Specialist Practitioner Qualification: prevention and control of by h7N2zL8r

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									                       SPQ Infection:
              Diseases, Prevention and Control


       Student and mentor /clinical supporter
            guidance and requirements




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Contents                                                                    Page

1   Introduction for students and clinical supporters                       3
2   Admission requirements and guidance notes                               4
        a. Specialist practitioner qualification: Admission                 5
            requirements
        b. Guidance notes for the application of the SPQ Infection:         6
            Diseases, Prevention and Control Programme
        c. Practice placement requirements: Extract from NES: The
            Development of Quality Standards for Practice Placements        8
3   Specialist Practitioner Qualification: General Aims and Outcomes        10
4   Design of modules                                                       11
5   Focused educational visits                                              12
6   Work-based learning                                                     13
        a. Learning contract                                                15
7   Marks-Maran and Rose model of reflection                                19
8   Folder of evidence of learning                                          20
9   The clinical supporters role                                            22


Appendices
1 Placement quality assurance statement, standards and action plan          25
2 Letter of support for prospective students                                31
3 Infection Prevention Society Core Competences for Advanced                34
   Level Practice (IPS 2011)
4 Record of student support and planning (meetings with clinical            39
   supporter)
5 Mentor/Clinical supporter’s report                                        41
6 Process for mentor/clinical supporter to demonstrate preparation          45
   to sign off mentor status
7 Role of the Academic Practice Contact                                     80




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1. Introduction for Students and Mentors /Clinical Supporters

    Welcome! This pack will provide you with information about supporting a student
    during their studies on the Specialist Practitioner Qualification Infection: disease
    prevention and control.

    Within this booklet you will find the following information:

   Admission requirements and guidance notes will help you to understand the entry
    criteria for the programme and the Quality Standards for Practice Placements.
    To support the admission to the programme, the necessary documentation
    required from the student, mentor / clinical supporter and manager to help
    facilitate smooth and successful application are provided in the appendices.
    Further details about those requirements are provided in this section.

   Overarching aims and outcomes for the programme are provided for you to give
    your further insight into the programme.

   The design of the modules provides an understanding of the programme’s
    requirements of the student with the notional breakdown of the hours of theory
    and practice, detail about the practice component of the programme and the
    purpose of focused educational visits.

   Details of how focused educational visits can be approached and organised to
    maximise learning opportunities are provided

   The above is in relation to work based learning and the process of agreeing and
    negotiating the substance of work based learning opportunities. The use of
    learning contracts and reflection is important and there is a brief outline of these
    learning strategies with a blank learning contract.

   Further information is provided around the Marks-Maran and Rose (1997) Model
    of Reflection to demonstrate how students can use this throughout their learning
    journey

   A folder of evidence of learning is an important activity and one the student
    should be encouraged to engage in right from the beginning of the programme
    and not just for the modules that require it as part of the assessment strategy.
    The folder should demonstrate their practice and level of competency. It is not a
    collect of random items or published articles or policy guidelines. It should show
    the application of theory and their learning in the student’s every day practice
    whilst demonstrating the development of their expertise in line with the NMC
    Specialist Practitioner Roles.

   Finally, the Mentor / Clinical Supporter’s role is explained which helps support the
    student in the professional development modules and keeping a record of
    contact.




2. Admission requirements and guidance notes



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This part contains the admission and progression requirements for students
wishing to undertake the SPQ. This section helps applicants to understand the entry
criteria for the programme, and the over arching aims and outcomes for the
Specialist Practitioner Qualification.   Along with this there is the necessary
documentation required from the student, Mentor / Clinical Supporter and manager to
help facilitate a smooth and successful application process (see table below).

      Appendix      Document                                            Action Required
      1             Placement Quality Assurance audit and               To be completed and
                    action plan                                         returned to School*
      2             Letter of support for prospective students          To be completed and
                                                                        returned to School*
      3             Infection   Prevention    Society    Core           To be completed by the
                    Competences for Practitioners of Infection          student and Mentor/Clinical
                    Prevention and Control                              Supporter at the end of
                                                                        each module
      4             Record of student support and planning              To be completed by the
                    (meetings with mentor / clinical supporter)         student and Mentor/Clinical
                                                                        Supporter at the end of
                                                                        each module
      5             Mentor / Clinical supporter’s report                To be completed and
                                                                        returned to the School with
                                                                        the       final     module
                                                                        assessment*
      6             NMC       requirements       for   Specialist       To be completed and
                    Practitioner Mentor / Clinical Supporters and       returned to the School
                    RPEL form (to be a sign-off mentor / clinical
                    supporter)

*All forms as detailed in the above table should be returned to:
Joyce Troon
Postgraduate Administrator
School of Nursing and Midwifery
11 Airlie Place
Dundee
DD1 4HJ




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a. Specialist Practitioner Qualification: Admission requirements

The information in this section is about the entry criteria, the general aims and
outcomes of the programme, guidance notes for application, and the letter of support
for prospective students,

   Entry criteria

       The student should be working in the speciality they wish to develop, normally
        for a minimum of one year.

