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					               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


Affiliated Group Sessions

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ITALIAN STUDIES (AAIS), SESSION I
Cinematic Auto/Biographies: Images of Italy in Contemporary Italian Cinema
Scholars of Italian cinema support the idea that many contemporary Italian directors use cinema as a means
for rebuilding the nation's political, social, and historical identity. In particular, films such as Bellocchio's
Buongiorno Notte, Giordana's La Meglio Gioventù, and Bertolucci's The Dreamers, if considered together,
offer a new perspective on the Italian cultural and historical context of the 1970s, generating a
"reconstruction of an Italian political autobiography" (Ida Dominijanni, Lost in Transition). This panel
seeks to explore how recent films conceive Italy and Italian society in the attempt to compile a new
national auto/biography, taking into account its many societal and cultural nuances. Papers might reflect on,
but are not limited to, films concerned with the reinterpretation of historical periods, social issues, cultural
trends, and major historical figures. By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts of 250 to 300 words, which are
welcomed both in Italian and in English, to Fabiana Cecchini, Texas A&M University, at
fcecchini@tamu.edu.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ITALIAN STUDIES (AAIS), SESSION II
Framing Blackness in Italian Cinema
This session accepts papers dealing with representations of black/dark-skinned characters in contemporary
Italian cinema preferably from 1980. Papers discussing films not authored by Italian filmmakers will be
considered, but storylines should be at least partially set in Italy or address Italian cultural life. By May 1,
2010, please send a one-page abstract to Rosetta Giuliani Caponetto, Auburn University, at
rgc0006@auburn.edu.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF FRENCH (AATF)
Visual and Written Text, in Concert
This session welcomes submissions investigating the specific modalities through which texts and images
combine and refer to one another in the creation of meaning, and how the use of the interplay between
written and visual text in the French-language curriculum may enable both teachers and learners to
communicate ideas more effectively and be more aware of what is being learned and understood. By May
15, 2010, please submit abstracts either by e-mail, preferably, at lcoropc@emory.edu or via post to Dr.
Lilia Coropceanu, Emory University, Emory University, Department of French and Italian, 537 S. Kilgo
Circle, 405N Callaway, Atlanta, GA 30322 or,.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF GERMAN (AATG)
Chair: Carrie Collenberg, California State University
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE (AATSP)
The Interplay of Text and Image and Its Role in the Classroom
We welcome papers dealing with the use of images in the classroom at all levels, from a beginners
language class to a literature class. Is the use of images in the classroom beneficial? Is it detrimental? What
are we trying to teach when we use images? How is this practice changing the profession? These are only a
few of the questions we would like to try to answer.
By May 1, 2010, please send submissions, by e-mail only, to Ruth Sánchez Imizcoz, The University of the
South, at rsanchez@sewanee.edu.

AMERICAN HUMOR STUDIES ASSOCIATION (AHSA)
Funny Girls: Humor and American Women Writers
In 1852, Fanny Fern, the newspaper columnist famous for her biting satires, responded to a letter from a fan
who suggested that only a happy woman could write such funny prose: “You labor under the hallucination
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


that I felt merry when I wrote all that nonsense! Not a bit of it; it’s a way I have when I can’t find a razor
handy to cut my throat!” In that vein, we invite proposals that consider how American women writers
(from any time period) follow Fern’s model, using humor in their writing to ameliorate anger, sadness,
frustration, or feelings of oppression and/or marginalization. Although examinations of all genres are
welcome, in keeping with SAMLA’s theme this year, proposals that discuss the interplay of text and image
are especially welcome. By April 1, 2010, please send 250-word abstracts to Heidi Hanrahan, Shepherd
University, at hhanraha@shepherd.edu.

ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF LITERATURE & ENVIRONMENT (ASLE)
Ecocriticism and the Virtues of Limits
In his recent Harper’s essay, “Faustian Economics: Hell Hath no Limits” (2009), Wendell Berry argues that
in order to recover from our disease of limitlessness, we will have to give up the idea that we have a right to
be godlike animals, that we are potentially omniscient and omnipotent, ready to discover “the secret of the
universe.” We will have to start over, with a different and much older premise: the naturalness and, for
creatures of limited intelligence, the necessity of limits. We must learn again to ask how we can make the
most of what we are, what we have, what we have been given.
Berry is not the only recent voice to question our fantasies of limitlessness. Another is Berry’s long-time
collaborator Wes Jackson, co-editor (with Bill Vitek) of the recent (2009) anthology The Virtues of
Ignorance: Complexity, Sustainability, and the Limits of Knowledge. This book makes a compelling case
for an ignorance-based approach to the world. None of the contributors – one of whom is Berry – is critical
of knowledge per se, but each shows that our knowledge is dwarfed by our ignorance, and that a proper
humility is called for. They also demonstrate that, paradoxically, a willingness to admit our ignorance often
leads to the greatest advances in knowledge.
This panel will explore the virtues of limits, not only in terms of knowledge, but also regarding space, time,
and other fundamentals. What sort of limits obtain in literary texts – epistemological, geographical,
religious, or social? What are the virtues of limits? How might an acceptance of limits lead to greater
insight? Possible topics: scientific hubris and alternatives, such as Goethe’s call for a “delicate
empiricism”; narratives of sustainability; environmental justice; limit as a theme in poetry or fiction; limits
and literary form; and technologies and fantasies of limitlessness.
By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts of 250 to 300 words to Timothy J. Burbery, Marshall University, at
Burbery@marshall.edu.

CERVANTES SOCIETY
Text and Image in the Works of Cervantes
We particularly seek papers that engage, in some way, with the theme of this year’s convention as it relates
to the works of Miguel de Cervantes. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the interplay among
words and images in the works themselves, film adaptations, artistic appropriations, and adaptations of
Cervantine characters or themes, and Cervantes’s use of political and religious imagery. Presentations may
focus on one or several works. By May 1, 2010, please submit a 250-word abstract to Michael Joy,
Northern Michigan University, at mjoy@nmu.edu.

CHARLES W. CHESNUTT ASSOCIATION (CWCA)
Charles Chesnutt: The Past and Future
The Charles W. Chesnutt Association invites proposals for papers on the topic, “Charles Chesnutt: The Past
and Future.” In 2006, Henry Wonham published an article in American Literary History entitled “What is
a Black Author?: A Review of Recent Charles Chesnutt Studies.” In this essay, Wonham suggests that
with the explosion of recent scholarship on Chesnutt and the release of so much previously unpublished
literature by Chesnutt, “the time has come to pause and reflect on exactly who and what Charles W.
Chesnutt has become.” This panel seeks to do precisely this. While we will consider papers on any aspect
of Chesnutt’s work, we are especially interested in papers that engage the following questions: What is
Chesnutt’s current status in academic studies? What does this status suggest about the future of Chesnutt
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


criticism? What have been some of the critical trends in Chesnutt scholarship? What do these trends
suggest about Chesnutt’s work or our current scholarly sensibilities? What are some new directions in
Chesnutt scholarship that offer exciting possibilities for future work?
While these questions are speculative and general, we are especially interested in papers that explore these
issues with attention to some of Chesnutt’s specific texts. By May 10, 2010, please send abstracts of no
more than 500 words to Bill Hardwig, University of Tennessee, at whardwig@utk.edu.

COLLEGE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION (CEA)
Land, Class and Money: Economics and Opportunity in Southern Literature
This session welcomes proposals that focus on how land ownership and acquisition of land play a role in
southern fiction. By May 1, 2010, please submit 500-word abstracts to Steve Brahlek, Palm Beach
Community College, at brahleks@pbcc.edu.

CONSORTIUM FOR GERMAN IN THE SOUTHEAST
BUSINESS MEETING
Chair: Hal Rennert, Professor Emeritus, University of Florida
Because this session is a meeting, submissions are not required.

COUNCIL OF EDITORS OF LEARNED JOURNALS (CELJ), SESSION I
In this roundtable, panelists will discuss current trends and issues in academic publishing, including, but
not limited to, the merits or limitations of online publishing, staffing, funding, academic workloads for
editors, and acceptance rates. By May 15, 2010, please send a one- to two-page abstract for a planned five-
to ten-minute presentation on one of the topics listed above or on a related topic to Amy Berke, Macon State
College, at amy.berke@maconstate.edu or to Lara Smith-Sitton, Georgia State University, at
ljsmith@gsu.edu. Preference will be given to those in the academic publishing profession.

COUNCIL OF EDITORS OF LEARNED JOURNALS (CELJ), SESSION II
In this roundtable, panelists will offer professional advice for graduate students entering the academic
publishing arena by discussing trends and issues relating to standards for publication, preparation of
manuscripts for publication, writing effective cover letters or letters of inquiry, preparing for the peer
review process, and understanding the reader's report. By May 15, 2010, please send a one- to two-page
abstract for a planned five- to ten-minute presentation on one of the topics listed above or on a related topic
to Amy Berke, Macon State College, at amy.berke@maconstate.edu or to Lara Smith-Sitton, Georgia State
University, at ljsmith@gsu.edu. Preference will be given to those in the academic publishing profession.

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY, SESSION I
Elizabeth Madox Roberts: Discovery and Recovery
Papers for this session may deal with all aspects of Roberts’s work and life. Suggested topics include, but
are not limited to, the following: Roberts in the context of Southern literature; Roberts and other writers
(i.e., Roberts and Faulkner, Roberts and Yeats, Roberts and James Still, Roberts and Wendell Berry,
Roberts and John Burroughs); Roberts and Southern Agrarianism; Roberts’s literary and stylistic influences
(i.e., Synge, Hardy, Joyce, Homer, Hopkins, Beethoven); Roberts and nature writing; Roberts and
Modernism; Roberts and the novel; Roberts as poet; Roberts as writer of short fiction; Roberts and
Regionalism; Roberts and the politics of literary reputation; Roberts and feminism; and, Roberts and
Kentucky. Papers should run between 15 and 20 minutes long. By May 15, 2010, please submit a title and a
250-word abstract to Cristin Rogowski, Wagner College, at Cristin.Rogowski@wagner.edu.

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY, SESSION II
Elizabeth Madox Roberts & the Southern Renascence
The Elizabeth Madox Roberts Society invites papers dealing with Roberts in conversation with writers
associated with the Southern Renascence—Robert Penn Warren, William Faulkner, Allen Tate, Donald
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


Davidson—and themes common to this broadly formulated “group” of writers. While any and all pertinent
abstracts are welcome of special interest are papers which examine the ways in which Roberts’ texts are
taken up by other writers (for instance, The Time of Man’s influence on Faulkner’s Light in August, or on
Warren’s Band of Angels), as well as papers which examine themes (such as agrarianism or the making of
Southern history) common to Roberts’ and other authors’ works. By May 1, 2010, please submit proposals
for papers of no longer than 15 to 20 minutes to Alex Shakespeare, Boston College, at shakespe@bc.edu.

EMILY DICKINSON INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY (EDIS)
Emily Dickinson and Image
This session will address the perception and construction of image (by Dickinson and/or us) in her work,
with wide latitude for essays about Dickinson’s textual, bibliographic, manuscript, comic, collage,
herbarium, metaphoric, written, holographic, or printed image(s). By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts to
Beth Staley, West Virginia University, at bstaley@mix.wvu.edu.

EUDORA WELTY SOCIETY
Losing Battles & Welty’s Complex Interplay of the Visual and Verbal
From signs to photographs to letters to oral history, Eudora Welty employs layers of visual and verbal texts
in her 1970 novel Losing Battles. Celebrating the 40th anniversary of the publication of this novel, this
session seeks papers that examine the interplay of text and image in, arguably, Welty's most complex
novel. By May 21, 2010, please send 500-word abstracts to Rebecca Harrison, University of West Georgia,
at rharriso@westga.edu.

Feministas Unidas
The special focus of SAMLA 2010, “The Interplay of Text and Image,” invites us to examine the
synergistic relationships between verbal texts and visual images. It asks us to consider the ways in which
text and image converge, diverge, build upon one another, contradict one another, or otherwise interact
when read together.
Feministas Unidas invites papers that explore such interplay of text and image in the representation of
women (real or imagined) and of women’s experiences. Proposals should address these questions in the
context of the Spanish-speaking and Luso-Brazilian world and must represent work not previously
published or presented. We invite presentations that depart from the traditional format of direct reading.
Please limit presentations to a maximum of 15 to 20 minutes in order to provide ample time for discussion.
Participants in this panel must be members of both SAMLA and of Feministas Unidas at the time of the
convention and must register for the convention. At the conclusion of this session, we will briefly conduct
SAMLA/Feministas Unidas business, such as the election of officers and the proposal of future topics.
Information about Feministas Unidas, including membership information, is available at
http://fu.echapters.com/. By May 15, 2010, please submit proposals of approximately 300 to 500 words to
Heather Hennes, Saint Joseph’s University, at hhennes@sju.edu.

FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY
Flannery O'Connor in Film
This session welcomes papers that explore the SAMLA 2010 special focus, "The Interplay of Text and
Image," in O'Connor and film. While papers dealing with film adaptations of O'Connor's works will be
considered, the session's specific goal is to expand our understanding of how filmmakers have incorporated
and/or have contrasted O'Connor's themes, character types, etc. in their own works. Preference will be
given to papers that seek creative connections between O'Connor's works and films that are not obvious
adaptations of O'Connor's fiction. By March 26, 2010, please submit abstracts of 500 words to Amy K.
King, University of Mississippi, at akking@olemiss.edu.

