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                           CONTENTS
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HANDBOOK .................................................................................. 8
  Admission To Teacher Education ............................................................................................... 9
  Undergraduate ............................................................................................................................. 9
  Admission To School Of Education - Graduate ....................................................................... 11
  Alternatives To Established Policies For Admission To The School Of Education ................ 12
  (Undergraduates Only).............................................................................................................. 12
  Grade Point Average (Gpa) ...................................................................................................... 12
  School Of Education Programs ................................................................................................. 12
  Education Minor ....................................................................................................................... 13
  Professional Training Option (Pto) ........................................................................................... 13
  Institutional And State Standards.............................................................................................. 13
  Uniform Core Curriculum......................................................................................................... 13
  School Of Education Conceptual Framework .......................................................................... 13
  Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (Feaps) ............. 14
  Student Learning Outcomes ...................................................................................................... 16
  Transition Points ....................................................................................................................... 18
     Transition Point #1 Admission to the School of Education ................................................................. 18
     Transition Point #2 Entrance into Field Experience I .......................................................................... 18
     Transition Point #3 Entry into Student Teaching ................................................................................ 18
     Transition Point #4 Exit Student Teaching .......................................................................................... 18
     Transition Point #5 Graduation........................................................................................................... 19
     Transition Point #6 Follow-up ............................................................................................................. 19
  Field Experiences ...................................................................................................................... 19
  General Information .................................................................................................................. 19
  Diverse Setting .......................................................................................................................... 19
  Field Experience I And II ......................................................................................................... 19
  Application And Placement Information .................................................................................. 19
  Student Teaching ...................................................................................................................... 20
  Application And Placement Information .................................................................................. 20
  Out Of Service Area Placement ................................................................................................ 22


                                                                                                                                                 2
   Iep Requirement ........................................................................................................................ 22
   COST (Consortium For Overseas Student Teaching) .............................................................. 22
   Clinical Field Experiences In Undergraduate Teacher Education ............................................ 23
   Response To Intervention (RTI) ............................................................................................... 24
   Related Information .................................................................................................................. 24
   Teacher Certification ................................................................................................................ 24
   Requirements For Graduation From School Of Education Programs ...................................... 24
   Probation ................................................................................................................................... 25
   Suspension ................................................................................................................................ 25
APPENDIXES .............................................................................................................................. 26
   The Principles Of Professional Conduct For The Education Profession In Florida (Code Of
   Ethics) 6B-1.006, FAC ............................................................................................................. 26
   Obligation To The Public Requires That The Individual: ........................................................ 26
   Liability Insurance .................................................................................................................... 28
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ORIENTATION ............................................................................ 29
   School Of Education Orientation .............................................................................................. 30
   Accreditation And Reciprocity ................................................................................................. 30
   Selecting A Major ..................................................................................................................... 30
   There Are A Variety Of Degrees To Choose From In The School Of Education Program: .... 30
   Professional Education Minor................................................................................................... 30
   School Of Education Admissions Requirements ...................................................................... 31
   Certification Exams .................................................................................................................. 31
   Advising .................................................................................................................................... 32
   School Of Education Student Services Contacts: ..................................................................... 32
   Tk20 .......................................................................................................................................... 34
   Uwf Online! .............................................................................................................................. 34
   Uwf Library Access .................................................................................................................. 35
   Uwf Bookstore .......................................................................................................................... 35
   Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................. 35
   Faculty....................................................................................................................................... 36
   Field Experiences ...................................................................................................................... 36

                                                                                                                                                   3
   Application And Placement Information .................................................................................. 36
   Student Teaching ...................................................................................................................... 37
   Graduation................................................................................................................................. 37
   Response To Intervention Mediation (RTI) .............................................................................. 38
   The RTI Mediation Process Commences: ................................................................................ 38
   Competencies And Skills .......................................................................................................... 39
   Esol Endorsement ..................................................................................................................... 39
   Assessment System And Academic Learning Compacts ......................................................... 39
   Critical Teacher Shortages ........................................................................................................ 39
   Course Load, Work, And Life .................................................................................................. 40
   Email Netiquette ....................................................................................................................... 40
   Laptops And Cell Phones.......................................................................................................... 41
   Required Affirmation ................................................................................................................ 41
Fields Experience I & II................................................................................................................ 43
   Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 45
   Definition of Terms................................................................................................................... 45
   General Information .................................................................................................................. 45
   Fingerprints and Background Checks ....................................................................................... 45
   Liability Insurance and Medical Insurance ............................................................................... 46
   Application and Placement Information ................................................................................... 46
   Diverse Setting .......................................................................................................................... 47
   ESOL Requirement for Field Experience II ............................................................................. 47
   Exceptional/Elementary, Elementary, Middle School English only ........................................ 47
      1. ESOL Critical Task Observation Journal ........................................................................................... 48
      2. Critical Task ESOL Assessments ....................................................................................................... 50
      3. Critical Task – ESOL Tutoring ........................................................................................................... 51
   Dress Code for All Field Experience Students ......................................................................... 52
   Orientation ................................................................................................................................ 52
   Professionalism ......................................................................................................................... 52
   Scheduling Field Experience Hours.......................................................................................... 52
   Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices .......................... 53

                                                                                                                                                   4
  IEP Requirement ....................................................................................................................... 54
  Goals and Objectives ................................................................................................................ 54
  Field Experience I ..................................................................................................................... 54
  Field Experience II.................................................................................................................... 54
  Supervising Teacher Evaluations .............................................................................................. 55
  Field Experience I and II Grades .............................................................................................. 55
  General Guidance...................................................................................................................... 55
  Final Critique ............................................................................................................................ 56
  Lesson Plans.............................................................................................................................. 57
  Reflection for Taught Lesson Plans .......................................................................................... 58
  Supervising Teacher Responsibilities ....................................................................................... 59
  University Supervisor Responsibilities ..................................................................................... 60
  Field Experience Student Responsibilities................................................................................ 60
SUPERVISING TEACHER HANDBOOK ................................................................................. 61
  Letter From Director Of School Of Education ......................................................................... 62
  Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 64
  Definition Of Terms .................................................................................................................. 64
  Supervising Teacher, Faculty Associate And University Supervisor ....................................... 64
  General Responsibilities Of Student Teachers And Interns ..................................................... 64
  Supervising Teachers ................................................................................................................ 66
  Criteria For Selection Of Supervising Teachers ....................................................................... 66
  Role Of The Supervising Teacher............................................................................................. 67
  Guidelines For The Supervising Teacher ................................................................................. 68
  Suggested Schedule Of Student Teaching ................................................................................ 69
  Recognition For The Supervising Teacher ............................................................................... 70
  Faculty Associates .................................................................................................................... 70
  Role Of The Faculty Associate ................................................................................................. 71
  University Supervisor In The University Of West Florida Area .............................................. 71
  Role Of The University Supervisor .......................................................................................... 71
  University Supervisor Out Of University Of West Florida Area ............................................. 71
  Student Teaching For Transient Students ................................................................................. 72

                                                                                                                                               5
   Purpose Of Supervising Teacher’s Evaluation Forms .............................................................. 72
   Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices .......................... 72
   UWF School Of Education Teacher Dispositions .................................................................... 73
   Iep Requirement ........................................................................................................................ 73
   Unit Plans .................................................................................................................................. 73
   Grading Criteria ........................................................................................................................ 74
   Unit Plans .................................................................................................................................. 74
   Content Unit Plan: Learners And Instructional Plans ............................................................... 75
   Tk20 .......................................................................................................................................... 76
   Continuation Of TK20 Help: .................................................................................................... 78
   Grant An Extension In Tk20 ..................................................................................................... 78
   Still Need Help? ........................................................................................................................ 79
   Eluminate-Orientation............................................................................................................... 79
   Supervising A Student Teacher-Review ................................................................................... 79
STUDENT TEACHER HANDBOOK ......................................................................................... 81
   Letter From Director Of School Of Education ......................................................................... 82
   Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 84
   Definition Of Terms .................................................................................................................. 84
   General Information .................................................................................................................. 84
   Fingerprints And Background Checks ...................................................................................... 84
   Liability Insurance And Medical Insurance .............................................................................. 84
   Application And Placement Information .................................................................................. 85
   Placement Out Of University Service Area .............................................................................. 85
   Employment During Student Teaching .................................................................................... 86
   Student Teacher Schedule ......................................................................................................... 86
   Dress Code ................................................................................................................................ 86
   Diverse Setting .......................................................................................................................... 86
   Orientation ................................................................................................................................ 86
   Professionalism ......................................................................................................................... 86
   Grading Criteria ........................................................................................................................ 87



                                                                                                                                                   6
   Supervising Teacher, Faculty Associate And University Supervisor – A Joint Venture In
   Supervision, Support, And Assessment Of Student Teachers .................................................. 87
   Student Teacher Responsibilities .............................................................................................. 87
   Iep Requirement ........................................................................................................................ 88
   Unit Plans .................................................................................................................................. 89
   Student Teachers And The Supervising Teacher ...................................................................... 90
   Student Teachers And The University Supervisor In The University Of West Florida Area .. 90
   Student Teachers Placed Outside Of The University Of West Florida Service Area And The
   University Supervisor. .............................................................................................................. 91
   Student Teachers And The Faculty Associate .......................................................................... 91
   Supervising Teachers ................................................................................................................ 91
   Criteria For Selection Of Supervising Teachers ....................................................................... 91
   Role Of The Supervising Teacher............................................................................................. 92
   Faculty Associates .................................................................................................................... 93
   Role Of The Faculty Associate ................................................................................................. 93
   Tk20 Help ................................................................................................................................. 94
   Unit Plans In TK20 ................................................................................................................... 94
   How To Upload An Image (Your Graph Or Chart In The Unit Plan): ..................................... 95
   Professional Education Applicant Self Rating Form ................................................................ 95
APPENDIX ................................................................................................................................... 97
Self Check List for Student Teachers and Interns ........................................................................ 98
University Supervisor Evaluation – 1st Visit ................................................................................ 99
University Supervisor Evaluation – 2nd Visit.............................................................................. 100
Student Affirmation .................................................................................................................... 101
Student Teaching Evaluation 1(Week 1) and 2 (Week 4) .......................................................... 102
Student Teaching Midterm (Weeks 7) and 4th Evaluation (Week 11) ....................................... 103
Final Student Teaching Evaluation (Week 14) ........................................................................... 104
Liability Insurance ...................................................................................................................... 106




                                                                                                                                                 7
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION HANDBOOK

           2010-2011




                               8
Admission To Teacher Education
Admission to the School of Education is a requirement of the Florida State Board of Education
for students seeking certification to teach in the public schools in Florida. Undergraduate degree
seeking students, graduate students, and approved alternative certification route students who are
working toward certification must meet all admission requirements. Admission to the School of
Education should not be confused with admission to the University or acceptance into an
academic department.

Undergraduate
Admission to the School of Education is provisional. Provisional admission allows the unit to
carefully monitor student progress through teacher education programs. Careful monitoring will
ensure that academic and/or social skills deficits of pre-service teachers can be identified in a
timely manner so that appropriate interventions can be implemented.

For Provisional Admission to the School of Education, students must meet the following
requirements:
All students must complete the provisional admission to process as listed below by the end of the
first semester of attendance at UWF’s School of Education. Those students who do not complete
the provisional admission process by the end of the first semester may be denied further
registration and an enrollment hold will be placed on any future enrollment in education courses.
The hold may be removed by the student completing the admission process. Students must also
maintain these standards to ensure the continuation of provisional admission and continued
registration. Students who fail to meet these standards may be removed from teacher education.

All students must purchase the School of Education Assessment program, TK20. This
assessment system allows the unit to track student progress throughout the program. Courses in
the School of Education program will have at least one key assignment which is submitted to
TK20. All field experience evaluations are submitted through TK20. In addition, students will
have the opportunity to develop a teaching portfolio within TK20 that may be provided to
prospective employers. This is a one-time purchase that will provide seven years of access to
TK20 and may be obtained through the UWF Bookstore or directly from TK20. The website is:
uwf.tk20.com The cost for the subscription is approximately $105 from TK20 or approximately
$115 from the Bookstore. Financial Aid may be used to purchase TK20 through the Bookstore.
Once purchased, access to TK20 will be available in 3-5 business days.

All students must complete the Application for Admission to the School of Education found in
TK20. To access the application:

       •       Login to your TK20 account.
       •       Click on “Artifacts” on the top menu.


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       •       Click on “Application Forms” on the left menu.
       •       Click on “Create” on the left menu.
       •       Select “Admission to Teacher Education Application” from the dropdown box.
       •       Complete the application and click on “save.”
All students must complete the Professional Education Applicant Self-Rating Scale found in
TK20. To access this scale:

       •       Login to your TK20 account.

       •       Click on “Artifacts” on the top menu.

       •       Click on “Application Forms” on the left menu.

       •       Click on “Create” on the left menu.

       •       Select “Professional Education Applicant Self-Rating Scale” from the
               dropdown box.

       •       Complete the rating scale and click on “save.”

Prospective teacher education candidates must have a cumulative GPA of 2.50 in all previously
attempted college work.

All students are required to provide passing scores on all sections (math, English, reading, essay)
of the General Knowledge (GK) Exam for admission to the School of Education. Students who
reside outside of Florida and are in the online exceptional student education certification
program may provide passing scores on the Praxis I exam for admission purposes only.

To ensure students are eligible for field placement within the schools, all students must be
fingerprinted prior to beginning Field Experience I. Fingerprinting and background checks are
conducted through the school district where the student will complete any field experiences and
not through UWF School of Education. Each district has different policies and students should
follow their specific county’s guidance. Some counties require a “badge” which is obtained
through that county. Students in other states should contact their local school district for
guidance. Students will not be allowed entrance to the schools until fingerprinting and
background checks are complete.

All School of Education students must purchase liability insurance prior to Field Experience I.
Please see the Appendix of this Handbook for information on where the insurance can be
purchased. Students should secure their own medical insurance. The University of West Florida
will not cover any illness or injury sustained during the field experience. Students will bear all
responsibility for illness or injury.

                                                                                                 10
All students seeking initial certification must be degree-seeking. Please contact the
Undergraduate Admissions Office (Building 18) for procedures to follow to change your status
to degree-seeking.

      The deadline for completion of the admission process is the end of the first semester of
       enrollment in the School of Education. Students may not enroll in a second semester until
       the admission process is complete.
      All students are required to attend an orientation to the School of Education at the
       Pensacola campus, read the School of Education Orientation Handbook online, or view
       the narrated orientation to School of Education powerpoint presentation online.
      Students must maintain a minimum major GPA of 2.5 to remain in the School of
       Education program. Students whose major GPA drops below 2.5 will be given one
       semester to improve the GPA to the acceptable 2.5 level. Students who do not maintain a
       major GPA of 2.5 will be required to leave the School of Education program.
      Students who are not admitted to Teacher Education can take no more than 15 semester
       hours of teacher education courses. Please contact your Advisor to determine the courses
       that may be taken.
      The Advising Office is located in Bldg. 85, Room 196. If we can be of assistance, please
       call us at (850) 857-6306.

Admission To School Of Education - Graduate
   Students who meet the following requirements may be provisionally admitted to the program:

              Hold current professional teacher certification
              Have earned a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or
                        from an institution accredited by an equivalent accrediting body or a
               comparable degree from an international institution
              Have earned a GPA of at least 3.0 on bachelor’s degree
              Submit a current (within five years) official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) verbal
                        score OR Miller’s Analogies Test (MAT) score
              Submit a letter of intent that includes the following information: your background,
                        short- and long-term goals, contributions you would like to make to your
               field of         study, and strengths you bring to the program
              Submit contact information (email addresses and phone numbers) for two
                        professional references
              Be in good standing at all previous institutions of higher learning. Students who,
                        for academic or disciplinary reasons, are not eligible to register in the
               college or       university last attended will not be admitted for graduate study

To be fully admitted to the program, the following requirements must be met in addition to the
requirements for provisional admission (above).


                                                                                                 11
          Full admission is required by the fifth week of the first semester. Students will be
           unable to register for a second semester of coursework until full admission has been
           granted.
          Completion of the Professional Education Applicant Disposition Scale by each person
           identified as a professional reference (the Graduate Advising Office will contact each
           professional reference with instructions)
          Purchase and activation of a subscription to the School of Education's assessment
           system, Tk20
          Completion of the Professional Education Applicant Disposition Self-rating Scale
           within Tk20.

Alternatives To Established Policies For Admission To The School Of Education
(Undergraduates Only)
A student who does not meet the GPA admission requirements may appeal to be admitted as an
exception to this requirement. All other admission requirements must be met.

Grade Point Average (Gpa)
Undergraduate degree-seeking candidates with less than a 2.5 post-secondary grade point
average (when applying for admission to the School of Education) may take a maximum of
twelve (12.0) hours in School of Education courses for one semester. Please check with Advising
regarding the courses that may be taken. A hold will be placed on the student’s account and the
student will not be allowed to register for any additional teacher education courses until grades
are posted. If the candidate maintains a minimum GPA of 2.5 during this semester, the student
may be considered for admission to the School of Education.

School Of Education Programs
Certification Programs

Currently, there are several different certification programs available in the School of Education.
These are:

   •       Elementary Education (K-6)
   •       Middle School Education (Grades 5-9)
   •       Math/Science
   •       Math/ English with ESOL endorsement
   •       Math/ Social Science
   •       Science/ English with ESOL endorsement
   •       Science/Social Science
   •       Social Science/ English with ESOL endorsement
   •       Exceptional Student Education (K-12) with ESOL/Reading Endorsements




                                                                                                 12
Education Minor
Professional Training Option (Pto)
For students who wish to teach at the high school level, an Education Minor is available. The
Professional Training Option (PTO) may lead to a temporary certificate from the State of
Florida. Students should visit the School of Education Advising Center located in Bldg. 85 Room
196 to complete the necessary forms. A cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for the PTO which
consists of 15 hours of additional coursework and one field experience. Students requesting
Student Teaching will complete a total of two field experiences: Field Experience I (ESE 4940)
and Student Teaching (EDG 4940). Please see the current UWF Catalog under “Education
Minor” for the specific courses required. Additionally, students will need to complete the
Florida Teacher Certification Exams required for the content area. These exams include: General
Knowledge Exam, Professional Educator Exam and a Subject Area Exam (dependent on
student’s area of study).

Once the student has graduated with the PTO minor, the student may apply for temporary
certification from the State of Florida. The State will then provide a Letter of Eligibility to the
student detailing what additional requirements the State requires in order to obtain a Professional
Certificate. The Temporary Certificate is generally valid for three (3) years in which the student
should complete any additional requirements stated in the Letter of Eligibility. Be aware that a
temporary certificate cannot be used for employment purposes outside of the State of Florida.
Students with the Temporary Certificate should complete the requirements provided by the State
and obtain the Professional Certificate before seeking employment outside of the State of
Florida.

Institutional And State Standards
Throughout the Teacher Education programs and through a variety of means, candidates in the
School of Education are assessed on Institutional and the State of Florida Standards.

Uniform Core Curriculum
The coursework contained within the different School of Education programs includes similar
key assignments designed to monitor the candidate’s progress on all Uniform Core Curriculum
regardless of the program. Depending on the School of Education program, the Uniform Core
Curriculum includes the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs), Professional
Education Competencies (PEC), English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), Subject Area
Competencies, and Reading Endorsement Competencies and Skills/Standards. Key assignments
related to the Uniform Core Curriculum are submitted by students to TK20. Student progress
related to the Uniform Core Curriculum is monitored through TK20 and Transition Points (see
Transition Points).

School Of Education Conceptual Framework
The Conceptual Framework establishes goals of the School of Education’s programs. Outcomes
of the programs are intended to produce educational leaders who are:
                                                                                                13
       1. Critical Thinkers: Individuals who are able to examine their frame of reference by
          analyzing educational policy and practice in everyday experiences.
       2. Problem Solvers: Educators who are able to develop alternative solutions to
          educational problems while believing that all individuals learn.
       3. Decision Makers: Leaders who utilize self-reflection and data analysis in order to
          learn from experiences and make changes.
       4. Counselor/Mentor: Sensitive individuals who are able to interact effectively with
          learners, colleagues, and the public to promote high levels of success for every
          individual.
       5. Ethical/Moral Professionals: Educational leaders who recognize human diversity and
          intentionally make individuals feel valued for their potential.
       6. Lifelong Learners: Motivated learners who are committed to the profession, to
          continuous learning and self improvement.



Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (Feaps)
Throughout the School of Education program, students will be assessed on the 12 Florida
Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) and the six dispositions in order to monitor progress
toward becoming an empowered professional who makes a difference. Dispositions are
monitored through the “Professional Education Applicant Self-Rating Scale” which the
candidate completes twice during the Teacher Education program. The candidate must complete
the Professional Education Applicant Self-Rating Scale as part of the admission process as well
as at the end of the program after Student Teaching. In addition, two external reviews are
conducted by Supervising Teachers: the first during Field Experience I and the second at the end
of Student Teaching. The 12 FEAPs are assessed throughout the candidates program through
coursework and specifically during Field Experience I, II and Student Teaching.

   1. Assessment
      The preprofessional teacher collects and uses data gathered from a variety of sources.
      These sources will include both traditional and alternate strategies. Furthermore, the
      teacher can identify and match the student's instructional plan with their cognitive, social,
      linguistic, cultural, emotional, and physical needs.
   2. Communication
      The preprofessional teacher communicates and works cooperatively with families and
      colleagues to improve educational experiences at the school.
   3. Continuous Improvement
      The preprofessional teacher realizes that she/he is in the initial stages of a lifelong
      learning process and that self reflection is one the key components of that process. While
      her/his concentration is, of necessity, inward and personal, the role of colleagues and
      school-based improvement activities increases as time passes. The teacher's continued
      professional improvement is characterized by self-reflection, working with immediate

                                                                                                14
     colleagues and teammates, and meeting the goals of a personal professional development
     plan.
4.   Critical Thinking
     The preprofessional teacher is acquiring performance assessment techniques and
     strategies that measure higher order thinking skills in students and is building a repertoire
     of realistic projects and problem-solving activities designed to assist all students in
     demonstrating their ability to think creatively.
5.   Diversity
     The professional teacher establishes a comfortable environment which accepts and fosters
     diversity. The teacher must demonstrate knowledge and awareness of varied cultures and
     linguistic backgrounds. The teacher creates a climate of openness, inquiry, and support
     by practicing strategies such as acceptance, tolerance, resolution, and mediation.
6.   Ethics
     The preprofessional teacher adheres to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional
     Conduct of the Education Profession in Florida.
7.   Human Development and Learning
     The preprofessional teacher understands the importance of setting up effective learning
     environments and has techniques and strategies to use to do so, including some that
     provide opportunities for student input into the processes. The teacher understands that
     she/he will need a variety of techniques and is working to increase his/her knowledge and
     skills.
8.   Knowledge of Subject Area
     The preprofessional teacher has a basic understanding of the subject field and is
     beginning to understand that the subject is linked to other disciplines and can be applied
     to real world integrated settings. The teacher's repertoire of teaching skills includes a
     variety of means to assist student acquisitions of new knowledge and skills using that
     knowledge.
9.   Learning Environments
     The preprofessional teacher understands the importance of setting up effective learning
     environments and has techniques and strategies to use to do so, including some that
     provide opportunities for student input into the processes. The teacher understand that
     she/he will need a variety of techniques and is working to increase his/her knowledge and
     skills.