       The student should have a sign off mentor or equivalent in place

       It is acknowledged that a speciality may comprise only part of an applicant’s
        work role, for example a link nurse. When this is the case it may result in the
        requirement for focussed educational visits out with the normal work place, to
        obtain sufficient experience for completion of the pathway.

       Entry on the appropriate part of the NMC professional register.

       Dip HE in Nursing or equivalent

       Normally recommended for the specialist programme and support by
        immediate manager (letter of support).

       Student will require access to a computer connected to the internet, and basic
        IT skills




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b. Guidance notes for application for the Specialist Practitioner Qualification
Infection: Diseases, Prevention and Control programme

Thank you for expressing interest in the SPQ Infection: Diseases, Prevention and
Control programme at the School of Nursing and Midwifery of the University of
Dundee.

This programme has been validated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)
and there is a recordable professional qualification as well as an academic award.
The NMC require rigorous adherence to the entry criteria, the monitoring of the
suitability of the clinical area to provide the student with the learning opportunities to
meet the learning outcomes, and in the preparation and support of students and their
mentors / clinical supporters. Entry to the SPQ programme thus has the following
requirements.

1   Entry on the appropriate part of the NMC Professional Register
    Whilst the modules are open to any student wishing to study with us using
    distance e-leaning to gain an academic award, students out with the United
    Kingdom who are not registered with the NMC are not eligible for the
    professional qualification.

    All placements will be required to complete a Placement Quality Assurance
    statement prior to the student commencing the programme (See appendix 1)

2   The student will have completed a period of experience of sufficient length
    to have consolidated pre-registration outcomes and to have gained a
    deeper understanding in relevant professional practice
    This is normally considered to be 2 years in practice. However the applicant may
    have been newly appointed to the specialty of Infection Prevention and Control,
    or Infection Prevention and Control may comprise a part of the applicants work
    role. For example an active Link Nurse or (Scottish) Cleanliness Champion

3   Recommended for the specialist programme and supported by their
    manager
    This is an important element. You will need to discuss with your manager and
    your chosen mentor (clinical supporter) a number of issues regarding your needs
    for studying on this programme to ensure successful outcomes. A letter of
    support from you manager and naming your mentor / clinical supporter must be
    submitted with your application.
    (See appendix 2 for issues to be discussed and supporting letter format)

4   The students will be employed in a clinical post that provides the learning
    opportunities required to achieve the outcomes of the programme
    Because students will be studying at a distance and engaging in work based
    learning it is important that the programmes learning outcomes can be achieved
    in the student’s clinical environment. It is recommended that the mentor / clinical
    supporter is an Infection Prevention and Control Practitioner (IPCP). Where the
    mentor /clinical supporter is not an IPCP, a local IPCP should be involved to
    assess the suitability of the work environment and to help identify where it would
    be appropriate for educational or focused visits so that required experiences not
    available in the work place can be met. To help in this assessment it is
    suggested that the IPCP uses the IPS competence statement summary as a
    framework (see appendix 3), and should be involved in the initial discussions
    before the students application is submitted. (See appendix 1 and 2)



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5   Access to a mentor (clinical supporter) at specialist practitioner level or
    above, and an infection control nurse
    Mentors / Clinical supporters should be experienced practitioners at specialist
    level or above.

    Mentors must be a Registered Nurse with one or more of the following
    qualifications for the role:
    - have completed a mentor preparation course,
    - have completed a practice teachers course
    - undertaken the University of Dundee RPEL procedure (Appendix 6)
    And must be registered on the local mentor register as a sign off mentor or, for
    clinical supporters, have undertaken the equivalent preparation.


    A clinical supporter is a healthcare professional who is not a Registered Nurse
    who can demonstrate having received preparation for the role equivalent to that
    of a sign-off mentor. The university holds the database for clinical supporters.


    All mentors / clinical supporters will receive a guide for the SPQ programme and
    ongoing support from the module team.

6   The student will require access to a computer connected to the internet and
    basic IT skills
    Preferably the student would have their own computer but it may be necessary to
    negotiate access and computer time in the work place. The student will receive
    information about the ‘MyDundee student portal’ when they commence the
    programme,

7   A minimum of Diploma in Higher Education in Nursing (DipHE)




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c       Practice placement requirements (Extract from NES: The development
        of Quality Standards for practice placements)

This document has been written for use in both the health and social sectors and is
broad enough to embrace approval of practice placement learning environments for
undergraduate and postgraduate students.

When undertaking approval visits, Stage One (Generic) and Stage Two (Programme
Specific) (of appendix 1) should be completed for undergraduate and postgraduate
students.

