Review for Chapter 37 & 38 by 5d3t46e

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 126

									Review for Chapter 37 & 38
        Mrs. Senger
The Earth’s oceans likely evolved

• From the condensation of water vapor in
  the hyrogen-oxygen rich atm
• With the accumulation of rainfall
• From the condensation of water vapor
  from volcanic eruptions
• As the Earth cooled
The Earth’s oceans likely evolved

• From the condensation of water vapor in
  the hyrogen-oxygen rich atm
• With the accumulation of rainfall
• From the condensation of water vapor
  from volcanic eruptions
• As the Earth cooled
The earth’s earliest atm was lacking
in
• Carbon dioxide
• Photosynthesis
• Free oxygen
• Hydrogen
The earth’s earliest atm was lacking
in
• Carbon dioxide
• Photosynthesis
• Free oxygen
• Hydrogen
The process of photosynthesis is
important because photosynthesis
• Allows plants to grow to larger size
• Is an energy source that drives the
  metabolic process
• Converts carbon dioxide and water to
  hydrogen & free oxygen
• All of these
The process of photosynthesis is
important because photosynthesis
• Allows plants to grow to larger size
• Is an energy source that drives the
  metabolic process
• Converts carbon dioxide and water to
  hydrogen & free oxygen
• All of these
The atm is divided into several
layers. The troposphere is the
• The atmosphere's 3rd layer and the
  thickest layer
• Lowest layer and the thickest layer, where
  earth’s weather occurs
• Lowest layer and the thinnest, where the
  earth’s weather occurs
• None of these
The atm is divided into several
layers. The troposphere is the
• The atmosphere's 3rd layer and the
  thickest layer
• Lowest layer and the thickest layer, where
  earth’s weather occurs
• Lowest layer and the thinnest, where the
  earth’s weather occurs
• None of these
The ozone layer is a region within
the
• Ionosphere
• Troposphere
• Mesosphere
• Stratosphere
The ozone layer is a region within
the
• Ionosphere
• Troposphere
• Mesosphere
• Stratosphere
The layers of the earth’s atm, from
top to bottom, are the
• Troposphere, stratosphere, ozone layer,
    mesosphere, thermosphere, ionosphere and
    exosphere
•   Exosphere, thermosphere, mesosphere,
    stratosphere, and troposphere
•   Exosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere,
    mesosphere, ozonosphere, stratosphere and
    troposphere
•   Troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere,
    thermosphere and exosphere
The layers of the earth’s atm, from
top to bottom, are the
• Troposphere, stratosphere, ozone layer,
    mesosphere, thermosphere, ionosphere and
    exosphere
•   Exosphere, thermosphere, mesosphere,
    stratosphere, and troposphere
•   Exosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere,
    mesosphere, ozonosphere, stratosphere and
    troposphere
•   Troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere,
    thermosphere and exosphere
The temperature in the
thermosphere reaches a whooping
2000 degrees C. This extreme
temperature has very little
significance because
• The thermosphere is very far from the Earth’s surface
• There are not enough air molecules & atoms colliding
    with one another to generate heat energy
•   There is very little ozone in the air to absorb the solar
    radiation
•   Few atoms and air molecules in this region move slowly
    enough to absorb much solar radiation
The temperature in the
thermosphere reaches a whooping
2000 degrees C. This extreme
temperature has very little
significance because
• The thermosphere is very far from the Earth’s surface
• There are not enough air molecules & atoms colliding
    with one another to generate heat energy
•   There is very little ozone in the air to absorb the solar
    radiation
•   Few atoms and air molecules in this region move slowly
    enough to absorb much solar radiation
The ionosphere

• Is produced by the action of solar
  radiation and atmospheric atoms
• Reflects solar ultraviolet & atmospheric
  atoms
• Consist of ozone ions
• Occurs at roughly the same altitude as
  high clouds
The ionosphere

