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					                                HQ 957207

                             February 9, 1995

CLA-2 CO:R:C:M 957207    RFA

CATEGORY:   Classification

TARIFF NO.: 8540.91.50


Mr. Gordon W. Larson
Rudolph Miles & Sons, Inc.
Customhouse Brokers
4950 Gateway East
P.O. Box 11057
El Paso, TX 79983

RE:   Television Deflection Yoke Parts; Liner; Cross Arm;
      Corrector; Ferrite Core; Electro-magnets; Spools, Cones and
      Similar Supports; Insulated Fittings for Electrical
      Machines; Ejusdem Generis; Section XVI, notes 1(c) and 2;
      Additional U.S. Rule of Interpretation 1(c); Headings 6909,
      8505, 8547; ENs 69.09, 85.05, 85.47; HQs 953074, 955777; NY
      800718, affirmed


Dear Mr. Larson:

     This is in response to your letter dated October 14, 1994,
on behalf of Murata Erie Texas, Inc., requesting reconsideration
of NY 800718, issued to you on August 15, 1994, in which the Area
Director of Customs, New York Seaport, classified parts of
television deflection yokes under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule
of the United States (HTSUS).

FACTS:

     The merchandise consists of the following television
deflection yoke parts: a liner; a cross-arm; a corrector; and a
ferrite core. The liner is made of two molded polypropylene
forms which when snapped together, form a cone. In a cathode
ray tube (CRT) deflection yoke, the inner surface of the cone
acts as a coil form for two horizontal deflection coils. The
outer surface of the cone forms a base which positions and
supports two vertical deflection coils.


     The cross arm, which is described as a stamped metal article
made of coated, silicon steel, functions to enhance the magnetic
fields of the electromagnets which act as the vertical and
horizontal coils which are integral parts of a deflection yoke.
The specific shape to which this article is stamped, also acts to
give a more precise shape to the magnetic fields created by the
horizontal and vertical deflection coils.

     The corrector is described as a coated, silicon steel device
which functions to enhance the magnetic fields of the
electromagnets which act as the vertical and horizontal coils
which are integral parts of a deflection yoke. The specific
shape to which this article is stamped allows it to be fitted
into a groove provided in the liner supporting the
electromagnetic coils. During the assembly process, the
corrector will be slid along the groove to reach a point where
its presence critically defines and enhances the electromagnetic
field of a coil. The corrector is then held in place by the
application of an epoxy adhesive. Four correctors are used with
each deflection yoke.

     The ferrite core is a ceramic article manufactured by
combining manganese oxide with a ceramic binding agent under high
temperature and pressure. After importation, the ferrite core
will be attached around the outside of the liner.

ISSUE:

     Are the parts of deflection yokes classifiable as
electromagnetic parts or as parts of cathode ray tubes under the
HTSUS?

LAW AND ANALYSIS:

     Classification of merchandise under the HTSUS is in
accordance with the General Rules of Interpretation (GRI's). GRI
1 provides that classification shall be determined according to
the terms of the headings and any relative section or chapter
notes.

     In NY 800718, dated August 15, 1994, the Area Director of
Customs, New York Seaport, classified the above merchandise under
subheading 8540.91.50, HTSUS, which provides for: "Thermionic,
cold cathode or photocathode tubes (for example, . . . ,
cathode-ray tubes, television camera tubes); parts thereof:
[p]arts: [o]f cathode-ray tubes: [o]ther. . . ."

     The subject merchandise consists of parts of deflection
yokes which are to be assembled inside of CRTs. CRTs are
provided for under chapter 85, HTSUS. Legal Note 2 to Section
XVI, HTSUS, states that:


          [s]ubject to note 1 to this section, note 1 to
     chapter 84 and to note 1 to chapter 85, parts of
     machines (not being parts of the articles of heading
     8484, 8544, 8545, 8546 or 8547) are to be classified
     according to the following rules:

          (a) Parts which are goods included in any of the
     headings of chapters 84 and 85 (other than headings
     8485 and 8548) are in all cases to be classified in
     their respective headings;

          (b) Other parts, if suitable for use solely or
     principally with a particular kind of machine, or with
     a number of machines of the same heading (including a
     machine of heading 8479 or 8543) are to be classified
     with the machines of that kind. However, parts which
     are equally suitable for use principally with the goods
     of headings 8517 and 8525 to 8528 are to be classified
     in heading 8517;

          (c) All other parts are to be classified in
     heading 8485 or 8548.