10. Planning
    Recognizing the importance of setting high expectations for all students, the
    preprofessional teacher works with other professionals to design learning experiences that
    meet students' needs and interests. The teacher candidate continually seeks
    advice/information from appropriate resource (including feedback), interprets the
    information, and modifies her/his plans appropriately. Planned instruction incorporates a


                                                                                               15
       creative environment and utilizes varied and motivational strategies and multiple
       resources for providing comprehensible instruction for all students. Upon reflection, the
       teacher continuously refines outcome assessment and learning experiences.
   11. Role of the Teacher
       The preprofessional teacher communicates and works cooperatively with families and
       colleagues to improve educational experiences at the school.
   12. Technology
       The preprofessional teacher uses technology as available at the school site and as
       appropriate to the learner. She/he provides students with opportunities to actively use
       technology and facilitates access through the use of electronic resources. The teacher also
       uses technology to manage, evaluate, and improve instruction.

Student Learning Outcomes
Each undergraduate School of Education program has Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) that
each candidate will meet upon graduation. The SLOs are similar across programs with the
exception of the level and unique learning needs of children the candidate’s program addresses.
The SLOs for each program may be found in the Academic Learning Compacts at
http://uwf.edu/education/ug_ba_ted.cfm

The UWF School of Education graduate should be able to do the following:

Content

              Collect and use data gathered from a variety of sources, including formal and
               informal measures, to develop educational goals for elementary, middle or
               exceptional student education students.
              Identify the cognitive, linguistic, emotional, and physical needs of elementary,
               middle or exceptional student education students and match them appropriately to
               instructional plans.
              Draw upon human development/learning theories and concepts as the foundation
               for instructional planning for elementary, middle or exceptional student education
               children.
              Implement a variety of strategies to motivate and help elementary, middle or
               exceptional student education students acquire knowledge and skills needed to
               succeed in life.
              Demonstrate knowledge in relevant subject fields through integration of real
               world learning activities designed for elementary, middle or exceptional student
               education students.
              Design and establish effective learning environments that are conducive to high
               achievement of elementary, middle or exceptional student education children.

Critical Thinking

                                                                                               16
              Master performance assessment techniques to promote and measure the thinking
               skills of elementary, middle or exceptional student education students
              Develop a repertoire of realistic projects and problem solving activities that will
               enable elementary, middle or exceptional student education students to improve
               their life skills and creative thinking abilities

Communication

              Communicate accurately and effectively through oral presentation skills and the
               written word to deliver high quality education for elementary, middle or
               exceptional student education students.
              Effectively collaborate with families of elementary, middle or exceptional student
               education students and colleagues to facilitate optimal educational experiences for
               students.
              Establish high performance expectations for elementary, middle or exceptional
               student education students and communicate these expectations to colleagues,
               families, and students.

Values/Integrity

              Engage in self-reflection regarding performance and pursue opportunities for
               feedback to demonstrate commitment to continuous improvement in effective
               goal setting and the elementary, middle or exceptional student education field
              Adhere to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct of the
               Education

Profession Project Management

              Use instructional technology to manage, evaluate, and improve instruction for
               elementary, middle or exceptional student education students
              Seek the involvement of elementary, middle or exceptional student education
               students to design effective learning experiences to meet students’ needs and
               interests

Diversity Skills

              Practice and teach strategies of tolerance and acceptance related to individual and
               cultural differences
              Create educational climates that foster openness, inquiry and concern for others
              Employ suitable strategies resulting in successful conflict resolutions
              Use appropriate ESOL strategies and instructional methods to develop
               experiential and literary activities to effectively deliver instruction to elementary,
               middle or exceptional student education ESOL students.


                                                                                                   17
Transition Points
Once a candidate has expressed interest in being admitted to the School of Education, the
candidate is tracked through TK20 beginning with the application process through completion of
student teaching and for an additional year after graduation. The following Transition Points are
currently in place for Undergraduate School of Education:

Transition Point #1 Admission to the School of Education
           Application for the School of Education
           Minimum 2.5 Cumulative GPA
           Passing Scores on General Knowledge Exam
           Attend Teacher Education Orientation
           Disposition Self-Assessment

Transition Point #2 Entrance into Field Experience I
           Admitted into the School of Education
           Minimum 2.5 Cumulative GPA
           Minimum 2.5 Major GPA
           Successful Completion of EDF3234 Applied Foundation of Education
           Completion of General Studies and Education Pre-requisite Coursework
              (exception - Foreign Language and CLAST)

Transition Point #3 Entry into Student Teaching
           Student Teaching Application
           Completion of Major Related Coursework
           Passing Scores on Key Assessments
           Attend Student Teaching Orientation
           Minimum 2.5 Major GPA
           Passing Scores on Subject Area Exam(s)
           Passing Score on Professional Education Exam
           Disposition External Assessment
           Minimum of “Meets Expectations” on Benchmark Assessment of
              FEAPS/PECs/ESOL/RECs

Transition Point #4 Exit Student Teaching
        Acceptable Grade on Teacher Work Sample/Unit Plan Development & Analysis
        Satisfactory Grade in Student Teaching
        Passing Grade in Senior Seminar
        Disposition External Assessment
        Minimum of “Meets Expectations” on Mastery Assessment of
          FEAPS/PECs/ESOL/RECs
        Member of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Team Meeting



                                                                                               18
Transition Point #5 Graduation
        Minimum 2.5 Major GPA
        Application for Graduation
        Completion of All University Requirements (including Foreign Language and CLAS)
        Disposition Self-Assessment

Transition Point #6 Follow-up
        Employment Information
        Principal Follow-up Survey
        One Year (Alumni) Follow-up Survey

Field Experiences
General Information
Field Experiences are integral to UWF’s Teacher Education programs and only candidates who
have been admitted to the School of Education may be enrolled. (Please see the admission
requirements.) The two field experiences, Field Experience I (FE I), Field Experience II (FE II)
and Student Teaching, are placed throughout the programs. The field experiences are sequential
and cannot be taken together during the same semester. Student Teaching is the culminating
experience of the School of Education program and is completed during the last semester of the
program. All coursework must be completed before commencing student teaching.

As students move through the different field experiences, higher levels of thinking and
performance are expected. During Field Experience I students will demonstrate thinking at the
knowledge level while Field Experience II students will apply the learning to various
assignments. During student teaching students will analyze information, plan, teach and finally
evaluate the results. This movement from lower level to higher level thinking and performance is
reflected on the evaluation forms for each field experience.

Diverse Setting
In order to provide appropriate field experiences, students will be placed in a variety of
classroom settings among the three field experiences (Field Experience I, II, Student Teaching).
A minimum of one placement must be in a diverse setting as defined by the local area. Field
Experience II has been designated as the mandatory diverse setting. Some regions and schools
will not be available for the diverse placement.

Field Experience I And II
Application And Placement Information
Students will apply for any field experience through TK20. Applications are due by July 1 for
fall placement and November 1 for spring placement. There is an application tutorial available
on the TK20 login site (uwf.tk20.com). To access the application on TK20:

      Login

                                                                                                 19
      Click Artifacts
      Click Applications
      Click Create
      Choose Field Experience I and II Application
      Complete and save
      Students will be registered for all field experiences through the Advising Office using the
       submitted applications. Students without an application may not be registered for field
       experience.

Students in UWF’s service area (i.e. Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa) may choose the county
and region on the application. Students may not choose a specific school or teacher. Students out
of the service area should choose “other” on the application and work with the Field Placement
Coordinator to secure appropriate placements (see below). Students requesting placement in
Santa Rosa must complete the Santa Rosa Disclosure Form by the application due date. The form
is available on the application found in TK20. Students will not be placed in Santa Rosa without
this form and will be placed in Escambia County.

Remember:

      Students will not be placed in a high school from which they graduated or in school
       where a relative is a student or staff member.
      Once a placement is obtained, it will not be changed.
      Students in Field Experiences I and II will be notified of their placement through TK20.
       The majority of placements will be provided by the end of the third week of the semester.
      Field Experience I and II are sequential and cannot be taken together during the same
       semester.
      Students will be registered for field experience in late July for fall and late November for
       spring.
      Please see the Handbook for Field Experience I and II for additional information and
       details. The Handbook may be found at
       http://uwf.edu/education/internal/advising/handbooks.cfm

Student Teaching
Application And Placement Information
All students will apply for student teaching through TK20. Applications are due by March 1 for
fall placement and August 1 for spring placement. To access the application:

To access the application on TK20:

      Login
      Click Artifacts


                                                                                                20
      Click Applications
      Click Create
      Choose Student Teaching Application
      Complete and save

Students will be registered for all field experiences through the Advising Office using the
submitted applications.

Students not in UWF’s service area (i.e. Escambia, FL, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa) or students
requesting to student teach in a private school must also submit two copies of a hard copy
application (in addition to completing the application in TK20). The hard copy application may
be found on the following School of Education website:
http://uwf.edu/education/internal/advising/studentteach.cfm

Students in the service area are not permitted to contact the county/school district office directly
regarding placement. Students who contact the county/school district office regarding their
placements will be removed from student teaching for that semester. Students out of the service
area will provide information to help find a placement. Students should not work with the county
to determine placement. Please allow the Director of Student Teaching Placement to initiate
contact. (Students provide information and the Director contacts the county.) The following
information should be attached to the hard copy application:

      District name
      Name, phone number and email of individuals responsible for placing students in field
       experiences
      List of possible schools in the district and corresponding principals’ names, phone
       numbers and emails
      Any other information that will help placement

Remember:

      Students will not be placed in a high school from which they graduated or in school
       where a relative is a student or staff member.
      Once a placement is obtained, it will not be changed.
      Student teachers will be notified of their placement through the TK20 message system as
       soon as they become available.
      Student teaching is the culminating experience and all course work must be completed
       before entering student teaching.
      Please see the Handbook for Student Teachers for additional information and details. The
       Handbook may be found at http://uwf.edu/education/internal/advising/handbooks.cfm




                                                                                                 21
Out Of Service Area Placement
Students placed out of the UWF service area may be charged an additional fee for supervision.
Since it is impossible for UWF School of Education faculty to drive to distant locations, a
University Supervisor must be obtained. This fee may range from $500 to $2000 or more. This
fee is in addition to the normal fees required by the University and will be paid by the student.
Since each location is different, the fee amount will be provided once the placement has been
determined.

Iep Requirement
The State of Florida has recently added an additional experience for all teacher candidates in an
initial certification program. During one of the field experiences (Field Experience I, II or
student teaching), teacher candidates in elementary education, prek/primary education, middle
school and exceptional student education program must observe or participate in an Individual
Education Program (IEP) meeting. Please be sure you complete this requirement in one of the
field experiences. Your supervising teacher will document this on your Final Summative
Evaluation.

COST (Consortium For Overseas Student Teaching)
The COST Program arranges international student teaching experiences for American Students.
With the COST program, students are placed in public and private institutions in various
locations around the world. Students are responsible for all fees related to the experience
including the amount required for travel, accommodations, meals, and so on. Students are
currently able to choose from various locations within 16 different countries. For more
information regarding the COST program, contact Dr. Charlotte Boling at cboling@uwf.edu
(850.474.2646), located in Building 85/Room 118. (Students, please remember to sign in at the
School of Education Undergraduate Advising office before going to see her.)




                                                                                                    22
Clinical Field Experiences In Undergraduate Teacher Education


PRE-K/PRIMARY           ELEMENTARY              MIDDLE LEVEL            EXCEPT. STUD.
                                                                        EDUCATION
EDUCATION               EDUCATION               EDUCATION

EEC 3941                NA                      NA                      NA

ICFE I Practicum

(35 hrs)

EEC 3942                EDE 3942                EDM 3942                EEX 4832

Field Experience I      Field Experience I      Field Experience I      Field Experience I

(50-60 hrs)             (50-60 hrs)             (50-60 hrs)             (50-60 hrs)

EEC 4943                EDE 4944                EDM 4943                EEX 4833

Field Experience II     Field Experience II     Field Experience II     Field Experience II

(75)                    (75 hrs)                (75 hrs)                (75 hrs)



EDG 4940                EDG 4940                EDG 4940                EDG 4940

Student Teaching        Student Teaching        Student Teaching        Student Teaching

(15 weeks; min. 400     (15 weeks; min. 400     (15 weeks; min. 400     (15 weeks; min. 400 hrs)
hrs)                    hrs)                    hrs)
                                                                             or
           or                or                      or
                                                                        EDG 4941
EDG 4941                EDG 4941                EDG 4941
                                                                        Teaching Internship I and
Teaching Internship I   Teaching Internship I   Teaching Internship I
and                     and                     and                     EDG 4942

EDG 4942                EDG 4942                EDG 4942                Teaching Internship II

Teaching Internship     Teaching Internship     Teaching Internship
II                      II                      II




                                                                                              23
Response To Intervention (RTI)
The School of Education in the College of Professional Studies has as its goal the professional
preparation of elementary, middle, and exceptional student education pre-service and in-service
teachers. Accordingly, the School of Education has an oversight role in teacher preparation and
development of academic competencies of prospective teachers pursuing a major within the
many departments of the College of Professional Studies. Toward that goal, emphasis is placed
on the preparation of personnel for educational careers through professional development
programs which are current and relevant in theory and practice.

The School of Education defines professional development as a continuous process of
improvement to promote high standards of academic achievement and responsible citizenship for
all students. A goal in Teacher Education is to provide students with the tools needed to become
a successful teacher. The School of Education employs an RtI process that promotes an
atmosphere of prevention and support through a three tier system that uses data to improve
courses, programs, and procedures and to support candidates who are struggling to meet content
and disposition standards and competencies. Please refer to the RtI flowchart included in the
Appendixes section

Related Information
Teacher Certification
Requirements for the Professional Teaching Certificate in the State of Florida include:

      Graduation from an approved teacher certification degree program which includes a
       planned program of courses in the major and passing all FTCE examinations.
       OR
      Certification in states other than Florida

Graduates of approved bachelor's degree certification programs receive the recommendation of
the college and are eligible for the initial teaching certificate, in comparable programs, through
agreements with the following states: Alabama, California, District of Columbia, Georgia,
Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota,
Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia. This list is subject to change.
Students desiring certification in states other than Florida should contact the specific state.

Requirements For Graduation From School Of Education Programs
In order to be graduated from the School of Education Program, the following requirements must
be met:

      Minimum of 120 semester hours in an approved program (most programs are over 120
       hours);
      A major GPA of 2.5 or better;

                                                                                                 24
      Passing scores on the General Knowledge Exam, Professional Educators Exam, and
       Subject Area Exams (dependent upon program).
      Completion of the Disposition Self-Assessment (found in TK20 during Student
       Teaching)
      Completion of all general studies requirements (including Gordon Rule, general studies,
       core, or general education as appropriate)
      Fulfillment of College Level Academic Skills (CLAS) requirement;
      Completion of all program specific lower division common prerequisites;
      Completion of the admissions foreign language requirement;
      Nine hours of summer semester enrollment at an SUS institution (students who entered
       UWF with fewer than 60 semester hours).

Probation
A student who is placed on probation because he/she earns unsatisfactory grades in courses is
reminded of the necessity of raising the grade point average and repeating courses when he/she
meets with the advisor each semester. If the grades continue to decline, the student will be
suspended.

Suspension
Suspension is a minimum of one semester. A student who has been suspended follows the
procedures developed by the University which are listed in the University Catalog and Student
Life for both undergraduate and graduate students




                                                                                                25
                                         APPENDIXES
The Principles Of Professional Conduct For The Education Profession In Florida (Code
Of Ethics) 6B-1.006, FAC
      The following disciplinary rule shall constitute the Principles of Professional Conduct for
       the Education Profession in Florida.
      Violation of any of these principles shall subject the individual to revocation or
       suspension of the individual educator’s certificate, or the other penalties as provided by
       law.
      Obligation to the student requires that the individual:
      Shall make reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions harmful to learning
       and/or to the student’s mental and/or physical health and/or safety.
      Shall not unreasonably restrain a student from independent action in pursuit of learning.
      Shall not unreasonably deny a student access to diverse points of view.
      Shall not intentionally suppress or distort subject matter relevant to a student’s academic
       program.
      Shall not intentionally expose a student to unnecessary embarrassment or disparagement.
      Shall not intentionally violate or deny a student=s legal rights.
      Shall not harass or discriminate against any student on the basis of race, color, religion,
       sex, age, national or ethnic origin, political beliefs, marital status, handicapping
       condition, sexual orientation, or social and family background and shall make reasonable
       effort to assure that each student is protected from harassment or discrimination.
      Shall not exploit a relationship with a student for personal gain or advantage.
      Shall keep in confidence personally identifiable information obtained in the course of
       professional service, unless disclosure served professional purposes or is required by law.

Obligation To The Public Requires That The Individual:
      Shall take reasonable precautions to distinguish between personal views and those of any
       educational institution or organization with which the individual is affiliated.
      Shall not intentionally distort or misrepresent facts concerning an educational matter in
       direct or indirect public expression.
      Shall not use institutional privileges for personal gain or advantage.
      Shall accept no gratuity, gift, or favor that might influence professional judgment.
      Shall offer no gratuity, gift, or favor to obtain special advantages.
      Obligation to the profession of education requires that the individual:
      Shall maintain honesty in all professional dealings.
      Shall not on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national or ethnic origin, political
       beliefs, marital status, handicapping condition if otherwise qualified, or social and family
       background deny to a colleague professional benefits or advantages or participation in
       any professional organization.
      Shall not interfere with a colleague’s exercise of political or civil rights and
       responsibilities.
      Shall not engage in harassment or discriminatory conduct which unreasonably interferes
       with an individual’s performance of professional or work responsibilities or with the
       orderly processes of education or which creates a hostile, intimidating, abusive,

                                                                                                    26
    offensive, or oppressive environment; and, further, shall make reasonable effort to assure
    that each individual is protected from such harassment or discrimination.
   Shall not make malicious or intentionally false statements about a colleague.
   Shall not use coercive means or promise special treatment to influence professional
    judgments of colleagues.
   Shall not misrepresent one’s own professional qualifications.
   Shall not submit fraudulent information on any document in connection with
    professional activities.
   Shall not make any fraudulent statement or fail to disclose a material fact in one=s own or
    another=s application for a professional position.
   Shall not withhold information regarding a position from an applicant or misrepresent an
    assignment or conditions of employment.
   Shall provide upon the request of the certificated individual a written statement of
    specific reason for recommendations that lead to the denial of increments, significant
    changes in employment, or termination of employment.
   Shall not assist entry into or continuance in the profession of any person known to be
    unqualified in accordance with these Principles of Professional Conduct for the
    Education Profession in Florida and other applicable Florida Statutes and State Board of
    Education Rules.
   Shall self-report within forty-eight (48) hours to appropriate authorities (as determined by
    district) any arrests/charges involving the abuse of a child or the sale and/or possession of
    a controlled substance. Such notice shall not be considered an admission of guilt nor
    shall such notice be admissible for any purpose in any proceeding, civil or criminal,
    administrative or judicial, investigatory or adjudicatory. In addition, shall self-report any
    conviction, finding of guilt, withholding of adjudication, commitment to a pretrial
    diversion program, or entering of a pleas of guilty or Nolo Contendre for any criminal
    offense other than a minor traffic violation within forty-eight (48) hours after the final
    judgment. When handling sealed and expunged records disclosed under this rule, school
    districts shall comply with the confidentiality provisions of Sections 943.0585(4)(c) and
    943.059(4)(c), Florida Statutes.
   Shall report to appropriate authorities any known allegation of a violation of the Florida
    School Code or State Board of Education Rules as defined in Section 231.28(1), Florida
    Statutes.
   Shall seek no reprisal against any individual who has reported any allegation of a
    violation of the Florida School Code or State Board of Education Rules as defined in
    Section 231.28(1), Florida Statutes.
   Shall comply with the conditions of an order of the Education Practices Commission
    imposing probation, imposing a fine, or restricting the authorized scope of practice.
   Shall, as the supervising administrator, cooperate with the Education Practices
    Commission in monitoring the probation of a subordinate.
   Specific Authority 229.053(1), 231.546(2)(b) FS. Law Implemented 231.546(2), 231.28
    FS. History - New 7-6-82, Amended 12-20-83, Formerly 6B-1.06, Amended 8-10-92,
    12-29-98.




                                                                                              27
Liability Insurance
The School of Education does not specifically endorse or recommend any particular insurance
carrier or insurance policy. However, the following information is provided for your
convenience, as options you may wish to consider.