GEORGIA AND CAROLINAS COLLEGE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION (GCCEA)
Beauty and Truth in Literature and Life
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


“Beauty is truth, truth beauty” – John Keats
In “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” Keats declares that beauty and truth are as one. But are they? T. S. Eliot called
Keats’s pronouncement “meaningless” and “a serious blemish on a beautiful poem.” Scientists and
mathematicians debate beauty in terms of symmetry. Aestheticians ponder what is beautiful and try to
determine whether it is true. Ethicists and theologians explore the moral nexus between beauty and truth.
For its 2010 GACCEA at SAMLA session, the GACCEA seeks proposals that discuss beauty and/or truth.
Potential topics include: beauty and/or truth in poetry, fiction, and drama; beauty and/or truth in
composition and rhetoric; pedagogies that seek beauty and/or truth; ethics and the pursuit of beauty and/or
truth; beauty and truth in cinema (American Beauty, A Beautiful Mind, The Truth about Cats and Dogs,
etc.); beauty and/or truth in popular culture (pop music, advertising, mass media); and, other academic
topics that discuss truth and/or beauty. By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts of no more than 250 words to
Lee Brewer Jones, Georgia Perimeter College Online, at lee.jones@gpc.edu.

HAWTHORNE SOCIETY
The Marble Faun at 150
This panel seeks sesquicentennial reflections on any aspect of The Marble Faun. Papers which address the
overall conference theme of “The Interplay of Text and Image” will be especially welcome. By April 30,
2010, please submit abstracts of approximately 250 words to Sandy Hughes, Western Kentucky University,
at sandy.hughes@wku.edu.

HEMINGWAY SOCIETY
Ernest Hemingway and Cormac McCarthy: Echoes and Influence
We are seeking submissions that reflect the session/topic description: comparative studies of style, theme,
technique, and so on, in the fiction of Ernest Hemingway and Cormac McCarthy. By April 1, 2010, please
send abstracts or proposals of 100 to 200 words either by e-mail at lgrimes@bethanywv.edu or via post to
Dr. Larry Grimes, Bethany College, P. O. Box C, Bethany, WV 26032.

INTERNATIONAL COURTLY LITERATURE SOCIETY
Text and Image in the Courtly Tradition
The International Courtly Literature Society invites submissions on the topic “Text and Image in the
Courtly Tradition.” Papers might consider manuscript illuminations, marginalia, ekphrasis, visual rhetorics,
or intersections and disjunctions between text and image. Submissions unrelated to the proposed topic are
also welcome. By April 30, 2010, please send abstracts of 250 words or less to Brooke Heidenreich
Findley, Penn State Altoona, at bhf2@psu.edu.

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR TRAVEL WRITING
Documenting Southern Travel Writing: Interplays of Text and Image
The International Society for Travel Writing seeks 20-minute papers for a session entitled “Documenting
Southern Travel Writing: Interplays of Text and Image.” Papers may address any topic suggested by the
terms of the session title. Preference will be given to papers that examine the relationship between texts
about travel in the American South or travel texts written by American Southern authors and images from
visual media, including, but not limited to, film, painting or drawing, advertising, and Internet web pages or
mashups. By May 15, 2010, please submit paper proposals of no more than two pages to Russ Pottle, Regis
College, at russ.pottle@regiscollege.edu. Notification will be made by May 22, 2010.

JAMES DICKEY SOCIETY
James Dickey and Learning from Others
This approved session is sponsored by the James Dickey Society.
In “James Dickey: Learning from Others,” Mark Edmundson focuses on Dickey’s capacity to learn vital
information from others, to answer Walt Whitman’s democratic call to “stave off the need for glowing
monarchs of all descriptions, to learn from others, not the Other,” a term that Edmundson defines as
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


“Dickey’s image of a heroic ideal-I, his self-made superego.” Much of the scholarship on Dickey’s fiction
and poetry concentrates on how his works seem to shirk connections with others in an effort to attain some
form of transcendent connection with the Other. Yet a number of his more empathetic texts (fiction, poetry,
letters) focus on the comforts, complexities, concerns, and contradictions of engaging with others. This
panel will consider how Dickey’s life and creative output speak to other-directed models of interaction and
reciprocity, of learning from others.
Topics might include, but are certainly not limited to, a consideration of the following:
How do fathering, family, and/or friendship serve as deeply imprinted means of learning from others in
Dickey’s life and work? How does his poetry engage the Orphic task of drawing the other out of the
darkness, per Susan Stewart’s understanding of poetic intersubjectivity? What relation do his poems
establish between poet and reader?
How does the nonhuman environment constitute another source of learning from others? What forms of
nature and the ecology course through Dickey’s texts, and to what ends? How might animals count as
others in his work? How does violence impact the capacity to learn from others? Can violence ever be a
point of connection as well as conflict? How do gender dynamics (codes of masculinity and/or femininity)
or sexuality in Dickey’s work affect the potential to connect with others? What about issues of class or
ethnicity and race?
All panel participants must be members of SAMLA no later than August 15, 2010. By May 1, 2010, please
submit (as an attachment and copied into the text of your message) an abstract of 250 to 500 words along
with any requests for audio-visual support, to Daniel Cross Turner, Siena College, at dturner@siena.edu.

MARK TWAIN CIRCLE
"Of its own accord and uninvited": Mark Twain’s Influence on 20th- and 21st- Century Literature
and Culture
Humor must not professedly teach, and it must not professedly preach,
but it must do both if it would live forever. By forever, I mean thirty years. . . .
I have always preached. That is the reason I have lasted thirty years.
—Mark Twain in Eruption, 202
2010 marks the centennial of Mark Twain’s death, and his continued force in academia and in the wider
community reveals the modesty of his own estimates. His books continue to sell well, and two of his
novels remain on the American Library Association’s list of the “100 Most Frequently Banned Books.”
Twain’s “preaching” cut to the heart of deep contradictions in American culture, and a century after his
death, he continues to inspire us to participate actively in difficult conversations. Like the humor he
claimed came “of its own accord and uninvited,” Twain remains vibrantly a part of who we are as a nation.
This panel seeks to use the opportunity of the centennial to examine aspects of Twain’s writing and thought
that reach forward into our own time. The scope of this panel is fairly broad, and welcomes papers that
examine Twain’s own writings and their relevance to us today. Equally, I am interested in papers that
examine later writers or performers who felt his influence: modern “preachers” who are compelled to re-
examine some of the questions he raised, the characters he created, the laughter he provoked, the
controversies he aroused, or the scathing critiques he offered. By May 25, 2010, please submit 250-word
abstracts or complete papers to Sharon McCoy, University of Georgia, at sdmccoy@uga.edu.

MARXIST LITERARY GROUP
Marxist and Psychoanalytic Approaches to the Culture of 9/11
By now it is clear that the attacks of September 11, 2001, have provided grist for the culture industry mill,
spawning a variety of theoretical, literary, and cinematic productions. This panel seeks to analyze these
cultural productions from a specifically Marxist and/or psychoanalytic perspective. That is, panelists may
do a Marxist or psychoanalytic reading of a particular book, movie, etc., or they may do a Marxist and/or
psychoanalytic explanation about the industry of 9/11 culture in general. By May 15, 2010, please send
abstracts to Charles Sumner at charlessumner@hotmail.com.
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


MELUS (SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF MULTI-ETHNIC LITERATURE IN THE U.S.)
Reflections on Identity: Images in Multi-Ethnic American Literature
In keeping with the 2010 SAMLA convention theme, the “Interplay of Image and Text,” the MELUS panel
seeks papers examining how images and/or the relationship between images and literary texts can inform,
circumscribe, or perform identity within the context of multi-ethnic literature of the United States. Projects
may consider images as constructed within narrative or place images and literary texts independent of one
another in conversation. Selected panelists must meet all registration and membership deadlines for the
2010 SAMLA convention and be members of MELUS by the time of their presentation. By April 15, 2010,
please send 250-word abstracts and contact information to Lucy Littler, Florida State University, at
llittler@fsu.edu. Panelists will be notified via e-mail by May 1, 2010.

ROBERT PENN WARREN CIRCLE
Robert Penn Warren and Sex
Robert Penn Warren’s fiction has its fair share of sexuality. While Willie Stark’s sexual promiscuity in All
the King’s Men comes to the forefront in a discussion of sex in Warren’s work, the topic abounds in many
of his other works, including most of the novels. This call seeks papers addressing all aspects of sex in
Warren’s fiction and poetry, including sexual violence, the use of sex for power or coercion, and sex as a
means of escape from reality. By April 30, 2010, please submit abstracts to Kyle Taylor, West Georgia
Technical College, at kyle.taylor@westgatech.edu.

SOCIETY FOR CRITICAL EXCHANGE, SESSION I
Jung’s Red Book: Confronting the Unconscious through Word and Image
In 1913, at a moment of personal and professional crisis, Jung began recording a series of visions and
fantasies in what would become an extended “confrontation with the unconscious.” The Red Book, newly
published last year after decades kept under a shroud of family secrecy, is rife with all the chaos and horror
one might expect an honest accounting of the unplumbed depths of the human psyche to contain. The book
has another striking feature as well, however: it is visually stunning. Comprised of flowing calligraphic
text illuminated by richly colored and densely symbolic images, it is on its own terms an aesthetic object of
great precision and beauty.
This panel welcomes papers that explore the visual dimension of Jung’s text in any aspect. Possible topics
might include, but are not limited to, the relations between textual/visual aesthetics and the unconscious;
the use of an essentially medieval literary form to delineate a profoundly modern search for self; the
practical importance of creativity and design in charting the hidden landscapes of human experience, such
as those designated by the terms “unconscious,” “psyche,” and “soul”; the role of aesthetic expression in
the development of the human psyche; and the dynamic interplay between word and image, including their
interchangeability (i.e., text that functions visually as image, and images that function narratively or
informationally as text).
By May 15, 2010, please submit (e-mail preferred), one-page proposals and abstracts, along with any
requests for audio-visual support, to Nicholas Miller, Loyola University Maryland, at nmiller@loyola.edu.

SOCIETY FOR CRITICAL EXCHANGE, SESSION II
Chair and session information will be forthcoming at the web site.

SOCIETY FOR TEXTUAL SCHOLARSHIP
Imaging Textual Studies
This session welcomes proposals on the interplay of text and image in textual studies, broadly defined,
including, but not limited to, creation of digital archives and editions, relations of text and illustration,
relations of image and caption, editorial treatment of visual material, visual representation of edited text,
scholarly editing, digital editing, editorial theory, editorial case studies, and use of archives and/or
electronic archives. By May 1, 2010, please send 250-word abstracts either by e-mail at
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


cpaul@clemson.edu or via post to Dr. Catherine Paul, Department of English, Clemson University,
Clemson, SC 29634-0523.

SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE (SSSL)
The Inward Gaze: Multimedia Literatures of the South
With the special focus of SAMLA’s upcoming convention being “The Interplay of Text and Image,” this
session welcomes submissions of proposals regarding the connections between text and image in Southern
literatures. Many Southern narratives have become quintessential American stories, while retaining their
unique regional characteristics. Increasingly, Southern writers and artists are utilizing multiple lenses of
new media to understand the South in conceptually different ways. Burgeoning media representations are
allowing for more intense and fascinating critiques from within. For example, the journal Southern Spaces
provides cutting edge scholarship and original art (short films, photo essays) from contemporary Southern
artists. The fiction of canonical Southern writers like Eudora Welty is enriched by further attention to her
photography and understanding of place. And, film interpretations of novels like All the King’s Men, Cold
Mountain, or The Secret Life of Bees offer a layering of genres and intertextuality that deserve further
exploration. This session invites academic papers, multimedia, or digital pieces on any intersection of text
and image in Southern literatures, which may include: film, art, illustration, photography, and/or visual
rhetoric. By May 30, 2010, please submit abstracts by e-mail of 300 words with the requisite information
as noted in the SAMLA call for papers guidelines, to Angela Mullis, Mount Olive College, at
amullis@moc.edu.

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE (SCCL), SESSION I
Christian Themes in Film and Image
We welcome papers dealing with themes in film that reveal Christianity. In 1983, Tender Mercies showed
themes of redemption in the life of country music singer Mac Sledge (Robert Duvall). Themes of grace
were evident through the roles of Rosa Lee, Mac’s wife, and Rosa’s young boy, Sonny. Duvall and
screenwriter Horton Foote won awards from several festivals. How have grace, redemption, prayer,
contrition, providence, and compassion have found their way into film? Theoretical discussions of visual
images and Christianity fit this session. Presenters may include showing episodes for up to five minutes of
their 20-minute allotment. By June 1, 2010, please send a 600-word abstract to Rich Gray, Montreat
College, at rgray@montreat.edu. If an abstract is accepted, the deadline for the completed paper is
September 1, 2010.