     You contend that all of the merchandise except for the liner
is classifiable under heading 8505, HTSUS, as parts of
electromagnets.   You contend that the liner is classifiable
under heading 3926, HTSUS, or under heading 8547, HTSUS. We will
resolve the classification of each piece of the merchandise
separately.

LINER:

     The liner consists of two molded polypropylene forms which
snap together to form a plastic cone.   The liner provides
support for the deflection coils and the ferrite core for the
deflection yoke. You have suggested that the liner is precluded
from classification under chapter 85, HTSUS, based upon Legal
Note 1(c) to Section XVI, HTSUS, which provides as follows:
"[t]his section does not cover: . . (c) [b]obbins, spools, cops,
cones, cores, reels or similar supports of any material (for
example, chapter 39, 40, 44 or 48 or section XV). . . ."    The
HTSUS does not define these terms anywhere in the tariff
schedule.

     A tariff term that is not defined in the HTSUS or in the
Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System Explanatory
Notes (ENs), which constitute the Customs Cooperation Council's
official interpretation of the HTSUS, is construed in accordance
with its common and commercial meaning. Nippon Kogaku (USA) Inc.
v. United States, 69 CCPA 89, 673 F.2d 380 (1982). Common and
commercial meaning may be determined by consulting dictionaries,
lexicons, scientific authorities and other reliable sources. C.J.
Tower & Sons v. United States, 69 CCPA 128, 673 F.2d 1268 (1982).
Webster's New Riverside Dictionary defines the following terms:

     bobbins:(p. 186)     A spool or reel that holds thread
                          or yarn for sewing, spinning,
                          weaving, knitting, or lace making.
                          . . . .

     spools:(p.   1124)   1. A cylinder on which wire,
                          thread, or string is wound. 2. The
                          amount of material wound on a
                          spool. 3. A reel for magnetic
                          paper or plastic tape. . . . .
    cop:(p. 309)        1. A cone-shaped or cylindrical
                        roll of yarn or thread wound on a
                        spindle. . . . .

    cones:(p.   296)    . . . 2. . . b. Something have the
                        shape of this figure. . . .

    cores:(p. 311) . . . 2. The innermost or most important
                   part: HEART <the core of the discontent>
                   3. Elect. A soft iron rod in a coil or
                   transformer that intensifies and
                   provides a path for the magnetic field
                   produced by the windings. . . .

    reels:(p. 987) 1. A device, as a cylinder, spool, or
                   frame, that spins on an axis and is used
                   for winding rope, tape, or other
                   flexible materials. . . . .

     The doctrine of ejusdem generis is a useful aid in
interpreting the construction of statutes and tariff laws of the
United States. The Court of International Trade (CIT) has stated
that the canon of construction ejusdem generis, which means
literally, of the same class or kind, teaches that "where
particular words of description are followed by general terms,
the latter will be regarded as referring to things of a like
class with those particularly described." Nissho-Iwai American
Corp. v. United States (Nissho-Iwai), 10 CIT 154, 156 (1986).
Legal Note 1(c) to Section XVI, HTSUS, consists of particular
items (i.e., bobbins, spools, cones, reels), followed by general
terms (i.e., similar supports).   Therefore, this legal note
requires an ejusdem generis method of construction.

     The CIT further stated that "[a]s applicable to customs
classification cases, ejusdem generis requires that the imported
merchandise possess the essential characteristics or purposes
that unite the articles enumerated eo nomine in order to be
classified under the general terms." Nissho-Iwai, p. 157.

     We are of the opinion that the subject liner is not ejusdem
generis with the articles described within Legal Note 1(c) to
Section XVI, HTSUS. The general term of similar supports refer
to the type of supports which were specifically enumerated (i.e.,
bobbins, spools, cones, reels). The subject liner does not
function as a support in which wire is wound and unwound.
Instead, the liner acts as a base to attach the various
components which make-up a deflection yoke for a CRT. Therefore,
we find that the liner is not within the scope of Legal Note 1(c)
to Section XVI, HTSUS.