      If you are a member of a professional association (e.g., MENC, NCTE, NCTM, NCSS),
       and professional liability insurance is not provided with the membership, you may wish
       to consider Forrest T. Jones: http://www.ftj.com/TIE/pages/plstudfeatures.asp. The
       insurance is $15.00 per year. Email confirmation is provided.
      If you are a sorority/fraternity member, determine if professional liability insurance is
       included with your membership.
      Professional liability insurance may be available as an endorsement, for an additional fee,
       to a renter’s or homeowner’s insurance policy. However, you should investigate carefully
       the terms of the policy and speak with your insurance agent to ensure that the policy is
       applicable to student field experiences. It is your responsibility to purchase the policy for
       at least $1,000,000 coverage.
      You may also consider coverage provided by the Student Florida Education
       Association(SFEA). The SFEA’s annual membership fee of $32.00/year includes
       $1,000,000 of professional liability protection, which is applicable to classroom
       situations. SFEA membership enrollment information is available at:
       www.nea.org/HowToJoin/stateStudent.do?sea=fl&mbrType=STUDENT.
      Website for Council for Exceptional Students:
       http://www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Membership/JoinCEC/ Student
       members preparing for employment and performing educational duties under the
       supervision of a licensed educator can purchase an individual $1 million policy for an
       annual premium of only $15. The policy is the same as that offered to professional
       members, but does not include job protection benefits. Apply online or call 800/821-
       7303.




                                                                                                 28
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ORIENTATION
       The Empowered Professional

          Making a Difference




                                    29
School Of Education Orientation
Welcome to the School of Education at the University of West Florida. Please read carefully
through the following information. At the end of this document, there is an Affirmation section
that includes directions on how to submit a confirmation of completion for admission purposes.

Accreditation And Reciprocity
UWF's baccalaureate and graduate degree programs in the School of Education are accredited by
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the Florida
Department of Education (FLDOE).
Reciprocity agreements allow UWF graduates to move seamlessly to other states and begin their
teaching careers.

Selecting A Major
There Are A Variety Of Degrees To Choose From In The School Of Education Program:
              Elementary Education/ESOL/Reading – Kindergarten through 6th Grade
              Exceptional Student Education (K-12)/Elementary Education (K-6)/ESOL
               /Reading – both online and face-to-face offerings
              Middle Grades – 5th Grade through 9th Grade (must choose two tracks)
              English
              Mathematics
              Social Sciences
              General Science

Professional Education Minor
For students who wish to teach at the high school level, an Education Minor is available. The
Professional Training Option (PTO) may lead to a temporary certificate from the State of
Florida. Students should visit the School of Education Advising Center located in Bldg. 85 Room
196 to complete the necessary forms. A cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for the PTO which
consists of 15 hours of additional coursework and one field experience. Students requesting
Student Teaching will complete a total of two field experiences: Field Experience I (ESE 4940)
and Student Teaching (EDG 4940). Please see the current UWF Catalog under “Education
Minor” for the specific courses required. Additionally, students will need to complete the
Florida Teacher Certification Exams required for the content area. These exams include: General
Knowledge Exam, Professional Educator Exam and a Subject Area Exam (dependent on
student’s area of study).

Once the student has graduated with the PTO minor, the student may apply for temporary
certification from the State of Florida. The State will then provide a Letter of Eligibility to the
student detailing what additional requirements the State requires in order to obtain a Professional
Certificate. The Temporary Certificate is generally valid for three (3) years in which the student
should complete any additional requirements stated in the Letter of Eligibility. Be aware that a

                                                                                                 30
temporary certificate cannot be used for employment purposes outside of the State of Florida.
Students with the Temporary Certificate should complete the requirements provided by the State
and obtain the Professional Certificate before seeking employment outside of the State of
Florida.

School Of Education Admissions Requirements
Once a student is admitted to UWF, there are separate admissions requirements for the School of
Education program. School of Education students entering UWF as freshmen, sophomores, or
juniors will automatically be placed into a pending status until they meet the requirements for
provisional admission. Before the end of the first semester of taking core education classes at
UWF, students will be required to meet the following requirements below in order to register for
the next semester:

   1. Complete an Application for Admission to School of Education. (Submit the application
      through TK20).
   2. Complete the Dispositions Self-Assessment survey (i.e., Professional Education
      Applicant Self-Rating Scale) through TK20.
   3. Read the School of Education Orientation Handbook.
   4. Take and pass all areas (English Language Skills, Reading, Math, and Essay) of the
      FTCE General Knowledge Test (GK). Out-of-state students may take Praxis 1 for
      admission purposes.
   5. Have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 in all previous attempted college work

Provisional admission is achieved by completing items 1-5 above. Provisional admission allows
the unit to carefully monitor student progress through School of Education programs. Careful
monitoring will ensure that knowledge, skill, and or dispositional deficits of pre-service teachers
can be identified in a timely manner so that students can be referred to the Response to
Intervention process and appropriate interventions and remedies can be implemented.

Full admission to School of Education is required for student teaching. To achieve it, a student
must complete items 1-5 above, as well as pass the FTCE Professional and Subject Area
examination(s), be certified in good standing, and then be approved by the Dean of the College
of Professional Studies.

All students seeking initial certification must be degree-seeking. Please contact the
Undergraduate Admission Office (Building 18) for procedures to follow to change your status to
degree-seeking.

For assistance, contact your advisor either in person, by phone, or by email.

Certification Exams
The first is the FTCE (Florida Teacher Certification Exam) General Knowledge exam (GK) and
it is an admission requirement. The GK exam must be completed during the student’s first

                                                                                                   31
semester of core education courses at UWF. There are four sub-sections of this exam:
Mathematics, Reading, English Language Skills, and Essay. All four sub-sections must be passed
for School of Education admission purposes. Out-of- State students may take Praxis 1 for
admission purposes only, but still need to pass the GK exam prior to student teaching.

The next exam is the FTCE Professional Education exam. It is based on educational theories and
foundations, as well as on practical knowledge. It must be taken prior to student teaching. We
recommend that the student take this late in the School of Education program, i.e. the beginning
of the semester prior to the semester that the student is scheduled to do student teaching.

Finally, the student must take the FTCE Subject Area exam(s). These exams are based on the
content and methods of your major. We recommend that you also take this late in your School
of Education program, i.e., the beginning of the semester prior to the semester that you plan to do
your student teaching.

The Professional Education Exam and Subject Area Exam(s) must be passed prior to student
teaching.

Computer based tests are offered several times a week at various testing sites. Please refer to the
registration brochure available at the School of Education Undergraduate Advising office
(Building 85/Room 196) for information purposes only. Go online at http://www.fl.nesinc.com/
to register for your certification exams. The cost of the tests varies so please work closely with
your advisor to learn more details.

Additional testing information is available at: http://www.fldoe.org/asp/ftce

Out of state students: Please contact your advisor for guidance on Certification Exams.

Advising
Upon first entering the School of Education program, you will have a College of Professional
Studies (COPS) Advising hold placed on your account. This will prevent you from registering
for courses and requesting transcripts. You are required to make arrangements for advising in
person, online (e.g., email) or by phone to have this hold lifted in order for you to begin taking
classes in the School of Education Program. Contact your advisor through the School of
Education Undergraduate Advising office.

It is strongly recommended that you contact an advisor prior to registration each semester, due to
the changing nature of certification and education programs in Florida. In the end, this could
save you time and money!

School Of Education Student Services Contacts:
      Dr. Trudi Gaines at tgaines@uwf.edu (850.474.2848) is the Director of Student Services,
       and her office is located at our Pensacola main campus in the School of Education


                                                                                                     32
    Undergraduate Advising office (Building 85/Room 196). Dr. Gaines also coordinates
    student teaching placements and the RtI process.
   Calandra Jackson at cjackson@uwf.edu (850.857.6306) is the General Advisor/Office
    Manager of the School of Education Undergraduate Advising office, and she can assist
    you with the various Education programs, as well as refer you to your specific advisor if
    you are a dual (ESE/Elementary Ed) or Elementary Education student. In addition, she
    advises all middle school students, education minor students, and assists with alternative
    certification inquiries. Please note: she also receives the School of Education email
    commonly referred to as TESS (tess@uwf.edu), and either directly replies to it or
    forwards the email to an appropriate advisor.
   Gretchen M. Harris at mharris@uwf.edu (850.857.6009) is located in the School of
    Education Undergraduate Advising office and is the advisor for the dual (ese/elem)
    program. This program comprises both online and face-to-face students.
   Ann Tucei at atucei@uwf.edu (850.857.6306) is located in the School of Education
    Undergraduate Advising office, and she is the Advisor for elementary students on
    Mondays and Wednesdays. Carolyn Livingston at clivingston1@uwf.edu (850.474.3088)
    is located in Building 85/Room 181, and she is the Advisor for elementary students on
    Tuesdays and Thursdays. She also, as Field Placement Coordinator, advises students who
    have placement concerns on these days. Please use this email when contacting her for
    placement concerns: fieldplacement@uwf.edu. (Students, please remember to sign in at
    the School of Education Undergraduate Advising office before going to see her.)
   Dr. Richard Faessel at rfaessel@uwf.edu (850.857.6311) is located in building 85/room
    115. He is the Director of Assessment and administers TK20. If a student has technology
    problems with TK20 (a comprehensive assessment system required by any student who
    takes an undergraduate education class – see next section for more information), Dr.
    Faessel is the person to contact. Note: if a student has a content issue with TK20 in a
    particular class, that student’s instructor should be contacted. (Students, please remember
    to sign in at the School of Education Undergraduate Advising office before going to see
    him.)
   Latrece Gulley at lgulley@uwf.edu (850.833.4040) is our Advisor at the UWF Combs
    campus (Building 13/Room 1303). If you live in the Fort Walton Beach area, you should
    contact her if you would like to schedule an appointment to discuss our education
    programs in general, as well as which programs are offered at UWF Combs campus,
    specifically.
   In general (at the Pensacola main campus), if you need to speak with an advisor, please
    come by the School of Education Undergraduate Advising office in Building 85/Room
    196. We have walk-in advising hours (no appointment necessary) every week, Monday
    thru Thursday from 9:00am – 4:00pm (all other times are by appointment only). In
    addition, you can email the School of Education at tess@uwf.edu or call 850.857.6306, if
    you have questions regarding any of the education programs offered.

                                                                                            33
Tk20
UWF recently enhanced its procedures to ensure that you receive the quality education you
deserve. This comprehensive system provides us with a rich set of tools to help maintain the
quality of our programs and your education. Here is a partial listing of what TK20 will allow you
to do.

   1. Build your artifacts/assignments electronically, online. Your artifacts will stay with you,
      so you can use them even after graduation.
   2. Create electronic portfolios for documenting your work for presentation to the faculty and
      prospective employers.
   3. Have a fully documented record of your field experience work and your experience with
      student teaching/clinical practice.
   4. Fill out all your application forms online. This includes applications for admission to the
      program and for student teaching.
   5. Monitor your progress through the several Transition Points in the School of Education.

The program is a requirement in the UWF School of Education and can be purchased either
through the UWF Bookstore or online at uwf.tk20.com. It is recommended that your purchase
TK20 immediately upon beginning your studies in the School of Education.

Uwf Online!
As a UWF student, you will be expected to access your ARGUS and Gmail accounts on a daily
basis. ARGUS is a “one-stop shop” for all the information you need as a student. Your student
records, registration and course search, eLearning online courses, financial aid and account
balance, HOLD information (see Advising section), grades, and your SASS Audit can all be
found on ARGUS. To access your ARGUS account, go to our home page at http://uwf.edu and
choose Argus from the Quicklinks drop-down menu on the top right. If you have difficulties
signing up or understanding this website, please contact the UWF Informational Technology
Services (ITS) at 850.474.2075.

Your SASS Audit is a list of each requirement you will need to complete in order to graduate
from UWF. You can find a link to your SASS Audit under the “My Info” tab in ARGUS. Your
advisor can help you read your SASS Audit regularly; however, you should review it
periodically on your own to maintain accuracy. If an item has a “+” or “OK” or “IP” next to it,
then you have completed or are in the process of completing that item. If an item has a “-” or
“NO” next to it, then it has to be fulfilled before you can graduate.

Gmail is your student email account that you may access by going to the Gmail login at
http://gmail.students.uwf.edu , using your Argus user name and password.




                                                                                              34
Uwf Library Access
Students who are taking any classes on the UWF main campus are required to obtain a Nautilus
Card. On-campus students can access library materials from the UWF library with the use of the
Nautilus Card.
However, if all of your classes are online you may request a Library Access Number as follows:
        Go to the Library Home Page www.lib.uwf.edu
        Click on Services (a link on the left)
        Click on Access for Distance Learners
        Click on Access (link in center of page) and follow the directions

The Circulation Department will send you an access number via email and you will be able to
access library materials online.

However, in the meantime – you should be able to login to ARGUS, click on the MY Campus
tab, and locate the library interface in the center column. If you enter the databases here, in most
cases you will have full access even without an access number. If you should have any
additional questions regarding access to library materials, contact Lasandra Carmichael at
lcarmichael@uwf.edu (850.474.2413), Head of the Circulation Department, or you can contact
the main circulation number at 850.474.2414.

Uwf Bookstore
Students can purchase textbooks online at http://www.efollett.com/ by choosing Florida and
University of West Florida from the pull-down menu in the middle of the screen under U.S.
Colleges and Universities. In addition to books, students can purchase UWF apparel and gifts,
school supplies, and computer products.

In addition, once you register for classes and go to your class schedule link under the My Info
tab, at the bottom of your schedule is a link named “Purchase Books at the Bookstore.” This link
shows you what books your instructors have ordered for your various classes, both required and
recommended. You can pay for them online and have them shipped to you, or you can pay for
them online and have the books held by the bookstore until you can pick them up there in person.

Financial Aid
Students attending on-campus or online may apply for eligibility to receive financial aid. The
financial aid home page is located at: http://uwf.edu/finaid/index.cfm

Please familiarize yourself with this site, which contains information, applications, additional
forms, as well as the steps to follow in the financial aid process. Please read the information
found in the Scholarship link, if you are interested in applying for one, because there are
deadlines that must be met.

Students attending UWF online who are non-Florida residents may apply for an out-of-state
tuition waiver online at http://onlinecampus.uwf.edu/affordable/tuition.cfm


                                                                                                   35
Faculty
School of Education faculty members are recognized for their research-based teaching practices,
commitment to scholarly service in the educational community, and significant contributions in
research and scholarly activity not often seen at similarly sized institutions.
For information and contact information for a specific School of Education faculty member, you
can go to: http://uwf.edu/education/faculty/index.cfm .

Field Experiences
Application And Placement Information
Students will apply for any field experience through TK20. Applications are due by July 1 for
fall placement and November 1 for spring placement. There is an application tutorial available
on the TK20 login site (uwf.tk20.com). To access the application on TK20:

      Login
      Click Artifacts
      Click Applications
      Click Create
      Choose Field Experience I and II Application
      Complete and save
      Students will be registered for all field experiences through the Advising Office using the
       submitted applications. Students without an application may not be registered for field
       experience.

Application Deadline Dates for Field Experience I & II are as follows:

      For Fall – application deadline is July 1st
      For Spring – application deadline is November 1st

School of Education students participate in a field-intensive program of study that allows them to
engage in extensive reflection and writing about their classroom practice, preparing them for the
diverse economic, social, cultural, and political context of Florida’s schools.

There are two field experience classes once you start taking your education core classes: Field
Experience I & II. Work with you advisor to learn the details of each of them.

Note: Admission to the School of Education program is required before you will be eligible for
your first field experience.

School of Education Undergraduate Advising Staff will register students for all field
experiences. Before they can do this, students must first submit field placement applications in
TK20 by the above stated deadlines.

For out of service area placements, after you fill out your TK20 application for placement, please
send an email to fieldplacement@uwf.edu . Provide the school district’s name where you would
                                                                                                   36
like to be placed, and a list of the schools in that school district that would be appropriate
placements (such as grade level). For each of those schools, provide the principal’s name, phone
number, and email. Please note: 1) there is no guarantee that you will receive a requested
placement; and 2) You do not need to find the actual placement, just provide us the with the
contact information needed to place you.

Handbooks for each of the field experiences are located:
http://uwf.edu/education/internal/advising/handbooks.cfm

Please be aware that for placements out of UWF’s service area (i.e., out of Escambia, Santa
Rosa, and Okaloosa Counties), an additional supplemental fee may be required (at the beginning
of the semester) for supervision purposes.

Student Teaching
      Applications must be received by the deadline date – No Exceptions!!
      Student Teaching Application Deadline dates are as follows:
      Fall Student Teaching – deadline is March 1st
      Spring Student Teaching – deadline is August 1st

Student teaching provides you with the opportunity for the culmination of the learning
experiences and knowledge that you receive at UWF. Student teaching is begun AFTER you
have completed all other course work, and completed your certification exams. You must have a
major GPA of 2.5 or better to be eligible for Student Teaching. Your student teaching experience
will be a progressive responsibility for learning under the supervision of high-performing and
highly qualified educators. Throughout the student teaching assignment, the supervising teacher
will closely monitor and measure your teaching skills to ensure you demonstrate the highest
standards of excellence.

Note: Students must take and pass the professional and subject area exam(s) prior to student
teaching or they will be removed from their student teaching placement (see the "Certification
Exams" section). You can obtain FTCE brochures from your advisor for informational purposes
only. You actually register to take the exam(s) at the website: www.fl.nesinc.com . You establish
your account and register for exams online.

Students completing student teaching outside of the UWF service area must submit a hard copy
of their student teaching application (see your advisor for further details) in addition to their
TK20 application (by the deadline). These students may be charged an additional supplemental
fee for supervision purposes at the beginning of their student teaching semester. (The amount of
the additional fee is dependent on location, but typically, it ranges from $500-$2000.)

Graduation
In order to be graduated, you are required to complete all of the University and School of
Education requirements.

                                                                                                37
University requirements include, but are not limited to:

      Completion of the CLAS proficiency, General Studies and Gordon Writing and Math
       Requirements, and Foreign Language.
      You must have a major GPA of 2.5 or better in order to be graduated from UWF School
       of Education in a certification program.

Upon graduation from a School of Education certification program, students are eligible for a
five year professional certificate in their subject area(s). To secure this, they are required to
submit an application to the Florida Department of Education via their website:
www.fldoe.org/edcert. Consult your advisor for more details.

Application for Graduation forms are typically due during the drop-add period of the semester
prior to the student’s last. However, most education students submit these forms at the time they
submit their student teaching placement application.

Response To Intervention Mediation (RTI)
The School of Education in the College of Professional Studies has as its goal the professional
preparation of elementary, middle, and exceptional student education pre-service and in-service
teachers. Accordingly, the School of Education has an oversight role in teacher preparation and
development of academic competencies of prospective teachers pursuing a major within the
many departments of the College of Professional Studies. Toward that goal, emphasis is placed
on the preparation of personnel for educational careers through professional development
programs which are current and relevant in theory and practice.

The School of Education defines professional development as a continuous process of
improvement to promote high standards of academic achievement and responsible citizenship for
all students. A goal in Teacher Education is to provide students with the tools needed to become
a successful teacher. The School of Education employs an RTI process that promotes an
atmosphere of prevention and support through a three tier system that uses data to improve
courses, programs, and procedures and to support candidates who are struggling to meet content
and disposition standards and competencies. Please refer to the RTI flowchart included in the
Appendixes section

The RTI Mediation Process Commences:
      When a faculty member or advisor notes a student is having a problem with his or her
       course early in the semester
      When the student demonstrates a need/problem in general knowledge and/or basic skills,
       including GPA and professionalism issues.
      When a faculty member or advisor notes the student lacks proficiency in subject matter
       content
      When a student has not successfully met key assignment expectations


                                                                                                    38
      When a student has received an less than a C-, an I, or a W in a course
      When a competency in the State of Florida, Department of Education mandated Educator
       Accomplished Practices has not been met, or
      When the student fails to meet the Ethical and Professional Standards of Conduct
       expected for the Education Profession in Florida.

The faculty member/advisor notes the student’s performance need(s) and completes a referral
form to Dr. Trudi Gaines at tgaines@uwf.edu (850.474.2848), located in Building 85/Room 196.
The student is then contacted and advised about the appropriate remedy for the particular
concern(s). The instructor(s) in question are also required to perform a review to determine if
there are any course/assignment adjustments that should be considered. RtI is a tiered process
and students may expect an incremental increase in the level of remedy or intervention based on
the duration and or frequency of the deficiency.

Competencies And Skills
In your educational course programming, you will be trained in specific competencies and skills,
which the Florida Department of Education has determined as necessary for effective teachers to
demonstrate competency on the Florida Teacher Certification Exams.

You can find more information on the Competencies and Skills at:
http://www.fldoe.org/asp/ftce/ftcecomp.asp

Esol Endorsement
There are students from over 250 countries speaking more than 100 languages in Florida’s
schools. Over half of these students were born in the United States or its territories. The English
for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement ensures that future teachers will be
prepared to work with English Language Learners. The knowledge necessary to work with
ESOL students is embedded within the content of your degree courses and in TSL4080 and
TSL4081.

For more information on the ESOL Endorsement please click on the following link:
http://www.fldoe.org/profdev/pdf/final_esol.pdf

Assessment System And Academic Learning Compacts
School of Education faculty have developed an academic plan for the evaluation of students to
ensure that specific student learning outcomes and compacts through coursework, projects, and
field experiences will be met. This plan follows students while they are taking their coursework,
upon graduation, and in-field two years after graduation.

Critical Teacher Shortages
The Florida Department of Education has acknowledged that there are several areas of teaching
in the state of Florida that will have moderate to severe shortages. If you are preparing to enter
a Critical Teacher Shortage area, you may be eligible for the Critical Teacher Shortage Loan

                                                                                                 39
Forgiveness Program. The program description, eligibility requirements, application and
renewal process, and detailed information can be found at:
http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/factsheets/CTS-LF.htm

Course Load, Work, And Life
Please think about the amount of hours you can contribute to your studies. While most of us
think we are “Superman” or “Superwoman,” in reality, we are not. There are only 168 hours in a
week. The rule of thumb for the amount of time you should spend on your course work weekly is
3 hours per semester hours. This means that if you are taking 15 semester hours, you should be
spending 45 hours (3 x 15) per week on your courses. This does not include the 15 hours you are
in class. Bottom line = a total of 60 hours for your studies.

If you work full time, that’s another 40 hours a week. You need to sleep-6 hours a night (that’s
low), for another 42 hours.

This adds up to 142 hours per week. You only have 26 hours left. You also need to cook, eat,
shower, and take care of your family etc.; if you have children, consider the time you need to
spend with them. It is very important to schedule some “me time” and/or recreation time.

Many of you will think, “But I’m taking courses online-I won’t spend that much time.”
Unfortunately, online courses often take more time than courses that are face to face.

The important point here is that you cannot carry a full time class schedule with a full time life --
something has to give! Please carefully consider what you are capable of doing before attempting
too many courses in one semester.