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE (SCCL), SESSION II
The Problem of Faith in Literature: Belief and Art
For this session, we are looking for papers on faith as a resource for the imagination. We are interested in
studies of how religious belief and practice inform and give shape to literary texts. The works under
consideration may fall into any generic category—novel, short story, epic poem, lyric poem, drama—and
may represent any time period, from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century. By June 15, 2010, please
send abstracts of 500 words to Robin Colby, Meredith College, at colbyr@meredith.edu.

SOUTHEASTERN MEDIEVAL ASSOCIATION (SEMA)
Text and Image in Medieval Literature and Culture
This session welcomes submissions for 20-minute papers considering “the interplay of text and image” in
medieval literature and culture. By May 1, 2009, please submit 300-word abstracts to Elizabeth Lucia,
Rhodes College, at luciae@rhodes.edu.

SOUTHEASTERN RENAISSANCE CONFERENCE (SRC)
Text and Image in the Renaissance
This panel seeks papers that explore the interplay of text and image in Renaissance works. Topics might
include, but are not limited to, film adaptations or appropriations of Renaissance drama; emblem literature;
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


masques; the visuality of Early Modern theatre performance or contemporary re-stagings; neo-iconoclasm;
depictions of women or race or gender; the sermon or religious service as performance; staging power;
visual representations (i.e. paintings, sketches, etc.) of Early Modern texts; or, book covers, book making,
and printing. By April 23, 2010, please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Lynne Simpson,
Presbyterian College, at lsimpson@presby.edu.

TRUMAN CAPOTE SOCIETY
Studies in the Works and Life of Truman Capote
Presentations on any topic related to the title of this session will be considered. By April 15, 2010, please
send submissions of no longer than two or three pages, as well as contact information, by e-mail at
stuart.noel@gpc.edu or via post to Dr. Stuart Noel, Georgia Perimeter College, Humanities Department,
555 North Indian Creek Drive, Clarkston, GA 30021-2361.

Regular Sessions

ADVANCED WRITING
Seeking chair. If you have an interest, please contact Lara Smith-Sitton, SAMLA Associate Director, at
ljsmith@gsu.edu.

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
Horror in the African American Literary Aesthetic
This session will explore the presence of horror in African American literature in an attempt to redefine the
boundaries of horror when it is constructed within the African American aesthetic. Papers that explore
lesser-known and analyzed authors and texts will be privileged. By May 1, 2010, please send submissions
to Kinitra Brooks, University of Texas San Antonio, at kinitra.brooks@utsa.edu.

AMERICAN LITERATURE I (PRE-1900)
American Childhoods: Representations of Childhood in pre-1900 American Literature
Whether they appear in literary works intended for adults or for children, and whether they are “real” or
fictional, child characters are almost always the product of adult imaginings. What kinds of “cultural work”
do child characters do in literary works? How is gender performed by these characters? How is national
identity formed? This panel seeks papers which address these issues or others centered on the
representation of childhood in American literary texts before 1900. By May 15, 2010, please submit
inquiries and/or abstracts of 250 words to Chris Nesmith, University of South Carolina-Columbia, at
cnesmith@sc.edu.

AMERICAN LITERATURE II (POST 1900)
Illustrated Texts in American Literature
In keeping with SAMLA’s theme for the year, this session will explore how text and image have interacted
in American literature since 1900. This panel will be open to analyses of comic books, graphic novels, or
any type of illustrated texts that seek to elucidate how the presence of images adds to (or detracts from) the
goals, themes, or subject matter of the text. By May 15, 2010, please send 250- to 300-word abstracts and
current CVs to Victoria Bryan, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, at
Victoria.M.Bryan@gmail.com.

APPALACHIAN LITERATURE
Labor and Leisure
This session will explore attitudes toward work and/or play in Appalachian literature and may include some
attention to the interplay between these two activities. Proposals and presentations that consider any
approach to labor and/or leisure in poetry, fiction, or non-fiction by Appalachian writer(s) are welcome.
The subject may touch on topics related to gender, race, class, environmentalism; the other arts; human
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


relationships; and/or time. Activities of labor and leisure may contrast to time spent in contemplation, and
such activities may be a primary or secondary focus of the literature. By May 1, 2010, please submit
abstracts of at least 250 words to Libby Broadwell, Christian Brothers University, at lbroadwe@cbu.edu.

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Rewriting Traditional Literature: Transformations of Fairy Tales, Folklore, and the Unearthed
Undead
Textual adaptations of traditional literatures have long been written and discussed. Recent incarnations,
such as Disney’s film The Princess and the Frog (2009) or Michael Buckley’s The Sisters Grimm series
illustrate our continued fascination with such literatures. Other authors, such as Ryan C. Thomas with The
Undead World of Oz or W. Bill Czolgosz and his text Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim,
have chosen to dig deep into the tales of the undead to breathe new life into such stories. This panel seeks
to explore the transformations such tales have undergone and how such retellings impact the lore regarding
such works. In keeping with the conference theme, “The Interplay of Image and Text,” essays that engage
adaptations into a video game, comic book, graphic novel, and/or film formats are particularly encouraged,
though all papers that address the above concerns are welcomed. Papers addressing retellings from all time
periods, not just those pertaining to contemporary adaptations, are also sought.
Topics may include, but are not limited to, magic-uses, belief in/practice of, access to such power;
gendered spaces and performance of gender; revisions of “powers” of the undead/supernatural; myth and
spirituality; the impact of colonialism/the colonized; lost adaptations; and, rewritten texts for
older/younger audiences. By May 15, 2010, please submit inquiries and/or abstracts of 250-300 words to
Amberyl Malkovich, Concord University, at amalkovich@concord.edu.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Word and Image across Cultures
Inter-relations between the arts have long been central to comparative study. The current
session can thus be expected to provide a staging ground for exemplary forays into the
discursive space shared by words and images. Theoretical as well as practical approaches
are welcomed. Cutting across cultures or national traditions, possible topics include
literature and photography, the impact of visual art on texts, textual determinants of
visual art, East-West comparisons, or critical redefinings of verbal-visual space. The
historical time-frame is left open, but the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are preferred.
By June 1, 2010, please e-mail abstracts of 250 to 300 words to Nathaniel Wallace, South
Carolina State University, at nwallace@scsu.edu or nathaniel240@hotmail.com.
CRITICAL THINKING IN THE RHET/COMP CLASSROOM, SESSION I
Using Images in the Composition Classroom
The special session on composition at SAMLA in 2010 will focus on the conference theme of "The
Interplay of Text and Image." Many composition textbooks and courses already address students' facility
(or lack thereof) with analyzing and developing visual arguments, and the trend towards multimodality
seems likely to continue in the age of Web 2.0. We encourage paper proposals on using images in the
composition classroom. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: using visual images to
teach composition and/or rhetorical skills; teaching students to include visuals in their texts; new strategies
for teaching rhetorical analysis of visuals; the pedagogy of document design in freshman writing
classrooms; connections between basic writing and visual literacy; rethinking PowerPoint in the classroom;
the value of multimodality in writing pedagogy; visuals in/and the online composition course. By May 14,
2010, please submit paper proposals of 500 words to Sonya C. Brown, University of North Carolina at
Fayetteville, at scbrown@uncfsu.edu.
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


CRITICAL THINKING IN THE RHET/COMP CLASSROOM, SESSION II
Composing Literacy, Developing Agency
The 2010 SAMLA conference will be held at the Loews Hotel Atlanta in Atlanta, Georgia, November 5-7,
2010. We welcome proposals that offer new considerations of the relationship between literacy and
identity formation as played out in pedagogical strategies, assignments, and assessment of student writing.
James Paul Gee has argued that “a discourse is a sort of ‘identity kit’” that is learned not through direct
instruction but through “social practice.” Though scholars have argued about the implications of this
dynamic for the better part of two decades, how well have we applied it in our classrooms? Do our
pedagogical strategies and assignments give students the tools to make meaningful identities or do we
truncate writing to conform to the expectations of the academy and thus threaten authentic identity
formation? More importantly, how do we enable and encourage our students to acquire literacy skills for
their own needs and identity constructions? How do students develop agency as they engage and practice
the literacies of the academy? Do these activities work at cross purposes to one another or are they
reconcilable?
How may we better enable our students to engage and participate in academic literacies and also develop
agency in the classroom and in the world at large? Consider sharing and analyzing pedagogical strategies
and assignments from your teaching experience.
By May 1, 2010, please submit proposals of no more than 250 words to David Brauer, North Georgia
College and State University, at dbrauer@northgeorgia.edu.

ENGLISH I (MEDIEVAL)
Chair: Nicholas Haines, State University of New York, Ulster
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

ENGLISH II (1500-1600)
Violent Masculinities: Early Modern Texts and Modern Images
Co-Chairs: Catherine Thomas, University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Jennifer Feather, University
of North Carolina at Greensboro
From Lavinia’s rape and dismemberment in Titus Andronicus to the decimation of villains in The Faerie
Queene, early modern texts are rife with acts of spectacular violence in part because of the central role they
play in constituting and contesting early modern masculinity. Similarly, modern popular culture has
proliferated and valorized images of violent masculinity, both in adaptations of early modern works (e.g.
Hamlet and The Revenger's Tragedy) and in later models of heroism (e.g. The Terminator films, superhero
comics). This panel welcomes papers considering historical, theoretical, literary and/or aesthetic aspects of
violent masculinity, then and now. How do displays of violence construct masculinity? Trouble it? To what
extent and in what ways is the spectacularity of violence significant in forming masculinity? How do
modern representations of violence perpetuate, transform, and/or challenge early modern models of
masculinity? By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts of 250- to 500-words to Catherine Thomas, University
of North Carolina at Greensboro, at ThomasC@cofc.edu.

ENGLISH III (RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE)
The Eighteenth-Century Fatal Woman
SAMLA’s “The Long Eighteenth Century” panel is seeking papers that focus on the figure of the
eighteenth-century fatal woman. The femme fatale is loosely defined as an irresistible woman who leads
men (and women) into dangerous, often deadly situations; however, the fatal woman need not always be
aware of the threat she embodies. Papers should address some aspect of the femme fatale in eighteenth-
century literature and/or culture by addressing a literary character, artist, or some other figure who poses a
threat to individuals, gender conventions, a particular social order, etc. Papers might also address the
conference theme of text and image by considering the visual representations of eighteenth-century femmes
fatales in art, photography, and film adaptations of eighteenth-century literary texts. By May 20, 2010,
please send 300-word abstracts to Heather Braun, Macon State College, at braunhe@gmail.com.
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.



ENGLISH IV (ROMANTIC AND VICTORIAN)
Nineteenth-Century Supernatural
Ghosts and ghost stories fascinated the British reading public throughout the nineteenth-century. The
supernatural genre was an intriguing area for many authors during this time because it allowed them to
voice their socio-political concerns within the well-known and non-threatening form of the ghost story.
These writers used the figure of the ghost to carry their messages of social reform, or to raise awareness of
problems in British society that needed to be considered or changed. Thus, the “social supernatural” often
combines an entertaining ghost story with a deeper social or political agenda. For the 2010 English IV
(Romantic and Victorian) session, topics that address the above concerns are especially welcome. Topics
could include critiques of gender, economics, religion, class, race, or imperialism through a supernatural
lens; ghosts as contaminating influences (i.e., critiques of Victorian disease and other health issues);
forgotten ghost story writers; supernatural poetry vs. prose; publishing histories of supernatural literature
(in collections, periodicals, popular magazines, etc.); beneficial/friendly ghosts; colonial and postcolonial
ghosts; and, comparisons of female versus male ghost story writers, Are there major differences in subject
and style?
Accepted presenters will need to be members of SAMLA before the 2010 convention. By May 15, 2010,
please send one-page abstracts along with a short C.V. (including complete contact information) to Melissa
Edmundson, Independent Scholar, at Remmel102@aol.com.

ENGLISH V (MODERN BRITISH)
From Text to Image: Modern English and Anglophone Literature on Film
Contemporary cinema has frequently mined the modern English canon (now including works from
England’s former colonies as well as from those like Conrad, Nabokov, or Ishiguro who chose to write in
English) for its material. We solicit papers that address the alchemical process by which film transmutes
word into image. By May 15, 2010, please send abstracts of 500 words to Michele Frucht Levy, North
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, at mflevy@ncat.edu.

ENGLISH IN THE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE, SESSION I
Moving Images: Multi-Media Problems and Solutions for the English Composition/Literature
Student in the Two-Year College
Students in two-year colleges are increasingly, even alarmingly, disconnected from written/published texts.
In response, many of us have turned to sound recordings/film/television in an effort to encourage at least
student response if not student interest and engagement. Frequently, however, what had been revolutionary
or provocative works/genres (film noir, animation, music video) when utilized in English
Composition/Literature classes only yesterday, now appear to many students to be as obsolete and without
relevance as the written texts themselves. How are English instructors “moving” the image forward in an
era of twittering and Kindles? What multi-media solutions still work in the age of Avatar? By May 15,
2010, please send a one-page abstract and vitae and to Hank Eidson, Georgia Perimeter College, at
Rodger.Eidson@gpc.edu.