All practice placements will be monitored by the School, in collaboration with local
higher education institutions where appropriate, when the student is out with
Scotland. The framework used is the NHS Education Scotland (NES) Quality
Standards for Practice Placements.            Full details can be found on
www.nes.scot.nhs.uk

Institutions which provide NES approved and NMC approved programmes/courses
are responsible for:
   identifying and securing sufficient practice placements to meet the
    programme/course outcomes and cover the range of the programme;
   assuring the suitability of proposed practice placements through audit;
   ensuring that the practice supervision meets the demands of the programme by:
    - identifying sufficient appropriate mentors and practice supervisors;
    - providing adequate preparation for mentors and practice supervisors; and
    - providing adequate ongoing support for mentors and practice supervisors;
   co-ordinating the allocation of students to placements; and
   providing the placement manager with guidance on the status of the student.

Extract from NES Quality Standards/Indicators for Practice Placements:

Students can expect:
 a named mentor/assessor with appropriate qualifications/education/training and
   experience to assess students
 to gain experience as part of a multiprofessional team
 a regular review of their learning needs
 a named link with their HEI

Mentors/assessors can expect:
 adequate and timely information prior to students arrival
 to have knowledge of the students learning needs
 to provide ongoing feedback to the students
 a support network inclusive of clinical colleagues, education colleagues,
  managers and peers

Service providers have a responsibility to:
 establish a process within a governance framework to ensure that issues
   identified in relation to quality practice placements are addressed
 consider how local quality standards meet the needs of all professional groups in
   relation to the provision of adequate facilities and a clinical learning environment

Practice placements may be in:



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   NHS areas within or outwith the geographical area of the programme/course
    provider where appropriate; and/or
   Non-NHS settings where appropriate

Practice learning environment requirements for Specialist Practitioner
Qualification in Adult Nursing (Infection Prevention and Control)
Students undertaking practice placements for this qualification generally do so in an
institutional setting that is not confined by traditional boundaries e.g. a ward or unit.
The nature of the experience required to achieve the competences require the
student to be exposed to diverse settings. The practice learning environment provider
is required to assure the module team that this experience is available.

Process
The practice learning environment provider completes the Placement Quality
Assurance Audit (Appendix 1). This demonstrates the quality of the practice learning
environment. The provider is required to document the evidence available to support
the audit. The module team will verify the evidence of selected providers and will also
use desktop review to further interrogate the evidence to assure the quality of the
practice placement.




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3. Specialist Practitioner Qualification: General Aims and Outcomes

Aims

This programme of study aims to:

   Enable the student to develop higher levels of clinical decision-making in order to
    monitor and improve standards of care.

   Enhance the student’s ability to promote excellence of care through effective
    supervision and specialist practice.

   Empower the student to develop further the skills of professional leadership and
    practice, to function effectively within the context of multi-professional and inter-
    agency collaboration.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the programme of study the student will be able to:

   Lead and clinically direct specialist care by effective assessment, planning,
    implementation and evaluation of care both for individual patients/service users
    and their carers and for groups of patients/service users.

   Create an environment that promotes the empowerment of patients/service users
    and their carers, facilitating their participation in decision-making and service use
    related to their care.

   Initiate and contribute to the overall delivery of effective evidence-based practice
    within an approved ethical and legal framework.

   Provide and promote clinical practice leadership and clinical supervision.

   Promote effective and efficient management and utilisation of resources within
    the multi-disciplinary and inter-agency care setting.

   Initiate and lead practice development to enhance evidence-based practice and
    promote integrated care pathways.

   Ensure effective strategies are employed to facilitate quality assurance and audit.




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4. Design of modules

Each module is designed to run over a 15-week period. The notional student effort
during this period of time is 300 hours. The practice component will be undertaken in
the student’s workplace for the most part but will be complemented by focused
educational visits.

Breakdown of Module Theory/Practice Hours

The curriculum development group anticipates that the theory/practice balance will
break down in the following manner over the 15-week period of each module;

The theoretical component which includes theory input
and notional student effort                                           = 150 hours.

In the practice component, including work-based
learning and practice within own clinical area, as
well as possible focused educational visits, and
mentor support time                                                    = 150 hours

In Summary the three modules each containing theory 150 hours and practice 150
hours. Total for the complete programme of study is theory 600 hours and practice
600 hours.

Clearly working at specialist practitioner level will require flexibility in order to work
out individual student’s notional breakdown of hours. It is considered important that
maximum flexibility and negotiation are features of this programme of study.
Achieving a 50% practice requirement is facilitated by the pathway running over 2
calendar years, rather than the minimum 32 week provision.