Email Netiquette
Email is a wonderful tool as it lends itself to quick communication between parties. However,
please remember, email should not be used to discuss a topic that needs time and extended
attention. If you cannot state your question or need in 2-3 sentences or a short paragraph, you
need to phone or visit in person with that individual.

Email should not be used as a “vent.” If you are angry about a situation, please take time to “cool
off” before sending the email. Once it is sent, you cannot take it back.

      Do not use all capital letters in an email as this means that you are shouting at the
       receiver.
      Please always sign your email with your full name. Many times only the email address
       shows which may or may not identify the sender.
      Please include the class you are referencing in the subject line. Many professors teach
       multiple courses and identifying the course in the subject line is helpful.
      Please remember email is not "real time." You may send it at 9 in the morning but it may
       not be read until 3 in the afternoon.

                                                                                                   40
        Maintain professionalism in your emails.
        Finally, email has unfortunately become a method for stating things that would not
         normally be said in a conversation. Please do not put anything into an email that you
         would not say in a face-to-face conversation or on the phone.

Laptops And Cell Phones
In face-face courses, please be sure to turn your cell phones on “silent” before class begins. If
you choose to use a laptop during class, please be sure you are using for taking notes only. We
want you to have the best possible education and while laptops can be great for taking notes, they
should not be used to complete other assignments or to check email during class.

Required Affirmation
Once you’ve read and understand this orientation, you must submit an affirmation to us, which
provides proof that you have completed the orientation for admission purposes. How do you do
this? Please read the following statement, and then copy and paste it in an email (with your name
and student number included), and email to dherman@uwf.edu .



*****I have read and acknowledge all information in the Teacher Education Orientation. I am
aware of accreditation, advising, admissions, UWF online, faculty, field experiences,
certification exams, student teaching, and graduation requirements.*****

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



WE ADVISE YOU TO PRINT AND SAVE A COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT FOR YOUR
REFERENCE THROUGHOUT THE PROGRAM!




                                                                                                   41
42
Fields Experience I & II




                           43
Dear Field Experience Student,

         Each field experience serves as a prelude to student teaching and is designed to provide an
opportunity for students to demonstrate their ability to write lesson plans, deliver instruction, and manage
the classroom in a relevant field setting.

         For the past several semesters, you have received comprehensive, practical, and relevant
instruction designed to assist you in becoming an empowered professional and an excellent teacher. You
will now have the opportunity to apply what you have learned in the classroom—writing curriculum and
delivering individualized instruction—while working with students in the field.

        The enclosed guidelines provide detailed information concerning what is required.            It is
important that you read the requirements so that you will understand and be able to meet each of the field
experience setting demands. Please understand that you are representing The University of West Florida
and the School of Education each time you enter your assigned school. Such representation comes with
responsibilities. In essence, you are to present yourself as an emerging professional. Each time you are
given an opportunity to support your supervising teacher, do so with the utmost professionalism. There’s
not a doubt in my mind that the courses you have taken and the activities you have completed have
empowered you and that you are now ready for this opportunity. Furthermore, the professionalism you
have learned to demonstrate in those courses and through those activities have prepared you for your
placement and that you will demonstrate a high level of competence. However, ultimately your success
depends upon your level of commitment, involvement and proactive professionalism. I urge you to grasp
this opportunity to further develop your skills and deepen your knowledge as you engage in the teaching
profession.

        The School of Education, College of Professional Studies, and The University of West Florida
enjoy a superb relationship with Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa School Districts and eleven other
school districts in Northwest Florida. This relationship has evolved into a partnership in professional
development of our pre-service (field experience and student) teachers. It is essential that we maintain
this positive relationship. Your supervising teacher is the critical link in this relationship. Throughout
your field experience, your supervising teacher will closely monitor and measure your teaching skills. Be
open to constructive criticism. Be a good listener. Stay focused! Give consideration to the professional
feedback you receive! Act with the utmost professionalism!

        In closing, keep in mind that, as an emerging professional who represents the College of
Professional Studies’ “best of the best”, you will be establishing your professional reputation in the Public
School System. Thus, it is imperative to adhere to our highest standards of excellence as you become an
empowered person who makes a difference.



                                                  William Evans, Ph.D.

                                                  Director, School of Education




                                                                                                          44
Introduction
Field experience is an integral part of the Teacher Education program. With the cooperation of
school districts, administrators and teachers, the University of West Florida School of Education
strives to provide teacher candidates (students) with K-12 classroom experiences to develop the
skills and pedagogy necessary to become a successful teacher. The School of Education is
particularly indebted to the school districts for their help in preparing the teachers of tomorrow.

This handbook is intended to provide general information regarding each of the field experiences
required for students in the Teacher Education programs. A separate handbook for the
Supervising Teachers of teacher candidates is also available. This handbook is divided into
several sections: general information, the different field experiences, and appendices. The
general information section contains information that is common to all field experiences while
the individual sections for each field experience contain the forms and other information that is
specific to a particular field experience. The handbook is a guide and students should also
consult the individual course syllabus for additional guidance on specific assignment
requirements.

Definition of Terms

Teacher Candidate/Practicum Student/Field Experience Student: A Teacher Education student
enrolled in one of the 3 hr field experience courses. These terms are used interchangeably.

Supervising Teacher: The supervising teacher is a fully certified teacher who is responsible for
working daily to assist in developing the professional growth of the field experience student.

University Supervisor: The university supervisor works collaboratively with the Supervising
Teacher in providing meaningful experiences and assignments for the field experience student.

General Information
Fingerprints and Background Checks
In order to comply with the Jessica Lunsford Act, students completing a field experience in the
State of Florida must be fingerprinted and complete a background check. Each school district is
responsible for the fingerprinting of students in that county. Students should check with the local
school district website for procedures for fingerprinting and background checks. Students in
Florida will not be allowed entry into a school without completing the fingerprinting and
background checks. To ensure the student is eligible for placement, fingerprints and
background checks must be completed at the beginning of the Teacher Education program.
However, each district has different policies and students should follow their specific county’s
guidance. Students in other states should contact their local school district for guidance.




                                                                                                   45
Liability Insurance and Medical Insurance
Beginning in Fall 2009, all Teacher Education students must purchase liability insurance. Please
see the Appendix of this Handbook and the Teacher Education Handbook for information on
where the insurance can be purchased. Students should secure their own medical insurance. The
University of West Florida will not cover any illness or injury sustained during the field
experience. Students will bear all responsibility for illness or injury.

Application and Placement Information
Students will apply for any field experience through TK20. Applications are due by July 1 for
fall placement and November 1 for spring placement. There is an application tutorial available
on the TK20 login site (uwf.tk20.com) under “Artifacts” and “Applications.” Students will be
registered for all field experiences through the Advising Office using the submitted applications.

Students in UWF’s service area (i.e. Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa) may choose the county
and region on the application. Students may not choose a specific school or teacher. Students out
of the service area should choose “other” on the application and work with the Field Placement
Coordinator to secure appropriate placements (see below).

Students in the service area are not permitted to contact the county/school district office
directly regarding placement.

Student out of the service area: If you are not in the three local counties listed above, you are
responsible for finding your own placement.
Please follow these steps:
    1. E-mail Mrs. Livingston to receive the requirements for your placement. She will send
        you placement requirements and the necessary paperwork. clivingston1@uwf.edu
    2. Check with the local school district to see if there is a district level person who handles
        placements. Be sure to clarify that this is for field experience, not student teaching. Do
        not just consult the web site. Call or, better yet, go by the office and inquire. It is harder
        to ignore a live person. If there is such a person, please get a correct e-mail address and
        phone number and send to Mrs. Livingston. In addition, send a list of schools (2 to 3)
        where you would like to be placed with phone numbers and principals’ names and e-
        mails.
    3. Initiate fingerprint and background checks, if you have not already done so, to avoid
        unnecessary delays in being placed.
    4. If you are applying in the following Florida Counties, we have a contact established.
        Please notify Mrs. Livingston, and she will direct you to the next step: Charlotte, Clay,
        Duval, Hernando, Highlands, Indian River, Leon, Lee, Madison, Marion, Monroe,
        Nassau, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Sarasota, Seminole, St. Johns, Volusia, and Walton.
    5. For all other areas, if there is no district representative, locate a school principal who is
        willing to place you. Send a correct e-mail add
    6. ress and phone number to Mrs. Livingston so that placement can be verified.

                                                                                                    46
Students will not be placed in a high school from which they graduated or in school where a
relative is a student or staff member.

                      Once a placement is obtained, it will not be changed.

Students in Field Experiences I and II will be notified of their placement through TK20. The
majority of placements will be provided by the end of the third week of the semester.

Field Experience I and II are sequential and cannot be taken together during the same semester.

Students will be registered for field experience in late July for fall and late November for spring.

Diverse Setting
In order to provide appropriate field experiences, students will be placed in a variety of
classroom settings among the three field experiences (Field Experience I, II, Student Teaching).
A minimum of one placement must be in a diverse setting as defined by the local area. Field
Experience II is considered the diverse field experience, although many students will be placed
in diverse settings for more than one experience. Some schools will not be available for the
diverse placement. Currently, schools in South Santa Rosa are not available for the diverse
setting for students in Elementary and Middle School programs. For example, if you are in EDE
4944 or EDM 4943, you cannot be placed in South Santa Rosa. You will need to go to Central
Santa Rosa or be placed in another county (Escambia or Okaloosa). Students in EEX 4833 may
be placed in South Santa Rosa in a special education classroom as special education classrooms
are considered diverse. Please be aware that each county has its own fingerprinting process and
fingerprints which cannot be transferred to another county.

ESOL Requirement for Field Experience II
Exceptional/Elementary, Elementary, Middle School English only
In order to meet the State requirements for the ESOL endorsement, students must have
experience in a classroom that includes English Language Learner (ELL) students. Since FE II
has been designated the diverse field experience setting, FE II students will have a total of 75
hours in the classroom with 25 hours being in the ESOL classroom. If you are placed in a
classroom with ELL students, you may complete the additional 25 hours within your “home”
placement. If you are placed in a classroom that doesn’t have any ELL students, you will be
placed in an additional classroom that serves ELL students. This classroom may or may not be
within your “home” school. The 25 ESOL hours will be completed starting at the middle of the
semester. You may not complete the ESOL hours at the beginning of the semester.

You will be initially observing and learning about the ELL student(s) in your ESOL classroom.
After this initial period, you will be assessing, developing activities and tutoring the ELL
student(s). In order to effectively teach ESOL students, teachers must learn about their ELL
                                                                                                   47
students’ culture and language. You should investigate the culture and language of the ELL
student.

You may wish to informally record your experiences in the ESOL classroom. This is not a
requirement but may help you complete the required assignments. This is not the “Observation
Journal” that is required but rather an informal tool to help you with your thoughts and
experiences.

Any assignments for the ESOL component must reflect the ELL students in your classroom. For
example, if you are explaining a strategy to use with the ELL students, the strategy must be
appropriate for the ELL student in your classroom. You cannot have a “general” strategy that
could be used with any student; the strategy must be specific to the ELL student’s culture.

All ESOL assignments will be submitted to Tk20 in the ESOL binder. Field Experience II
students will have two binders-one for the “home” classroom and one for ESOL classroom, even
if the home classroom also has the ESOL student. Once the binders have been sent, the grading
rubrics for the ESOL assignments as well as other Tk20 assignments may be seen. Since ESOL
assignments are Critical Task assignments, you must earn at least “meets expectations” in order
to pass the Field Experience.

You are expected to apply your knowledge learned in your coursework including ESOL courses
and other ESOL infused courses. In addition, you should be enrolled with TSL 4081
concurrently with Field Experience II or you must have successfully completed TSL 4081 before
Field Experience II.

There are three distinct experiences within the ESOL requirements: observation, assessment and
tutoring. All assignments related to the ESOL experience will be submitted to Tk20. See the
descriptions below for each assignment.


1. ESOL Critical Task Observation Journal

Observation of ESOL Teacher and ELL student(s)
You should spend five hours (total) observing the teacher and ELL student(s). You cannot
complete the five hours of observation on one day. You will need to plan to observe the teacher
and ELL student(s) over several days and at different times of the day if possible. You will need
to identify the language and the home culture of the ELL student(s) as soon as possible as you
will need to learn about your ELL student’s home culture.

Teacher Observation:
1. Culturally Sensitive Behaviors

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Initially, you will observe your teacher directly interact with the ELL student(s). You will
document any “culturally sensitive behaviors” specific to the ELL student’s culture that the
teacher exhibits. Some examples of these behaviors are respect for the student’s unique need for
personal distance (or ), understanding the student’s discomfort in making eye contact,
appreciation for the student’s inability to express personal thoughts/feelings in class for cultural
reasons, etc. You should provide at least three examples of your teacher demonstrating these
culturally specific sensitive behaviors. If you do not observe your teacher demonstrating these
behaviors, you should document this and provide examples of how you could have reacted in a
culturally sensitive manner. You must provide examples that meet the specific culture and needs
of the ELL student. Non-specific or general behaviors are not accepted.

2. Accommodations/Adaptations of lessons

You will observe the teacher teaching at least five different lessons. These should be different
content lessons (reading, math, social studies, science) and on different days if possible. During
these five lessons, you should identify and explain three specific accommodations and/or
adaptations used by the teacher that meet the specific needs of the ELL student(s). If the
teacher does not include any accommodations and/or adaptations, you should identify and
explain a minimum of three different adaptations you would use during the lessons. These
adaptations/accommodations must meet the specific needs of the ELL student(s) in the
classroom.

3. ESOL Appropriate Materials

You will provide a minimum of three examples of materials the teacher uses that are adapted for
the specific ELL student use. These materials may be used within the lessons or on an individual
basis. If the teacher doesn’t employ any ESOL adapted materials, you should provide a minimum
of three examples of how you would adapt the materials for the specific ELL student in the
classroom.
ELL Student Observation:

1. Ask the ESOL teacher for documentation relating to the level of proficiency of the ELL(s) in
the classroom. You should include the CELLA scores (if available) and any other language
proficiency assessment. You should also include how long the ELL has been in the school
system and any other information that will help you with your observations and future tutoring.

2. During the five hours, you will observe the ELL student’s behavior in the classroom. You
should observe the ELL student during lessons, independent work, group work and when the
teacher is working individually with the student. Are there any behaviors exhibited that can be
related to the ELL’s culture? For example, in general, the Hispanic culture has a smaller area of
personal space than other cultures. Latinos may stand so close to others that it’s uncomfortable
for the non-Hispanic. You will identify and explain a minimum of three culturally-specific
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behaviors exhibited by the ELL student in the classroom. If there are no observable culture
behaviors, you will need to research to identify and explain a minimum of three behaviors
specific to the ELL’s culture that might be exhibited. In your explanation you should include
how these behaviors are different from the mainstream school culture and if these behaviors were
observed or identified through research.


2. Critical Task ESOL Assessments
You will be conducting some informal assessments of your ELL student. If you have more than
one ELL student in your classroom, you may choose one student to conduct the assessments.

1. BICS/Social Language: After completing the observation journal, you should engage the ELL
student in a discussion lasting between 10 and 15 minutes. This discussion should be taped and
must be at least 10 minutes in duration. You will also conduct a Language Experience Approach
(LEA) activity with the ELL student. You should also audio tape this activity. Using your audio
tape and the SOLOM, analyze your ELL student’s oral language. You will determine your ELL
student’s level of Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS). You will score the student’s
language and provide examples and explanation for all 5 areas of the SOLOM (comprehension,
fluency, vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar). Please follow this link to find the SOLOM:
http://www.cal.org/twi/evaltoolkit/appendix/solom.pdf

2. CALP/Academic Language: Many ELL students have not been in the US long enough to
develop Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) which takes 5-7 years with direct
academic instruction with ESOL support and longer if there is interrupted instruction. However,
we can describe how the student is functioning. Using any information provided by the teacher
and the student’s cumulative folder, you will develop a profile of your student. You should
include
     age of the student
     grade of the student
     how long the student has lived in the US
     how long the student has been in school
     any interrupted time of being in school
     any ESOL support provided to the student
     home language
     CELLA results (if available)
     any other information that will help with instruction

3. Writing: You will read an appropriate age level narrative text to your ELL student. The ELL
student should retell the story through writing and pictures. You will review the student’s writing
for accuracy of retelling and for use of mechanics/grammar. You should note any patterns the
student uses such as over generalization, verb tense, and punctuation. You will compare the



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writing with the results of the SOLOM. You should explain the differences/similarities in the
oral language and written language for each of the five areas on the SOLOM.

4. Test Adaptation: Using one of the assessments your ESOL teacher uses (can be teacher
developed or from text), adapt the test to meet your specific ELL student’s needs. Some possible
adaptations are simplifying the language, inclusion of hints, use of pictures and use of gestures.
The test can either be oral or written depending on your ELL student’s level of proficiency in
oral/written language. You should coordinate with your teacher so that the test you adapt is test
your ESOL teacher will give to her class.

3. Critical Task – ESOL Tutoring
You will be using all of the information you have gathered from your observations and
assessments as well as learning from your ESOL courses and other infused ESOL courses to
tutor an ELL student for the remaining 25 required hours. You will develop and teach activities
that involve oral and written language as well as listening skills. You may complete the
following activities in any order. You may develop more than one activity for each listed task.
For example, perhaps your ELL needs additional practice with a group of vocabulary words. You
may develop additional activities for the same group of vocabulary words.

Each tutoring session you will focus on one aspect of oral or written language. You should work
with the ESOL teacher to coordinate your activities with the ESOL teacher’s curriculum.

1. You will read an appropriate age level narrative text (ex. story such as The Three Little Pigs)
to your ELL student (this is different from the listening/writing text in the assessments). You will
develop a writing activity that includes modifications/adaptations to meet the specific needs of
your ELL student. You should include an explanation for why you chose the text and how the
writing activity with at least 3 modifications/adaptations meets the specific needs of your ELL
student. You will include if the activity was successful/non-successful and explain why you
believe the activity was or wasn’t successful.

2. You will develop an appropriate reading selection from a content area book (i.e. science,
social studies, math not a narrative or story such as The Three Little Pigs) used in the classroom.
Using the content text, you will rewrite the selection to include a minimum of three specific
modifications/adaptations (i.e. pictures, simplified language) that meet the needs of your ELL
student. This should be in conjunction with your ESOL teacher so that the content covered by the
ESOL teacher is the content you have adapted for your ELL student. Using the planned activity
of the ESOL teacher, you will adapt the activity to meet the specific needs of your ESOL
student. You will explain the modifications/adaptations to the text and activity as well as why
you chose those modifications/adaptations. You will include if the modifications/adaptations for
the text and activity were successful or not and explain why or why not.

3. Using the SOLOM results, you will develop two activities for each of the areas on the
SOLOM (comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar). You should work

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with your ESOL teacher in order to develop activities that work with her curriculum. You will
include at least 3 modifications/adaptations, explain why you chose those
modifications/adaptations and how the activity meets the needs of the specific ELL student.

Please submit your assignments into Tk20 using the provided template. Students may develop
the ESOL assignments using a word document (highly recommended) and then copy and paste
the document into the template on Tk20. Students should use the rubrics located on Tk20 in the
ESOL binder to help develop their assignments.

Dress Code for All Field Experience Students
Students participating in a field experience should dress according to professional practices.
Jeans are not considered appropriate dress and any piercings should be removed with the
exception of standard earrings for women. Shirts must cover the midriff and back and extend
below the waist band of pants. Additionally, follow the advice of the Supervising Teacher.

Orientation
Students in all field experiences must view through elearning the orientation for their field
experience.

Professionalism
Students should always maintain a high level of professionalism especially while in the schools.
Indicators of professionalism include a willingness to participate in activities, attendance,
punctuality, completing assignments, and demonstration of a positive attitude. Students should
maintain a professional stance while participating in the field experience as well as away from
the school environment. Lack of professionalism can result in the student being removed from
the field experience and will result in failure for the course.

Scheduling Field Experience Hours
Students should schedule their classroom hours to meet their own schedule. Consult your
supervising teacher to ensure you will be in the classroom during appropriate times. Once you
have determined your schedule, you are expected to be present in the classroom at the scheduled
times. If you must be absent, be sure to inform your teacher in advance. If you have an
emergency that prevents you from attending your scheduled time, contact your supervising
teacher and or school immediately. Remember, your teacher is expecting you at the scheduled
time. Please also email your Field Experience Instructor of any unexpected change to your
schedule.




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Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices
Throughout the Teacher Education program students will be assessed on the 12 Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) and the six dispositions in order to monitor progress toward
becoming an empowered professional who makes a difference.

Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs)

       1. Assessment

       2. Communication

       3. Continuous Improvement

       4. Critical Thinking

       5. Diversity

       6. Ethics

       7. Human Development and Learning

       8. Knowledge of Subject Area

       9. Learning Environments

      10. Planning

      11. Role of the Teacher

      12. Technology

UWF School of Education Teacher Dispositions

   1. Critical Thinkers are able to examine their frame of reference by analyzing educational
      policy and practice in everyday experiences. (D1)
   2. Mentors are able to interact effectively with learners, colleagues and the public to
      promote high levels of success for every individual. (D2)
   3. Lifelong learners are committed to the profession, to continuous learning and to self
      improvement. (D3)
   4. Decision makers utilize self-reflection and data analysis in order to learn from
      experiences and make changes. (D4)
   5. Ethical professionals recognize human diversity and intentionally make individuals feel
      valued for their potential. (D5)
   6. Problem solvers develop alternative solutions to educational problems while believing
      that all individuals learn. (D6)

As students move through the different field experiences, higher levels of thinking and
performance are expected. During Field Experience I students will demonstrate thinking at the

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knowledge level while Field Experience II students will apply the learning to various
assignments. During student teaching students will analyze information, plan, teach and finally
evaluate the results. This movement from lower level to higher level thinking and performance is
reflected on the evaluation forms for each field experience.

IEP Requirement
The State of Florida has recently added an additional experience for all teacher candidates in an
initial certification program. During either Field Experience I or II, elementary education,
prek/primary education, exceptional student education, and middle level education program
students must observe or participate in an Individual Education Program (IEP) meeting. Please
be sure you complete this requirement in either of the field experiences. Your supervising
teacher will document this on your Final Summative Evaluation.