ENGLISH IN THE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE, SESSION II
Approaches to Teaching Information Literacy in English 1102
One of the greatest challenges of teaching students how to write a research paper in Freshman Composition
(English 1102) is developing their skills in locating, evaluating, and utilizing appropriate critical sources.
Without proper guidance, most students erroneously believe an adequate bibliographic search consists of
the first half-dozen items they pull up on the Internet. This session invites presenters to consider successful
approaches to teaching students how to use the library to find both traditional and online sources, then how
to assess the quality and determine the usefulness of those documents to their research projects. By May 15,
2010, please send a one-page abstract and a short C.V. (including complete contact information) to
Rosemary Cox, Georgia Perimeter College, at Rosemary.Cox@gpc.edu.
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.



ENGLISH IN THE TWO-YEAR COLLEGE, SESSION III
Using Short Stories in Composition Courses
The idea of using short stories in freshman composition courses remains controversial, but many instructors
find this practice useful in teaching analysis before students move on to literature survey courses. It would
be interesting to learn more about how teaching methods in freshman composition affect student skills as
they move on to the next levels of English instruction. Our panel seeks participants who have used short
stories effectively in freshman composition I or II. We are particularly interested in those who have
designed unique assignments or presentations to incorporate the study of short stories into freshman
composition. We also welcome instructors who wish to argue against the practice of using short stories in
freshman composition so that this session might prove a lively debate as well as an opportunity for “best
practices” discussion. By May 15, 2010, please e-mail an abstract of 300 words or less to Rachel Wall,
Georgia Highlands College, at rwall@highlands.edu.

FILM
In keeping with the theme of the 2010 SAMLA convention, this panel seeks paper proposals that address
the interplay of text and image. Possible topics may include, but are not limited to, cinematic adaptations of
literary works, film theory and authorship, reflexivity in film and literature, and the relationship of word
and image in national cinemas and cinematic traditions. All submissions will be acknowledged. Please
note: panelists must complete SAMLA membership forms by August 15, 2010. By May 15, 2010, please
send proposals of approximately 500 words with presenter’s name, academic affiliation, and contact
information (including e-mail and mailing addresses) to Adrienne Angelo, Auburn University, at
ama0002@auburn.edu.

FOLKLORE
We welcome proposals that explore folklore, folklife, or traditional forms of expression. Papers may
include, but are not limited to, examinations of oral traditions, music, material culture, folk festivals, ritual,
dance, and folklore collectors. Proposals that investigate literary, filmic, or other interpretations of folklore
are also welcome. By May 15, 2010, please submit a brief proposal of 250 words to Emily Kader, Emory
University, at ekader@emory.edu.

FRENCH I (MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE)
“The Representation of the Other” in Medieval and Renaissance French Literature
This session welcomes submissions for 20-minute papers on any aspect of the representation of the "Other"
(social, cultural, etc.,) in French medieval and renaissance literature and culture. By May 1, 2010, please
submit 300-word abstracts to Vilay Lyxuchouky, University of Georgia, at vilayly@uga.edu.

FRENCH II (17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES)
This session is open to papers pertaining to French studies of the 17 th and 18th centuries. By April 30, 2010,
please submit 250- to 300-word abstracts to Virginie Cassidy, Georgetown University, at
virginie_cassidy@georgetowncollege.edu.

FRENCH III (19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES)
Hommage à Sembene Ousmane
This panel invites proposals that explore any aspects of Sembene Ousmane’s life, works, and politics. By
May15, 2010, please submit proposals of not more than 350 words in French or English to Martine
Boumtje, Southern Arkansas University, at meboumtje@saumag.edu.

GAY AND LESBIAN STUDIES
Fatal Attractions: Homoeroticism in the Novels of Patricia Highsmith and Their Film Adaptations
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


In line with this year’s conference theme, we invite papers on gay and lesbian themes in Highsmith’s
novels and their representation, or absence, in film adaptations of her work. In Bruce R. Smith’s famous
study of homosexual desire in Shakespeare’s England, the author distinguishes categories of gay
interaction, including “Combatants and Comrades,” “The Secret Sharer,” and “Master and Minion”: these,
or other definitions, such as “Friend,” “Sister,” or “Other Self” might well be applied to Highsmith’s
characters, such as Bruno Anthony from Strangers on a Train, or the infamous Tom Ripley, with their fatal
attraction to “others.” By June 01, 2010, please submit a 250-300 word abstract or complete papers, either
by post to Dr. Linda Rohrer Paige, Georgia Southern University, Department of Literature and Phil., P. O.
Box 8023, Statesboro GA 30460-8023 or via e-mail at lpaige@georgiasouthern.edu. Additionally, Dr.
Paige can be reached at 912-690-4660 for questions.

GERMAN I (MEDIEVAL, RENAISSANCE, AND BAROQUE)
Chair: Jocelyn McDaniel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

GERMAN II
Rivalry, Resentment, Conflict and War: Auto- and Hetero-image in German Literature, Drama and
Film (1700-1913)
In times of extreme political and social change, there is always a stronger need for explorations of personal
and national identity, and the most common approach to define the self is by contrasting it to the other. In
the aftermath of the French Revolution, the wars of liberation against Napoleon, the dissolution of the Holy
German Empire and German (dualism the differentiation between self and other, familiar and alien) is at
the very root of German philosophy, literature, and drama.
Topics that could be addressed may include but are not limited to conflicts of identity and alterity in
historic, fantastic, and imaginary genres; dualistic oppositions (savage versus civilized / East versus West);
progression and development of self and other in depictions of war and conflict; self and other in gothic
novels, cartoons, caricatures, and travel writing; historical or legendary personifications of German
characteristics; discourse of national character and national heroes; poetics of ethnic and national
stereotypes; and orientalism.
By April 30, 2010, please submit abstracts of about 300 words to Heidi Denzel de Tirado, Universiteit van
Amsterdam / Freie Universität Berlin, at HeidiDenzel@gmx.net. Notification of acceptance will be sent by
May, 2010.

GERMAN III (1933-PRESENT)
Chair: Magdalen Stanley, Washington University in St. Louis
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

GRADUATE STUDENTS’ FORUM IN ENGLISH
Politics and Literature
The idea for this panel is parallel to an issue-topic in the Pennsylvania Literary Journal,
http://sites.google.com/site/pennsylvaniajournal, founded by the chair. Hopefully, the papers presented in
this panel will be edited into articles for the journal. Many literary theorists from Karl Marx to Ana
Castillo's Chicana feminism are rooted in political science rather than in purely textual analysis. Classical
and modern authors frequently blend politics with fiction. Dumas and Shakespeare dramatized political
maneuverings in their histories and tragedies. Stowe, Dickens, and Twain wrote against slavery in their
novels, journals, and letters. Political sarcasm and satire has been a dominant form of popular and elite
expression from Aristophanes to Swift and to the modern-day comedians. Realists and naturalists made
melancholic anti-poverty and corruption stands. Cooper pled for the rights of the Native Americans, and
Conrad protested against colonialism. These are some examples of canonical encounters between the
causes of social justice and literary interpretations or portrayals of the ills that plague humanity. All literary
periods from the beginning of written thought to the present day are relevant. One should be able to read
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


his or her paper in fifteen minutes. By May 1, 2010, please submit a title, a brief abstract of approximately
250 words and a C.V. or resume to Anna Faktorovich, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, at
annafaktor@yahoo.com.

GRADUATE STUDENTS’ FORUM IN FRENCH
This session is open to graduate students who are invited to present their current work. Represented fields
usually include linguistics, applied linguistics, cultural studies, film and literature. Works dealing with the
Middle Ages, the early modern period, 19th- and 20th- century French and Francophone literature and
culture, and contemporary issues, are welcome. By May 25, 2010, please send a short bio-bibliography (4-5
lines maximum), and indicate clearly whether A/V equipment is needed along with an abstract of 100-
to150-words to Christophe Ippolito, Georgia Institute of Technology, at
christophe.ippolito@modlangs.gatech.edu.

GRADUATE STUDENTS’ POETS’ CIRCLE
Contemporary Poets and Their Interplay of Text and Image
For SAMLA’s conference in 2010, the Graduate Students’ Poets’ Circle will feature the poetry of four
graduate students. With the special focus of the 2010 SAMLA Convention being “The Interplay of Text
and Image,” this poetry circle will discuss how contemporary poets use both text and image, and the poets
will read from their work that embraces this sense of interplay. By May 1, 2010, please submit a bio and
sample of three poems to Charlotte Pence, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, at cpence1@utk.edu.

GRADUATE STUDIES IN GERMAN DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Seeking chair. If you have an interest, please contact Lara Smith-Sitton, SAMLA Associate Director, at
ljsmith@gsu.edu.

GRADUATE STUDIES IN ITALIAN DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Italian Visual Art in Relation to Literature: Analyzing the Separation between Fact and
Embellishment
This session will explore the relation between text and image through varied analyses and methodologies of
films, photography, art, and technology within Italian literature and culture. Special emphasis will be given
to papers that explore the factual/documentary aspect of art versus the embellished/fictional contrast.
Papers related to modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture, though with other focus, will also
be considered. By June 15, 2010, abstract of 200 to 400 words to Shelton Bellew, University of Georgia, at
rsbellew@uga.edu.

GRADUATE STUDIES IN SPANISH DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Special Topics in Spanish Graduate Studies: Hispanic Theater
This session focuses on open topics in Hispanic theater. By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts of between
100-125 words in length along with your full name, e-mail address, and affiliation to Rocío Zalba,
Columbia College, South Carolina, at rzalba@columbiasc.edu.

HISTORY AND THEORY OF RHETORIC, SESSION I
Political Speak: A Look at the Use and Abuse of Rhetoric to Promote Support of Torture and
Punishment
Torture: What is the fascination with this arcane activity? The very nature of torture is that it speaks to us
viscerally—a prolonged sensory activity that captivates its audience with images of pain and misery. It is
something society looks down upon but simultaneously has almost an obsessive interest in viewing,
dissecting and in some cases applying. This panel seeks to present theories and analysis regarding the use
of rhetorical methods in history, literature, art and film to rally the masses in support of the very activities
that society collectively deems heinous.
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


Paper topics may concern the historical, literary, or artistic use of speech and language in relation to public
torture and execution; nationalistic or ethnocentric influences and biases (i.e., xenophobia, war); population
control; prevalence of the use of torture in contemporary film (ex. “Saw” series of films); maintenance of
existing political hierarchies; influence on religion and faith; mind control (ex. fear and intimidation); the
Holocaust and other acts of genocide throughout the world - past or current. By April 30, 2010, please send
abstracts of 300 words or less to Jessica Charles, Prince Georges County Community College, at
CharleJE@pgcc.edu.

HISTORY OF THEORY AND RHETORIC, SESSION II
Chair and session information will be forthcoming at the web site.

HUMANITIES DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Humanities and the Meaning of the Text
In this postmodern age, nearly everything that can be seen as a locus of meaning has been redefined along
the lines of textuality: gender, race, nationality, sexuality, subcultures, and even academic disciplines. How
has post-modernity’s concentration on textuality affected the humanities? How has the expansion of what
defines textuality affected the humanities? How can the humanities benefit from the cross-disciplinarity
that comes from contemporary studies of textuality? Papers are being solicited that will explore how
meaning is constructed or translated by the very notion of textuality. By May 15, 2010, please send a one-
page abstract to Matthew Guy, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, at matthew-guy@utc.edu.

HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE AND FILM
Representations of Women and Children in Holocaust film
In the last two decades, we have seen a surge in Holocaust representations in popular feature film in the
U.S. The majority of these films have been adapted from novels, testimonies, and other literary sources.
Many also portray women and children during the Holocaust in a variety of ways that demands scholarly
exploration and interdisciplinary discussion.
This session invites proposals to address SAMLA’s special focus, “The Interplay of Text and Image,”
between Holocaust films and their literary counterparts. Films suggested for consideration include, but are
not limited to, The Grey Zone (2001), The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (2008), and The Reader (2008).
Within the framework of portraying women and children in the Holocaust, proposals may address issues of
Jewish and non-Jewish representation, resistance, forms of Holocaust denial connected to historical and/or
literary accuracy, gender representation, and other issues specific to the particular film. Your proposal
should address one film, though proposals with multiple films focusing on one particular issue will be
considered.
Some general questions that may be discussed include the following: What are the differences between the
representations of women victims and men victims? Male and female perpetrators? Does gender play a role
in the portrayal of victimhood? Do children have agency in the films? What has the film adaptation
achieved or lacked in comparison with its literary counterpart? What are the moral and aesthetic issues
facing the portrayal of women and children in Holocaust films? How can literary and cinematic strategies
and approaches further develop in this field in the future? Does the historical context matter in the
representations of individual characters? The panel welcomes presenters from a variety of backgrounds
including Jewish studies, film studies, gender studies, literary studies, and other fields. By May 1, 2010,
please send proposals to Karen Schwerin, Brandeis University, at karens1@brandeis.edu.

HUMANITIES DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Chair: Matthew Guy, University of Tennessee
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

IRISH STUDIES
The Supernatural in Irish Literature and Film
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


In many ways, Irish Literature and film are haunted, literally and figuratively. Additionally, is home to
many creatures and myths and even the most famous of the undead. This panel encourages an open
approach to any way in which the supernatural works within Irish literature or film and discussions of the
ways in which the supernatural, from haunting to vampires, works in conjunction or juxtaposition with Irish
culture. Approaches may include, but are not limited to, the following:
Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Selkies (ex. Secrets of Roan Inish), Pookas, green women, banshees, hags turning
into young women (ex. Cathleen Ni Houlihan), spirits, ghosts, apparitions, myth or magic. By April 30,
2010, please submit abstracts of 300 words or less to Shane Trayers, Macon State College, at
shane.trayers@maconstate.edu.

