited, most work done by overseas company or
    expatriate).
   No policy governing management of Domain names
    (.gov.fm, .com for businesses etc). Registering
    domain names is not organized.
   Lack of coordination in various computerization
    projects. Duplication of efforts, waste of limited
    resources.
   National ICT Policy are being formulated resulting in
    lack of direction. (Policy need to simple and practical)
   Internet leased line connections are still high. (Price
    high compared to many other countries…).
        Continue FSM: Summary in Perspective

 ICT is not integrated into the education
  curricula. (Used for teaching MS Office
  etc but not as a subject like Math, etc.)
 No computer crimes legislation.
           FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH


BACKGROUND-Taking into considerations global trends and
regional developments:
WSIS 2003: Declaration of Principles
“Common Vision for an inclusive information society”
 Building a people centered information society
 Information Infrastructure: an essential foundation
 Capacity building: continuous life-long learning
 Building confidence and security in the use of ICTs
 ICT applications: benefits in all aspects of life
 Cultural and linguistic diversity and identity, local contents
 International and regional cooperation
WSIS 2003 Plan of Action to be achieved by 2015

July 2004: APT Ministerial Conf. (Asia Pacific Broadband Summit) in Bangkok,
    Agreed on the Bangkok Agenda for broadband and ICT development in the Asia-
    Pacific Region.
          Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH

   WSIS 2005: Tunis Commitment
Connecting all communities by 2015
(From closing address by Yoshio Utsumi, Secretary General of ITU)
   Reaffirmed WSIS 2003 Declaration of Principles and Plan of Action
   To build ICT networks and develop applications that are affordable and accessible to all,
    available anywhere and any time, to anyone and any device, leading to a ubiquitous
    network.

PALM 2006, Okinawa, Japan May 2006
Okinawa Declaration of PALM 2006 to strengthen international cooperation activities on ICT projects in
realizing “Benefits of ICT for All Pacific Islanders”.

   The Asia Broad Program, strategic part of the e-Japan Strategy II, includes PI Cs.
   WSIS has also given special attention on PICs
   There is a need ICT projects for PICs in conjunction with both Asia Broadband Program and WSIS.
   Japanese Government should take an initiative under the close coordination with PIF, UNU, PIDO
    etc.
   Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH


At the second Forum Communications Ministers’
Meeting, convened in Suva, Fiji in April 2002,
Ministers endorsed a second action plan the
Communications Action Plan 2002 (CAP 2002),
building on from that endorsed in 1999.
Ministers also endorsed the Pacific Islands
Information and Communication Technology
Policy and Plan (PIIPP) with its vision for “ICTs
for Every Pacific Islander”.
    Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APROACH


In April 2004, Forum Leaders at their Special Leaders Retreat, in Auckland,
New Zealand met to consider and discuss the EPG Report, and agreed to
the formulation of a Pacific Plan called the “Pacific Digital Plan.”

   “The development of a digital strategy would allow huge gains to be
    made through the countries of the region working more closely
    together. We regard this as an area requiring urgent, concerted action
    and so offer some reasonably detailed thoughts”
   “The regional IT infrastructure is limited in its reach and accessibility.
    Few Pacific people have good access to electronic communication of
    any type and those who do face indifferent services and high prices.
    In a world increasingly divided into “information rich” and “information
    poor” there is little risk that the Pacific is beginning to slide down the
    wrong side of the digital divide. That can only lead to marginalization
    and isolation, both economically and socially.”
    Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH




   In August of the same year, Leaders at the 2004 Forum
    Leaders Meeting, held in Apia, Samoa, adopted the following
    vision:
    “Leaders believe the Pacific region can, should and will be a
     region of peace, harmony, security, and economic prosperity,
     so that all its peoples can lead free and worthwhile lives. We
     treasure the diversity of the Pacific and seek a future in which
     its cultures, traditions and religious beliefs are valued,
     honoured and developed. We seek a Pacific region that is
     respected for the quality of its governance, the sustainable
     management of its resources, the full observance of
     democratic values, and for its defence and promotion of
     human rights. We seek partnerships with our neighbours and
     beyond to develop or knowledge, to improve our
     communications and to ensure a sustainable existence for all.”
    And agreed to:
    “Develop a Digital Strategy for the region, based on the 1999
     Communications Action Plan.”
Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH




    Forum ICT Ministers endorsed the Digital Strategy at
     their meeting in March 2006 in Wellington, New
     Zealand. At this meeting, the Forum ICT Ministers
     also endorsed the Wellington Declaration recalling
     past decisions and initiatives of past Ministerial
     meetings, including references to the 2002 Pacific
     ICT Survey, as well as pledging and declaring future
     areas for regional ICT cooperation and collaboration.
     Specific reference was made to undertaking seven
     initiatives in the first year.
 Continue FSM: GLOBAL/REGIONAL STRATEGIC APPROACH