Goals and Objectives
Field experiences are designed to provide the critical opportunity for pre-service teachers to
demonstrate their ability to write lesson plans, deliver individualized instruction, and manage the
classroom in a relevant field setting. Specifically, the following experiences will be provided:

   Link theory and practice through field experiences and class seminars
   Develop student awareness of classroom challenges and explore possible solutions
   Discuss concerns of pre-service teachers
   Sharpen written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills of pre-service teachers
   Assist pre-service teachers in identifying and practicing effective patterns of teaching
    behavior
   Recognize and encourage field students to seek assistance with limitations that may interfere
    with their success as teachers
   Provide pre-service teachers with exemplary role models, both in field placements and in
    field seminars
   Develop in the pre-service teacher an awareness, understanding, and respect for diverse
    students
   Develop knowledge of Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs)
   Develop dispositions required for successful teaching

Field Experience I
   Required hours: a minimum 50 hours in the field classroom
   Field experience I is to be completed in any combination of hours spread over a period of ten
    (10) – twelve (12) school weeks.
   Coursework related to the 12 FEAPs will be assigned and completed through the elearning
    course.
   Key Assignment is submitted to Tk20.


Field Experience II
   Required hours: a minimum 50-hours in home classroom; 25 hours in ESOL classroom


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   Field experience II is to be completed in any combination of hours spread over a period of
    ten (10) – 12 school weeks. The ESOL hours must be completed in the second half of the
    semester.
   Coursework related to the 12 FEAPs will be assigned and completed through the elearning
    course.
   ESOL Critical Tasks and Key Assignment will be submitted to Tk20.

Supervising Teacher Evaluations
   Attendance: Attendance and promptness reflect professionalism. Activities and assignments
    have been carefully planned to meet the field experience goals and objectives. Attendance is
    necessary to acquire exposure to a variety of teaching innovations and field experience
    procedures and responsibilities.
    Please use the Daily Attendance Record form (found near the end of the Handbook) to log
    your hours each day you attend your field experience classroom. This form does not need to
    be submitted. Your supervising teacher will verify your hours on the final evaluation.

   Forms: Evaluation forms for Field Experience I and II are located in the back of the
    Handbook. These forms are provided in the Handbook for information purposes only. Your
    Supervising Teacher will submit all forms in TK20. Please see the chart near the end of the
    Handbook for the Tk20 submission schedule.

Field Experience I and II Grades
This field experience is graded on a point system which will result in a Satisfactory (S) or
Unsatisfactory (U). The University Instructor assigns points to each assignment and a final grade
(S/U) after reviewing all evaluations, your lesson plans, personal reflections, critique of the
practicum experience, completion of all TK20 items, and satisfactory completion of all
assignments and discussions. Please see the “Grade Points” document on elearning under the
Syllabus Module. Other guidance on course requirements may be found in the syllabus.


    All assignments will be evaluated by the following criteria:

          Language usage-spelling/grammar/punctuation/sentence structure
          Delivery-appearance/legibility/typed
          Organization-format/transitions/framework
          Content-accuracy/amount
          Meaning – “what are you saying”
          Observation skills-analytical descriptions/factual data
          Feelings/opinions-stated in professional manner and supported with factual
           statements

General Guidance


As a Field Experience Student, you will have to demonstrate your competence to your
Supervising Teacher as well as the University Supervisor. This will necessitate that you

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communicate directly and frequently with both of these supervisors. In order to document your
professional experience, the following forms must be submitted to your TK20 account:

          Student Statement: immediately after receiving Field Experience Binder in TK20
          Practicum Schedule: immediately after receiving Field Experience Binder in TK20
          First Formative Evaluation: by teacher – early in field experience (approx week 2)
          Midterm Formative Evaluation: by teacher – middle of field experience (approx week
           5-6 of your experience)
          ESOL Experience Evaluation: by teacher – end of field experience; FE II only
          Final Summative Report of Field Experience: by teacher – end of field experience
          Evaluation of Lesson Plan/Teaching Effectiveness: all three evaluations submitted by
           teacher to TK20 after lesson taught
          Final Critique – end of field experience; see Tk20 submission chart-end of Handbook.
          Evaluation of Supervising Teacher-by due date in syllabus
          Field Experience I Supervising Teachers only: Professional Education Applicant Self
           Rating Form-by supervising teacher - end of field experience

Throughout the field experience your activities should focus on mainstream students and
students with special needs and include the following topics: integrated curriculum, teaching
techniques and strategies, materials and resources, classroom organization, developmentally
appropriate practices, classroom management techniques, and methods of assessment and
evaluation. In particular, your field experiences should maximize opportunities to plan, adapt,
deliver, and evaluate lessons that include curriculum materials, activities, and assessments of
LEP students.

Final Critique
At the end of the practicum, you should reflect upon your experiences in the classroom setting.
Using the following questions as guidelines, you will prepare a critique of the practicum
experience that is submitted to TK20 using the template provided in Tk20:
       1. What did you learn about the school/center, teachers and children, as it relates to
          teaching that you did not know prior to this field experience?
       2. Based on the 12 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP) covered during
          this field experience, choose three of the FEAPs and describe your teaching strengths
          you discovered in this field experience.
       3. Based on the 12 Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP) covered during
          this field experience, choose three of the FEAPs and describe three skills you need to
          focus on in your next field experience.

For Field Experience II students only: In addition to the above questions, please also answer
these questions:

       4. In Field Experience I, you identified three skills based upon the 12 Florida Educator
          Accomplished Practices (FEAP). Please list the three areas and explain how you have
          improved on these areas.


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       5. In your ESOL experience, what did you learn about ELL students, as it relates to
          teaching, that you did not know prior to this field experience? (only ESE/Elem,
          Elem, English Mid Sch)

Lesson Plans
Your lesson plans should be “scripted.” You should write the lesson plan as though you were
actually teaching the plan. This allows you to think through the entire lesson planning process
and possibly find problems before they occur. Scripting also allows you to “practice” your lesson
before you implement it. Your lesson plan should have enough details that “a stranger” could
teach the lesson solely based upon your lesson plan. Please see the example plans on elearning
under the Syllabus module.

In preparing lesson plans, follow the “Lesson Architect” model in STEPS website located at.
http://www.ibinder.uwf.edu/steps/ . You may also use the formats from lesson planning courses
as applicable. You are expected to complete at least three lesson plans in which you have
comprehensively planned what is to be taught and how it is to be taught. Your lesson plans
should demonstrate “best teaching practices.” Because you are a guest in your Supervising
Teacher’s classroom, you should plan your lessons in conjunction with the expectations present
in your Supervising Teacher’s classroom.
While developing your lesson plans through the Lesson Architect Model you should consider the
following:

Identifying information: (Created By/School)

       Include: Name, date, teacher, grade, (if applicable, list exceptionalities)

Unit Purpose:

       What is the purpose of the lesson?

       What relevance will this lesson have to real-life application?

       What are you planning to do? (Briefly describe lesson in 1-2 sentences).

       List necessary prerequisite skills related to the lesson objectives. How have you assessed these?

       List content area(s) that will be integrated in this lesson (e.g. reading, language arts, science,
       mathematics, social studies, art, music, physical education, technology, social skills, life-skills,
       etc.).

       What manipulatives, models, tools, technology, etc., will be used? Why?

Sunshine State Standards:

       Please list the Florida standards for the lesson. If you are in another state, you may also

        include that state’s standards but the Florida standards must also be present.

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Goals and Standards:

       Goal – The goal is the purpose of the lesson.
Objective:
       Behavioral Objective – This is a breakdown of a goal into a short-term (more immediate
       air). It indicates how students will respond to demonstrate mastery. An objective
       includes antecedent conditions, an expected behavior, and criteria by which mastery of
       the behavior will be determined or evaluated. (You must include at least one behavioral
       objective).

Assessment:
       Describe the method of informal evaluation that will be used during the lesson to evaluate
       each objective. Your assessment must match your objective.

       What will you do to get your students interested and actively involved in the lesson?
       How will you encourage them to take ownership of their own learning?
Introduction/Motivation
       Provide motivation for students to learn. You should relate the learning to the students’
       real lives-make a connection between the learning and the students.
Lesson Procedures
       List step by step what you plan to do and say during the lesson. Also, list pre-planned
       questions ranging from low-order to high order.
       Describe any special adaptations that will be needed so that all students can actively
       participate in learning activities.
Summary
       Summarize and conclude the lesson unit … “First you tell your students what you what
       you are going to tell them (Advance Organizer), then you tell them (Lesson), then you
       tell them what you told them (Summary/Conclusion).” Ask questions of students related
       to the learning.
Resources
       When listing materials and resources, indicate if they are teacher-made or commercial
       products

Each lesson plan should be free of errors including spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., and
provided for the Supervising Teacher’s review and approval prior to implementation. Your
Supervising Teacher must sign the final copy of the lesson plan. You should keep the signed
copy for reference.

After each lesson has been taught, compose a reflection of your taught lesson plan using the
following questions:


Reflection for Taught Lesson Plans


After the lesson has been taught provide a Personal Evaluation of the Session as follows:

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       (1) What evidence can you cite that demonstrates your students did or did not meet your
           objectives?

       (2) (a). Elaborate on specific things that you did that resulted in student learning.

          (b). Explain why what you did was effective.

       (3) (a). Elaborate on specific things that you would change that would improve students
                learning if you were to teach this lesson again.

          (b). Explain why you think something didn’t work and why your change would make
               it successful.

The first two lesson plans/reflections should be submitted to elearning dropbox.

The third and final lesson plan/reflection should be submitted to TK20.

All lesson plans/reflections (regardless of submission place) should be submitted as ONE
file-place the reflection at the end of the lesson plan.

Supervising Teacher Responsibilities


       1. Meet/communicate with the University Instructor prior to the student’s placement
       2. Facilitate introduction of the Practicum Student to the school administration, staff,
          parents, and students
       3. Provide leadership, direction, and assistance to the Practicum Student
       4. Allow the Practicum Student ample time for initial classroom observations and
          orientation to curriculum, instructional materials, and students
       5. Allow the Practicum Student sufficient time to plan/develop lessons to be taught in
          the classroom
       6. Provide the following suggested experiences:
          a. Teaching reading
          b. To plan, adapt, deliver, and evaluate units that include curriculum materials,
              activities, and assessments with LEP students
          c. Parent-teacher conference
          d. Faculty meetings
          e. Team meetings
          f. Additional duties: cafeteria/bus/library/etc.
          g. Field trips
          h. Resource classroom
          i. I.E.P. screening
       7. Observe and evaluate the Practicum Student’s performance
              a. First Evaluation (2nd week of practicum, within Tk20)
              b. Midterm Evaluation (5-6 week of practicum, within TK20)
              c. Summative Evaluation (end of the Practicum, within TK20)

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               d. ESOL Evaluation (FE II ESE/Elem, Elem, Middle Sch English students only)
       8. Assist the Practicum Student in developing any remedial plans necessary to help the
           student develop instructional and/or behavior management skills
       9. Approve all lesson plans and schedules
       10. Complete in TK20 the third Evaluation of Lesson Plan/Teaching Effectiveness (first
           two lesson evaluations are given to the student for feedback purposes)

University Supervisor Responsibilities
       1. Meet/Communicate with the Supervising Teacher prior to placement of the practicum
       2. Contact the Supervising Teacher as necessary and be available to discuss problems at
          any time.
       3. Review all Practicum Evaluations
       4. Review all assignments

Field Experience Student Responsibilities
       1.   Conduct him/herself professionally at all times
       2.   Review teacher’s editions and curriculum guidelines for assigned grade level
       3.   Be prompt and thoroughly plan lessons
       4.   Communicate directly and honestly with the Supervising Teacher and University
            Instructor
       5.   Immediately inform the Supervising Teacher and University Instructor of any
            changes in schedules
       6.   Have the Supervising Teacher approve all schedules, lesson plans and activities
       7.   Comprehensively plan at least three lessons delivered in a variety of instructional
            formats
       8.   Submit assignments in a timely manner
       9.   Maintain paper copy of attendance using Daily Attendance Record. Supervising
            Teacher should initial each day student is in practicum. Supervising teacher will
            verify hours in TK20 at the end of the semester.


For informational purposes, the forms follow but may appear different in TK20 due to computer
requirements. Each of the behaviors listed on the forms are linked to the Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (i.e. FEAP 4) and University of West Florida School of Education
Dispositions (i.e. D3). These are found in the Handbook on page 7.




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SUPERVISING TEACHER HANDBOOK
          2010 – 2011




                               61
Letter From Director Of School Of Education
Dear Supervisor of Student Teachers,

         Thank you for agreeing to supervise one of our student teachers. This will be a great
opportunity for learning for our prospective teachers. It also may be a chance for you to grow
professionally as a mentor teacher. The School of Education includes faculty members that are
recognized as experts in their field and committed to service in the local schools. This dedication
to scholarly service helps to provide quality education for the student teacher that you will guide
in the final phase of their professional preparation.

        Preparing prospective teachers is a longstanding tradition of the University of West
Florida. The School of Education has as its major function the professional preparation of Pre-
K/Primary, Elementary, Middle Level, Secondary, Career and Technical, and Special Education
pre-service and in-service teachers. Accordingly, the School of Education has an oversight role
in the development of academic competencies and skills of prospective teachers. Toward that
goal, emphasis is placed on the preparation of personnel for education careers through
professional development programs that are current and relevant in theory and practice.

        Over the past few semesters, our students have received comprehensive, practical, and
relevant instruction designed to assist them in becoming excellent teachers. Throughout their
educational programs, our students have had a planned series of clinical experiences beginning
early in their respective program. They have demonstrated the competencies and skills to write
curriculum, deliver instruction, and manage the classroom. Student teaching now provides our
students with the opportunity for culminating field experiences of progressive responsibility for
student learning under the supervision of teachers, such as you, who are high-performing
educators.

        The School of Education enjoys a superb relationship with the School Districts of
Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Holmes, Washington, Bay, Jackson, Calhoun, and
Gulf Counties. This relationship has evolved into a partnership in professional development of
our pre-service and in-service teachers. It is essential that we maintain this positive relationship.
You, the highly qualified professional in the field, are the critical link in this relationship.
Throughout the Student Teaching assignment, you will closely monitor and measure our
students’ teaching skills to ensure they maintain the highest standards of excellence and become
the best of the best teacher professionals.

       Thank you for your superb support and collaboration in grooming our student teachers.



                                               William Evans, PhD.

                                               Director, School of Education


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63
Introduction
Student teaching is the capstone and culminating field experience of the Teacher Education
program. With the cooperation of school districts, administrators and teachers, the University Of
West Florida, School Of Education strives to provide teacher candidates (students) with K-12
classroom experiences to develop the skills and pedagogy necessary to become a successful
teacher. The School of Education is particularly indebted to the school districts for their help in
preparing the teachers of tomorrow.

Definition Of Terms
Student Teacher: A student enrolled in the culminating field experience, student teaching. These
terms are used interchangeably.

      Supervising Teacher: The supervising teacher is a fully certified teacher who is
       responsible for working daily to assist in developing the professional growth of the
       student teacher.
      Faculty Associate (FA): A supervising teacher who has assumed additional supervisory
       duties. FAs provide guidance to both the supervising teacher and student teacher and
       maintain close contact with the University Supervisor.
      University Supervisor: The university supervisor works collaboratively with the
       Supervising Teacher in providing meaningful experiences and assignments for the
       student teacher.

Supervising Teacher, Faculty Associate And University Supervisor
Supervision of student teaching is a responsibility shared by the Supervising Teacher and the
University Supervisor. University of West Florida’s supervisory program is based on the
principle that the Supervising Teacher is responsible for classroom instruction and the University
Supervisor is a liaison between the Cooperating School and the University. Although the
assessment of the Student Teacher is primarily the responsibility of the Supervising Teacher, the
University Supervisor plays an active role in the process by facilitating the development of the
final assessment and by reviewing unit plans written and implemented by the student teacher.

General Responsibilities Of Student Teachers And Interns
Respect the Supervising Teacher. These veteran teachers are experienced, professional, and
capable of guiding your student teaching experience. Cheerfully accept suggestions for
improvement. Learn as much from those things with which you disagree as from those with
which you agree. Personal activities should not be allowed to interfere with time devoted to
student teaching/internship.

Student Teacher’s should be assertive in learning and work to build courteous and professional
relationships with educators and support staff. Relationships with pupils and parents should be
characterized by respect and professionalism. As you become a part of the educational team in
the cooperating school it is expected that you will abide by the following guidelines:


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   Student Teachers/Interns are expected to be present and on time every day that the school
    is in session and is equally responsible to University personnel and public school
    personnel for making arrangements in advance for any anticipated absence. In case of an
    emergency, the School Principal, the Supervising Teacher, and the University
    Coordinator should be notified by the intern immediately. Have the intern plan with you
    at the beginning as to how to handle this situation should it ever occur.
   They should prepare carefully and in sufficient detail for each day. It is not enough to be
    partially ready; they should always be prepared for the emergency which may require
    teaching on short notice.
   Student Teachers/Interns need to become acquainted immediately, with the school plant,
    administration, routines for reporting, parking areas, etc.
   Student Teachers/Interns are informed that they need to respect the Supervising Teacher
    as being experienced, professional, and capable of guiding the teaching experience. They
    should cheerfully accept your suggestions for improvement and learn as much from those
    things with which they disagree with you as from those with which you both agree. A
    Student Teachers/Intern’s personal activities should not be allowed to interfere with time
    devoted to student teaching/internship.
   Student Teachers/Interns should accept cheerfully and willingly the various assignments
    given to them.
   Student Teachers/Interns should develop a receptive attitude toward suggestions and
    criticisms.
   Student Teachers/Interns should expect to give more assistance than they receive. They
    may even ask to be allowed to participate in all normal teaching duties--playground,
    lunchroom, field trips, clubs, etc.
   Student Teachers/Interns may be expected, along with other teachers, to give extra time
    in helping students solve personal and academic problems as well as participating in extra
    class activities.
   A Student Teachers/Intern’s behavior throughout the student teaching/ internship
    experience should exemplify the best of their ability and they should endeavor to bring
    credit to themselves, the University, and to this state.
   A Student Teachers/Intern’s behavior during school days and non-school days should be
    governed by the fact that they are now a professional person.
   Student Teachers/Interns have established a designated level of proficiency in their major
    subject field and in professional courses. They will be expected to exhibit this proficiency
    and other professional qualities.
   Student Teachers/Interns are not allowed to chaperon alone, any type of activity during
    the student teaching/internship experience. However, they can be asked to assist you in
    this respect and they may do so if asked.
   Student Teacher/Interns should use methods and materials which are consistent with the
    philosophy and practices of the school in which they are teaching.

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      Student Teacher/Interns should accept the premise that the cooperating school is
       dedicated first and foremost to the well being of the students in that school.
      Student Teacher/Interns should abide by all rules which apply to students and teachers.
       They are not a visitor in a privileged status, but a fellow teacher subject to the established
       standards and practices of the school in which they are teaching.
      Student Teacher/Interns should avoid seeming to either take over or to revise procedures
       in your classroom. They are assigned to the public school and are subject to the policies
       of that school.
      Student Teacher/Interns are obligated to know their pupils as well as possible through
       observation, conferences, test scores, and examination of school records.
      Student Teacher/Interns’ early responsibility is to observe the Supervising Teacher
       conducting classes.
      Student Teacher/Interns gradually assume responsibility for, or help with, the physical
       condition of the classroom, light, ventilation, heat, equipment, bulletin board, flowers,
       and supplementary materials.
      Student Teacher/Interns must be available for called or impromptu conferences with the
       Supervising Teacher and/or University Coordinator at a time convenient to the
       Supervising Teacher or University Coordinator.
      Student Teacher/Interns are responsible for certain forms and reports. These forms and
       reports should be completed promptly and submitted to the appropriate person at the
       University. The fifth day report and the weekly previews (for Student Teachers only) go
       to the University Coordinator. The mid¬-semester evaluation (2 copies -- Student
       Teachers and Interns) should be submitted to the School of Education.
      Student Teacher/Interns need to maintain a notebook of helpful ideas and accumulate
       various materials as they become available in the student teaching/internship experience.
       They should develop a collection of audio-visual teaching aids, units, and lesson plans.
      Student Teacher/Interns should demonstrate the ability to reflect on their experiences.
       They should share with the University Coordinator and the Supervising Teacher their
       perception and judgment.

Supervising Teachers
Criteria For Selection Of Supervising Teachers
The qualifications of Supervising Teachers are based upon the following criteria which have
been agreed upon by the College of Professional Studies and the school district.

The Supervising Teacher should:

          Possess three years of teaching experience (at least one of these in the district at the
           grade level or in the subject to which the Student Teacher/Intern will be assigned).



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          Must possess full state certification, based upon at least a bachelor's degree, for the
           grade levels or subjects to which the Student Teacher/Intern will be assigned.
          Completed training in the Clinical Educator Training (or equivalent).
          Must complete orientation for Supervisors of Student Teachers.
          Express a willingness to mentor candidates while in the classrooms.
          Demonstrates personal-professional attitudes desirable for one in a leadership role in
           teacher education.
          Demonstrates evidence of continuous professional growth.
          Is recommended by his/her principal and approved by the administration of the
           teacher education institution.
          Exhibits professional and ethical behavior.
          Participates in the program willingly and looks upon supervising the growth of
           Student Teachers as a contribution to his profession.
          You are responsible for certain forms and reports. These forms and reports should be
           completed promptly.
          Review your Student Teaching Binder in TK20 to ensure you have submitted all of
           the documents appropriately. See Appendices for TK20 help.

Role Of The Supervising Teacher
The Supervising Teacher is in a key position in determining the success or failure of the student
teaching experience. If the Student Teacher is to do as well as possible, s/he must have some
understanding of the relationship existing between himself and the Supervising Teacher. The
following factors outline briefly this relationship.

