Category 1_ day 3 and 4

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					Category 1, Day 3
March 12, 2012
Leah Palmer and Jennifer Hannon
Objectives for Day 3
Participants will be able to:
•Understand WiDA’s Can-Dos and proficiency descriptors.
•Use English proficiency levels to analyze classroom tasks.
Agenda, Day 3;
Language, Culture, Teaching and Learning

•   Review 3-2-1
•   Assignment #3- Shadowing an ELL
•   Review of Assignment, p.25
•   Module 3: p.35 (supplemental materials)
    • Social and Academic language
    • WiDA Can Do Descriptors
• Ticket to Leave
What we said…
What is Randolph Public
Schools doing for ELLs?
• Providing sheltered content instruction by “qualified” teachers
  who have been trained to work with ELLs (Self-contained SEI
  classrooms and general education classrooms)
• Providing English as a Second language by credentialed ESL
  teachers. The number of hours in which these students
  receive services varies based on their language proficiency
  levels.
• Accessing support services as needed (after school tutorial,
  enrichment programs, counseling with bilingual professionals,
  working with schools to make sure that effective models of
  instruction are followed, and bilingual, bi-cultural staff are
  available to provide assistance.
• Reaching out to ELL families so that parent involvement and
  education is increased and enhanced.
Newest ELL Support Services
• ELL Inclusion (RCMS: Science, Math and SS) (RHS: SS&Math)
• Language Assessment Teams
• MCAS Math prep
• ESL for adults
• Multicultural Parent Advisory Council
• Growth in participation for the ELL summer school enrichment
  program (86 students) 6th-12th grade
• Service Learning
Assignment Review, bring 3/19
http://learningandteachingells.wikispaces.com
Assignment Reflection
Small Group Share: 1’s, 2’s, 3’s
• How did this assignment help you gain a better understanding
  of teaching and ELLs?

• What are 2 points you would like to share with the full
  group/your colleagues?
Reflect on Scenario and on the rules of
communication that are in play,
Think, write, pair, share
Activity 9a, p. 20
• What is going on here?
• Summarize each participant’s point of view.
• What cultural differences in communication rules might be at
  play here?
Art of Crossing Cultures:
COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN, Activity 9b, p.21
 first
 • We expect others to be like us-but not everyone is like
   us.


         second
         • Because we are different, a cultural incident can occur.


               third
               • When a misunderstanding or incident occurs, it causes
                 a reaction (anger, fear, frustration, annoyance, etc)



                       Fourth: WE WITHDRAW
Process preventing communication
breakdown, after first 3 steps: p.21
  Fourth: we become aware of our reactions



       Fifth: Once we are aware of our reactions, we can then reflect
       on why we are reacting the way we do.


            Sixth: AS we identify the cause of the way we feel, our
            reaction tends to subside.


                  Seventh: This will permit is to observe the situation and to
                  explore other perspectives.


                        Eighth: Gathering information, can help us gain a different
                        perspective, which can lead us to develop culturally
                        appropriate expectations.
Socio-type vs. Stereotype
• “some” vs. “all”
• A sociotype is observed BUT acknowledged that not
  everyone will have the same world view.
An example of Cultural
Implications
  Listen and obey,                                                          Luck and fate
    Not question                                                          Determine future,
    Not challenge                                                          Not own control
                               Work towards group
                                   harmony,
                                 Not individual
                                 advancement




  Parents may be indulgent,                                                    High value on
     Not push towards
    Independence and
                                                                                Family life
       achievement


                              Discourse Style:
                              Parents do not verbalize ongoing events
                              Adults do not ask children to voice
                              preferences
                              Adults do not ask children to foretell
                              or repeat facts
                              De-emphasis on actions and event
    Eye contact               Sequencing
                              Parents are parents not teachers
                              Directions are given one step versus multistep
Review: Questions to think about
• How can we effectively communicate
  with our ELL families?
 • What factors do we need to take into
   account?
Reflection, Turn and Talk:
• Think about the families you work with.
• Does this breakdown sometimes exist?
• What can we do to prevent the communication breakdown?
Factors of Language Processing
The Analytical Framework


                      What is the student’s English
                               proficiency?
                       When are they engaged?
                        What do they like to do?
                    What is their cultural background?
ELLs Differ Greatly in Terms of:
 Language background              Trauma and resiliency
 Place of origin                  Family legal status
 Rural or urban background        Family educational history
 Previous school experience       Family social organization
 Home language literacy skills    Birth order in family
 Proficiency in conversational    Size and resources of the local
  English(BICS)                     ethnic community
 Proficiency in CALP              Identification with local ethnic
 Age                               community
 Age on arrival                   Religious beliefs and practices
 Family circumstances and         Continued contact with place of
  responsibilities                  origin and language
 Living situation                 Gender roles and assumptions
 History of mobility              Interests, talents, and skills
 Employment/work schedule         Funds of knowledge and
 Immigration or refugee            community support
  experience
Second Language Acquisition Theory
Jim Cummins