Practice Component

The practice component contained within the modules has been designed in such a
way as to enable the majority of students to gain most of the outcomes in their
normal working environment. This will mean that prior to the student commencing
the programme of studies it must be established that the majority of the outcomes
can be met within the work environment. It is acknowledged that there may be
specific elements of the specialist pathway which the students cannot meet within
their own work environment and therefore focused educational visits have been
identified as a means of achieving these. In the case of the student who is working in
a non-specialist environment where the speciality comprises only part of the total
work role, arrangements to provide secondment, specialist placements, or
longer/more focused educational visits will require to be negotiated prior to the
student commencing the pathway. The extent and nature of the requirements will be
dependent upon the nature of the experience available in the workplace and the
background of the student. A placement provided out with the normal workplace for
one module may have the potential to be utilised to sustain the achievements of the
learning outcomes in other modules within the pathway, without additional time away
from the normal workplace other than that for focused educational visits.




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5. Focused Educational visits

A focused educational visit should always be explored, negotiated and agreed by the
work place mentor /clinical supporter in conjunction with the host mentor and the
student, using a learning contract.

By using learning contracts students will identify specific learning opportunities which
will complement and enhance their specialist perspectives and ideas related to the
specialist clinical pathway.

Such an approach will focus the student’s learning and ensure maximum benefit from
planned learning opportunities. It will also make best use of limited time, human and
economic resources. The student will enrich their main placement area with the
diverse perspectives, ideas and skills they take back with them on return from
focused visits.

It will enhance the ability of the student to provide informed and high quality care for
patients/clients and address the wider aspects of specialist clinical practice, care and
programme management thus widening the scope of these within the organisation.
Visits such as these will promote collaborative working across and within NHS
Divisions/Trusts.

There are possible disadvantages to this approach which could be;
    Limited exposure to the ‘real world’ of work
    Visits may be perceived as contrived experience
    Provide a limited range of experience

Practicalities
The student will:
    Explore, negotiate and agree learning opportunities with the mentor / clinical
       supporter.
    Write their learning contract to reflect these agreed learning outcomes.
    Specify possible focused educational visits and desired learning outcomes.
    Negotiate an educational programme including learning opportunities and
       outcomes with appropriate staff in the area to which they have been accepted
       for a visit.
    Compile an account of the visit and the learning which took place
       documenting the achievement of agreed learning outcomes as recorded in
       the learning contract.
    Meet the costs for focused educational visits but may be able to negotiate
       some assistance from their employer given that the visits benefit the
       organisation as well as the student.

Practice Areas

If students are to remain in their own clinical practice area for most of their
programme of study then it is crucial that the experience necessary to achieve
the learning outcomes is available. This will be a condition of commencing the
pathway.




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6. Work-based learning

A major component of each module will be spent in the student’s own place of work.
It is therefore essential to capitalise on the work-based learning which this presents.
Work-based learning is derived from engaging in practice, within the practice setting.
It draws on psychomotor, managerial and communication skills as well as on
perceptual and reasoning skills. To maximise work-based learning students are
encouraged to identify significant experiences for reflection then relate theoretical
knowledge to gain deeper understanding and meaning. This subsequently results in
meaningful learning and behaviour changes which impact on future practice. For the
specialist practitioner the focus will be on specialist clinical practice, care and
programme management, clinical practice leadership and clinical practice
development.

“The working knowledge base, the communication, perceptual, reasoning,
kinaesthetic and management skills, and the ethical, behavioural base of
professional practice merit study in their own right. Together they constitute a rich
intellectual discipline of clinical practice and expertise. Until we know what we do,
why we do it, and how we do it, we are guessing about how to improve it.”
(Cox 1997)

Aim
To develop a reflective approach to clinical practice which encourages critical
analysis and a deep understanding and integration of theoretical and clinical aspects
of practice, which will subsequently impact on the individual’s practice.

Overview
Reasons for adopting a work-based approach:
     It reveals personal qualities, eg honesty, caring, precision or sloppiness and
      socialises the student into roles and responsibilities through the LIVED
      experience within the work environment.
     Specialist practice requires integration of thinking, feeling and doing, focusing
      on performance, judgement and clinical decision-making at all levels.
     Contextual nuances are important to allow tailoring of actions in experiencing
      learning in the specialist practitioner role, fulfilling aspects of the role and
      assuming responsibility for the four component parts of the role.
     The development and use of reflective skills are a prerequisite to achieving
      the depth of learning required to attain role proficiency.
     It provides a means of challenging personal values and practice actions.
     It requires changes in practice to be made explicit and quantifiable.
     It is focused primarily on clinical practice needs and partnerships between the
      student and mentor / clinical support, Academic Practice Contact (Appendix
      7) and specialist care manager.

Process for Agreeing the Substance of Work-based Learning within a Module
of Study
Within the overall context of the module or programme outcomes, a learning contract
between the student, mentor / clinical supporter and manager. This will detail the
goals which are agreed, the learning opportunities which will be made available to
the student, the outcomes and how they will be measured and presented for scrutiny.
This collaborative approach allows all parties to engage in the formulation and
delivery of the educational programme and to tailor it to the needs of the student and
the clinical setting. It is envisaged that such co-operation will enrich the learning
environment and enhance the quality and relevance of the educational experience.