• Is produced by the action of solar
  radiation and atmospheric atoms
• Reflects solar ultraviolet & atmospheric
  atoms
• Consist of ozone ions
• Occurs at roughly the same altitude as
  high clouds
The tilt of the earth’s axis greatly
affects the
• Change of the earth’s seasons
• Intensity of sunlight that reaches the
  earth’s surface
• Hours of daylight
• All of these
The tilt of the earth’s axis greatly
affects the
• Change of the earth’s seasons
• Intensity of sunlight that reaches the
  earth’s surface
• Hours of daylight
• All of these
The angle of the sun’s rays striking
the earth’s surface greatly affects
the
• Earth’s seasons
• Intensity of solar energy received at the
  earth’s surface
• Equatorial and polar regions
• All of these
The angle of the sun’s rays striking
the earth’s surface greatly affects
the
• Earth’s seasons
• Intensity of solar energy received at the
  earth’s surface
• Equatorial and polar regions
• All of these
The lower atmosphere is directly
warmed
• By the absorption of terrestrial radiation
• From the weight of the atmosphere above
• By the emission of terrestrial radiation
• By incoming solar radiation
The lower atmosphere is directly
warmed
• By the absorption of terrestrial radiation
• From the weight of the atmosphere above
• By the emission of terrestrial radiation
• By incoming solar radiation
At the end of December, all the
Southern Hemisphere is in
• Summer
• Winter
• Darkness
• Light
At the end of December, all the
Southern Hemisphere is in
• Summer
• Winter
• Darkness
• Light
Almost all of the earth’s supply of
energy come from
• The Sun
• Carbon dioxide
• The earth’s interior
• The oceans
Almost all of the earth’s supply of
energy come from
• The Sun
• Carbon dioxide
• The earth’s interior
• The oceans
Air near the equator averages
higher temperatures than air near
the poles because
• The oceans near the equator are warmer than
    those near the poles
•   Polar air is cooled by ice and snow on the
    ground
•   Infrared radiation is absorbed more readily in
    equatorial air due to increased levels of carbon
    dioxide and water vapor
•   Sunlight falls in more vertical position at the
    equator than near the poles
Air near the equator averages
higher temperatures than air near
the poles because
• The oceans near the equator are warmer than
    those near the poles
•   Polar air is cooled by ice and snow on the
    ground
•   Infrared radiation is absorbed more readily in
    equatorial air due to increased levels of carbon
    dioxide and water vapor
•   Sunlight falls in more vertical position at the
    equator than near the poles
Wind is generated in response to

• Pressure differences
• Temperature differences
• The unequal heating of the earth’s surface
• All of these
Wind is generated in response to

• Pressure differences
• Temperature differences
• The unequal heating of the earth’s surface
• All of these
The Coriolis effect greatly affects
the path of air circulation, and it is
the result of
• The tilt of the earth
• The earth’s rotation
• Global winds
• All of these
If a volume of air is warmed, it
expands. After it expands the
volume of air expands because it
• Cools
• Warms
• Neither cools or warms
• Does both
If a volume of air is warmed, it
expands. After it expands the
volume of air expands because it
• Cools
• Warms
• Neither cools or warms
• Does both
The wind blows in response to

• Pressure differences
• The earth’s rotation
• Temperature differences
• Pressure and temperature differences
The wind blows in response to

• Pressure differences
• The earth’s rotation
• Temperature differences
• Pressure and temperature differences
Fresh water leaves the ocean by

• Precipitation, evaporation and runoff
• Condensation
• Evaporation, sublimation and freezing
• Evaporation and formation of ice
Fresh water leaves the ocean by

