Gender Bias

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					   Gender Bias
           in the
     Classroom
Presented By:
       Regina Horton
       Multi-Cultural Education
       Dr. Beth Christian
       September 19, 2005
            INTRODUCTION

Gender bias is when there is a difference
made between students in the classroom
according to the gender of the student.

   This could include:
   • how teachers respond to students
   • what subjects students are
     encouraged to study
   • how textbooks represent gender roles
           Overview

Gender bias is alive and well in the
United States. More often than not,
males are favored in the classroom in
various areas such as math, science,
and sports.
The Title IX program was
established in an effort to reduce
gender bias

   Title IX, in part, states:

   “No person in the United States shall,
   on the basis of sex, be excluded from
   participation in, be denied the benefits
   of, or be subjected to discrimination
   under any education program or
   activity receiving Federal financial
   assistance…”
Gender bias is not always obvious.
Often the bias is subtle and
unintentional, however, the result is
still the same – damaging.
    While observing a classroom, a
researcher noted the teacher facing the
 boys more often and they spent more
          time with the boys
  Girls became less active because the
boys were allowed to ask and have more
          questions answered.
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
                BIASES


• No. 10 – Segregation still thrives in America’s
  schools.

  – Actually, females still major in subject such
    as English, French, Spanish, drama and
    dance.

  – Males major in computer science, physics
    and engineering.
   THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
               BIASES


• No. 9 – Public schools are now creating
  single gender classes and schools

  – Private schools often do have separate
    classes for boys and girls – public schools do
    not.
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
                BIASES


• No. 8 – Gender related safety and health
  concerns continue to plague females.

  – 100 years ago, doctors stated that an
    education caused the blood that was destined
    for the ovaries to be “redirected” to the
    brain. As a result, educated women were
    unable to bear children.
   THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
               BIASES


• No. 7 – The dropout rate is not what we
  think it is.

  – Boys are more likely to repeat a grade than
    girls. Of those who do repeat a grade (boys
    and girls), the boys are more likely to drop
    out of school.
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
                BIASES


• No. 6 – For girls, gifted programs are often
  “early in and early out.”

  – Girls begin school performing equal to or
    above boys. By graduation, the opposite is
    true.
   THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
               BIASES


• No. 5 – More needs to be done to
  understand and eliminate the gender
  bias that impacts males.

  – Boys are stereotyped more often than girls.
    Males who show an interest in a career that
    is typically a “female” career are pressured
    on a social level.
   THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
               BIASES


• No. 4 – Classroom interaction between teachers
  and students puts males in the spotlight and
  relegates females to the sidelines.

  – Teachers recognize male students more often
    than females when giving instructions. For
    some, this attention is unwanted.
   THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
               BIASES


• No. 3 – The math and science gender is
  getting smaller.

  – During the 1990s, female students did enroll
    in the typical male subjects of science,
    however, males are still more likely to take
    all three science courses – physics, chemistry
    and biology.
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
                BIASES


• No. 2 – Don’t look now, but there is a new
  gender gap in technology.

  – Boys begin school with more computer
    knowledge and skill than girls.
    THERE ARE A NUMBER OF GENDER
                BIASES


• No. 1 – Political forces are intent on reversing
  many of the gains in educational equality made
  during the past decade.

  – “Educational Research” organizations are trying to
    discredit the last 10 years of research on gender bias.
    There is a continual reminder of the “natural” roles of
    men and women.

  – 25 years after Title IX, the progress made needs to
    continue.
       OTHER FACTS OF GENDER BIAS


• Females receive lower grades on standardized tests.
• Males receive lower grades on course work.
• Schools are often bias against girls.
• Elementary aged girls have high self-esteem, but it lowers
  by junior high.
• Boys receive more attention and are called on more often
  than girls.
• Boys are encouraged to think for themselves while girls
  are not.
• Textbooks present images that are stereotypical of
  females.
Although boys often receive more
attention in school, girls stay in school
longer, make better grades, and cut class
less. Girls also take more academic
classes and are more likely to complete
high school and go to college.
Our schools assure that girls are made
aware that they are unequal to boys. As
educators, we must be aware of what
these biases are and ensure they will
end.
Treatment of all students,
   regardless of race or
 gender, should be equal.
                WEB SITE #1

“It doesn’t have to be boys vs. girls.
Creating gender equality in the
classroom.”

http://www.atpe.org/TeacherToolbag/gender.htm


  *Did not state the source of the article
  *Information came from the early 1990s
  *Stated that girls fell behind in the typical ‘boy subjects’ such as
  mach the science
  *Suggested that boys were experiencing gender bias, not girls
                 WEB SITE #2

“Gender Bias in Education.”
http://www.educhange.org/multicultural/papers/genderbias.html

 *Did not state the source of the article
 *Included information ranging from 1990-2001
 *Stated that girls have no doubt of their unequal treatment
                  WEB SITE #3

“Education expert: Classroom
gender bias persists.”
http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/96/4.25.96/gender.html


*The source of information was in a newspaper article
*Published in 1996—gender bias is not a new concept
*Gave information of treatment from teachers
*Stated the participation level of students was based on their unequal
attention
                 WEB SITE #4

“Gender Bias in Education.”
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2602/ai_2602000263



*The source of information is from an encyclopedia article
*The information is recent—published in 2002
*Gave the basic definition of Gender Bias
*Stated that although females experience more bias in school, they out
perform their male peers
                    WEB SITE #5
“Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972.”

http://www.dol.gov.oasam/regs/statutes/titleix.htm.




*Stated the guidelines provided for the Title IX Amendment
                         Bibliography
“It doesn’t have to be boys vs. girls. Creating gender equality in the classroom.”
    http://www.atpe.org/TeachersToolbag/gender.htm.

Chapman, Amanda. “Gender Bias in Education.”
   http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/papers/genderbias.html.

Goetz, Jill. “Education expert: Classroom gender bias persists.” Cornell
   Chronicle. 1996 April 25.
   http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/96/4.25.96/gender.html.

Sadker, David. “Gender Equality: Still Knocking at the Classroom Door.” 1999.
   http://www.sadker.org/eq-leader.htm.

Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972
    http://www.dol.gov/oasam/regs/statutes/titleix.htm

Woodward, A. “Gender Bias in Education.” Gale Encyclopedia of Childhood and
  Adolescence. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g2602/ai_2602000263.

				
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