BICS              CALP




Social Language   Academic Language
BICS = Basic Interpersonal
Communication Skills

  • Playground Language
  • Not related to academic achievement
  • Attained after 1-2 years in host country
CALP = Cognitive Academic Language
Proficiency
 • Language proficiency needed to function in decontextualized,
   academic settings
 • CALP in L1 and L2 may overlap, despite differences in “surface
   features “ of each language
 • Attained between five to seven years in host country
Academic vs. Social Language
                                        BICS (Communicative Language)
                                Student comprehends
                                and responds to
                                interpersonal
                                language




                                                       Basic
                   High Context
               Students uses many                      Interpersonal
               Observational cues                      Communication
               •Nonverbal behaviour                    Skills
               •Intonation and stress
               •Pictures and objects                   (1-3 years)



                                                      Cognitive
     Context
     Reduced                                          Academic
  •Non verbal
     cues are
                                                      Language
       absent
  •Less face to
                                                      Proficiency
        face                                          Skills
    •Abstract
   •Inferential                                       (7 +years)
  •High literacy
     demand
    •High on
-Cummins
   cultural and
     linguistic
What influences language acquisition?

                                                         Prior educational
                           Motivation                    Experience/CALPS

                                         BICS
                                         Basic
                Social needs/friends                       Perception of L2
                                         Interpersonal       In the home
                                         Communication
             Risk taking                 Skills
               ability                    (1-3 years)             Parental support


    Emotional state
                                        CALPS                         Literacy level in L1
  Level of acculturation                Cognitive
                                        Academic
Cultural                                Language
Differences                                                                    Support in L1
•Learning                               Proficiency
Styles                                  Skills
•Teacher                                                               At home language rich
Centered vs..                            (7+ years)                     Environment L1? L2?
Student centered
Movie: an analysis of language
in the classroom
BICS and CALP in the
Classroom
      BICS                       CALP
   Morning Message   Cause and effect in Social Studies
Transfer of language skills from first language (L1) to second language (L2)
There is a transfer of not just language but also cognitive skills from L1 to L2.
Children who are proficient in their L1 will use these skills when acquiring L2. Children who are
prematurely stopped from fully developing their L1 will suffer and struggle trying to acquire
L2!!!
                                                                                             IA
                                                                                             (Internationall
 L1 proficient Learners                                                                      y Adopted
   Seek and discover                                                                         Children) may
        in the L2:                                                                           exhibit CDD
     Lexical items,                                                                          (cumulative
                                                                                             Cognitive
   Clauses, phrases,
                                                                                             Disorder due
    speech acts and
                                    L1                              L2                       to subtractive
       functions,                                                                            bilingual state
        patterns,
           and
       structures
                                         Additive bilingual state




Did you know??? Proficient bilingual and biliterate children and adults
have heightened metalinguistic awareness and knowledge that may
actually enhance their ability to use linguistic processes and analysis in
L2 reading?
-Cummins
Types of Bilingualism
It is important to identify your student’s bilingual state!

        Simultaneous:                                    Sequential:
         Both languages                           One language is in place
           since birth                            before another is learned
                                                      (new immigrant, Preschooler)




           Additive:                                    Subtractive:
        Both languages are
        reinforced resulting
                                                 Student’s first language
            in high levels                            is replaced by
        of proficiency in the                        second language
           two languages


  •High level of                          •Language loss
                                          •If English skills remain considerably
  •metalinguistic skills
                                          below English monolingual peers,
  •Cognitive skills intact                cognitive and linguistic growth
  •High functioning                       likely to be affected
WiDA, World-class instructional Design
Assessment
WIDA Standards: 27 states

 Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking based on 5
 overarching WIDA standards:
 • 1. Learning Social and Instructional language
 • 2. Learning the Language of Language Arts
 • 3. Learning the Language of Mathematics
 • 4. Learning the Language of Science
 • 5. Learning the Language of Social Studies
WIDA’s Standards: Grade Levels
  •   PreK-K
  •   Grades 1-2
  •   Grades 3-5
  •   Grades 6-8
  •   Grades 9-12
In Table Group: Alt Activity 17
• Groups 1’s, 2’s , 3’s
• 1’s present, 2’s write, 3’s check question and answer
• Match proficiency descriptor and modality and level.
   Language Proficiency Inventory,
   Activity 17, p.36
  • Reflect back on your Autobiography of a Second Language
    Learner.
  • Use the WiDA CAN DO descriptors to highlight the indicators
    that show what you can do in a second language.