• Precipitation, evaporation and runoff
• Condensation
• Evaporation, sublimation and freezing
• Evaporation and formation of ice
When precipitation at the ocean
surface exceeds evaporation, the
salinity of seawater
• Increases
• Decreases
• Stays the same
• Not enough info
When precipitation at the ocean
surface exceeds evaporation, the
salinity of seawater
• Increases
• Decreases
• Stays the same
• Not enough info
The two most abundant elements
that make up the salinity of
seawater are
• Sodium and potassium
• Chlorine and sulfur
• Chlorine and sodium
• Calcium and sulfur
The two most abundant elements
that make up the salinity of
seawater are
• Sodium and potassium
• Chlorine and sulfur
• Chlorine and sodium
• Calcium and sulfur
Most surface ocean currents are
due to
• River flow into the oceans
• Melting polar glaciers
• Density differences in vertical profile of
  the oceans
• Winds
Most surface ocean currents are
due to
• River flow into the oceans
• Melting polar glaciers
• Density differences in vertical profile of
  the oceans
• Winds
Because the Coriolis effect, a wind
in the Northern Hemisphere is
deflected
• Upward
• Downward
• Toward the right
• Toward the left
Because the Coriolis effect, a wind
in the Northern Hemisphere is
deflected
• Upward
• Downward
• Toward the right
• Toward the left
Air currents are sensitive to
changes in pressure and
temperature. In general, air moves
from regions of
• Low pressure to regions of high pressure
• High temperatures and low pressure to regions
    of low temperature and high pressure
•   Low temperature and high pressure to regions
    of high temperature and low pressure
•   High pressure to regions of low pressure
Air currents are sensitive to
changes in pressure and
temperature. In general, air moves
from regions of
• Low pressure to regions of high pressure
• High temperatures and low pressure to regions
    of low temperature and high pressure
•   Low temperature and high pressure to regions
    of high temperature and low pressure
•   High pressure to regions of low pressure
The ocean has many layers
amongst itself. The layers form due
to differences in
• Salinity
• Temperature
• Both
• neither
The ocean has many layers
amongst itself. The layers form due
to differences in
• Salinity
• Temperature
• Both
• neither
What is the driving force of energy
in the planet’s hydrologic cycle?
• Solar energy
• Wind
• Precipitation of water over the oceans
• The balance of precipitation and
 evaporation
What is the driving force of energy
in the planet’s hydrologic cycle?
• Solar energy
• Wind
• Precipitation of water over the oceans
• The balance of precipitation and
 evaporation
The Coriolis effect greatly affects
the path of circulation, and is the
result of what?
• The Earth’s rotation
• The tilt of the earth
• Global winds
• Wind changes
The Coriolis effect greatly affects
the path of circulation, and is the
result of what?
• The Earth’s rotation
• The tilt of the earth
• Global winds
• Wind changes
The changing of a substance from
a liquid into a vapor or gas is called
• Dew point
• Evaporation
• Condensation
• Saturation point
The changing of a substance from
a liquid into a vapor or gas is called
• Dew point
• Evaporation
• Condensation
• Saturation point
The changing of a vapor into a
liquid is called
• Saturation point
• Dew point
• Evaporation
• Condensation
The changing of a vapor into a
liquid is called
• Saturation point
• Dew point
• Evaporation
• Condensation
The amount of water vapor the air
can hold depends on the air
temperature. At higher
temperatures the air
• Is saturated
• Holds water at dew point
• Holds less water
• Can hold more water
The amount of water vapor the air
can hold depends on the air
temperature. At higher
temperatures the air
• Is saturated
• Holds water at dew point
• Holds less water
• Can hold more water
The temperature to which air must
be cooled for saturation to occur is
called
• Relative humidity
• Dew point
• Precipitation
• Condensation point
The temperature to which air must
be cooled for saturation to occur is
called
• Relative humidity
• Dew point
• Precipitation
• Condensation point
The limit at which the air contains
as much moisture as it can hold for
a given temperature is called
• Dew point
• Saturation
• Evaporation point
• Sublimation point
The limit at which the air contains
as much moisture as it can hold for
a given temperature is called
• Dew point
• Saturation
• Evaporation point
• Sublimation point
We feel uncomfortably warm on a
muggy day because water
molecules are
• Jostling about
• Preventing evaporation from our body
• Condensing on our skin
• Evaporating from out body
We feel uncomfortably warm on a
muggy day because water
molecules are
• Jostling about
• Preventing evaporation from our body
• Condensing on our skin
• Evaporating from out body
Evaporation of rain drops in the
atmosphere
• Is greatest above the polar ice caps
• Does not happen; rain always reaches the
  earth
• Cools the air
• Warms the air
Evaporation of rain drops in the
atmosphere
• Is greatest above the polar ice caps
• Does not happen; rain always reaches the
  earth
• Cools the air
• Warms the air
As air temperature decreases,
relative humidity
• Stays the same
• Drops
• Decreases
• Increases
As air temperature decreases,
relative humidity
• Stays the same
• Drops
• Decreases
• Increases
As air rises, it