ITALIAN I (MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE)
Italian Literature and Culture before 1600
Papers are sought on any topic concerning Italian literature and/or culture from the Duecento through the
Cinquecento. By May 1, 2010, please send abstracts to Silvia Giovanardi Byer, Park University, at
silvia.byer@park.edu.

ITALIAN II (1600 TO PRESENT)
The Interplay of Text and Image in 1600 thru Present Italian Literature and Culture
This session will explore the relation between text and image through varied analyses and methodologies of
films, photography, art, and technology within Italian literature and culture. Papers related to modern and
contemporary Italian literature and culture, though with other focus, will be also considered. By April 1,
2010, please submit a 200-word abstract to Giovanna Summerfield, Auburn University, at
summegi@auburn.edu.

LINGUISTICS
The SAMLA Linguistics session seeks abstract submissions for twenty-minute paper presentations on any
aspect of linguistic theory with a special emphasis on papers that consider language variation, language and
educational theory, and dialectology. Abstracts should be .doc or pdf format and no longer than 500 words
in length. By May 15, 2010, please send abstracts, including a cover page that provides the author’s name,
e-mail address, and affiliation to Benjamin Torbert, University of Missouri, Saint Louis, at
torbertb@umsl.edu.

LITERARY CRITICISM DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Chair: Mirja Lobnik, Emory University
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

LITERATURE OF AFRICA AND THE DIASPORA
Re-Imagining Africa
For Africans seeking to engage an American and European audience, there is a tension inherent in
representing Africa: what stories do you tell to non-African audiences? Do you tell stories of the present,
dealing with war and genocide? If so, does this play into stereotypes of Africa as plagued by poverty,
disease, and death? Or do you tell stories set in better times, or more prosperous places, and run the risk of
creating a work seemingly out of touch or willfully ignorant of real problems on the continent? This session
seeks papers that will focus on the literary production of African and African Diaspora writers whose work
recreates, responds, counters, or otherwise wrestles with outside, outdated, or clichéd images of Africa.
Literary attributes to consider might include any of the following and more: language, characterization,
setting, thematic content, voicing, and perspective. Papers should seek to address the question of how
African writers re-invent images of Africa and why. By May 15, 2010, please send proposals of no more
than 250 words for a 15- to 20-minute presentation to Justin Colussy-Estes, Georgia Perimeter College, at
Justin.Estes@gpc.edu.
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


LUSO-BRAZILIAN STUDIES, SESSION I
Chair: Emanuelle K. F. Oliveira, Vanderbilt University
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

LUSO-BRAZILIAN STUDIES II (MULTIPLE SESSIONS)
Luso-Brazilian Literature, Culture and Linguistics
The purpose of this general call for papers is to increase the number of Luso-Brazilian Studies sessions at
SAMLA in 2010. We would like to create as many coherent sessions as possible, in the greatest variety of
areas. To that end, we solicit proposals that deal with any aspect of the following: Brazilian Literature and
Culture / Cultura e Literatura Brasileiras; Portuguese Literature and Culture / Cultura e Literatura
Portuguesas; Luso-African Literature and Culture / Cultura e Literatura Luso-africanas; Linguistics of the
Portuguese-speaking World / A Linguística da Lusofonia; and the Inclusion of Undergraduate Research in
the Lusophone Studies Cannon / A Inclusão da Investigação de Alunos de Graduação no Cânon dos
Estudos da Lusofonia. (Such a panel would focus on the possibilities of including undergraduate
researchers in studies on the Lusophone world, and/or include research project presentations by
undergraduate researchers.)
Accepted papers will be grouped into sessions of three to four participants according to period and subject
matter. Proposals that deal with the convention topic, “The Interplay of Text and Image,” are encouraged,
but not required. Graduate student submissions are more than welcome.
Membership in SAMLA is required for conference attendance. Conference registration received before
October 1, 2010 is discounted. More information can be found at SAMLA’s website:
http://samla.gsu.edu/index.htm.
By May 15, 2010, please submit abstracts of 200 to 300 words including your name, contact information
and institutional affiliation to Robert Simon, Kennesaw State University, (770) 499-3366 (phone), or
770.499.3386 (fax), or by e-mail at rsimon5@kennesaw.edu.

MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
Papers on any aspect of the interrelation of text and image in the Middle Ages, including manuscript texts
and illuminations, textual representations of visuality, visual representations of texts, reading or writing,
etc. By April 30, 2010, please submit abstracts of no larger than 250 words to William Crooke, East
Tennessee State University at crooke@etsu.edu.

MODERN DRAMA
Chair: Laura G. Pattillo, St. Joseph's University
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE
Film by, for, and with Native Americans
With the special focus of SAMLA’s upcoming convention being on the “Interplay of Text and Image,” this
session welcomes submissions of proposals regarding the connections between film and Native American
literature. Like many literatures, various Native American stories both by Native and non-Native
filmmakers have been made into films, including Fast Runner, Skins, Naturally Native, and The Business of
Fancydancing. Non-Native filmmakers particularly have created narratives featuring Natives, such as Last
of the Mohicans, Apocalypto, and The New World, which present a very different image of Natives than
those created by Natives themselves. Films by non-Natives have endured criticism for their use of the
source narratives, inclusion of Native languages, and integration of Native actors and community voices.
Film has also become a medium for relating narratives from non-literary sources, so this panel also
encourages papers that engage in the growing body of Native film, from short to feature-length,
documentary to horror and other genres. This session invites academic papers, multi-media, or digital
pieces on any intersection of film and Native American literature. By May 31, 2010, please submit 300-
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


word abstracts with the requisite information as noted in the SAMLA call for papers guidelines by e-mail
(no regular mail), to Jessica Bardill, Duke University, at jdb29@duke.edu.

OLD ENGLISH
The Intersection of Text and Image in Anglo-Saxon Literature
What does image mean in Anglo-Saxon literature? How can we define the intersection of text and image
without first defining this term? This session seeks papers that will shed light on the meaning of image in
Old English texts. The topic is purposefully broad so as to invite multi-disciplinary perspectives. We
welcome proposals from specialties including, but not limited to, literary theory, medieval history, politics
in Anglo-Saxon England, linguistics and philology, and eco-literature. By May 15, 2010, please submit
abstracts of 250 to 300 words either to Elizabeth Canon, University of Wisconsin at La Crosse, at
canon.eliz@uwlax.edu or Megan Salter, Georgia College and State University, at
megan_salter@ecats.gcsu.edu.

POPULAR CULTURE
The Interplay of Text and Visual Imagery on Film and Television
How does the interplay of text and visual imagery in film and/or on television re-inscribe or break open
stereotypes of race, class, gender, and/or sexuality? By May 15, 2010, please submit 250-word abstracts of
paper proposals to Wendy A. Burns-Ardoline, Clayton State University, at wburnsar@clayton.edu.

POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE, SESSION I
The Future of Postcolonial Studies: Challenges, Opportunities, and New Horizons
Postcolonial studies has offered one of the most influential perspectives of the last few decades in critical
studies and drastically changed the way we look at ourselves and at others as it has investigated the
mechanisms of dominance. However, as the field expanded its territory to include other fields such as
gender studies, it has not been one without debates and contentions as its links to dominant systems were
investigated.
This panel will try to hold light on what awaits postcolonial studies in the near future. In what specific
ways must postcolonial theory revise itself to meet the new challenges of a world that is more merged and
more polarized at once? What are some potential tools/venues/perspectives that postcolonial studies must
employ in order to answer to the new critical challenges? Of specific interest are papers which examine the
current problems or challenges within postcolonial studies and which offer possible methodological
solutions to such problems. Focal points may include, but are not limited to, the following themes: new
orientalisms/occidentalisms in US and worldwide; new identity questions; nationalisms; war and terrorism,
profiling, and postcolonial theory; citizenship; religion and secularism; new language policies; popular
culture and postcolonial theory; new directions in race and ethnicity studies; new directions in gender
studies; new directions in critical theory; digital humanities; and, new forms of representation and
postcolonial studies.
We are expecting papers of no longer than 15 minutes. By March 20, 2010, please send the proposals to
Almila Ozdek, University of Maryland, at almila74@gmail.com.

POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE, SESSION II
Chair: Roopika Risam, Emory University
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE, SESSION III
Environmental Imperialism: Space, Place and the Body in Postcolonial Contexts
Postcolonial literature has traditionally addressed issues of race, gender and class, revealing oppression and
exploitation at the hands of Western colonial powers. Yet, in the 21st century, after colonies have long
achieved their political independence, exploitation continues, only changing its form. Now multina
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


tional corporations and international economic regulatory institutions such as the IMF, the WTO, and the
World Bank—all three dedicated to the promotion of international capitalism—have become agents of
control in the name of “development.” In such context, physical space, especially in the Third World,
becomes a contested site. Developing nations’ ecological balance falls victim to the interests of global
capital through measures presented as economic saviors with complete disregard for the consequences on
the people or their environment (for example, workers in developing nations are paid outrageously low
salaries for their work, while they lose access to their own space). This panel invites papers on post-
colonial texts that engage with the image of the neo-colonial space through analysis of the environment,
place and/or the body in contemporary or past contexts. Presentations should run between 15-20 minutes,
allowing time for discussion. Presenters must be SAMLA members by August 15th. If any audiovisual
equipment is necessary, please include a list of the equipment with your proposal. By June 1, 2010, please
submit abstracts of approximately 250 words or complete papers to Laura Barberan Reinares, Georgia State
University, at laubarberan@gmail.com.

SAMLA CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITERS
Pictures and Words
The SAMLA Creative Nonfiction Writers panel is seeking papers to consider for inclusion at the 2010
convention to be held November 5-7, 2010, in Atlanta, Georgia. The conference’s theme this year is “The
Interplay of Text and Image.” Submitted creative nonfiction papers should adhere to that theme and may
range from 1000 to 4000 words. Those writers whose works are accepted must be (or become) a SAMLA
member, must commit to attend the 2010 conference, and should be prepared to read the accepted work out
loud to an audience.
By May 1, 2010, please send submissions of the entire work, double-spaced, in legible (Times New Roman
or sans serif) fonts as well as a 100- to 150-word abstract of the work, either by e-mail at
dianaclambert@yahoo.com or via post to Diana Lambert (Warren Wilson College), 317 Surrey Road,
Cherry Hill, NJ 08002. Be sure to include all appropriate contact information, including school, home,
alternate summer address, and so on.

SAMLA FICTION WRITERS
The SAMLA Fiction Writers Session invites short stories of any length and style for the 2010 annual
conference. This session blends workshop and panel formats. Participants will not only present their work
to a live audience but also submit their manuscripts to the chair and co-presenters, before the conference
date, for critical feedback. Although short stories of any genre or style will be considered, the session chair
especially encourages works that address the “interplay of text and image,” as related to this year’s
conference theme. Such stories might reference works of visual art, photography, sculpture, and film, or
involve artists as central characters. By April 30, 2010, please e-mail an excerpt from the story (500 words)
as well as a brief abstract (100-200 words) outlining the issues or subject matter the work engages, and
what the author hopes to gain by sharing this work in a conference setting to Brian Ray, University of
North Carolina at Greensboro, at bcray2@uncg.edu.

SAMLA POETS
SAMLA Poets Reading
Once again, the 2010 SAMLA conference will feature a panel of four poets from the South Atlantic region
reading from their own work. This has traditionally been a well-attended and lively session. If you are a
poet and SAMLA member with at least one published book of original poetry who wishes to be considered
for this panel, by April 30, 2010, please send three to five representative poems and a current vita
(including recent publication history) to Doug Van Gundy, West Virginia Wesleyan College at
vangundy_d@wvwc.edu.

SCANDINAVIAN LITERATURE
Mediating Scandinavia: Image, Text and the Spaces Between
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


This session welcomes abstracts from Scandinavian Studies and the wider field of Germanic Studies that
deal with the interplay of image and text broadly conceived. In particular, we welcome papers that discuss
the gaps and closures that emerge from such interplay: what occurs in the process of mediating between
text and image? And subsequently, how have developments in media altered the engagement with text,
capital T? How have these changes and advancements reconfigured our notions of Scandinavia in regard to
literature, art, design or even nation? This panel is open to abstracts from literary studies, media studies
and the visual and musical arts.
By April 30, 2010, please submit abstracts of approximately 250 words either by e-mail at
aromo@nyu.edu or via post to Dr. Alina Romo, New York University, Department of English, 19
                     th
University Place/5 Floor, New York, NY 10003.

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Forging Links across Genres
This panel will concern itself with links between science fiction/fantasy and other genres in terms of theme,
characterization, plot structures and/or symbols. Possibilities include, but are not limited to, sci-fi/fantasy
adaptations of classic literature; authors skilled in writing both fantastic and realistic fiction; mythological
or fairytale symbology in realistic fiction; and, “magical realism” and other genre hybrids. By May 15,
2010, please submit abstracts of 250 to 500 words to Kelly Ceccato, North Georgia College and State
University, at swilleyk@bellsouth.net.