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The student will obtain a well thought through contextualised programme of study
with which they can identify completely. The manager and mentor / clinical supporter
will be more likely to invest resources in the student and be committed to the
programme when they have been involved in shaping it within the context of their
own staff development agenda linked to their business plan.

Criteria for Successful Completion of a Work-based Module

It has been long recognised that the assessment of clinical practice is a complex and
difficult area to address (Bedford et.al.1994) When a student is not achieving to the
expected level, however that is defined, the mentor / clinical supporter is faced with a
potentially difficult situation to resolve. Given that the mentor / clinical supporter may
have worked with the student as a colleague prior to commencing the module and/or
during the module and may have invested considerable time and effort into student
support, it may be difficult to them to have to discuss with the student the fact that
the expected level of performance has not been achieved. The mentor /clinical
supporter in these circumstances is quite understandably, likely to be reluctant to
make the decision to address the problem.

The student may have the ability to undertake specific skills in isolation but lack the
ability, essential for the demonstration of proficiency, to combine skills and priorities
to respond to a constantly changing practice environment. In these circumstances it
is necessary to have ways of highlighting such challenges in a consistent and visible
way.

These factors identify the need to generate a range of evidence to establish that a
student has met the practice assessment requirements of a module. A more
complete picture can be developed by combining evidence from several sources.
The combination of a mentor’s / clinical supporter’s report and a student-generated
folder of work-based evidence of learning will be developed for this purpose.

It may be difficult to identify individuals with enough expertise to assess practice in
the specialist practice context, especially in the early years of the programme. It may
be necessary for Academic Practice Contacts to provide support and advice to
mentors / clinical supporters who are supervising these students. In short, the
Academic Practice Contact will precept the mentors / clinical supporters, whilst they
precept the student on the programme of study.


Through critical analysis of significant clinical experiences, reflection and the
discipline of maintaining a folder of evidence of learning, it is felt that the student will
be able to become attuned to the rich learning potential in the work place. With this
realisation, it is anticipated that the student will find increasingly effective ways of
using that potential, to address the key components of the specialist practitioner role.




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    a. Learning contract

A learning contract is an agreed written document setting out individual learning
needs and objectives. It specifies the methods, which will be used, and the
resources required. It also includes an evaluation of the outcomes of the learning,
which has occurred, and the criteria for assessment.

Process for Agreeing the Substance of Work-based Learning within a Module
of Study

Within the overall context of the module outcomes, a learning contract between the
student and the mentor / clinical supporter, manager and module leader will be
negotiated, detailing the goals which are agreed, the learning opportunities which will
be made available, the outcomes and how they will be measured and presented for
scrutiny. This is very much regarded as a collaborative approach, which allows all
parties to engage in the formulation and delivery of the educational programme and
tailor it to individual student needs, and the clinical setting. It is envisaged that such
co-operation will enrich the learning environment and enhance the quality and
relevance of the educational experience. The manager and mentor / clinical
supporter will be more likely to invest resources and be committed to the educational
programme when they have been involved in shaping it within the context of their
own staff development agenda linked to their business plan.

Stages Involved in Developing a Learning Contract

       Identifying learning needs - the students must reflect on the learning
        outcomes of the module of study and identify potential areas for development
        and through dialogue with the mentor / clinical supporter, module leader and
        manager agree upon those which will be the focus of the learning contract.

       Setting learning outcomes (within the context of the module outcomes) -
        these should be in plain language, measurable and realistic.

       Identification of strategies and resources - include an outline of how the
        outcomes will be addressed and the activities, resources such as literature or
        focused visits which will be utilised.

       Determining evidence of achievement - an account of how the
        achievement of the learning outcomes will be demonstrated. The criteria set
        must be realistic and relevant and the method of assessment as well as being
        valid and reliable.

       Validation of evidence - this will be undertaken by the mentor / clinical
        supporter and the module leader in accordance with the criteria agreed at
        this point.

       Reviewing the contract - this is the stage when the contract is finalised
        before signing up to it. It is the last chance to adjust the contract before it is
        put into practise. If at a later stage it is clear that an aspect of the contract
        needs to be changed then it will necessitate re-negotiation.




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       Implementing the contract - it is important to start work as soon as
        possible and to keep in touch with the mentor / clinical supporter and module
        leader to provide progress updates. Contact time should be agreed at the
        onset of the contract.

       Assessing and evaluating learning - the criteria set within the contract will
        be used to determine how effectively the outcomes have been achieved and
        the identified learning needs addressed. The work will provide a substantial
        contribution to the folder of work-based evidence of learning for the module.