• Compresses and cools
• Compresses and warms
• Expands and cools
• Expands and warms
As air rises, it

• Compresses and cools
• Compresses and warms
• Expands and cools
• Expands and warms
We are warmed by condensation
because water molecules in the air
that strike our bodies
• Gain kinetic energy as they change state
• Transfer kinetic energy to us
• Form an insulating layer on our bodies
• None of these
We are warmed by condensation
because water molecules in the air
that strike our bodies
• Gain kinetic energy as they change state
• Transfer kinetic energy to us
• Form an insulating layer on our bodies
• None of these
Warm air rises and cools as it
expands. Warm air will continue to
rise as long as it is
• Snowing
• Warmer and more dense than the air
  above
• Warmer and less dense than the
  surrounding air
• Denser than the surrounding air
Warm air rises and cools as it
expands. Warm air will continue to
rise as long as it is
• Snowing
• Warmer and more dense than the air
  above
• Warmer and less dense than the
  surrounding air
• Denser than the surrounding air
An air parcel expands and cools, or
compresses and warms, with no
interchange of heat with its
surroundings, the situation is called
• An adiabatic process
• Temperature equilibrium
• Lapse rate
• Stable equilibrium
An air parcel expands and cools, or
compresses and warms, with no
interchange of heat with its
surroundings, the situation is called
• An adiabatic process
• Temperature equilibrium
• Lapse rate
• Stable equilibrium
When a volume of air is
compressed, its temperature
• Decreases
• Increases
• Both
• None of these
When a volume of air is
compressed, its temperature
• Decreases
• Increases
• Both
• None of these
A drop in pressure is an indication
of
• Sunny skies and clear weather
• Adiabetic warming
• Cloudy weather
• None of these
A drop in pressure is an indication
of
• Sunny skies and clear weather
• Adiabetic warming
• Cloudy weather
• None of these
A rise in pressure indicates

• Adiabatic warming
• Cloudy weather
• Sunny skies and clear weather
• None of these
A rise in pressure indicates

• Adiabatic warming
• Cloudy weather
• Sunny skies and clear weather
• None of these
Clouds occur when moist air is
cooled by
• Compression when it rises
• Expansion when it rises
• Expansion when it falls
• Compression when it falls
Clouds occur when moist air is
cooled by
• Compression when it rises
• Expansion when it rises
• Expansion when it falls
• Compression when it falls
Warm humid air is characteristic of
a
• Continental polar air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
Warm humid air is characteristic of
a
• Continental polar air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
When an air mass is pushed
upward over an obstacle, it
undergoes
• Orographical lifting
• Convectional lifting
• Adiabatic lifting
• Frontal lifting
When an air mass is pushed
upward over an obstacle, it
undergoes
• Orographical lifting
• Convectional lifting
• Adiabatic lifting
• Frontal lifting
An air mass with circulatory motion
is called
• Frontal
• Adiabatic
• Orographic
• Convectional
An air mass with circulatory motion
is called
• Frontal
• Adiabatic
• Orographic
• Convectional
Atmspheric lifting resulting from
the convergence of 2 different air
masses is called
• Orographic lifting
• Convectional lifting
• Frontal lifting
• Adiabatic lifting
Atmspheric lifting resulting from
the convergence of 2 different air
masses is called
• Orographic lifting
• Convectional lifting
• Frontal lifting
• Adiabatic lifting
When a cold air mass moves into a
region occupied by a warm air
mass, the contact zone is called
• A warm front
• A cold front
• An occluded front
• A stationary front
When a cold air mass moves into a
region occupied by a warm air
mass, the contact zone is called
• A warm front
• A cold front
• An occluded front
• A stationary front
When a warm air mass moves into
a region occupied by a cold air
mass, the contact zone is called
• A warm front
• A cold front
• An occluded front
• A stationary front
When a warm air mass moves into
a region occupied by a cold air
mass, the contact zone is called
• A warm front
• A cold front
• An occluded front
• A stationary front
Lower temperatures can be
expected
• Ahead of an advancing cold front
• Behind an advancing cold front
• Behind a stationary warm front
• Behind an advancing warm front
Lower temperatures can be
expected
• Ahead of an advancing cold front
• Behind an advancing cold front
• Behind a stationary warm front
• Behind an advancing warm front
Towering cumulonimbus clouds are
a common feature in regions where
moist unstable air is heated from
below. Such clouds are produced
by
• Frontal lifting
• Orographic lifting
• Convectional lifting
• None of these
Towering cumulonimbus clouds are
a common feature in regions where
moist unstable air is heated from
below. Such clouds are produced
by
• Frontal lifting
• Orographic lifting
• Convectional lifting
• None of these
If a cool dry day was followed by a
warm humid day, you might expect
the air masses to have been
• Continental polar and maritime tropical
• Continental tropical and continental polar
• Maritime tropical and continental polar
• Maritime polar and maritime tropical
If a cool dry day was followed by a
warm humid day, you might expect
the air masses to have been
• Continental polar and maritime tropical
• Continental tropical and continental polar
• Maritime tropical and continental polar
• Maritime polar and maritime tropical
Daily afternoon thunderstorms
along the Gulf coast are most likely
caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
Daily afternoon thunderstorms
along the Gulf coast are most likely
caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
Drought conditions and high
temperatures over the Great Plains
are most likely caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
Drought conditions and high
temperatures over the Great Plains
are most likely caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
Cold damp weather along the
eastern coast of the United States
is most likely caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
Cold damp weather along the
eastern coast of the United States
is most likely caused by a
• Maritime tropical air mass
• Maritime polar air mass
• Continental tropical air mass
• Continental polar air mass
When a funnel cloud touches the
ground, it becomes a
• Cyclone
• Tornado
• Hurricane
• Thunderstorm
When a funnel cloud touches the
ground, it becomes a
• Cyclone
• Tornado
• Hurricane
• Thunderstorm
Hurricanes are generated