     In the alternative, you indicate that the liner is
classifiable under heading 8547, HTSUS, which provides for
insulated fittings for electrical machines, appliances, or
equipment. You contend that the liner, made of molded plastic,
functions to insulate the vertical and horizontal deflection
coils and to secure the main parts of the deflection yoke
together. In support of this position, you cited to HQ 953074,
dated April 6, 1993, in which Customs classified a donut-shaped
ferrite core as an insulating fitting for electrical machines
under heading 8547, HTSUS.

     While not legally binding, the ENs provide a commentary on
the scope of each heading of the HTSUS and are generally
indicative of the proper interpretation of these headings. See
T.D. 89-80, 54 FR 35127, 35128 (August 23, 1989). In HQ 953074,
Customs consulted EN 85.47, to determine the scope of heading
8547, HTSUS. EN 85.47, pages 1407-1408, states that:

      (A)   INSULATING FITTINGS FOR ELECTRICAL MACHINES,
      APPLIANCES OR EQUIPMENT, BEING FITTINGS WHOLLY OF
      INSULATING MATERIAL APART FROM ANY MINOR COMPONENTS OF
      METAL (FOR EXAMPLE, THREADED SOCKETS) INCORPORATED
      DURING MOULDING SOLELY FOR PURPOSES OF ASSEMBLY, OTHER
      THAN INSULATORS OF HEADING No. 85.46

           With the exception of insulators as such (heading
      85.46), this group covers all fittings for electrical
      machinery, appliances or apparatus, provided:

      (i)    They are wholly of insulating material, or are
            wholly of insulating material (e.g., plastics)
            apart from any minor components of metal (screws,
            threaded sockets, sleeves, etc.) incorporated
            during moulding solely for purposes of assembly.

and   (ii) They are designed for insulating purposes even
           though at the same time they have other functions
           (e.g., protection).

           In general the fittings of this group are obtained
      by moulding or casting, or by sawing, cutting or
      otherwise working the raw material. They may be
      drilled, threaded, filed, grooved, etc.

           They may be made of any insulating material (e.g.,
      glass, ceramics, steatite, hardened rubber, plastics,
      resin impregnated paper or paperboard, asbestos-cement
      or mica).

           These fittings may be in various forms. This group
      includes, inter alia, covers, bases and other parts of
      switches, circuit breakers, etc.; bases and supports
      for fuses; rings and other parts for lamp-holders;
      formers for resistors or coils; connection strips and
      dominoes not fitted with their terminals; cores for
      bobbins and windings of various kinds; sparking plug
      bodies.

           The heading does not cover fittings which, even
      though made wholly of insulating material (or made
      wholly of insulating material apart from any minor
      components of metal incorporated during moulding solely
      for the purposes of assembly), have not been specially
      constructed for insulating purposes, such as
     containers, covers and separator plates for
     accumulators (heading 85.07).

     In HQ 953074, Customs determined that the donut-shaped
ferrite core was to be principally used to "choke out noise
and/or distortion" in electrical machines. Citing to The
Webster's New World Dictionary, Third College Edition (1988),
Customs defined "insulate" as follows:

     1. to set apart; detach from the rest; isolate. 2. to
     separate or cover with a nonconducting material in
     order to prevent the passage or leakage of electricity,
     heat, sound, radioactive particles, etc.

     Customs then concluded that the donut-shaped ferrite core's
function of "choking out noise and/or distortion" was, in fact,
an electrical insulation function because it functioned to
isolate the electrical connection leads from external electrical
phenomena. See HQ 953074.

     We find that the principal function of the liner is not
specially constructed to act as an insulator, but to give shape
and structure to the deflection yoke for CRTs. Therefore,
classification of the liner under heading 8547, HTSUS, is
inapplicable.

FERRITE CORES:

     The ferrite cores are described as ceramic articles
manufactured by combining manganese oxide with a ceramic binding
agent under high temperature and pressure. You indicate that
because of its high electrical resistivity and permeability,
ferrite material is commonly used as cores in electro-magnets.
You conclude that the ferrite cores will be used as the core of
an electro-magnet which will function as a vertical deflection
coil in a CRT deflection yoke. You suggest classification under
heading 8505, as an electromagnet or as a part of an
electromagnet.

     In HQ 955777, dated June 27, 1994, Customs dealt with the
classification of ferrite cores which were to be used to
manufacture deflection yokes for CRTs. In that ruling, Customs
consulted EN 85.05, page 1340, which described "electro-magnets"
as:

          These are of various sizes and shapes according
     to the use for which they are intended. They consist
     essentially of a coil of wire wound around a core of
     soft iron, this core being either in one piece or
     laminated. The passing of electric current in the coil
     confers magnetic properties on the core, which can then
     be used either for attraction or repulsion.