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                                    LEARNING CONTRACT


Module Title:                                                 Mentor /Clinical supporter:

Module Code:                                                  Module Leader:

Student’s Name:                                               Manager:



Learning Need(s)




Learning Outcome(s)




Learning Strategies




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Resources:




Assessment and Evaluation

Criteria:




Methods:




Validation:




Date of Contract:                                 Date to be Completed by:


Student’s Signature:                              Signatures of -

                                                  Mentor /Clinical supporter:

                                                  Module Leader:

                                                  Manager:




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7. Marks- Maran and Rose’s Model for Reflection

Marks-Maran and Rose (1997) suggest that it is through reflection that learning is
identified. Throughout the programme reflective activities are actively promoted.
According to Johns (1992) these contribute to the development of personal, practical
or intuitive knowledge and may expose and resolve the contradictions and conflicts
experienced between espoused theories and theories in use (Marks-Maran & Rose
1997). For meaningful learning to occur, the student must be committed to
engagement in such activities.

Reflective activities can involve personal confrontation that expose contradictions
between what the practitioner aims to achieve and the way they practice. The
conflict, of itself, and how it is handled could promote the empowerment necessary to
take action (Johns 1992). In summary, reflective practice promotes enlightenment
and emancipation, two characteristics crucial to effective practice by Specialist
Practitioners.

The Marks - Maran and Rose (1997) reflection model (Figure 2) has four stages as
follows:

       The incident - what actually happened.

       The reflective observation - the thoughts and feelings arising from the
        incident.

       Related theory - making sense of the incident in the light of current knowledge
        and related theories.

       Future actions - what was learned from the incident and the reflective
        activities and their impact on future actions, behaviour and practice.


Figure 2: Marks-Maran and Rose Model for Reflection (1997)


                                               Incident




          Future actions                                              Reflective observation




                                             Related theory




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8. Folder of evidence of learning

This is a collection of documented evidence of learning that the student has
presented to support a claim of achievement of the programme of studies learning
outcomes. The selection of evidence presented depends very much on the needs
and interests of the student and the employer as well as meeting the
module/programme learning outcomes. The folder is countersigned by the mentor to
verify its authenticity.

Assessing Proficiency Utilising Folders of Evidence

Benner’s (1984) framework has been selected to describe the transition from
competence to proficiency. At the level of proficiency, assessment involves
examining the ability to integrate a skill into a uniquely focused response rather than
the ability to transact a particular skill. The term skill refers to both interpersonal and
psychomotor skills. Proficiency differs from competence. It is reliant on the ability of
the practitioner to demonstrate accurate global perception, rather than fragmentary
competent performance. The response is intuitive, comprehensive and focused.
Judgement and action emerge from the accurate and intelligent synthesis of a given
global situation. It represents the application of skills to manage and exert a degree
of control over the complex clinical environment, rather than merely reacting to it.
The proficient practitioner must be able to demonstrate more than competent
specialist practice skills; he/she must also demonstrate fluency in the ability to
perceive the global picture and devise dynamic and novel strategies to address
unique situations as they present themselves.

The development of proficient skills and abilities must grow from the educational and
practice progression stimulated by the specialist programme of study. This engages
the student in the process of matching research evidence with actual specialist
clinical practice. (Marks-Maran & Rose 1997). This requires the student to utilise an
expanding specialist theoretical knowledge and understanding when thinking deeply
about the way in which care is delivered and managed. Subsequently a higher level
of insight, flexibility and fluency will be reflected in their own actions and reactions,
building a repertoire of responses.

The assessment strategy for this programme is sophisticated and demonstrates:

       fluency in the student’s ability to perceive the global picture

       judgement and action emerging from the accurate and intelligent synthesis of
        the global situation

       the integration of the uniquely focused response discussed above

       the ability to manage and exert a degree of control over a complex
        environment

This assessment strategy concentrates academic endeavour directly on the
situational context of specialist practice and on the student’s responses to it. The
work-based approach to programme delivery demands a work-based assessment
strategy, which goes beyond the achievement and logging of competencies. For
these reasons the production of folders of evidence of learning by the student are
promoted to chart and assess the above.




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The practice component contained within the modules has been designed in such a
way as to enable the majority of students to gain most of the outcomes in their
normal working environment. This will mean that prior to the student commencing
the programme of studies it must be established that the majority of the outcomes
can be met within the work environment. It is acknowledged that there may be
specific elements of the specialist pathway, which the students cannot meet within
their own work environment and therefore focused educational visits have been
identified as a means of achieving these. In the case of the student who is working in
a non-specialist environment where the speciality comprises only part of the total
work role, arrangements to provide secondment, specialist placements, or
longer/more focused educational visits will require to be negotiated prior to the
student commencing the pathway. The extent and nature of the requirements will be
dependent upon the nature of the experience available in the workplace and the
background of the student. A placement provided out with the normal workplace for
one module may have the potential to be utilised to sustain the achievement of
learning outcomes in other modules within the pathway, without additional time away
from the normal workplace other than that for focused educational visits. Practice
placement areas with the potential to provide the range of experience and learning
opportunities required to achieve the module outcomes have and will continue to be
identified by the pathway teams.