The Supervising Teacher should:

      Attend the Orientation Meeting provided by the Division of Teacher Education before
       assuming the role of Supervising Teacher.
      Qualify as a Supervising Teacher through the school district.
      Should have completed training in the Clinical Educator Training. (Please contact Dr.
       Wanda Wade at wwade@uwf.edu if you have not received Clinical Educator Training)
      Welcome the Student Teacher and introduce her/him to classes in a manner which is
       dignified and effective in establishing leadership status.
      Strive to provide an atmosphere of emotional security and stability.
      Understands that embarrassment causes anxiety to the Student Teacher and demands
       sympathetic understanding, helpful outlets and suggestions.
      Make time available for discussion.
      Make a conscious effort to be the best possible example of a professional teacher.
      Emphasize the importance of thorough mastery of subject matter. The limitations and
       adaptations of a variety of teaching methods in specific situations will be demonstrated.


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      Make time available to talk with the University Supervisor and the Student Teacher.
      Help the Student Teacher, by example and guidance; acquire the necessary poise in
       establishing an effective professional relationship with fellow teachers, administrators,
       parents, and students.
      Give frank and helpful criticisms to the Student Teacher throughout the student teaching
       experience. Such comments as "fine" or "good" fail to tell the Student Teacher about his
       progress. Strengths will be emphasized and encouraged, but weaknesses will be pointed
       out frankly and suggestions will be made to assist the Student Teacher to overcome these
       weaknesses.
      Have a philosophy of education which governs discipline and classroom control,
       methods, materials, etc., and assist the Student Teacher to develop his own philosophy,
       methodology and classroom control.
      Recognize that Student Teachers may be handicapped by immature features, odd
       hairstyles, distracting mannerisms, or an exposed lack of confidence. Moreover, realize
       that Student Teachers may deviate markedly from community norms by reason of race,
       size, dialect, voice, or social customs. When such is the case, make every effort to ensure
       the Student Teacher success.
      Be a sounding board for questions regarding the teaching process. The Student Teacher
       should not hesitate to ask questions of the Supervising Teacher. Student teaching is one
       of the last opportunities to ask questions before becoming a professional and assuming
       responsibility for a class of his own.
      Review the teaching schedule for the Student Teacher and assist in completing the
       assignments.
      Complete all Performance Evaluations cooperatively with the Student Teacher. All forms
       are submitted through TK20.

Guidelines For The Supervising Teacher
Before the Student Teacher/Intern arrives, you should:

      Contact him/her by phone, mail or personally to introduce yourself.
      Inform your students and emphasize that the Student Teacher/Intern is a "teacher."
      Provide a work area.
      Become familiar with the University's expectations of the Student Teacher/Intern.
       When the Student Teacher/Intern arrives, you should plan an orientation to include:
      The school and its programs, policies, etc.,
      Responsibilities relative to school routine (signing in and out, reporting and leaving,
       meetings, reports required, extra-curricular activities, etc.),
      Emergency care: fire drills, evacuation routes, clinic facilities, and
      Audio-visual materials, library, duplicating and other equipment.
      Arrange a meeting with the school administration.

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      Provide textbooks, manuals, plan books, classrooms and other materials which will aid in
       working with students.
      Provide and discuss the class schedule.
      Explain how you develop daily and weekly plans and the procedure he or she is to
       follow.
      Discuss classroom management techniques, which work for you.
      Summarize the material students have already covered and your goals for the remainder
       of the year.
      Arrange for observations in other classes.
      Discuss your expectations, evaluation techniques, etc.
      Be enthusiastic and project a positive attitude.
      To assist the Student Teacher/Intern in the transition from observing to teaching, you
       should:
      Plan activities that will allow the Student Teacher/Intern to become involved in some
       classroom activities immediately.
      Let him/her work with small groups of students at first. As he/she develops confidence
       and ability, increase teaching responsibility to full time.
      Plan cooperatively during the initial stages. Later, allow the Student Teacher/Intern to
       plan alone and submit them to you for approval and constructive suggestions.
      Set a definite day of the week for conferencing.
      Give advance notice concerning bulletin boards and other displays, which you expect.
      Assist in pupil evaluation. Show proper techniques for test construction, homework
       assignments, etc.
      Be specific, with tact, concerning strengths, weaknesses, idiosyncrasies, distracting
       mannerisms, etc.
      Keep records for conference with the University Coordinator.
      Reach a balance between remaining with the Student Teacher/Intern in the classroom and
       leaving him/her to work independently.

Suggested Schedule Of Student Teaching
Student Teachers should gradually assume responsibility of the classroom to reach “total
control” for six weeks. During the six weeks of total control, the Student Teacher should assume
all of the Supervising Teacher’s duties. The following is a suggested schedule but the exact
timing should be determined between the student teacher and the supervising teacher.



      First and Second Week of Student Teaching: During the first two weeks of the semester,
       the Student Teacher should observe and complete any duties assigned by the Supervising
       Teacher. The Student Teacher should also work with individuals and small groups. The
       Student Teacher may begin to teach lessons during the second week of the semester.
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      Third – Seventh Week of Student Teaching: In Week Three, the student teacher should
       begin to assume the primary responsibility (with the supervisor’s assistance) for planning
       and teaching one class or subject (or approximately one hour of the day’s program) each
       day with observation, participation and teaching assistance. During Weeks Four through
       Seven, the Student Teacher should add a class or subject for each week until the Student
       Teacher has assumed all of the Supervising Teacher’s duties.
      Seventh – Thirteenth Week of Student Teaching: The student teacher should retain the
       responsibilities assumed in the previous weeks and complete a minimum of six week of
       full-time teaching
      Thirteenth – Fifteenth Week of Student Teaching: The student teacher should gradually
       return primary responsibility of planning and teaching the class to the supervising
       teacher.

Recognition For The Supervising Teacher
Supervising Teachers receive a Certificate of Participation from the University of West Florida
for each semester a Student Teacher/Intern is in their classroom. The following guidelines are
provided:

Any teacher who supervises University students where the teacher is required to engage in direct
supervision of a student for 300 contact hours is eligible to receive a Certificate of Participation.

      The 300 contact hours may be incurred over a number of semesters provided there are at
       least 100 hours of direct supervision per semester.
      Teachers who attend a required Orientation Meeting for the preparation of student
       supervision may count these hours toward their 300 contact hours.
      The State of Florida Certificates of Participation waives ~80% of the matriculation fees
       for a maximum of six (6) hours of graduate credit instruction during a single term at any
       state university.
      The Certificate of Participation is mailed to the Supervising Teacher’s school at the end
       of the semester. Supervising Teachers who wish to use the Certificate in the immediately
       following semester should inform the Director of Student Teaching in order to expedite
       the Certificate.

Faculty Associates
Faculty Associates (FA’s) are supervising teachers assigned by UWF Staff who have assumed
additional supervisory duties. The Faculty Associate assist’s the Supervising Teacher in the
process of developing student teachers’ skills and to assure continuity of data entry in the
assessment system and equity in the evaluation products from the student teaching experience. If
there is a problem regarding the student teacher’s performance that the FA and Supervising
Teacher cannot solve together, the faculty member designated as the University Supervisor is
contacted.


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Role Of The Faculty Associate
          Understands and communicates the College of Professional Studies policies and
           procedures effectively.
          Act as liaison between the Supervising Teacher and University Supervisor.
          Supervise assigned group of Supervising Teachers.
          Contact Supervising Teachers weekly to address issues, questions and concerns.
          Remind Supervising Teachers of deadlines and due dates for evaluations to be
           submitted in TK20.
          Assess and provide feedback on 2 Unit Plans submitted by student teacher’s.
          Submits all required evaluations to the TK20 Website (the Supervising Teacher
           Handbook for the required dates).
          Provide guidance to both the supervising teacher and student teacher.
          Maintain close contact with the University Supervisor.

University Supervisor In The University Of West Florida Area
(Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa Counties).

The University Supervisor will complete 2 observations of the Student Teacher, participate in the
assessment process, and serve as a liaison between the University and the Cooperating School.
The University Supervisor will also review the Supervising Teacher’s assessment evaluations to
ensure that there is satisfactory performance. Because the Student Teacher does not see the
University Supervisor every day, it is very important for the student to know when and/or how to
contact their assigned University Supervisor should a question or problem arise.

Role Of The University Supervisor
      Understands and communicates the College of Professional Studies policies and
       procedures effectively.
      Act as liaison between the University and cooperating School.
      Complete 2 observations of the Student Teacher,
      Review the Supervising Teacher’s assessment evaluations to ensure that there is
       satisfactory performance.

University Supervisor Out Of University Of West Florida Area
In order to appropriately supervise students placed outside of the UWF service area, the Director
of Placement for Student Teachers will identify an individual who will serve as your University
Supervisor. You will need to compensate the identified University Supervisor for their services.

The Out of UWF Area University Supervisor will:

   1. Complete a "Meet and Greet" with the student teacher. You will also need to discuss
      payment for your University Supervisor during this initial meeting.
   2. Complete 2 Observations of the assigned student teacher.

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   3. Fax a copy of completed evaluations to the Director of Student Teaching at (850) 474-
      2844.
   4. Send the hard copy of signed evaluation forms to the following address:

                                        Dr. Wanda Y Wade
                                     11000 University Parkway
                                         Building 85/174
                                   Pensacola, Florida 32514-5750


Student Teaching For Transient Students
On occasion, students must leave the University of West Florida service area to complete their
student teaching experience. Also, students at other institutions request assignments in the
Pensacola area to complete student teaching. In the spirit of reciprocity with other NCATE-
accredited institutions, the University of West Florida will consider eligible students in selected
situations. Students should inquire at the Office of Teacher Education Building 85, Room 196.

Purpose Of Supervising Teacher’s Evaluation Forms
The Supervising Teacher’s Evaluation Forms are used to document the student teacher’s
demonstrated strengths as well as areas of needed improvement over the semester of student
teaching. Each evaluation form lists specific teaching behaviors that are related to our
Conceptual Framework and Teaching Dispositions (D) and the 12 Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (FEAP). The Dispositions, FEAPs and grading criteria are listed below:

Assessment Of Dispositions And Florida Educator Accomplished Practices
Throughout the Teacher Education program students will be assessed on the 12 Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) and the six dispositions in order to monitor progress toward
becoming an empowered person and professional who makes a difference.

                        Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs)

                       1. Assessment                          7. Human Development and
                       Learning

                       2. Communication                       8. Knowledge of Subject Area

                       3. Continuous Improvement              9. Learning Environments

                       4. Critical Thinking                   10. Planning

                       5. Diversity                           11. Role of the Teacher

                       6. Ethics                              12. Technology




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UWF School Of Education Teacher Dispositions
   1. Critical Thinkers are able to examine their frame of reference by analyzing educational
      policy and practice in everyday experiences.
   2. Counselor/mentors are able to interact effectively with learners, colleagues and the public
      to promote high levels of success for every individual.
   3. Lifelong learners are committed to the profession, to continuous learning and to self
      improvement.
   4. Decision makers utilize self-reflection and data analysis in order to learn from
      experiences and make changes.
   5. Ethical/moral professionals recognize human diversity and intentionally make individuals
      feel valued for their potential.
   6. Problem solvers develop alternative solutions to educational problems while believing
      that all individuals learn.

Iep Requirement
The State of Florida has recently added an additional experience for all teacher candidates in an
initial certification program. During one of the field experiences (Field Experience I, II or
student teaching), teacher candidates in elementary education, prek/primary education, middle
school and exceptional student education program students must observe or participate in an
Individual Education Program (IEP) meeting. If there is no child in your own classroom needing
an IEP, please ask another teacher to allow your student teacher to observe or participate in an
IEP meeting. You will document this on the final evaluation of the student teacher.

Unit Plans
All students participating in Student Teaching are required, with the help of their Supervising
Teacher, to develop, implement and evaluate two unit plans during their student teaching. Please
see the Appendix for the specific requirements. For Elementary, PreK-Primary and
ESE/Elementary students, one unit plan must be a reading plan while the other plan will be a
math plan if math is taught in that classroom. If math is not part of the Supervising Teacher’s
curriculum, then the second unit plan may be in any content area. For Middle School students the
two unit plans will be in the content area of the placement. All unit plans must be developed
during the first five weeks of the semester and submitted through TK20 by the end of the fifth
week of the semester. Faculty Associates will evaluate the Unit Plans and provide feedback to
the student. Please see the current syllabus for the specific requirements of the unit plans. Music
students should contact their University Instructor for additional information and deadlines.

Please help your student teacher develop two unit plans appropriate for your children. Since the
unit plans are developed early in the student teaching semester and usually not taught until later
in the semester, your student teacher will need to know the scheduled curriculum for later in the
semester. In spring semester due to FCAT, the unit plans may not be implemented until late
March. This is perfectly acceptable.




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Grading Criteria
       3 = Exceeds Expectations. Performance is consistently exemplary, showing extra time
       and effort invested. All plans and requirements are on time and of a professional quality.
       Student Teacher shows ability to identify and improve performance based on self-
       assessment and feedback from others. (Note: This level of performance is rarely seen
       until the final evaluation.)

       2 = Meet’s Expectations. Student Teacher’s performance is substandard showing poor
       performance. Plans and requirements are not completed. Student Teacher is not able to
       achieve goals for improvement.

       1 = Does Not Meet Expectations. Student Teacher’s performance is very poor and needs
       intensive remediation.

       NA = Not Applicable. Student Teacher’s performance has not been observed in this area.

Unit Plans
Each unit plan must meet the following criteria and must be a minimum of five days.

Reading Unit Plan (meets Florida Reading Endorsement Competency 6)

Learners and Instructional Plans

   A. Learning goals

       Classroom Description

       a.     Student demographics

       b.     Students’ characteristics

       c.     Students’ learning preferences

       d.     Students’ skill levels

       e.     Quality of home, school, community setting

       f.     Quality of learning environment (print-rich environment)

       g.     Specific student learning outcomes for unit that aligns with national and state
              standards

   B. Assessment Plan

       1. Screening – Design and administer a pretest addressing the specific student learning
       outcomes for the Reading Unit Plan. (Multiple-choice tests, timed-repeated readings,
       KWL, Anticipation Guide, etc.)

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        2. Progress Monitoring – design and administer multiple assessments based on learning
        goals to monitor student progress. Assessments should address higher and lower levels of
        thinking and questioning skills.

        3. Outcome-based Assessment – Design and administer a posttest addressing the specific
        learning outcomes for the Reading Unit Plan. Posttest should be same as pretest.

     C. Reading Instructional Plan

        1. Literacy based unit

        2. Address phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

        3. Include differentiated instruction techniques for diverse students (ESOL, ESE, etc.)
        and learning tasks/activities (tiered instruction, anchored instruction, cooperative
        learning, etc.)

Analysis and Reflection

     D. Analysis of student learning (after implementation in student teaching)

        1. Analyze the effectiveness of your instruction using the Pre/Post test.

        2. Record the results on a chart or table.

     E. Reflection and self-assessment (after implementation in student teaching)

        1. Reflect on the effectiveness of your Reading Unit Plan. Provide evidence of student
        learning (assessment results, student work samples, etc.)

        2. Reflect on your teaching effectiveness. What are your teaching strengths? What can
        you change to enhance student learning?

Content Unit Plan: Learners And Instructional Plans
Learners and Instructional Plans

A.      Learning goals

        Classroom Description

            a.   Student demographics
            b.   Students’ characteristics
            c.   Students’ learning preferences
            d.   Students’ skill levels
            e.   Quality of home, school, community setting
            f.   Quality of learning environment (print-rich environment)


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          g. Specific student learning outcomes for unit that align with national and state
             standards

B.     Assessment Plan

       1. Screening – Design and administer a pretest addressing the specific student learning
       outcomes for the Reading Unit Plan. (Multiple-choice tests, timed-repeated readings,
       KWL, Anticipation Guide, etc.)

       2. Progress Monitoring – design and administer multiple assessments based on learning
       goals to monitor student progress. Assessments should address higher and lower levels of
       thinking and questioning skills.

       3. Outcome-based Assessment – Design and administer a posttest addressing the specific
       learning outcomes for the Reading Unit Plan. Posttest should be same as pretest.

C. Content Instructional Plan

       1. Skill based unit (addition, multiplication, water cycle, Civil War etc.)

       2. Address concept building, mechanics, and knowledge application; (real-world
       problems, etc.)

       3. Include differentiated instruction techniques for student diversity and learning
       tasks/activities (tiered instruction, anchored instruction, cooperative learning, etc.)

Analysis and Reflection

D. Analysis of student learning

       1. Analyze the effectiveness of your instruction using the Pre/Post test.

       2. Record the results on a chart or table.

E. Reflection and self-assessment

       1. Reflect on the effectiveness of your Content Unit Plan. Provide evidence of student
       learning (assessment results, student work samples, etc.)

       2. Reflect on your teaching effectiveness. What are your teaching strengths? What can
       you change to enhance student learning?

Tk20
UWF uses TK20 as the assessment and tracking system. This helps us to gather data and track
our students through their programs. We use this information to document our programs for
NCATE, the Florida Department of Education, and to make improvements in our programs.


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Each course in the Teacher Education programs has an assignment in TK20 and certain
assignments are considered as “key assignments.” These key assignments become part of our
assessment data which is used to improve our programs and report to the State.

Each student will have a student teaching binder that includes the forms and assignments that the
student and the Supervising Teacher will submit. The binder is similar to an actual 3 ring binder
that contains specific items such as evaluation forms and the unit plans. Each item in TK20 is
“assigned” to a specific role. Neither the student nor the supervising teacher can submit any form
not assigned to them. For example, the “Final Evaluation” is assigned to you. Your student
cannot complete this form or change the form once you have submitted it.

All evaluations are completed through TK20. There is no need to scan any documents into the
system. Students may upload a file, graph or chart but scanning is not needed. Scanning is
actually not preferred as a scanned document uses a huge amount of the storage space available
to the student.

Once the Student Teaching Binder has been sent, Supervising Teachers will be able to access the
binder. The binders are sent once the majority of the placements have been determined. This is
during the first week of the semester. Your student will inform you when the binder has been
sent.

In order to access TK20, go to uwf.tk20.com. Do not add www or http to the beginning of the
address. Your browser will do this automatically. Once on the login page, Supervising Teachers
should use their first initial of their first name and then their last name followed by four zeros. If
there are multiple teachers with the same names, we will email you with your login name. The
password will be “jschmo0000.” Once you have logged in, you will change your password. If
you have previously supervised a student teacher or practicum student, you will still need to use
the first initial, last name for the login and password.

Example: Joe Schmo would use “jschmo0000” for the login name; password is “jschmo0000.”

Example for multiple names: Joe Schmo would be “jschmo0001;” password is “jschmo0000.”

If you are also a University of West Florida student as well as a Supervising Teacher, you will
have two different logins/passwords. Use your UWF user name and password for any activities
in TK20 that are related to you as a student. For your Supervising Teacher role, use the first
initial, last name for any activities related you as a supervising teacher.

Once you have successfully logged in and changed your password, you will be directed “Home.”

To complete an evaluation on your student, follow these steps below. Screen shots and directions
also follow.



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       1.     If you haven’t already done so, log in-the first time you log in you will need to
       change your password.

       2.      Click on Field Experience tab at top

       3.      Click on Assessments on left side

       4.      Click on the Student’s name in blue

       5.      Click on the form you want to complete. Student’s assignments on left side of
       screen and the different assessors (FA, University Supervisor, Supervising Teacher) on
       right side of screen.

       6.      Complete the form

       7.     Be sure you give a grade. Since student teaching is pass/fail, an S is fine. The
       system just needs a placeholder.

       8.      Click on Save.

       9.      At the end of the semester when you have completed all of the forms, click on
               Submit.

Continuation Of TK20 Help:
At the end of the semester when you have completed all of the forms, click on Submit. If the
system doesn’t allow you to submit, there is an area on one of the forms that needs to be
completed. A message in red will appear stating the form that has not been completed. Please
return to that form and find the area that needs to be completed.

A red flag next to the student’s name means you have tasks to complete. Don’t worry about this
until the end of the semester when you have completed all of the tasks-click on Submit and the
red flag will disappear. If the red flag is still present, something still needs to be completed. See
screen shot below.

There are also tutorials available on the login page. To view any of these click on the “tutorial”
tab before you log in.

Please wait until the “binders” have been sent. Your student will let you know when this
happens.

Grant An Extension In Tk20
One problem that may occur relates to student work that has been graded or submitted late. In the
Student Teacher’s TK20 binder are all of the assignments the student needs to complete. Once an
assignment has been graded, the student no longer has access to the assignment. If the student
needs to revise and resubmit, an “extension” must be granted. In addition, if the “due date” has


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passed for an assignment, the student is again locked out and will need an extension. If your
student asks you to do this, follow these steps:

        1.      If you haven’t already done so, log in

        2.      Click on Field Experience tab at top

        3.      Click on Assessments on left side

        4.      Click on the student’s name in blue

        5.      At the top right is the “extension” tab. Click on this tab and complete the form.

Still Need Help?
If you still need help with TK20, please contact TK20@uwf.edu This is monitored by UWF
School of Education personnel.

Eluminate-Orientation
Please be sure to view the Eluminate session for Supervising Teachers. The link will be provided
by the University Instructor at the beginning of the semester. The session will include
information on assessing students as well as expectations of student teaching.

Supervising A Student Teacher-Review
You are probably feeling a little overwhelmed with all of the information contained in this
Handbook. To help relieve this feeling, here’s a quick review of frequently asked questions-in a
“nutshell.”

   1.        Attend the scheduled orientation or view the orientation through Elluminate-link will
             be provided by your student teacher. If you haven’t had Clinical Educator Training
             provided by your district, please contact Dr. Wanda Wade at wwade@uwf.edu
   2.        Welcome your student teacher and provide an area for them to work. Your student
             teacher is just as nervous as you were during student teaching. Provide your student
             teacher with an emergency phone number. Your student should call you if they
             cannot be at school.
   3.        Student teachers are allowed 3 days to be absent. Any additional days must be
             completed at the end of the semester.
   4.        Know who your Faculty Associate is. You should be contacted through email the first
             week of the semester. Please respond to your FA and use him/her as a sounding board
             or peer counselor regarding your student teacher’s progress. Communicate any
             problems with your student teacher to your FA and the Director of Student Teaching.
   5.        Provide honest feedback to your student teacher. Use constructive criticism to provide
             ideas on how your student teacher can improve.
   6.        Help your student develop appropriate Unit Plans. See the section on Unit Plans for
             specifics.