p. 36
Ticket to Leave: Think Write
 • One insight I have gained…
 • One thing I struggled with…




Language proficiency is not about intelligence. It is about what you can do and
not in the language being used in the classroom.
                                                      Kathryn Riley, 2004




   p. 41
Category 1, Day 4
March 19, 2012
Leah Palmer
Jenn Hannon
Objectives For Day 4:
• Use the variables represented in the Analytical Framework to
  analyze your own classrooms as sites of second language
  learning and learning in a second language.
• Use the Analytical Framework to plan changes that would
  make your classrooms more effective environments for
  second language learning and learning in a second language.
• Explain the implications of differentiating for ELLs for
  classroom organization and instruction.
• Identify the type of information that would help in meeting
  the educational needs of ELLs.
Agenda: Language, Culture, Teaching and Learning
• Shadowing Assignment Share
• Module 4: p.37
  • Responsive Learning Environments
  • Analyzing classroom tasks for proficiency level, language input, language output,
    and assessment


• Module 5: p.44
  • Putting it all together: Reflection and Analysis
  • Looking at our lesson and analyzing the tasks for proficiency level, language
    input, language output


• Conclusion/Evaluations
  • Lesson Task Analysis
Shadowing Assignment Reflection
Proficiency levels
WiDA
Revisit SS class: What CAN
students do?
   Questions for Small Proficiency
   Level Group Discussion:
    • revisit autobiography- what level are you?
    • What does it mean to be:
        • Level 1, entering,
        •   Level 2, emerging/beginning,
        •   Level 3, Developing,
        •   Level 4, Expanding,
        •   and Level 5, Bridging
    • What can you do at your level of proficiency?
    • What supports do you need to succeed in school?



p. 36
 Activity 18: Hopes and Fears,
 Proficiency level groups
• Think of yourself as a student in a classroom in which the
  language of instruction is a language in which your proficiency
  is limited.
• Record your proficiency for this language in the four domains
  of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.




           p. 38
    Activity 18: Hopes and Fears
        • Choose a scenario. The class is taught in a language you have
          limited proficiency in.

 Answer the following:
            -What do you hope your teacher will do on the first day? What
             do you fear?
            -What do you hope your teacher will do on follow-up days?
             What do you fear?
            -What kind of homework do you hope the teacher will assign?
             What do you fear?
            -How do you hope the teacher will assess what you have
             learned?
p. 39       -What do you hope the teacher will not do? What do you fear?
Activity 19: Classroom Task
Analysis: language domain and proficiency
1.      Students given time for silent reading in class.
2.      Students listen while instructor introduces a new topic.
3.      Students watch video.
4.      Students watch teacher perform a science experiment.
5.      Students work in small groups to answer study questions,
        then report back to whole group.
6.      Students draw a map.
7.      Students answer yes-no question.
8.      Students watch while one student does a math problem on
        the board in front of the room.




p. 40
Analytical Framework:
    Situational Factors




           Language       Language      Variable
              Input       Processing   Language
                                        Output




   Individual
   Characteristics


p. 42
    Activity 20: Classroom
    Interaction Analysis
        • Reflect on the Analytical Framework: Classrooms as Sites for
          Second Language Acquisition.
        • Think about the language requirements in each of these tasks,
          and decide which students could fully engage with this task.
        • Think about all four domains of listening, speaking, reading,
          and writing.
        • FROM FINAL ASSIGNMENT:
          • Step 1: What are the tasks students will need to accomplish in a
            lesson you will be teaching?
          • Step 2: What are the language requirements, listening,
            speaking, reading, and writing?
          • Step 5: Task Analysis, what proficiency levels of speaking,
            listening, reading, or writing are required to complete the task?
p. 42
Notes:
       Classroom Task Analysis
Task      Language        1-         2   3   4   5-
          requiremen      Entering               Bridging
          ts (L, S, R,
          W)
           - students
          read a
Journal   prompt (R)
writing    - Students
          listen while
          the teacher
          reads a
          prompt
           - students
          write in
          their journal
       Classroom Task Analysis
Task      Language       1-         2        3           4            5-
          requiremen     Entering                                     Bridging
          ts (L, S, R,
          W)
           - students   -         - action    - details   - set
          read a        pictures verbs        -          minimum
Journal   prompt (R)    - lists   - sentences paragraphs requireme
writing    - Students   - short  (3-5)                   nts
          listen while sentence                           - details
          the teacher s
          reads a
          prompt
           - students
          write in
          their journal
                                           What type of
Video Example                              interaction is
                                             required-                    Is speaking required?
                                                                          How much do students speak?
                                              partner
                                                                          What kind of talk is it?
                                            work, whole
    Situational Factors                                                   How much does the teacher speak?
                                            group, small                  Is writing required?
                   Who talks? Who reads?       groups                     How much do the students write?
                   About what? How much?