SLAVIC LITERATURE
Papers are welcome on any Slavic language, literature, or culture including film and comparative literature
topics. By May 1, 2010, please send submissions to E. C. Barksdale, University of Florida, at
barksdal@ufl.edu.

SPANISH I (PENINSULAR: MEDIEVAL TO 1700)
Chair: Bruno M. Damiani, The Catholic University of America
This panel is complete. No submissions are requested at this time.

SPANISH II-A AND II-B (PENINSULAR: 1700 TO PRESENT) DOUBLE SESSION
Submissions for this double session will reflect any theme related to Peninsular Literature from 1700 to the
present. Please bear in mind the following: This is a double session with a maximum of four participants
per session. It also involves SAMLA business, such as elections. It is hoped that there will be a wide range
of topics from different periods. Papers should not exceed twenty minutes and readers should limit their
texts to 3,100 words. Presenters must be members in good standing of SAMLA by August 15, 2010.
Presenters may read only one paper at the convention. Papers must be unpublished and not previously
presented at a professional meeting. By April 30, 2010, please submit one-page abstracts either by e-mail,
preferably, at javier.sanchez@stockton.edu or via post to Dr. Francisco Javier Sánchez, The Richard
Stockton College of New Jersey, P.O. Box 195, Pomona, NJ 08240.

SPANISH III-A (COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE)
Proposals/papers are welcome on any aspect of this session topic. Please submit one-page abstracts to
Jeremy Paden, Transylvania University, at jpaden@transy.edu.

SPANISH III-B (19TH CENTURY SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE)
Proposals/papers are welcome on any aspect of this session topic. Please send a one-page abstract to
Jeremy Paden, Transylvania University, at jpaden@transy.edu.

SPANISH IV-A (CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AMERICAN)
Contemporary Mexican Literature and Popular Culture
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


We welcome proposals that analyze the representation of the Mexican Revolution in film, literature and/or
popular culture. By May 15, 2010, please send a 250-word abstract to Romano Sánchez-Domínguez,
Imperial Valley College, at romano.sanchez-dominguez@imperial.edu.

SPANISH IV-B (CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AMERICAN)
Chair: Angel M. Aguirre, University of South Florida
Call for papers detail forthcoming at the SAMLA web site.

SPANISH CONTEMPORARY WRITERS
El Mundo Literario de Luis Araujo: Sesión Homenaje al Escritor y Su Obra
Chair: Enrique Ruiz-Fornells, University of Alabama
This session comes with a full panel.
No submissions are sought at this time.

TEACHING LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Aliens, Private Eyes, and Superheroes in the Classroom: The Place of Genre Fiction in Literature
and Composition
The 2009 MLA Annual Convention included panels dedicated to graphic novelist Alan Moore and the topic
of autobiography in graphic narratives, as well as papers on science fiction writer Octavia Butler and the
Halloween horror film series—all evidence that fiction once relegated to the margins of academia has
begun to attract serious critical attention. This panel aims to investigate how texts from previously non-
canonical genres—sci-fi, detective fiction, graphic novels, film, etc.—can be productively included in
undergraduate literature and composition courses. By May 15, 2010, please submit proposals of no longer
than 250 words along with a brief biographical sketch either by e-mail – preferred – at
tracy.bealer@gmail.com or via post to Dr. Tracy Bealer, Department of English, The Citadel, 171
Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.

TEXTUAL AND BIBLIOGRAPHICAL STUDIES
This session is an open topic in textual and bibliographical studies. By April 30, 2010, please send a brief
outline of your proposed paper (about 250 words) either by e-mail at rgreer@twu.edu or via post to Dr.
Russell Greer, Texas Woman’s University, Department of English, Speech, and Foreign Languages, Box
425829, Denton, Texas, 76204-5829.

WOMEN WRITERS OF SPAIN AND LATIN AMERICA
This session will accept submissions that propose open topics, genres and periods, but must examine works
by female Hispanic authors. Preference will be given to abstracts relating to the conference theme “The
Interplay of Text and Image.”
Please bear in mind that potential presenters on this panel must present only one paper at the convention;
present papers of original, unpublished research not previously presented at a professional organization; be
members of SAMLA in good standing by August 15, 2010; register for the convention prior to September
1, 2010 when the program appears online; submit one-page abstracts as early as possible for consideration;
and not exceed twenty minutes while reading. In view of the varieties in sizes and fonts, the number of
pages is no longer a viable measure of length. Readers should limit their texts to 3,100 words, and the
session is limited to three to four persons. This session also involves SAMLA business, such as election of
officers (Chair and Secretary) and proposal of topics for the following year.
By April 30, 2010, please submit abstracts to Jennifer A. Colón, William Jewell College, at
colonj@william.jewell.edu.

WOMEN'S CAUCUS PROFESSIONAL FORUM
Standing Still? Addressing Gender Disparities in the Profession
Roundtable Discussion
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


In 2009 the MLA's Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession published "Standing Still: The
Associate Professor Survey," a report that documents continuing disparities that shape the careers of
women in academe. Among the study's findings: women take longer to attain the rank of professor than
their male colleagues; women spend less time on research and more time on course preparation and grading
than men: and, men report greater job satisfaction than women at all ranks. The report (available at
www.mla.org and reprinted in Profession 2009) offers several recommendations that will serve as the
starting point for our roundtable discussion. The session will open with panelists offering remarks on
measures their institutions have taken or might take to improve women's status at all academic ranks. Case
studies, personal narratives, success stories, and cautionary tales are welcome. Remarks might focus on,
but are not limited to, the following: mentoring, establishing clear and equitable guidelines for promotion,
faculty development, equitable allocation of service responsibilities, training in leadership and academic
administration. Panelists will be asked to limit remarks to ten minutes so that we have ample opportunity
for conversation.
By May 1, 2010, please submit 250-word proposals either in the body of an e-mail message at
roost@wesleyancollege.edu or via post to Dr. Regina B. Oost, Professor of English, Wesleyan College,
4760 Forsyth Road, Macon, GA 31210. Please include name, academic affiliation, and e-mail address with
the proposal.

WOMEN'S CAUCUS WORKSHOP
"The Interplay of Text and Image"
By April 1, 2010, please submit one-page abstracts either by e-mail as an attachment at
sdcasado@uga.edu or via post to Dr. Stacey D. Casado, University of Georgia, Department of Romance
Languages, Gilbert Hall, Athens, GA 30602-1815.

WOMEN RHETORIC
Chair: Bonnie Smith, Belmont University
We seek papers that explore any aspect of women's rhetoric--historical, cultural, pedagogical, or
theoretical. By May 15, 2010, please send proposals of no more than 500 words to Bonnie Smith, Belmont
University, at bonnie.smith@belmont.edu.

WOMEN’S STUDIES PANEL
This session welcomes papers that explore the SAMLA 2010 theme, "The Interplay of Text and Image,"
and its connection to Women’s Studies, broadly defined. Presentations may address, among other topics,
image and text in the Women’s Studies classroom, the visual as feminist intervention, digital
communication and gender, the queering of image and text, and other topics that address intersections of
gender, race, sexuality, and class in light of the conference theme. By May 31, 2010, please submit
proposals (up to 350 words) with institutional affiliation and contact information to Letizia Guglielmo,
Kennesaw State University, at lgugliel@kennesaw.edu; include SAMLA Proposal in the subject line.
Presenters must be SAMLA members by August 15, 2010.

Special Sessions

       POSTER PRESENTATIONS: VISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF SCHOLARLY WORK

In addition to traditional paper sessions and roundtables, through the poster
presentation session, SAMLA welcomes visual presentations as well. The subject
matter for the proposal may be in any area related to languages and literature,
including the special focus: "The Interplay of Text and Image." This topic invites
presentations that explore the cross fertilization between text and image through a
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                            (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                     SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


variety of traditional and modern means--including film, art, illustration,
photography, and visual rhetorics. The topic especially lends itself to the “poster
presentations” session because of the emphasis on the visual. Please know that
while there is a special focus, we welcome and encourage proposals outside of this
topic area as well. We also would be open to visual displays that reach beyond the
limits of a “poster,” including photography, art, illustration, electronic media or
other formats and designs.

The visual representation should serve to explicate the researched topic. In the
proposal for this session, author(s) are encouraged, but not required, to explain how
their research will manifest itself in the presentation.

Examples of how a poster presentation may be utilized for our disciplines:
 Examining the staging of a particular play,
 Tracing the origins of a symbol or metaphor within a text,
 Presenting research on illuminated manuscripts,
 Providing data on methods and their effectiveness, and
 Charting linguistic trends within a particular community.

Poster presentations are frequently utilized in the sciences to effectively convey
research and data.
Presenters are asked to visually represent their findings and conclusion on a poster
in a designated space. By standing or sitting by the poster, researchers are able to
interact with those interested in their work. While this form of presentation is new
in the study of literature, composition/rhetoric, and linguistics, the Program
Committee believes this method will create new opportunities for discussions about
literature and language, and may spark innovative ways of thinking about the field.

Presenters will be required to be present for a designated two-hour period during the
convention when the poster display will be available to attendees. Typically, the
session takes place at the same time as one of the receptions at the convention to
allow for high visibility and attendance. Computer display equipment and other
technology may be used but must be provided by the participant.

By June 30, 2010, please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words describing
the intent and overall theme of the presentation to session chair David Parker,
English Department, Gardner-Webb University, at dparker@gardner-webb.edu.


19th Century Rhetoric
This session seeks presentations on any topic related to 19th century rhetoric. Of particular interest are
topics relating to the work Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, George Campbell, Richard Whatley, and the way their
work shaped and influenced 19th century writers and education in America. By May 15, 2010, please send
abstracts of no more than one page to Sam Perry, Georgia State University, at jouspp@langate.gsu.edu.
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


“A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words”--Effectively Teaching ESL/EFL Through the Use of
Imagery Corresponding to Text
This panel will discuss the various ways that film, illustration, and visual rhetoric can be used to enhance
and enrich the effective teaching of English to non-native speakers. Photography, images, and illustrations
are invaluable tools in aiding the English learner to fully comprehend the meaning of denotation,
connotation, and vocabulary in context. This panel will explore all related subjects. By May 15, 2010,
please submit 250-word abstracts either by e-mail at msantos2@FAU.edu or ESLCARE@aol.com or via
post to Dr. Myrna Santos, 3600 NW 82 Drive, Coral Springs, FL 33065.

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE, SPECIAL SESSION I
Black and Brown in African American literature
This session will explore how the meeting of black and brown identity is explored in African American
literature. Papers that explore constructions of femininity and masculinity are especially welcome. By May,
1, 2010, please send submissions to Kinitra Brooks, University of Texas San Antonio, at
kinitra.brooks@utsa.edu.

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE, SPECIAL SESSION II
Blackness in Contemporary Fantasy Texts
This session will explore how blackness is constructed in contemporary fantasy. All manner of texts are
welcome for critical analysis including literature, film, games (including video and role-playing),
television, etc. By May 1, 2010, please send submissions to Kinitra D. Brooks, University of Texas at San
Antonio, at kinitra.brooks@utsa.edu.

AFRO-HISPANIC LITERATURE
Texts of a Transatlantic Experience
This panel seeks papers that explore Afro-Hispanic cultural identity issues. How is the transatlantic
experience reflected in these texts? What cultural expressions result within this transatlantic exchange?
African religious systems of belief and folkloric expressions are also topics of interest. By May 15, 2010,
please send abstracts to Patricia Coloma-Peñate, Georgia State University, at patcoloma@hotmail.com.

Cervantes in 20th Century Europe
This panel seeks papers examining the reception of Miguel de Cervantes’s texts in European Literature and
Film since 1900. By May 1, 2010, please send submissions of 500 words to Gabriele Eckart, Southeast
Missouri State University, at geckart@semo.edu.

Cinematic Adaptations of Dramatic Works by Southern Playwrights
This panel will examine original works by Southern authors, playwrights and screenwriters that have been
adapted into film and/or television plays. Major artists to be considered would include Faulkner, O’Connor,
Welty, Wolfe, Flagg, Uhry, Agee, Norman, Foote, etc. Particular emphasis will be directed toward
challenges related to cinematic adaptations. By June 1, 2010, please send abstracts either by post to Dr.
Sean Dugan, Mercy College, 555 Broadway, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 or via e-mail at
sdugan@mercy.edu.

Contemporary Spanish Theatre: Contemporary Peninsular Theatre, 1980-2010
Word and image form the basis of the dramatic work. The focus of this session is to examine how word and
image express the political, cultural, national or global issues that characterize contemporary peninsular
theatre of the past three decades: 1980-2010. By June 1, 2010, please send abstracts of 250 words to
Candyce Leonard, Wake Forest University, at leonaca@wfu.edu.

Conversations among Teachers in Learning: Incorporating Art in the English Classroom
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


This panel will consider practical ideas for incorporating art in English teaching, including activities that
ask students to engage with works of art that are in some way related to their English studies or to create
artistic expressions of their own in response to literature. How does this interplay between art and literature
enrich the English classroom? What challenges do such activities entail? Presentations that feature high
school/college collaborations are especially encouraged. By May 1, 2010, please send 250-word abstracts
to Renée Schatteman, Georgia State University, at schatteman@gsu.edu.