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7.    Allow your student to have “total control” of the classroom for a minimum of 6
      weeks. In spring during FCAT, you may administer the test during the morning and
      the student teacher may assume control for the afternoon. Allow your student teacher
      is proctor if possible.
8.    Login to TK20 during the first week of the semester. The sooner we find any tech
      bugs, the better!
9.    Complete the evaluations on time. See the TK20 chart with the specific due dates.
10.   Finally, and most importantly, enjoy your student teacher!!




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STUDENT TEACHER HANDBOOK
         2010-2011




                           81
Letter From Director Of School Of Education
Dear Student Teacher,

Congratulations on achieving this significant milestone in your educational career.

Over the past few semesters, you have received comprehensive, practical, and relevant
instruction designed to assist you in becoming an excellent teacher. Throughout your educational
program, you have had a planned series of clinical experiences beginning early in your program.
You have demonstrated the competencies and skills to write curriculum, deliver instruction, and
manage the classroom. Student teaching now provides you with the opportunity for culminating
field experiences of progressive responsibility for learning under the supervision of high-
performing educators. Your supervising teacher has been selected because she/he is a highly
qualified professional in the field of education … a key to your success as a UWF student
teacher.

The University of West Florida, College of Professional Studies, and School of Education enjoy
a superb relationship with the School Districts of Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa Counties.
This relationship has evolved into a partnership in professional development of our pre-service
and in-service teachers. It is essential that we maintain this positive relationship. You are the
critical link in this relationship. Throughout the student teaching assignment, the supervising
teacher will closely monitor and measure your teaching skills to ensure you demonstrate the
highest standards of excellence. Stay focused, pay attention to the feedback you receive, and act
appropriately.

In closing, keep in mind that you represent the College of Professional Studies’ best of the best.
You will be establishing your professional reputation in the Public School System … so it is
vitally important that you maintain the highest standards of excellence.

Have a great student teaching experience!




                                              William Evans, Ph.D.

                                              Director, School of Education




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83
Introduction
Student teaching is the capstone and culminating field experience of the Teacher Education
program. With the cooperation of school districts, administrators and teachers, the University Of
West Florida, School Of Education strives to provide teacher candidates (students) with K-12
classroom experiences to develop the skills and pedagogy necessary to become a successful
teacher. The School of Education is particularly indebted to the school districts for their help in
preparing the teachers of tomorrow.

This handbook is intended to provide general information regarding student teaching required in
the Teacher Education programs. A separate handbook for the Supervising Teachers of teacher
candidates is also available. The handbook is a guide and students should also consult the
individual course syllabus for additional guidance on specific assignment requirements.

Definition Of Terms
       Student Teacher: A student enrolled in the culminating field experience, student teaching.
       These terms are used interchangeably.

       Supervising Teacher: The supervising teacher is a fully certified teacher who is
       responsible for working daily to assist in developing the professional growth of the
       student teacher.

       Faculty Associate (FA): A supervising teacher who has assumed additional supervisory
       duties. FAs provide guidance to both the supervising teacher and student teacher and
       maintain close contact with the University Supervisor.

       University Supervisor: The university supervisor works collaboratively with the
       Supervising Teacher in providing meaningful experiences and assignments for the
       student teacher.

General Information
Fingerprints And Background Checks
In order to comply with the Jessica Lunsford Act, students completing a field experience in the
State of Florida must be fingerprinted and complete a background check. Each school district is
responsible for the fingerprinting of students in that county. Students should check with the local
school district website for procedures for fingerprinting and background checks. Students will
not be allowed entry into a school without completing the fingerprinting and background checks.
Each district has different policies and students should follow their specific county’s guidance.
Student teachers should check with their local district to ensure their fingerprints are current.
Students in other states should contact their local school district for guidance.

Liability Insurance And Medical Insurance
Beginning in Fall 2009, all Teacher Education students must purchase liability insurance. Please
see the Teacher Education Handbook for information on where the insurance can be purchased.

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Students should secure their own medical insurance. The University of West Florida will not
cover any illness or injury sustained during the field/student teaching experience. Students will
bear all responsibility for illness or injury incurred during student teaching.

Application And Placement Information
All students will apply for student teaching through TK20. Applications are due by March 1 for
fall placement and August 1 for spring placement. There is an application tutorial available on
the TK20 login site (uwf.tk20.com) under “Artifacts” and “Applications.” Students will be
registered for all field experiences through the Advising Office using the submitted applications.

Students may request three different schools on their student teaching application. Students may
also request a specific grade level. While the school districts try to honor these requests, it may
not be possible to place the student in their requested grade or school.

For students not in UWF’s service area (i.e. Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa), a hard copy of the
application is also required. This may be found on the School of Education website as well as
through TK20.

Students in the service area are not permitted to contact the county/school district office directly
regarding placement. Students who contact the county/school district office regarding their
placements will be removed from student teaching for that semester. Students out of the service
area will provide information to help find a placement. Students should not work with the county
to determine placement. Please allow the Director of Student Teaching Placement to initiate
contact. (Students provide information and the Director contacts the county.) The following
information should be attached to the hard copy application:

              District name
              Name, phone number and email of individuals responsible for placing students in
               field experiences
              List of possible schools in the district and corresponding principals’ names, phone
               numbers and emails
              Any other information that will help placement

Placement Out Of University Service Area
Students may be placed outside of the University Service Area. (See above for application
requirements) In order to appropriately supervise these students, a University Supervisor must be
identified for the student teacher. Usually, the University Supervisor is an individual from a local
University who is part of a Teacher Education program. Fees for the outside of the University of
West Florida Service Area may be required and range from $500 - $2,000. Students are required
to pay the additional fees for the Out of Area University Supervisor. In addition, if the local
district requires a fee for the Supervision of Guest Student Teachers, the student will also pay
these required fees. These fees are in addition to normal University of West Florida fees.


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Employment During Student Teaching
Candidates should not be employed outside of student teaching. However, if financial reasons
require a student to work part time during student teaching, permission must be gained from the
Director of Student Teaching. Additionally, the employment must be after school hours or on
weekends. If the employment impacts a student’s performance in any manner during student
teaching (i.e. teaching performance, attendance), the student teacher will need to withdraw from
student teaching or stop working.

Student Teacher Schedule
Student teaching begins on the first day of the semester and ends on the last day of the semester.
(See the University’s calendar for specific dates) Candidates are expected to be in their field
classrooms starting on the first day of the semester and ending on the last day of the semester.
Once student teaching has begun, the candidate will follow the local school district’s schedule.
For example, during fall semester, some districts have a fall break during the week of
Thanksgiving. While the University is in session through Wednesday of Thanksgiving week, if a
school district is not in session during Thanksgiving week, the student teacher will not be in the
field classroom. For spring semester, student teachers will follow their school district’s schedule
for spring break regardless of the University’s spring break.

Dress Code
Students participating in a field experience should dress according to professional practices.
Jeans are not considered appropriate dress and any piercings should be removed with the
exception of standard earrings for women. Shirts must cover the midriff and back and extend
below the waist band of pants. Additionally, follow the advice of the Supervising Teacher.

Diverse Setting
In order to provide appropriate field experiences, students will be placed in a variety of
classroom settings among the three field experiences (Field Experience I, II, and Student
Teaching). A minimum of one placement must be in a diverse setting as defined by the local
area. Some schools will not be available for the diverse placement.

Orientation
Orientation for student teaching is generally held during the week before the semester begins.
For students out of the service area, an Eluminate orientation session will be available. Local
student teachers must attend the orientation. Out of Area students must view the Eluminate
session before student teaching commences.

Professionalism
Students should always maintain a high level of professionalism especially while in the schools.




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Indicators of professionalism include a willingness to participate in activities, attendance,
punctuality, completing assignments, and demonstration of a positive attitude. Students should
maintain a professional stance while participating in the field experience as well as away from
the school environment. Lack of professionalism can result in the student being removed from
student teaching and will result in failure for the course.

Grading Criteria
       3 = Exceeds Expectations. Performance is consistently exemplary, showing extra time
       and effort invested. All plans and requirements are on time and of a professional quality.
       Student Teacher shows ability to identify and improve performance based on self-
       assessment and feedback from others. (Note: This level of performance is rarely seen
       until the final evaluation.)

       2 = Meet’s Expectations. Student Teacher’s performance is substandard showing poor
       performance. Plans and requirements are not completed. Student Teacher is not able to
       achieve goals for improvement.

       1 = Does Not Meet Expectations. Student Teacher’s performance is very poor and needs
       intensive remediation.

       NA = Not Applicable. Student Teacher’s performance has not been observed in this area.

Supervising Teacher, Faculty Associate And University Supervisor – A Joint Venture In
Supervision, Support, And Assessment Of Student Teachers
Supervision of student teaching is a responsibility shared by the Supervising Teacher and the
University Supervisor. University of West Florida’s supervisory program is based on the
principle that the Supervising Teacher is responsible for classroom instruction and the University
Supervisor is a liaison between the Cooperating School and the University. Although the
assessment of the Student Teacher is primarily the responsibility of the Supervising Teacher, the
University Supervisor plays an active role in the process by facilitating the development of the
final assessment and by reviewing unit plans written and implemented by the student teacher.

Student Teacher Responsibilities
Respect the Supervising Teacher. These veteran teachers are experienced, professional, and
capable of guiding your student teaching experience. Cheerfully accept suggestions for
improvement. Learn as much from those things with which you disagree as from those with
which you agree. Personal activities should not be allowed to interfere with time devoted to
student teaching/internship.

Student Teacher’s should be assertive in learning and work to build courteous and professional
relationships with educators and support staff. Relationships with pupils and parents should be
characterized by respect and professionalism. As you become a part of the educational team in
the cooperating school it is expected that you will abide by the following guidelines:

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      Know and operate within the policies, rules, and regulations of the cooperating school.
      Dress professionally and in accordance with the standards of the cooperating school.
      Take proper care of all school equipment and facilities.
      Work cooperatively with the Supervising Teacher and others in the school setting.
      Refrain from gossip about pupils, teachers, and other staff members, and confine any
       discussion of problems that might arise to conferences with the Supervising Teacher.
      Attend all meetings, conferences, and in-service programs required of the school faculty.
      You are expected to be present and on time every day the school is in session and for the
       same hours your Supervising Teacher is required to be present. For example, if your
       teacher is required to be present at 6:45 am until 3:15, you will also be present during
       those hours.
      You are responsible to University personnel and public school personnel for making
       arrangements in advance for any anticipated absence.
      In case of an emergency, the School Principal, the Supervising Teacher, and the
       University Supervisor should be notified. Plan with the Supervising Teacher at the
       beginning as to how to handle this situation should it ever occur.
      Prepare carefully and in sufficient detail for each day. It is not enough to be partially
       ready; be prepared for the emergency which may require teaching on short notice.
      Expect to give more assistance than you receive. Expect and even ask to be allowed to
       participate in all normal teaching duties--playground, lunchroom, field trips, clubs, etc.
      You may be expected, along with other teachers, to give extra time in helping students
       solve personal and academic problems as well as participating in extra class activities.
      In the classroom, you should avoid seeming to either take over or to revise procedures.
       Your behavior throughout the student teaching experience should exemplify the best of
       your abilities and you should endeavor to bring credit to yourself, the University, and to
       the teaching profession.
      You have established a designated level of proficiency in your major subject field and in
       professional courses. You will be expected to exhibit this proficiency and other
       professional qualities.
      Keep the University Supervisor informed of any irregularities or difficulties encountered
       in the student teaching experience. While such conversations might be uncomfortable,
       they should not be delayed.

Iep Requirement
The State of Florida has recently added an additional experience for all teacher candidates in an
initial certification program. During one of the field experiences (Field Experience I, II or
student teaching), teacher candidates in elementary education, Pre-K/Primary education, middle
school and exceptional student education program students must observe or participate in an
Individual Education Program (IEP) meeting. Please be sure you complete this requirement in


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one of the field experiences. Your supervising teacher will document this on your Final
Summative Evaluation.

Unit Plans
All students participating in student teaching are required, with the help of their Supervising
Teacher, to develop, implement and evaluate two unit plans during their student teaching. The
unit plans must cover a minimum of five days. For Elementary, Pre-K-Primary and
ESE/Elementary students, one unit plan must be a reading plan while the other plan will be a
math plan if math is taught in that classroom. If math is not part of the Supervising Teacher’s
curriculum, then the second unit plan may be in any content area. For Middle School students the
two unit plans will be in the content area of the placement. All unit plans must be developed
during the first five weeks of the semester and submitted through TK20 by the end of the fifth
week of the semester. Faculty Associates will evaluate the Unit Plans and provide feedback to
the student. All sections of the plans must be assessed as “meets expectations.” Any part of the
plans assessed as “does not meet expectations” must be revised. Please see the current syllabus
for the specific requirements of the unit plans. Music students should contact their University
Instructor for additional information and deadlines.

For elementary and special education students, the first unit plan will be the reading plan. The
second plan will be the content plan. Please submit your reading unit plan under the “Unit Plan
1” tab in TK20.

Key Things to Remember!

      You are not allowed to chaperon alone any type of activity during the student
       teaching/internship experience.
      The University prohibits the use of Student Teachers as substitute teachers.
      Accept the premise that the cooperating school is dedicated first and foremost to the well
       being of the students in that school.
      You are assigned to the public school and are subject to the policies of that school.
      You are obligated to know your pupils as well as possible through observation,
       conferences, test scores, and examination of school records.
      Your behavior during school days and non-school days should be governed by the fact
       that you are now a professional person.
      You must be available for called or impromptu conferences with the Supervising Teacher
       and/or University Supervisor.
      Maintain a notebook of helpful ideas and accumulate various materials as they become
       available in the student teaching/internship experience.
      Start to develop your own collection of audio-visual teaching aids, units, and lesson
       plans.
      Demonstrate the ability to reflect on your experiences.


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      Share with the University Supervisor and the Supervising Teacher your perception and
       judgment.

Student Teachers And The Supervising Teacher
Supervising Teachers are the professionals with whom the University West Florida student is
most closely associated during student teaching. Supervising Teachers have made a commitment
to the Student Teacher, yet are also responsible for providing a positive learning environment for
all pupils. The Supervising Teacher provides guidance and support and is primarily responsible
for the assessment of the Student Teacher’s performance.

The relationship between the Student Teacher and Supervising Teacher is of critical importance
to the student teaching experience. It is necessary for an open and positive relationship to exist
right from the beginning. The Student Teacher should take the initiative in establishing
communication with the Supervising Teacher. If, for some reason, the Student Teacher is having
difficulty or senses a problem with the relationship, the Student Teacher should bring up the
issue immediately with the Supervising Teacher, University Supervisor, Faculty Associate or
Director of Student Teaching. It is essential that any barriers to open communication be resolved
quickly. To establish a productive working relationship with the Supervising Teacher, the
Student Teacher should:

      Display an interest in becoming a teacher by conveying a sincere desire to learn,
       willingness to cooperate, and an appreciative attitude toward suggestions and criticism.
      Keep in mind that he/she has an adequate knowledge of the subject matter, human growth
       and development, teaching techniques, and planning.
      Be willing to make every effort to implement theory into sound classroom practice.
      Strive for insights from the observation and participation phases of student teaching.
      Take an early initiative in assuming responsibility and, when teaching, attempt alternate
       teaching techniques in order to discover and develop an individual teaching style.
      Realize that the classroom pupils are the ultimate responsibility of the Supervising
       Teacher and that variations from standard procedure should be discussed in advance with
       the Supervising Teacher (The Student Teacher and Supervising Teacher are encouraged
       to be innovative in ensuring that the Student Teacher is able to apply knowledge-based
       strategies in the classroom).
      Seek the advice of the Supervising Teacher. Plan for regular daily conferences to discuss
       planning. Be frank and honest regarding teaching performances and be open to
       suggestions.



Student Teachers And The University Supervisor In The University Of West Florida
Area (Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa Counties).


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The University Supervisor will complete 2 observations of the Student Teacher, participate in the
assessment process, and serve as a liaison between the University and the Cooperating School.
The University Supervisor will also review the Supervising Teacher’s assessment evaluations to
ensure that there is satisfactory performance. Because the Student Teacher does not see the
University Supervisor every day, it is very important for the student to know when and/or how to
contact their assigned University Supervisor should a question or problem arise.

Student Teachers Placed Outside Of The University Of West Florida Service Area And
The University Supervisor.
In order to appropriately supervise students placed outside of the UWF service area, the Director
of Placement for Student Teachers will identify an individual who will serve as your University
Supervisor. You will need to compensate the identified University Supervisor for their services.

The Out of UWF Area University Supervisor will:

   1. Complete a "Meet and Greet" with the student teacher. You will also need to discuss
      payment for your University Supervisor during this initial meeting.
   2. Complete 2 Observations of the assigned student teacher.
   3. Fax a copy of completed evaluations to the Director of Student Teaching at (850) 474-
      2844.
   4. Send the hard copy of signed evaluation forms to the following address:

                                      Dr. Wanda Y Wade
                                   11000 University Parkway
                                       Building 85/174
                                 Pensacola, Florida 32514-5750

Student Teachers And The Faculty Associate
Faculty Associates (FA) are teachers who have previously and successfully supervised student
teachers. The Faculty Associate will provide feedback to the student teacher regarding the unit
plans written during student teaching. The FA will also provide support and guidance to the
Supervising Teachers as well as maintain contact with the University Supervisor and the Director
of Student Teaching.

Supervising Teachers
Criteria For Selection Of Supervising Teachers
The qualifications of Supervising Teachers are based upon the following criteria which have
been agreed upon by the College of Professional Studies and the school district. The Supervising
Teacher:

      Should possess three years of teaching experience (at least one of these in the district at
       the grade level or in the subject to which the Student Teacher/Intern will be assigned).



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      Must possess full state certification, based upon at least a bachelor's degree, for the grade
       levels or subjects to which the Student Teacher/Intern will be assigned.
      Completed training in the Clinical Educator Training (or equivalent).
      Must complete orientation for Supervisors of Student Teachers.
      Express a willingness to mentor candidates while in the classrooms.
      Demonstrates personal-professional attitudes desirable for one in a leadership role in
       teacher education.
      Demonstrates evidence of continuous professional growth.
      Is recommended by his/her principal and approved by the administration of the teacher
       education institution.
      Exhibits professional and ethical behavior.
      Participates in the program willingly and looks upon supervising the growth of Student
       Teachers as a contribution to his profession.
      You are responsible for certain forms and reports. These forms and reports should be
       completed promptly.
      Review your Student Teaching Binder in TK20 to ensure you have submitted all of the
       documents appropriately. See Appendices for TK20 help.

Role Of The Supervising Teacher
The Supervising Teacher is in a key position in determining the success or failure of the student
teaching experience. If the Student Teacher is to do as well as possible, s/he must have some
understanding of the relationship existing between himself and the Supervising Teacher. The
following factors outline briefly this relationship. The Supervising Teacher should:

      Attend or view through TK20 the Orientation Meeting provided by the Division of
       Teacher Education before assuming the role of Supervising Teacher.
      Qualify as a Supervising Teacher through the school district.
      Welcome the Student Teacher and introduce her/him to classes in a manner which is
       dignified and effective in establishing leadership status.
      Strive to provide an atmosphere of emotional security and stability.
      Understands that embarrassment causes anxiety to the Student Teacher and demands
       sympathetic understanding, helpful outlets and suggestions.
      Make time available for discussion.
      Make a conscious effort to be the best possible example of a professional teacher.
      Emphasize the importance of thorough mastery of subject matter. The limitations and
       adaptations of a variety of teaching methods in specific situations will be demonstrated.
      Make time available to talk with the University Supervisor and the Student Teacher.
      Help the Student Teacher, by example and guidance; acquire the necessary poise in
       establishing an effective professional relationship with fellow teachers, administrators,
       parents, and students.

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      Give frank and helpful criticisms to the Student Teacher throughout the student teaching
       experience. Such comments as "fine" or "good" fail to tell the Student Teacher about his
       progress. Strengths will be emphasized and encouraged, but weaknesses will be pointed
       out frankly and suggestions will be made to assist the Student Teacher to overcome these
       weaknesses.
      Have a philosophy of education which governs discipline and classroom control,
       methods, materials, etc., and assist the Student Teacher to develop his own philosophy,
       methodology and classroom control.
      Recognize that Student Teachers may be handicapped by immature features, odd
       hairstyles, distracting mannerisms, or an exposed lack of confidence. Moreover, realize
       that Student Teachers may deviate markedly from community norms by reason of race,
       size, dialect, voice, or social customs. When such is the case, make every effort to ensure
       the Student Teacher success.
      Be a sounding board for questions regarding the teaching process. The Student Teacher
       should not hesitate to ask questions of the Supervising Teacher. Student teaching is one
       of the last opportunities to ask questions before becoming a professional and assuming
       responsibility for a class of his own.
      Review the teaching schedule for the Student Teacher and assist in completing the
       assignments.
      Complete all Performance Evaluations cooperatively with the Student Teacher. All forms
       are submitted through TK20.

Faculty Associates
Faculty Associates (FA’s) are supervising teachers assigned by UWF Staff who have assumed
additional supervisory duties. The Faculty Associate is able to assist the Supervising Teacher in
the process of developing student teachers’ skills and to assure continuity of data entry in the
assessment system and equity in the evaluation products from the student teaching experience. If
there is a problem regarding the student teacher’s performance that the FA and Supervising
Teacher cannot solve together, the faculty member designated as the University Supervisor is
contacted.

Role Of The Faculty Associate
      Understands and communicates the College of Professional Studies policies and
       procedures effectively.
      Act as liaison between the Supervising Teacher and University Supervisor.
      Supervise assigned group of Supervising Teachers.
      Contact Supervising Teachers weekly to address issues, questions and concerns.
      Remind Supervising Teachers of deadlines and due dates for evaluations to be submitted
       in TK20.
      Assess and provide feedback on 2 Unit Plans submitted by student teacher’s.


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      Submits all required evaluations to the TK20 Website (the Supervising Teacher
       Handbook for the required dates).
      Provide guidance to both the supervising teacher and student teacher.
      Maintain close contact with the University Supervisor.