           Language                        Language                               Variable
              Input                        Processing                            Language
                                                                                  Output




   Individual                                  What strategies are
                                               required to successfully
   Characteristics                             complete this task?
                                               Are there any
                                               opportunities for students
                                               to use their first language?
p. 42
Classroom Task Analysis:
Science Lesson: 2nd showing

• Step 3: input/output analysis, how much time is the
  teacher talking? Students?
• Step 4: Interaction Analysis, are students working
  individually? In pairs? In small groups? Whole group?
   Activity 20: Classroom Task Analysis

 1.     Students given time for silent reading in class.
 2.     Students listen while instructor introduces a new topic.
 3.     Students watch video.
 4.     Students watch teacher perform a science experiment.
 5.     Students work in small groups to answer study
        questions, then report back to whole group.
 6.     Students draw a map.
 7.     Students answer yes-no question.
 8.     Students watch while one student does a math
        problem on the board in front of the room.



p. 42
Classroom Interaction Analysis
Tasks           Input           Language Processing           Variable Language
                Who talks?      What strategies are           Output
                Who reads?      required in order to          Is speaking required?
                About what?     successfully complete         How much do students
                How much?       this task?                    speak?
                                Are there any                 What kind of talk is it?
                                opportunities for             How much does the
                                students to use their first   teacher speak?
                                language to complete this     Is writing required?
                                task?                         How much do students
                                                              write?
                Teacher           - writing ideas before      -Speaking not required
                explains the    speaking                      for beginners
Think, write,   prompt - 10%     - pictures/word              -Students speak 50% of
pair, share                     lists/bullets                 the time (other 50%
                Students         - L1 peers                   writing)
                talking - 90%    - access content – time      -Writing is required in L1
                Students talk   to reflect and process        or L2
  Activity 21b:     Unit Lesson Analysis
Tasks      Input/Output      Interaction Analysis   Task Analysis           Assessment
           Analysis          Are students           What proficiency        Analysis
           How much time     working                levels of speaking,     How will
           is the teacher    individually? In       listening, reading or   comprehension
           talking?          pairs? In small        writing are required    and learning be
           Students?         groups? Whole          to complete tasks?      assessed?
                             class?
Internet   Teacher           Students work in       Video for advanced      Students will
research   explains the      pairs according to     students                complete a
           tasks and gives   proficiency level      Website for low-        graphic
           students web                             intermediate            organizer
           addresses                                students
Final Project
• Write a brief description of a lesson you have planned for the
  near future.
• Break the lesson into tasks on the worksheet and reflect on
  implications of this lesson for ELLs at different levels
• What changes might you make to this lesson to make it more
  accessible to ELLs.
• Teach the lesson.
• Reflect on the lesson.
ASSIGNMENT #2:
Analyze a lesson's tasks, teach the lesson (optional-with a peer
observation, conference with peer), reflect
DUE: March 31, 2012
   • Step 1: What are the tasks students will need to accomplish in a lesson you
     will be teaching?
   • Step 2: What are the language requirements, listening, speaking, reading,
     and writing?
   • Step 3: input/output analysis, how much time is the teacher talking?
     Students?
   • Step 4: Interaction Analysis, are students working individually? In pairs? In
     small groups? Whole group?
   • Step 5: Task Analysis, what proficiency levels of speaking, listening,
     reading, or writing are required to complete the task?
   • Step 6: Assessment analysis, how will comprehension and learning be
     assessed?
   • Step 7: Teach the lesson (optional: with a peer observing).
   • Step 8: Conference with the peer who observed you teach your
     lesson(optional)
   • Step 9: Reflect on your lesson and the experience.
   • Step 10:Answer the following questions:
Reflection Questions:
• Overall, how do you feel your lesson went? Were ELLs
  able to manage the tasks? Did they actively participate in
  the lesson?

• Would you change any part of the lesson? Why or why
  not?

• What part of the lesson did you find most helpful for
  ELLs?

• Was this experience helpful? Why or why not?
Lesson Task Analysis Notes:
Evaluation Time…
    Thank you!
Thank you!
Contacts:
• Leah Palmer
  • leahlillian@aol.com



• Jenn Hannon
  • jenninbusan@yahoo.com

				
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