Cormac and God
This is a special session on Cormac McCarthy, American novelist and playwright. Submissions must
address the above title. Submission topics can vary within the title, and the 2010 SAMLA theme, “The
Interplay of Text and Image,” may be weaved into the abstract context. By May 1, 2010, please submit
abstracts to Allen Josephs, University of West Florida, at allenjosephs@yahoo.com.

CULTURAL MEMORY STUDIES
Collective Memory versus Cultural Amnesia: Textual and Visual Canons and Archives
In his 1925 study, La Mémoire Collective, Maurice Halbwachs famously stated that “it is in society that
people normally acquire their memories. It is also in society that they recall, recognize, and localized their
memories.” Individual memory always operates within collective frameworks and contexts. The past is
therefore always reconstructed according to a group’s present cultural or political needs. They also
determine what is remembered and what is forgotten.
This panel aims to discuss questions of literary and visual archives against the theoretical background of
cultural memory studies. Do texts remember differently from images? How can memory in its disembodied
form (as text or image) be used or abused? How do changes in literary and medial canon reflect the way
communities like to remember? How is our way to reconstruct the past influenced by current identity
politics?
Presentations should run between 15-20 minutes, allowing time for discussion. Presenters must be SAMLA
members by August 15th. If any audiovisual equipment is necessary, please include a list of the equipment
with your proposal. By May 20, 2010, please send abstracts of approximately 250 words to Balthazar
Becker, City University of New York, at bastian.balthazar.becker@live.com.

Country Lyricists
This panel explores the contributions of country music lyricists to the literary canon; approaches can
include literary influences on particular writers, lyricists' thematic affinities, or particular themes addressed
by a number of lyricists. While submissions may feature the work of singer/songwriters, submissions must
emphasize subjects' work as writers and not as performers. Please send proposals and queries either by e-
mail at holmest@etsu.edu or via post to Dr. Thomas Alan Holmes, East Tennessee State University
English Department, P. O. Box 70683, Johnson City, TN, 37614.

Darwinian Literary Theory
Literary Darwinism, an emerging field of critical inquiry, has gained increasing stature during the last
decade and now appears to be approaching critical mass. Founded on the work of contemporary biologists
and evolutionary psychologists, it is creating new and exhilarating opportunities for literary exploration,
and it is becoming a significant landmark in the contemporary intellectual landscape of interdisciplinary
study. This forum invites proposals for papers that consider literary works, periods, or authors through the
lens of contemporary evolutionary theory and papers that view literature as an extension of the adapted
mind. By May 1, 2010, please submit all inquires and one-page proposals for the 2010 convention to
Charles Duncan, Clark Atlanta University, at cduncan@cau.edu, with cc to Robert Funk, Middle Georgia
College, at rnfunk@mgc.edu.

Digital Pedagogy: What Do We Do When Teaching in Digital Spaces?
Chair: Alice Myatt, Georgia State University
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions requested at this time.

Disability and the American South
The panel welcomes proposals that examine any aspect of the topic including analysis of fiction, poetry,
drama, and film, as well as non-literary materials from all periods. Papers that engage with questions of the
intersections between disability and regionalism, metrocentricity, North/South, city/country, as well as
race, class, gender, and sexuality are especially encouraged. Work that addresses the theme of this year’s
conference, “The Interplay of Text and Image,” is also especially desirable. By May 1, 2010, please submit
an abstract of no more than 500 words to Scott St. Pierre, Montgomery College, at
Scott.St.Pierre@montgomerycollege.edu.

Disciplining World Literature
Since Goethe’s introduction of the notion in 1823, the idea of Weltliteratur has remained as elusive as it has
attractive. In spite of this elusiveness, it is today taught in one-semester courses across the nation and often
in the context of departments that are not defined in terms of world literature. This session will focus on
how the idea of world literature affects the study of literature and calls for papers on the relationships
between comparative literature and world literature or between regional or national literatures and world
literature. Papers might also address the teaching of world literature in the context of departments defined
by those more prominent literary fields. By June 15, 2010, please send abstract to Brian Armstrong,
Augusta State University, at barmstr3@aug.edu.

Early Modern Local Identity
Even in an age of burgeoning nationhood, English men and women were profoundly influenced by—and
even drew their primary identity from—the parish, the town, and the county. This session welcomes
proposals that focus on the textual construction and maintenance of local identity and/or community.
Topics might include, but are not limited to, the impact of a geographical locale on a particular writer’s
works, the depiction of the local as an alternative to or retreat from national events like the English Civil
War, or the invocation of local places, traditions, and ways of thinking to respond to the larger political,
religious, and cultural changes of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. By May 1, 2010, please send
abstracts of around 300 words to John Adrian, University of Virginia’s College at Wise, at
jma6x@uvawise.edu.

Emblematic Literature in the Early Modern: Engaging Instruction
This session proposes to explore various roles and functions of text and image as they join to “engage our
delighted sympathy” (T.S. Eliot, writing of George Herbert’s emblem poems) and instruct the
reader/viewer who “puzzles out” meanings in a space of pleasure. Interpreted broadly, “emblematic
literature” includes here pattern poems or “Carmen figuratum,” symbolic frontispieces that suggest
meanings of the work they precede, two-, three- or four-part emblems complete with motto or devise, and
highly symbolic text with no visual image. The latter has been termed “a habit of mind” by Leonard Marsh,
who in his study of the Théorèmes of Jean de La Ceppède, shows that in the absence of an artistic image,
La Ceppède skillfully leads the reader to create his or her own. Proposed papers might examine prevalent
modes (movere, docere, etc.), the appeal to the senses, the decoding of messages, and so forth. Before April
30, 2010, please submit proposals for this session either by e-mail at probes@cas.usf.edu or via post to Dr.
Christine M. Probes, University of South Florida, WLE, CPR 107, USF, Tampa, FL 33620.

Face(t)s of the World: Enhancing the Foreign Language Instruction through Visual Means
The saying goes that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” This panel seeks to answer the fundamental
question why even the most lethargic students in class become alert when shown images representing (or
related to) foreign countries whose languages they are studying. We invite papers describing activities that
involve the use of Power Point presentations, video clips, or the Internet in the classroom, activities created
by either teachers or students and used to introduce vocabulary notions, grammar rules, or cultural facts of
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


the foreign culture targeted. By April 15, 2010, please submit abstracts of about 200 words of your
proposed paper to Gabriella Baika, Florida Institute of Technology, at gbaika@fit.edu.

Faulkner’s Narrators
The ambiguity behind Faulkner’s narrators can be astounding and confusing – and wonderfully ripe for
analysis. This session welcomes abstracts that seek to elucidate the vagueness that colors any aspect of
Faulkner’s narrators. Abstracts that incorporate this year’s convention theme of “The Interplay of Text and
Image” are welcome, but not required. By May 15, 2010, please submit 250- to 300-word abstracts and
current CVs to Victoria Bryan, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, at
Victoria.M.Bryan@gmail.com.

Firsts in Mystery and Detective Fiction
This session seeks 15-minute papers in English on works in English or any modern language in this genre,
focused on the first in a language, country, ethnicity, gender, sub-genre, etc., or the first to employ a
character type, plot device, motif, or anything distinctive. Welcomed in particular are papers that challenge
received views or share discoveries that will promote discussion. I will develop this panel to represent
SAMLA's broad constituency of literature and language professors, to look like SAMLA. By May 1, 2010,
send one-page abstracts to Martha E. Cook, Longwood, University, at cookme@longwood.edu.

FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE AND CINEMA
Nostalgia for Lost Paradises in Francophone Literature and Cinema
This panel examines the various forms through which nostalgia is expressed in Francophone Literature and
Cinema. By April 1, 2010, please submit abstracts of 250 words written in English or in French to Carla
Calargé, Florida Atlanta University, at ccalarge@fau.edu or to Vincent Simédoh, University of
Lethbridge, Canada, at vincentsimedoh@yahoo.com.

GERMAN STUDIES
Reshaping the Body – Rewriting Identity
Among other things, the human body functions as a text, both a product and a producer of cultural
discourse. Similarly, remaking the physical appearance of the self and others constitutes an act of rewriting
identity. This panel aims to explore the cultural, social, political and artistic significance of (representations
of) body modifications within the context of the German speaking countries. Possible topics include, but
are not limited to, the body as site of social and economic status, beauty ideals and aesthetic surgery, the
transsexual body, alteration and assimilation, self-adornment vs. self-mutilation, inscriptions of power, the
mechanical body, scars of the past, and the changing faces of the future. By June 1, 2010, please submit
abstracts of no more than 300 words to Brechtje Beuker, University of Georgia, at bbeuker@uga.edu.
Intertextuality in the Works of Caryl Phillips
Over the course of his nearly thirty-year career as a writer, the Caribbean/black British writer Caryl Phillips
has received considerable attention for his unique literary aesthetic that involves the fragmentation and
juxtaposition of multiple story lines in any given text. But Phillips has also been consistent in his use of
intertexuality, for in his fiction and his non-fiction, he has made extensive and explicit use of a wide range
of historical and literature sources. While Phillips' intertextuality never goes the way of pastiche or "literary
cannibalism," it is a critical component of his prominent themes and interests in history, in identity, and in
the effects of exclusionary practices across race, space, and time. This panel welcomes papers that examine
Phillips' intertexuality in general or in relation to particular texts. By May 1, 2010, please send 250-word
abstracts to Renée Schatteman, Georgia State University, at schatteman@gsu.edu.

Mark Twain’s 175th Anniversary of his Birth: “New Beginnings”
The year 2010 is important. November 30, 2010, is the 175th anniversary of Mark Twain/Samuel Clemen’s
birth. In this special session, we will celebrate the many “beginnings” in Mark Twain’s life. These
beginnings could include the start of his life, his inventions, and his works that are the first of that type of
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


publishing; for example, Connecticut Yankee is the first science fiction book in America. Please submit
abstracts to Jules Hojnowski, Independent Scholar, at jah@twcny.rr.com.

Mothers & Motherhood in Literature of Women of Color in the Twentieth/Twenty-first Century
This session seeks papers dealing with how mothers mother, and the relationship between a mother’s
mothering and the psychological impact it has on her child. Any subject matter connected to mothers in
literature of women of color will be considered, such as other mothers, community mothers, mothers in
war, mother from different social-economic backgrounds, etc. I encourage papers and research on literature
of African-American, Chicana, Latina, Native American, and all other women of color.
Abstracts should be between 250 and 300 words and will only be accepted by e-mail. By May 14, 2010, by
5 p.m., graduate as well as undergraduate and independent scholars are encouraged to send their abstracts
to Adriane Niedorf-Pierson, University of Texas at San Antonio, at oxn847@my.utsa.edu. Acceptance
notifications will be sent out via e-mail by midnight on May 7, 2010.

Music of Poetry/Poetry of Music
Chair: Jim Clark, Barton College
This session comes with a full panel. No submissions are sought at this time.

Nature and Its Discontents
“Nature and Its Discontents” will explore the ontological, epistemological, and theological significances of
“the natural” in relation to literature and to life. Possible topics may include the following: the varieties of
human nature; environmental philosophy vis-à-vis queer, feminist, postcolonial, critical race and/or post
humanist theory; the aesthetics of life cycles; violence and peace in the ecological order; natural disaster
and environmental risk; terror, wonder, and the sublime. By June 1, 2010, please send 300-word abstracts
to Robert Azzarello, Southern University New Orleans, at razzarello@suno.edu.

Poetry Reading Session: "Des Hymnagistes" Poets
Chair: H. R. Stoneback, State University of New York at New Paltz
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are requested at this time.

(Re)Constructing the American West
In his essay “Walking,” Henry David Thoreau says, “We go eastward to realize history and study the works
of art and literature, retracing the steps of the race; we go westward as into the future, with a spirit of
enterprise and adventure.” Similarly, in All the King’s Men, Robert Penn Warren’s protagonist remarks on
a trip westward, “For West is where we all plan to go some day.” Yet, Warren’s west is starkly different
from Thoreau’s. The myth of the American West has provided a geographical space for philosophers,
writers, artists, and filmmakers to interrogate, personal as well as cultural, ambivalence towards the
promises of Manifest Destiny, the American Dream, capitalism, individualism, diversity, and community.
As a result, the metaphorical nature of the American West has reached mythic proportions and is constantly
being deconstructed and re-imagined. Thinking about what Roland Barthes says about myth, that “it
transforms history into nature,” this panel seeks to examine, through text and/or image, how the myth of the
American West has been challenged, transformed, recuperated, or reconstructed since Thoreau. Papers
dealing with any aspect of the American West will be considered; but papers dealing with the convention’s
theme, “The Interplay of Text and Image,” are strongly encouraged. By May 15, 2010, please send 250-
word abstracts to Amber Estlund, Georgia State University, at engale@langate.gsu.edu.

Re-examining the Theme of the Journey in Italian Literature before 1900
From Dante to Ariosto, from Foscolo and Leopardi to Manzoni, scholars of Italian literature have engaged
critical points of view on the subject of the journey. The vast implications of this trope invite our re-
examinations of the theme of the journey. Spiritual journeys, journeys of self-discovery, the exile, the
hero’s quest, real versus imaginary journeys, and other variations on this topic will be considered for
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


inclusion in this session. By May 1, 2010, please submit 250-word abstracts to Daria Valentini, Stonehill
College, at dvalentini@stonehill.edu.