REGIONAL PRIORITIES:
 Tele-health: The Pilot Tele-health Project
 Community access: Multipurpose Community Telecentres (some best
  practices and success stories are becoming reality)
 Human resources: Various programmes are on-going
 National Policy and regulatory frameworks: Still on-going subjects in Pacific
  Islands countries
          FSM: National Initiatives



I. Government

First ICT Workshop-”e-FSM” conducted by the e-Pacifika Project funded by
Japan through the UNDP was held in November 2002, involving stakeholders
from all sectors of the FSM, endorsed ICT goals and objectives for the FSM.

Second ICT Workshop- “Policy Makers and Leadership Workshop” co-
Sponsored Peace-sat, SPINF, FSM Telecom, College of Micronesia and FSM
National Government. The participants represent many leaders from both the
State and National governments, Governors, Legislatures, Department
directors and Congressmen. National Policies were endorsed for government
consideration.
               Con’t. FSM; National Initiatives


Draft Telecom Policies addressing present telecom market
environment is completed ready to be submitted to Government
for consideration and establishing National ICT Committee (CIPAC).
FSM National ICT and strategic Plan is to be completed early next
year.
FSM in partnership with SOPAC have completed ICT assessment in
FSM, report to be submitted in January 2007.
Joint FSM/Japan on APT HRD Research Project to develop models
for tele-centers in FSM.
                FSM NATIONAL PLAN
                         ORGANIZATION

       Executive order establishing National ICT
      Committee (INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION
                POLICY ADVISORY COMMITTEE)



President’s                                           FSMTC
 Cabinet                   CIPAC                      CEO/GM




        State                                  Private
        Rep.                                 Sector Rep.
                      Working Group
   ICT Working Group
                                          Continue…
Formulation of ICT Working Group to
advise and provide technical support to
CIPAC


                     CIPAC




                  ICT WORKING
                     GROUP
                   Continue FSM: National Initiatives



II. Current FSM Telecom Corporation Projects

Up grade of GSM system migrating from inter-wave to
Huawei, 2006-2007.

Plans approved to build additional GSM systems (similar to the
Ulithi system) for 3 outlying atolls in Chuuk and Pohnpei, 2006-
2007.
 FSM: Plan of Action


A plan is a statement of the desired future and
what actions will be undertaken and
resources committed so that the future is what
is desired.
                            FSM: Plan of Action

POLICY DIRECTION

The digital divide between urban areas of
developed countries and rural areas of
developing countries are becoming:
         “wider and wider!”
We must expedite and strengthen our actions
to bridge the digital divide by developing
information infrastructure in rural areas.

Dr. Kenji Saga presentation at FSM ICT Policy and
Leadership workshop, March 2006

“…Without access to affordable ICT capacity and services, our people
will continue to be unable to fully benefit from opportunities that could
otherwise be made available for education, health, and economic
development, to name a few. Indeed, telecommunications is a necessary
tool for economic and social development…”

FSM President, H.E. Joseph Urusemal, Opening remarks at FSM ICT Policy and ICT
   Workshop,
March 2006
                            Continue FSM: Plan of Action
1. National ICT Proposed Plan:
Objectives-Efficient government communication network at affordable
cost. This is a rolling plan with a short and long term objectives, to be
achieved within the Compact II period or by 2020 year. ICT Policies built into Plan.
Priority areas:( Capacity Building in all areas)
e-government
Health
Education
Universal Service Obligations

Strategy-Objectives achieved by planned phases. ICT Pilot projects like telecenters,
Mail-wave, etc. for rural areas should be pursued upon availability of funding. These
small projects should attached under annexes in National Plan.

Financial Resources-Compact Fund, FSM Governments, Donor Countries-Japan ODA,
PRC grants, Regional programmes thru ITU, APT, etc…

2. Legislation to amend law to open telecom sector for competition.
             FSM: Conclusion
FSM Government supports PIDO
Recommendation that : “Government of FSM
to play a key role with strong support of other
Pacific Island countries that Okinawa
Declaration of PALM 2006 to strengthen
international cooperation activities on ICT
projects in realizing “Benefits of ICT for All
Pacific Islanders”.
     ?
      THANK YOU

        CONTACT:
e-mail: transcom@mail.fm
  Cell phone: 920 9736
   Tel: (691)320-2381

				
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