• In tropical areas
• As moist thermal winds converge in
  tropical storms
• From tropical storms with high levels of
  moisture and thermal energy
• By all of these
Hurricanes are generated

• In tropical areas
• As moist thermal winds converge in
  tropical storms
• From tropical storms with high levels of
  moisture and thermal energy
• By all of these
Lightning occurs as water droplets
become electrically charged.
Energy that is positively charged is
found
• Throughout the cloud
• Surrounding the cloud
• At the top of the cloud
• At the base of the cloud
Lightning occurs as water droplets
become electrically charged.
Energy that is positively charged is
found
• Throughout the cloud
• Surrounding the cloud
• At the top of the cloud
• At the base of the cloud
The fundamental source of energy
released by a tropical hurricane
come from
• The Sun
• Warm moist air
• The convergence of maritime polar and
  maritime tropical air masses
• The trade winds
The fundamental source of energy
released by a tropical hurricane
come from
• The Sun
• Warm moist air
• The convergence of maritime polar and
  maritime tropical air masses
• The trade winds
The atmospheric condition at a
particular location moment in time
is called
• Climate
• Weather
• Average temperature
• Average precipitation level
The atmospheric condition at a
particular location moment in time
is called
• Climate
• Weather
• Average temperature
• Average precipitation level
In general, warm days are
associated with
• Summer storms
• Low surface pressure
• High surface pressure
• Negative change in pressure gradient
In general, warm days are
associated with
• Summer storms
• Low surface pressure
• High surface pressure
• Negative change in pressure gradient
All of the Earth’s weather occurs in
the
• Lower levels of the atmosphere
• Troposphere
• Troposphere and stratosphere
• Tropopause
All of the Earth’s weather occurs in
the
• Lower levels of the atmosphere
• Troposphere
• Troposphere and stratosphere
• Tropopause
Which of the following has the
greatest impact on generating
waves in the ocean
• The movement of sea life causes
  disturbances in the water
• The density differences of the water due
  to the ocean’s salinity
• Magma at ocean ridges causing the warm
  water to rise and cool water to sink
• Friction with the wind at the surface of the
  ocean
Which of the following has the
greatest impact on generating
waves in the ocean
• The movement of sea life causes
  disturbances in the water
• The density differences of the water due
  to the ocean’s salinity
• Magma at ocean ridges causing the warm
  water to rise and cool water to sink
• Friction with the wind at the surface of the
  ocean

								
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