Religion and World Literature: Imago Dei in Contemporary World Literature
Imago Dei: humanity contains the image of God. What does this idea look like in late twentieth-century
world literature (1970-2010)? What does it look like outside the Judeo-Christian tradition? How have
globalization, technologization, secularization, post-secularization and other historical developments
created new “images of God”? In what ways are modern “images of God” syncretic and in what ways are
they traditional? By May 15, 2010, please send a one-page abstract to Steve Pearson, University of
Tennessee, Knoxville, at aristophanes68@hotmail.com.

Religious Oratory Rhetoric in the Streets and the Pulpit
Co-Chairs: Lynee Lewis Gaillet, Georgia State University and Amanda Mills, Georgia State University
This session seeks submissions that examine the relationships and intersections of rhetoric and religion.
Topics include, but are not limited to investigating the rhetorical elements of homiletics; theology and
logology; historical analysis of religious rhetoric development; methodology; religion, rhetoric and space;
intersections of race, class and gender; language and practice; and controversies within the field. We are
particularly interested in proposals that skirt or problematize traditional interpretations of religious oratory
rhetoric. By May 1, 2010, please send an abstract of no longer than one page either by e-mail at
amills8@student.gsu.edu or via post to Amanda Mills, Georgia State University, Department of English,
P.O. Box 3968, Atlanta, GA 30303-3968.

Representations of Southern Cultures on Screen
This session will emphasize ways in which Hollywood has represented Southern culture as originally found
in short stories, novels, and plays by Southern authors. Elements to be considered could include filmic
representations of social and political events, regional cultures, landscapes, characters, language, and the
unique vision of individual authors. Use of visuals and excerpts from representative films are encouraged.
By June 1, 2010, please send abstacts either by post to Dr. Paul Trent, Mercy College, 555 Broadway,
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 or via e-mail at Ptrent@mercy.edu.

SAMLA Literature Writers: Readings of Fiction, Poetry, and Literary Nonfiction
Chair: Melissa D. Fletcher Keith, Kennesaw State University
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are requested at this time.

SCOTTISH STUDIES
Interdisciplinarity in Scottish Studies
In keeping with the conference focus on the interplay of text and image, this session will explore the
interplay of disciplines, especially but not limited to the interplay of literature and art, in Scottish Studies.
Welcome are 20-minute papers that consider how Scottish literary works or history have been illustrated or
adapted to other media; how verbal and visual modes of analysis complement or conflict with each other;
or how the collaborations of writers, artists and scholars have shaped/are shaping the features of Scottish
studies today. By May 1, 2010, please submit proposals of approximately 500 words to Regina Hewitt,
University of South Florida, at hwt87@earthlink.net or rhewitt@cas.usf.edu.

Servants and the Text
While we have many accounts of reading and the emerging middle class in eighteenth-century England, our
understanding of literacy for domestic servants is less clear. There is evidence that a range of men and
women servants read for pleasure and self-improvement. Ironically, as the number of domestic servants
who were able to read grew steadily, writers became aware of how the text can affect moral character. As
Judith Frank points out, “along with women and apprentices, servants stood at the boundary of the
literacy/non-literacy divide, and as such were a particular source of anxiety to the eighteenth-century ruling
               2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                              (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                       SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


class, which was acutely aware of the ideology-forming powers of the printed word.” This panel invites
proposals for papers that consider the influence of print (i.e. novels, periodicals, pamphlets, conduct
literature) on eighteenth-century servants. Papers from other historical periods are also welcome.
By May 15, 2010, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words in the body of an e-mail, with your
CV as an attachment to Kathleen Alves, St. John’s University, at tamayok@stjohns.edu.

Service Learning Roundtable Discussion: Using New Media in the Service Learning Classroom
As service-learning projects become more widely used in the humanities classroom, we start to consider
more seriously the pedagogy of service learning and the best ways to reach out to students participating in
service learning projects. One way we can facilitate service learning is through the use of new media. This
session will discuss the use of new media (such as podcasting, video podcasting, wikis, blogs, websites,
social media, etc.) as a pedagogical tool in the service-learning humanities classroom. I seek to organize a
panel of four or five presenters to explore the uses of new media in service learning projects.
By June 5, 2010, please submit a 250-word abstract detailing your experience using new media in the
context of a service-learning project, including specific information regarding the new media form used
(podcast, video podcast or vodcast, wiki, blog, website, etc.) and the way new media functions as a
pedagogical tool, to Laura Howard, Georgia State University, at laura.w.howard@gmail.com.

Shakespeare and Victorian Drama
Chair: Robert Sawyer, East Tennessee State University
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are requested at this time.

Southerners in Contemporary Film
All proposals relating to southerners in contemporary film, broadly defined, will be considered, though we
have a special interest in ones speaking to the conference’s theme about the interplay of text and image. By
May 15, 2010, please submit abstracts along with a two-page CV either by e-mail at tfpowell@gmail.com
or via post to Dr. Tara Powell, USC Institute for Southern Studies, Gambrell 107, Columbia, SC 29208.

SPANISH-AMERICAN SPECIAL SESSION
Lo afro-hispano en la literatura hispanoamericana
This session welcomes papers on any topic related to the session subject: open topic, open genre, open
period, but must examine works by Afro-Hispanic authors. By June 1, 2010, please submit a one-page
abstract (300 words) to León Chang Shik, Claflin University, at leoncs168@gmail.com.

Special Session Honoring Dr. Enrique Ruiz-Fornells
Chair: Barbara Foley Buedel, Lycoming College
Information will be forthcoming at the web site. Please direct inquiries and participation interest to Lara
Smith-Sitton at ljsmith@gsu.edu.

Teaching Colonial and 19th Century Latin America
A Roundtable Discussion
The teaching of Colonial and 19th Century Latin American literature can be challenging. Along with the
historical and cultural distance, the Spanish is archaic and the role and function of literature are different.
The purpose of this roundtable is to share techniques, tricks, and texts that have worked well in class.
Should you like to participate and present on a specific topic, by May 1, 2010, please send proposals to
Jeremy Paden, Transylvania University, at jpaden@transy.edu.

Text and the Linguist
This session seeks abstract submissions for twenty-minute paper presentations on the representation of
language in texting and tweeting and how technology is changing the way we read and write. We invite
papers involving issues of orthography, accuracy and development of first or second language skills in the
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


era of texting and tweeting. Abstracts should be .doc or pdf format and no longer than 500 words in length.
By May 15, 2010, please send abstracts, including a cover page that provides the author’s name, e-mail
address, and affiliation to Carmen Schlig, Georgia State University, at cschlig@gsu.edu.

The Image in American Realism and Naturalism
In The Ferment of Realism, Warner Berthoff notes that "[a]t its most compelling, [. . .] realism points
towards an imaginative sociology that is at once objective and visionary. The images it yields up compose
the fragments of a book of the people, an essential history of their lives' common conditioning.” As
Berthoff seems to indicate, it is the image—as opposed to the symbol so dominant in the previous
Romanticism—which is both the subject and the object of American realism and, later, American
naturalism. Thus, in line with the 2010 SAMLA theme of the “Interplay of Image and Text,” this panel
seeks to explore the uses of the image—broadly conceived—in texts of American realism and naturalism.
While papers should focus on texts from the periods of American realism and naturalism proper (roughly
1885-1925), the view of how these texts are critically or theoretically connected to the concept of the image
is entirely open. Possible topics include, but are in no way limited to 1) The image and/as verisimilitude; 2)
The aesthetic image; 3) The image of the individual or individuality; 4) The image of “the world;” 5) The
image of the Other (be they in terms of gender, race, class, etc.; 6) The image of the city; 7) The historical
image (images of the fin de siècle, images of modernity, etc.; 8) The image of nature; 9) The image of
economy; 10) The images of success or wealth; and, 11) Cinematic images of/from Realist or Naturalist
texts.
By May 15, 2010, please send one-page abstracts and a brief bio (including all contact information) to
Adam H. Wood, Salisbury University, at ahwood@salisbury.edu.

The Interplay of Text and Image in the Foreign Language Classroom
Chair: Peter Swanson, Georgia State University
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are required at this time.

The Politics of Middle Eastern Graphic Novels
This panel will explore recent developments of graphic novel production in the Middle East. There are a
number of issues involved in producing texts with visual elements within the Islamic world. Visual
representations coupled with colloquial language and subversive themes have made the production of
Arabic graphic novels especially problematic in a publishing market controlled by government censorship.
Therefore, the graphic novels which have broken through have been those written in Hebrew, French, or
English. Persepolis (2000-2004), Waltz with Bashir (film 2008, graphic novel 2009), and Wristcutters
(from the graphic novel Pizzeria Kamikazi, 2005) were all made into feature films with wide distributions.
But within the Arabic speaking world, the prospects for the genre are quite grim. The Egyptian graphic
novel, Metro (2008), was confiscated and banned shortly after it was published. In more liberal Lebanon,
there have been a few graphic novels that have surfaced but with little following (for example, Mazen
Kerbaj). The papers presented in this panel will address the varied landscape of graphic novel publishing in
the Middle East, censorship, their themes, and their audiences both at home and abroad. Please submit
abstracts to Kari Neely, Middle Tennessee State University, at ksneeely@mtsu.edu.

The Preservation of Place: Regionalism and Ecological Conservation
 “We seek the balance between cosmopolitan pluralism and deep local consciousness. We are asking how
the whole human race can regain self-determination in place after centuries of having been disenfranchised
by hierarchy and/or centralized power” (Gary Snyder, “The Place, the Region, and the Commons”).
“And so I look upon the sort of regionalism that I am talking about not just as a recurrent literary
phenomenon, but as a necessity of civilization and survival” (Wendell Berry, “The Regional Motive”).
This session will explore the importance of regionalism and regional writing in relation to eco-criticism and
ecological conservation. In an era of increasing globalization and permeable boarders, how can reading and
              2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                             (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                      SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
   If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                           session is full.


writing about specific regions affect our understanding of ecological conservation? How can the local and
the particular inform global conversations regarding environmental degradation?
Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, understanding eco-criticism in a regional context; nature
and place writings in an age of globalization; translating a sense of place; intersections of the local and
global; and, the interactions between a sense of place and ecocriticism in one or more particular regional
authors. By April 30, 2010, please send a 500-word abstract to Michael Beilfuss, Texas A&M University,
at mbeilfuss@tamu.edu.

Tillie Olsen, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf—Competitions and Riddles: Honoring Weldon
Thornton
Chair: Joseph M. Flora, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are requested at this time.

Victorian Images of Aging
Chair: Esther Godfrey, University of South Carolina Upstate
This session comes as a complete panel. No submissions are requested at this time.

VISUAL RHETORIC
Reading the Visual Text: Visual Rhetoric in a Visual Culture
This panel invites participants to explore the ways in which reading visual texts plays out in our
increasingly visual culture. From the bombardment of images used in advertising, to the moving image that
adapts printed text to the cinematic screen, to the increasing centrality of visual images in digital spaces
like Facebook and Second Life, our culture is one that often takes for granted the interplay between text
and image.
Proposals for any presentation connected to the field of visual rhetoric are welcome.
Presentations may seek to answer any of the following questions, or they may offer any perspective on
visual rhetoric that connects to the convention theme:
How do we as educators remove the transparency of our visual culture and use visual rhetoric to foster the
critical reading and examination of visual texts? What is the “visual grammar” that might help us to make
use of what Gunther Kress refers to as the “regularities” (Kress & Van Leeuwen 1996, Kress 2003) that our
visual culture has produced as the interplay between text and image becomes ever more pervasive in all
forms of communication? In what ways does visual rhetoric explicate the rhetorical activities of social
networking and blogs? What strategies have you found helpful in teaching students how to critically
examine the visual? How does the field of visual rhetoric connect to our visual culture? By June 15, 2010,
please send abstracts of 500 words to Alice Myatt, Georgia State University, at amyatt1@gsu.edu.

Walter Inglis Anderson: Writer, Painter, Naturalist, Mystic
Walter Inglis Anderson was one of the finest American painters of his generation. He was also a fascinating
writer who often illustrated his writings with his paintings and drawings, mostly of the flora and fauna in
and around Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Perhaps the best example of Anderson’s unique, and rather
Blakean, interdisciplinary art is The Horn Island Logs of Walter Inglis Anderson (UP Mississippi, 1981).
By May 1, 2010, please submit (e-mail preferred), one-page proposals and abstracts dealing with the
interplay of text and image in Anderson’s work to Jim Clark, Barton College, at jclark@barton.edu.

World Poetry in Translation
Please send English translations of world poetry from any culture or language. There is no set agenda for
this session. The theme is crafted from the submissions received. The length of the presentations will be
determined by the number of presenters; however, they are usually 15-20 minutes. By May 15, 2010,
please send requests and representative selections to Gordon E. McNeer, North Georgia College and State
University, at gmcneer@northgeorgia.edu.
         2010 SAMLA Calls for Papers – Updated April 22, 2010
                       (CFP updated weekly through May 2010)
                SAMLA 2010 Conference: November 5-7, 2010 in Atlanta, GA
If the date for submissions has passed, we encourage you to contact the chair to confirm the
                                        session is full.

				
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