     Customs determined that the ferrite cores are not
classifiable under heading 8505, HTSUS, because they do not meet
the definition of electro-magnets. Customs then concluded that
ferrite cores which are assembled into a deflection coil which is
then incorporated into a cathode-ray tube are classified as parts
of cathode-ray tubes under subheading 8540.91.50, HTSUS.
Furthermore, classification of the ferrite cores under subheading
8505.90.80, HTSUS, as parts of electro-magnets, is inappropriate
because the ferrite core is designed to act as part of a cathode-ray tube and
not as part of an electro-magnet. See HQ 955777.

     In the alternative, classification of the ferrite cores was
also suggested under heading 6909, HTSUS, as ceramic wares for
other technical uses.   EN 69.09, pages 920-921, provides in
pertinent part:

     This heading covers in particular:

           *   *    *    *    *    *

     (2)   Ceramic wares for other technical uses, such as
           pumps, valves; retorts, vats, chemical baths and
           other static containers with single or double
           walls (e.g., for electroplating, acid storage);
           taps for acids; coils, fractionating or
           distillation coils and columns, Raschig rings for
           petroleum fractionating apparatus; grinding
           apparatus and balls, etc., for grinding mills;
           thread guides for textile machinery and dies for
           extruding man-made textiles; plates, sticks, tips
           and the like, for tools.

     We find that the ferrite cores for deflection yokes do not
fall within the class or kind of articles listed as ceramic wares
for other technical uses. Therefore, classification under
heading 6909, HTSUS, would be inappropriate. The ferrite cores
for deflection yokes are classifiable under subheading
8540.91.50, HTSUS.
CORRECTOR and CROSS ARMS:

     The cross arms and the corrector are described as coated,
silicon steel devices which are used to enhance the magnetic
field of deflection coils. You claim that these articles should
be classified as parts of electromagnets because of your
statement that deflection coils are electromagnets. However,
deflection coils are provided for under heading 8540, HTSUS, as
parts of cathode-ray tubes. Because there is no provision which
describes the corrector and cross arms, Note 2(a) to section XVI,
HTSUS, does not apply. We must apply Legal Note 2(b) to section
XVI, HTSUS.   According to the information provided, these parts
are specifically designed to be attached and are used solely or
principally with deflection yokes for CRTs. Based upon
application of Legal Note 2(b) to section XVI, HTSUS, we find
that the corrector and cross arms should be classified as parts
for CRTs.    Therefore, we affirm NY 800718 which classified the
corrector and cross arms under heading 8540, HTSUS. They are
classified under subheading 8540.91.50.

     It has been suggested that Additional U.S. Rule of
Interpretation 1(c), HTSUS, is dispositive as to the
classification of the subject deflection yoke parts under the
HTSUS. It states that:

     [if the absence of special language or context which   otherwise requires -
. . . (c) a provision for parts of
     an article covers products solely or principally used
     as a part of such articles but a provision for "parts"
     or "parts and accessories"shall not prevail over a
     specific provision for such part and accessory.

     The above rule does not apply to the classification of the
deflection yokes because Legal Note 2(b) to section XVI, HTSUS,
is the "special language or context which otherwise requires".
In accordance with Legal Note 2(b) to section XVI, HTSUS, the
subject deflection yoke parts are to be classifiable as parts of
cathode ray tubes under heading 8540, HTSUS. Therefore,
Additional U.S. Rule of Interpretation 1(c), HTSUS, is
inapplicable in this case. (See HQ 954768, dated January 4, 1994,
and HQ 953141, dated February 8, 1993, for similar holdings on
this issue).

HOLDING:

     Under the authority of GRI 1, the liner, ferrite core, cross
arms, and the corrector are classifiable under subheading
8540.91.50, HTSUS, which provides for: "Thermionic, cold cathode
or photocathode tubes (for example, . . . , cathode-ray
tubes, television camera tubes); parts thereof: [p]arts: [o]f
cathode-ray tubes: [o]ther. . . ." The general, column one rate
of duty is 5.9 percent ad valorem.

    NY 800718, dated August 15, 1994, is affirmed.

                             Sincerely,



                             John Durant, Director
                             Commercial Rulings Division

				
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