Tk20 Help
If you need help with TK20, please first go to the tutorials found on the login page. Be sure to
follow the directions exactly. To find the tutorials, go to “uwf.tk20.com.” DO NOT add “www”
or “http” before the address. Your computer will automatically go to the correct site. Listed
below are several different tasks and where the tutorial may be found:

       TASK                                  FOUND

       1. Logging In                         Student Tutorials: Introduction: Logging in

       2. What’s an Artifact?                Student Tutorials: Introduction: Artifacts

       3. Creating an Artifact               Artifacts: General Artifacts: Creating an
                                             Artifact

       4. Uploading/attaching a file         Artifacts: General Artifacts: Attaching
                                             Documents to Artifacts

       5. Recall an assignment               Courses: Assignments and Projects: Recalling an
                                             Assignment

       6. Recalling a binder                 Courses: Course Binders: Recalling a Course
                                             Binder

       7. Need an extension?                 Ask Supervising Teacher, University Instructor
                                             or Faculty Associate to grant an extension

Unit Plans In TK20
Unit plans must be submitted in TK20 using the template. DO NOT upload a file of the unit
plan. Since the Unit Plans cannot be developed quickly, you should develop the unit plan outside
of TK20. Please see the current syllabus for the specifics of each section in the unit plans. Save
your unit plans on your computer. (Always backup your computer work-you never know when
something with crash!) When you have completed the plans, copy and paste them into the
templates on TK20. Again, uploaded files are not acceptable.

For the Analysis/Reflection portion of your Unit Plans, you will be creating a chart or graph to
demonstrate your children’s learning. Please follow the directions below exactly and your graph
or chart will appear correctly in TK20. You should print this page in order to follow the
directions easier.


                                                                                               94
How To Upload An Image (Your Graph Or Chart In The Unit Plan):
          1. Create your graph or chart as a word document or excel document.
          2. Copy this into “Paint.” You may also create the graph or chart in Paint directly.
              Paint is found on all computers. Try looking under “All Programs” and then
              “Accessories.”
          3. Save the graph or chart as a “gif” file.
          4. In TK20, click on “Artifact” on the top tab.
          5. Next, click on “Create” on the left menu.
          6. Using the scroll down box, choose the appropriate Artifact (i.e. Unit plan
              analysis)
          7. Scroll to #2 “Record the results” and click on “rich formatting.”
          8. A box appears-click on the “insert/edit image” (yellow box with mountain and a
              sun”
          9. “Image Properties” box appears-click on “browse server.”
          10. “Resource browser” box appears-click on “browse.”
          11. Find your saved gif graph or chart and select it-click on “open.”
          12. Click “upload.” This places your image (graph or chart) in the TK20 folder.
          13. Click on the “image” in the folder (this is the image you just loaded)
          14. Click on “ok” and the image (graph or chart) will load into the appropriate space.
          15. Be sure to “Save.”

Remember-you cannot simply upload from a word doc or excel. You have to upload an “image”
such as a gif or jpeg file.

Professional Education Applicant Self Rating Form
You will need to complete the Professional Ed. Applicant Self Rating Form. You completed this
at the beginning of your program and both you and your Supervising Teacher will complete the
form at the end of Student Teaching. Please follow the directions below to complete this form:

   1.     Login to TK20
   2.     Click on Artifacts on the top menu
   3.     Click on Application Forms on the left menu
   4.     Click on Create
   5.     In the dropdown box, click on Professional Education Applicant Self Rating Form
   6.     Complete the form and save
   7.     Click on Field Experience at top menu
   8.     Click on your Student Teaching binder
   9.     Click on the Professional Ed tab
   10.    Follow directions for submitting an artifact




                                                                                              95
IMPORTANT

1.     Click “Save” each time you submit an artifact in the Student Teaching Binder.

2.     DO NOT click on “Submit” until the end of the semester and your Unit Plans
Analysis/Reflection have been graded as “meets expectations.”

3.     There is no need to scan any document into TK20. All artifacts are either uploaded from
your computer or completed within the TK20 system.




                                                                                             96
APPENDIX




           97
                  Self Check List for Student Teachers and Interns
A.   In observation and participation, did I:

     1.      Locate facilities and materials provided for instructional use?       ____
     2.      Identify and locate school personnel other than teachers?      ____
     3.      Become acquainted with fellow teachers?         ____
     4.      Become alert to the daily schedule routine? ____
     5.      Become aware of permission procedures in all situations? ____
     6.      Make notation of best observed teaching practices? ____
     7.      Take responsibility for physical conditions in the classroom?         ____
     8.      Assist individual students who need special help?      ____
     9.      Assist in keeping records, making reports, etc.?       ____
     10.     Learn to use audio-visual aids and equipment?          ____
     11.     Learn to use duplicating equipment, if available?      ____
     12.     Seek sufficient conference time with my supervising teacher?          ____
     13.     Attend routine and professional faculty meetings?      ____
     14.     Gain experience in and through extra class activities?         ____


B.   In teaching, did I:

     1.      Gather all available data on my students?      ____
     2.      Provide in my plans for individual differences?        ____
     3.      Develop overall plans for my own teaching? ____
     4.      Prepare detailed and usable lesson plans?      ____
     5.      Locate and use effectively supplementary material? ____
     6.      Provide a variety of procedures or activities in my classes? ____
     7.      Utilize community resources? ____
     8.      Use evaluation devices related to purposes in my teaching? ____
     9.      Did my lesson result in a positive learning experience for my students?        ____

C.   After student teaching, did I:

     1.      Return all borrowed material to material centers, libraries and individuals?
     2.      Express appreciation to all in the school who shared in my student teaching
             experience?




                                                                                               98
                                                   University Supervisor Evaluation – 1st Visit
                                             The University Of West Florida
                                             College of Professional Studies
                                             Division of Teacher Education
Student: _______________________ School: _____________________ Subject: _____________ Term: _____ Grade Level: _____
Ratings: 3=Exceeds Expectations 2=Meets Expectations 1=Does Not Meet Expectations              NA=Not observed
Rating                                                                                             Comments: Strengths/Needs
I. Personal Qualities
              Neat and clean appearance
              Appropriately dressed
              Punctuality
              Reliability
              Adaptability
              Cooperation
II. Communication
              Effective communicator
              Positive interaction
              Encourages students in a positive and supportive manner
III. Ethics
              Demonstrates ethical principles in dealing with students
              Demonstrates honesty and integrity
IV. Diversity
              Values students from diverse cultures and linguistic backgrounds
              Treats all students equitably
              Promotes student responsibility and appropriate social behavior

Based on the observation above, this student teacher should: _____ Continue in student teaching _____ Remediate specific needs
Signatures:
__________________________ ____                        __________________________________              ____________________________
University Supervisor      Date                        Supervising Teacher              Date           Student Teacher           Date


                                                                                                                                        99
                                                          University Supervisor Evaluation – 2nd Visit
                                                                      The University Of West Florida
                                                                      College of Professional Studies
                                                                      Division of Teacher Education
         Student Teacher:__________________      School:_______________ Subject:________________ Term:___ Grade Level:_____
         Ratings: 3=Exceeds Expectations 2=Meets Expectations 1=Does Not Meet Expectations NA=Not observed
I. Planning                                                                                                                            Comments: Strengths/Needs

                  1. Uses knowledge of content to inform selection of instructional strategies
                  2. Pairs instructional methods and activities to objectives/performance standards
                  3. Uses knowledge of students’ development, interests, and the classroom context to influence content
                  4. Selects varied readings appropriate to students’ skills in all content areas
                  5. Pursues alternative ways of representing and exploring content
                  6. Organizes the learning environment to reflect instructional goals
                  7. Plans for students’ ownership and engagement in purposeful learning
                  8. Develops plans that include goals and procedures for teaching, assessment, and self-assessment
II. Teaching
                  Implementation of Plans
                  1. Follows plans effectively and flexibly, and responds to student needs, interests, and contributions
                  2. Uses strategies, i.e., clear objectives, modeling, guided practice, adjusting pace/level of difficulty of work
                  Communication and Interaction in Instruction
                  1. Establishes authoritative presence through appropriate voice quality, articulation, and language usage
                  2. Establishes respectful non-verbal interactions, e.g., gestures, expression, eye contact, movement and wait time
                  3. Helps students construct meaning through thoughtful questioning and listening
                  4. Consistently models good writing and writing-to-learn across subjects
                  Productive Classroom Management
                  1. Is proactive in creating a safe and trusting community of learners
                  2. Communicates expectations for classroom activity; consistently monitors and responds to students’ behavior
                  3. Anticipates potential disruptions and problem-solves to avoid them
III. Assessment
                  Assessment of Student Learning
                  1. Effectively uses assessments paired with lesson plan objectives/performance standards
                  2. Uses multiple and varied assessments over time and across content area work
                  3. Maintains dated and organized record of students’ progress
                  4. Uses data to chart next steps and shares this information with students, teachers, and/or parents
                  5. Shows competence in developing grading criteria and procedures, carrying them out in a timely fashion
                  Self-Assessment
                  1. Actively reflects on his/her teaching experiences
                  2. Uses input from the supervising teacher to plan next steps
         I endorse this candidate for certification.      Yes:_____     No:_____
         Signatures:___________________________________________________________________________________________________
                         University Supervisor       Date Supervising Teacher    Date Student Teacher      Date
                                                                                                                    100
                             Student Affirmation

-   I personally viewed or attended the Student Teaching Orientation Briefing prior to
    commencement of Student Teaching.
-   I met/communicated with the University Instructor prior to commencement of
    Student Teaching.
-   I have read and understand the information and guidance provided in the Student
    Teaching Handbook.
-   I have obtained liability insurance.
-   I will bear all responsibility for any illness or injury incurred during Student
    Teaching.
-   I am ready to commence Student Teaching.
                     Student Teaching Evaluation 1(Week 1) and 2 (Week 4)
(Ratings: 3=Exceeds Expectations 2=Meets Expectations 1=Does Not Meet Expectations                          NA=Not observed)
A. Personal Qualities (D3)
    1.    Presents self in a professional manner
    2.    Attends as required
    3.    Accepts responsibility for assigned tasks
    4.    Adapts to changing environment
    5.    Cooperates with school personnel
B. Professional Dispositions and Qualities: (D2, 3, 5, FEAP 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11)
    1.    Respect for other professionals (D3, FEAP 3, 11)
    2.    Awareness of physical and social development of students (D5, FEAP 7)
    3.    Command of oral and written language (D3, FEAP 2)
    4.    Displays problem solving skills (D1, FEAP 4)
    5.    Fosters an environment which encourages diversity (D5, FEAP 5)
    6.    Reflects on performance and seeks continuous improvement (D3, FEAP 3)
    7.    Demonstrates a positive attitude toward all students (D2, FEAP 2, 5)
    8.    Treats all students fairly (D2, D5, FEAP 5)
    9.    Collaborates with colleagues for planning instruction (D3, FEAP 10)
    10.   Increases professional growth by participating in training and other professional development experiences (D3, FEAP 3)
    11.   Does not use institutional privileges for personal gain or advantage. (D5, FEAP 6)
C. Knowledge of Subject Matter: (D3, FEAP 8)
    1.    Communicates knowledge of subject matter in a manner that enables students to learn (D3, FEAP 8)
    2.    Continuously develops knowledge of subject are to facilitate learning (D3, FEAP 8)
    3.    Uses materials and technologies of the subject field in developing learning. (D3, FEAP 8)
D. Learning Environment (D2, FEAP 9)
    1.    Practices a variety of techniques for establishing smooth and efficient routines (D2, FEAP 9)
    2.    Arranges learning environments and activities to meet cognitive, linguistic and affective needs of students (D2, FEAP
          9)
    3.    Arranges and manages the physical environment to facilitate student learning outcomes (D2, FEAP 9)
    4.    Uses learning time effectively (D2, FEAP 9)
    5.    Provide clear directions for classroom routines and procedures (D2, FEAP 9)
E. Instructional Skills (D1, 2, 3, 4, 5, FEAP 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12)
    1.    Prepares effectively for lessons (D3, FEAP 10)
    2.    Uses Sunshine State Standards and learning outcomes to meet needs of all students (D2, DEAP 5, 9, 10)
    3.    Plans activities to engage learners in critical thinking and problem solving (D1, 2; FEAP 10)
    4.    Plans activities that uses enrichment activities and materials, including technology (D3, FEAP 10, 12)
    5.    Relates new content to prior knowledge (D1, FEAP 7)
    6.    Uses technology to assist with instructional and classroom management (D3, FEAP 12)
    7.    Provides a variety of activities to meet the cultural, linguistic and experiential diversity of students (D2, 5, FEAP 5)
    8.    Provides opportunities for cooperative learning (D1, 2, FEAP 2)
    9.    Provides opportunities for students to learn higher-order thinking skills (D1, 2, FEAP 4)
    10.   Provides meaningful feedback on student progress to students and families (D2, 5, FEAP 2, 9, 11)
    11.   Communicates verbally and nonverbally with students (D2, 5, FEAP 2)
    12.   Modifies instruction based upon assessed student performance (D1, 2, 3, FEAP 1)
    13.   Regularly reflects upon own practice and modifies behavior based upon that reflection (D3, 4, FEAP 10)




Comments:
          Student Teaching Midterm (Weeks 7) and 4th Evaluation (Week 11)
(Ratings: 3=Exceeds Expectations 2=Meets Expectations 1=Does Not Meet Expectations
NA=Not observed)
A. Professional Dispositions and Qualities: (D2, 3, 5, FEAP 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11)
   1.    Respect for other professionals (D3, FEAP 3, 11)
   2.    Demonstrates command of oral and written language (D3, FEAP 2)
   3.    Displays problem solving skills (D1, FEAP 4)
   4.    Can describe signs of child abuse, emotional distress, alcohol and drug abuse and knows how to report abuse   (D3, FEAP
         11)
   5.    Does not use institutional privileges for personal gain or advantage. (D3, FEAP 6)
   6.    Fosters an environment which encourages diversity (D5, FEAP 5)
   7.    Reflects on performance, seeks continuous improvement and works as reflective practitioner (D5, FEAP 3)
   8.    Demonstrates a positive attitude toward all students and treats all students fairly (D2, FEAP 2, 5)
   9.    Uses data from own learning environment for reflecting and experimenting with personal teaching practices (D2, 3,
         FEAP)
   10. Collaborates with colleagues for planning instruction (D3, FEAP 10)
   11. Increases professional growth by participating in training and other professional development experiences (D3, FEAP 3)
   12. Provides meaningful feedback on student progress to students and families (D2, 5, FEAP 11)
   13. Proposes ways in which families can support classroom goals (D2, 5, FEAP 11)
   14. Communicates students progress with students, families and colleagues (D3, 5 FEAP 3)
   15. Identifies principles and strategies for effecting changes occurring in the classroom (D2, 3, FEAP 3)
   16. Makes reasonable effort to protect students from conditions harmful to learning and/or students’ well being (D2, 5,
       FEAP6)
   17. Demonstrates ethical principles of professional conduct in dealing with students (D2, 5, FEAP 6)

B. Knowledge of Subject Matter: (D3, FEAP 8)
   1.    Communicates knowledge of subject matter in a manner that enables students to learn (D3, FEAP 8)
   2.    Continuously develops knowledge of subject are to facilitate learning (D3, FEAP 8)
   3.    Uses materials and technologies of the subject field in developing learning. (D3, FEAP 8)

C. Learning Environment (D2, FEAP 9)
   1.    Practices a variety of techniques for establishing smooth and efficient routines (D2, FEAP 9)
   2.    Arranges learning environments and activities to meet cognitive, linguistic and affective needs of students (D2, FEAP
         9)
   3.    Arranges and manages the physical environment to facilitate student learning outcomes (D2, FEAP 9)
   4.    Uses learning time effectively (D2, FEAP 9)
   5.    Provide clear directions for classroom routines and procedures (D2, FEAP 9)
   6.    Establishes positive learning environment that uses incentives and consequences for students (D2, FEAP 2)

E. Instructional Skills (D1, 2, 3, 4, 5, FEAP 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12)
   1.  Prepares effectively for lessons (D3, FEAP 10)
   2.  Uses Sunshine State Standards and learning outcomes to meet needs of all students (D2, DEAP 5, 9, 10)
   3.  Uses a variety of traditional and alternative assessment strategies to determine student learning (D4, FEAP 1)
   4.  Communicates to all students’ high expectations for learning (D1, 2, 5, FEAP 2)
   5.  Provides opportunities for cooperative learning (D1, 2, FEAP 2)
   6.  Utilizes strategies to help students to learn higher-order thinking skills and encourage problem solving (D1, 2, FEAP 4)
   7.  Plans activities that uses enrichment activities and materials, including technology (D3, FEAP 10, 12)
   8.  Relates new content to prior knowledge (D1, FEAP 7)
   9.  Uses technology to assist with instructional and classroom management (D3, FEAP 12)
   10. Provides a variety of activities to meet the cultural, linguistic and experiential diversity of students (D2, 5, FEAP 5)
   11. Select and uses materials that are multicultural (D2, 5, FEAP 5)
   12. Modifies instruction based upon assessed student performance (D1, 2, 3, FEAP 1)
   13. Uses multiple activities which engage and motivate students at appropriate developmental levels (D1, 2, 5, FEAP 7)
   14. Varies activities to accommodate different student learning needs (D2, 4, 5 FEAP 7)
   15. Varies role in the instructional process (e.g. mentor, instructor, coach) in relation to the purpose of instruction and
       students’ needs (D1, 2, FEAP 4)
   16. Has a repertoire of teaching techniques and strategies to effectively instruct all students (D2, 5, FEAP 5)




COMMENTS:
                         Final Student Teaching Evaluation (Week 14)
                                                                                   5th (Final)
                               The University Of West Florida
                               College of Professional Studies                     Evaluation
                                      School of Education
Student Teacher: ____________ UWF ID: _______________ School: ______________
Grade: ______        Semester: Fall / Spring    Subjects(s) Observed: ____________
Length of Observation: _____
Ratings: 3=Exceeds Expectations 2=Meets Expectations 1=Does Not Meet Expectations
NA=Not observed)
       AP 1: ASSESSMENT – Collects and uses data gathered from a variety of sources, including both
       traditional and alternative assessment strategies; analyzes individual learning needs and practices
       techniques which accommodate differences, including linguistic and cultural differences.
       AP 2: COMMUNICATION – Recognizes the need for effective communication in the classroom and is in
       the process of acquiring techniques, which he/she will use in the classroom.
       AP 3: CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT - Recognizes that she/he is in the initial stages of a life long
       learning process and that self-reflection is one of the key components of that process. While his/her
       concentration is, of necessity, inward and personal, the role of colleagues and school-based improvement
       activities increase as time passes. Professional improvement is characterized by self-reflection, work with
       immediate colleagues and teammates, and the goals of a personal professional development plan
       AP 4: CRITICAL THINKING – Is acquiring performance assessment techniques and strategies that
       measure higher order thinking skills in students and is building a repertoire of realistic projects and
       problem solving activities designed to assess all students in demonstrating their ability to think.
       AP 5: DIVERSITY – Establishes a comfortable environment which accepts and fosters diversity..
       Demonstrates knowledge and awareness of varied cultures and linguistic backgrounds. Creates a climate
       of openness, inquiry, and support by practicing strategies such as acceptance, tolerance, resolution, and
       mediation. Fosters a learning environment in which all students are treated equally.
       AP 6: ETHICS – Adheres to the State of Florida Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct by
       making reasonable effort to protect each student from conditions harmful to learning, mental and physical
       health, encouraging independent action in pursuit on learning, providing access to diverse points of view.
       AP 7: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING – Draws upon well-established human
       development/learning theories and concepts and a variety of information about students in planning
       instructional activities.
       AP 8: KNOWLEDGE OF SUBJECT MATTER – Has a basic understanding of the subject field and is
       beginning to understand that the subject is linked to other disciplines and can be applied to real world
       integrated settings. Repertoire of teaching skills includes a variety of means to assist student acquisition of
       new knowledge and skills using that knowledge.
       AP 9: LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS – Understands the importance of setting up effective learning
       environments and has techniques and strategies to use to do so, including some that provide opportunities
       for student input into the processes.
       AP 10: PLANNING - Recognizes the importance of setting high expectations for all students and works
       with other professionals to design learning experiences that meet student needs and interests. Continually
       seeks information from appropriate resources, interprets the information, and modifies his/her plans
       appropriately. Planned instruction incorporates a creative environment, and motivational strategies for
       instruction for all students.
       AP 11: ROLE OF THE TEACHER – Communicates and works with families and colleagues to improve
       the educational experiences at the school.
       AP 12: TECHNOLOGY – Uses technology as available at the school site as appropriate to the learner.
       Provides students with opportunities to actively use technology and facilities access to the use of electronic
       resources. Uses technology to manage, evaluate and improve instruction.


“Comments” section on next page.
Due end of 14th week of student teaching.
Supervising Teacher’s Comments:




The Teacher Candidate attended an IEP conference.

Yes________           No_________




The Student Teacher has/has not met the competencies and skills for student teaching.

Yes________           No_________
                                              Liability Insurance
The School of Education does not specifically endorse or recommend any particular insurance carrier or insurance
policy. However, the following information is provided for your convenience, as options you may wish to consider.

      If you are a member of a professional association (e.g., MENC, NCTE, NCTM, NCSS), and professional
       liability insurance is not provided with the membership, you may wish to consider Forrest T. Jones:
       http://www.ftj.com/TIE/pages/plstudfeatures.asp. The insurance is $15.00 per year. Email confirmation is
       provided.
      If you are a sorority/fraternity member, determine if professional liability insurance is included with your
       membership.
      Professional liability insurance may be available as an endorsement, for an additional fee, to a renter’s or
       homeowner’s insurance policy. However, you should investigate carefully the terms of the policy and speak
       with your insurance agent to ensure that the policy is applicable to student field experiences. It is your
       responsibility to purchase the policy for at least $1,000,000 coverage.
      You may also consider coverage provided by the Student Florida Education Association (SFEA). The
       SFEA’s annual membership fee of $32.00/year includes $1,000,000 of professional liability protection,
       which is applicable to classroom situations. SFEA membership enrollment information is available at:
       www.nea.org/HowToJoin/stateStudent.do?sea=fl&mbrType=STUDENT.
      Website for Council for Exceptional Students:
       http://www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Membership/JoinCEC/ Student members preparing for
       employment and performing educational duties under the supervision of a licensed educator can purchase an
       individual $1 million policy for an annual premium of only $15. The policy is the same as that offered to
       professional members, but does not include job protection benefits. Apply online or call 800/821-7303.

				
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