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9. The Mentor / clinical supporter’s role

In this programme of study the student is has tripartite support, from her manager,
from the module leader and from the mentor / clinical supporter.

According to Carmin (1993) mentoring is a complex, interactive process, occurring
between individuals of differing levels of experience and expertise which incorporates
interpersonal psychosocial development, career and/or educational development,
and socialisation functions into the professional relationship…to the extent that
parameters of mutuality and comparability exist in the relationship, the potential
outcomes of respect, professionalism, collegiality, and role fulfilment will result.
Further, the support process occurs in a dynamic relationship within a given
environment.

There is an increasing recognition of the need for clinical supportive relationships that
provide practitioners with a critical friend who supports and guides them through the
organisational, social and political networks of the world of work to provide effective
learning support and professional development (Humphris and Masterton 2000).
Mentoring can also assist with professional development by facilitating critical
reflection on practice (Durgahee 1998).

Criteria for becoming a Mentor

       Experienced Registered Nurses who are competent in their area of practice
       Have undertaken a mentor preparation programme or equivalent
       Be registered on the live mentor register as a sign off mentor or
       Have completed RPEL and supporting activities to sign off mentor standard

Criteria for becoming a Mentor /Clinical Supporter:-
     Experienced practitioners who are competent in their area of practice
     Be registered on the University database of clinical supporters and have
        undertaken preparation to sign off mentor standard.
     Have completed RPEL and supporting activities to sign off mentor standard


Characteristics of a mentor /clinical supporter:-

The mentor /clinical supporter will:

       Be honest and objective
       Be able to listen actively
       Base the partnership on openness and trust
       Become a reflective partner for the student
       Enable the student to explore the concept of critical incident analysis as a
        learning tool
       Facilitate the use of learning contracts by the student
       Promote the identification of learning needs
       Negotiate learning opportunities related to the outcomes of the module of
        study

Characteristics of a Good Student:-

For the student/mentor / clinical supporter relationship to work effectively the student
should be:



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       Motivated and willing to learn
       Willing to challenge, and engage with the mentor / clinical supporter in critical
        discussion
       Willing to take responsibility for their learning within the context of the
        partnership
       Honest and objective in self-assessment
       Able to listen actively
       Engage in critical dialogue to explore the thinking behind the mentor / clinical
        supporter’s feedback
       Prepared to push out the boundaries of personal comfort zone
       Able to treat the learning experience as a basis for critical discussion
       Prepared to explore and critically appraise limitations and development needs
        as part of the partnership
       Base the partnership on openness, realism and trust
       Prepared to plan learning opportunities in a negotiated manner with the
        mentor /clinical supporter and significant others as appropriate

Process for Selection

Each student will identify a named mentor /clinical supporter who will facilitate
practice aspects of the student’s educational development. The student should
discuss the key requirements and role of a mentor /clinical supporter prior to their
agreeing/not agreeing to this very important function. This should be done in
collaboration with the manager for the specialist practice area. The manager will
confirm that a mentor meets the requirements to support the student i.e. that they are
sign off mentor or equivalent. Clinical supporters will be assessed for suitability by
the University. Where the mentor / clinical supporter does not meet the required
standard, the University of Dundee can provide access to materials to enable
progression to sign off standard.

Mentorship / Clinical Support

Aim

The aim of Mentor /Clinical Supporter is to facilitate the professional and personal
development of the student.

Role and Function

Mentors / Clinical Supporters will

       Provide the student with a professional role model in the context of their
        specific area of practice.
       Support and encourage the student to progress through their role specific
        development.
       Facilitate the student to identify resources that will enable successful
        completion of the module.
       Ensure that students are given the necessary level of supervision throughout
        their modules
       Provide the student with formative feedback throughout the work-based
        element of their module.
       Undertake continuous summative assessment of practice throughout the
        module and a written summative assessment report on completion.
       Assist in identifying and building on the students’ personal strengths.
       Encourage creativity in educational and practice.


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       Foster a stimulating and challenging learning environment.
       Encourage active learning.
       Facilitate the use of learning contracts by the student.
       Enable the student to explore the concept of critical incident analysis as an
        effective learning tool.

What is Mentorship /Clinical Support in Post Graduate Professional
     Development Modules?

The principal aim is to assist students to develop their role specific competence to
become fit to practise within the particular practice context. A supportive relationship
should be an actively enabling relationship where experiences are shared and
critically explored through a partnership of mutual trust and reciprocity (Humphries
and Masterton 2001). Students undertaking a professional development module will
negotiate for a mentor /clinical supporter to be allocated for the duration of their
period of study. Mentorship / Clinical Support in this context builds on the traditional
mentoring which is widely used within the clinical context and is seen as a powerful
tool for professional development and learning from the mentor. It is also seen as a
means for encouraging systematic critical reflection.

What do Mentors / Clinical Supporters Need to Know to Assist Students in
Achieving the Goal of Success Completion of their Module and Attainment of
Role Competence?

The Mentor / Clinical Supporter should be familiar with:

       The documentation pertaining to the module.
       The content of the module.
       The assessment strategy

Mentor / Clinical Supporter Support Systems and Networks

Supporting mentors / clinical supporters in clinical practice is essential if we are to
ensure that the Professional Development Modules are fit for purpose and deliver
competent role specific practitioners who are able to function as effective team
members in an ever changing health care environment.

Mentors / Clinical supporters will be able to draw on a number of avenues for
continuing support throughout the period they support students. These include:

Direct Contact:
Dr Karen Lee
Programme Leader/Module Leader
Tel:    01382 388651
E-mail: k.e.lee@dundee.ac.uk

Key areas offered by the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Dundee to
provide support at this point in time are website, telephone and email contact
Website Developments:

As part of the school’s commitment to supporting you in the work place, the CPPSU
now has its own website: http://cppsu.snm.dundee.ac.uk/

Academic Practice Contacts – this role is undertaken by members of the module
team and is described in Appendix 7.


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School of Nursing and Midwifery                                             Appendix 1

                AUDIT OF THE PRACTICE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT:
                        Specialist Practitioner Qualification

Section 1: PROFILE

   Organisation


   Postal Address

   Manager

   Telephone Number

   Email address

   Date of Audit

   Speciality


   Sub Speciality e.g. surgery,
   care of the elderly


   Maximum bed / places



   Name of University Contact
   (e.g. Academic Practice Contact)
   Name of practice staff member
   completing audit




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Mentor Profile

Part of NMC                 Adult          Child           Mental           Learning     Midwifery
register                                                   Health           Disability

Number of mentors
on that part of the
register
Clinical Supporter

Number of sign- off
mentors

Specialist in
Infection
Prevention and
Control




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Standard 1: Each practice learning environment must have mentors who meet NMC Standards
            to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice ( NMC 2008)

                                                          Achieved                 Evidence required/
                                                            Yes              No    auditors comments
1.1   Registered mentor

      Students on Specialist Practice
      programmesmust be supported by sign off
      mentors or clinical supporters who have
      been prepared to sign off mentor standard.

1.2   There are arrangements in place for re-
      allocating mentors/clinical supporters to
      students if required.
1.3   There are arrangements in place for
      ensuring that all mentors meet NMC
      standards for mentorship/addressing
      concerns about mentors /removing mentors
      from the register.




Standard 2: Systems are established which support the management and organisation of an
            Effective practice learning environment

                                                           Achieved                Evidence required/
                                                             Yes              No   auditors comments
2.1   SPQ information is available in the practice
      learning environment


2.2   The role of mentor in relation to allocated
      students has been discussed with the
      mentor.

2.3   Students will have a named mentor for the
      duration of the practice learning experience.


2.4   Documentation is accessible in the practice
      learning environment which specifies the
      process for contacting the relevant
      University administrative and academic staff
      in relation to student and practice issues.
2.5   Mentors/Clinical Supportersare aware who
      their Academic Practice Contact is




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Standard 3: The practice learning environment provides a safe and appropriate learning
environment which supports enhancement of quality activity

                                                         Achieved                  Evidence required/
                                                            Yes             No     auditors comments
3.1   The practice learning environment has a
      documented philosophy or statement of
      values in relation to the educational needs
      of students
3.2   There is evidence that the values expressed
      within the philosophy are reflected in the
      practice learning environment
3.3   Identify professional development activities
      being undertaken by staff within the
      placement.
3.4   What quality improvement activities have
      been undertaken recently

3.5   Current relevant key documents are
      accessible within the practice learning
      environment

3.6   Current NMC documents are accessible
      within the practice learning environment

3.7   The practice learning environment provider
      confirms that they comply with legal
      requirements relating to health, safety and
      welfare of students




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Standard 4:    Opportunities are available to facilitate student achievement of agreed learning
               outcomes

                                                         Achieved                  Evidence required/
                                                            Yes             No     auditors comments
4.1   Relevant educational programme and policy
      documents are available within the practice
      learning environment plus access to the
      CPPSU website

4.2   Mentors/Clinical Supporters have
      knowledge of the programmes of study
      being undertaken by students

4.3   Students have access to appropriate
      learning resources and study areas within
      the practice learning environment

4.4   Mentors/Clinical supporters are aware of;

      1) the NMC Standards



4.5   Appropriate learning opportunities are
      available to facilitate the achievement of
      relevant students’ practice competencies
      (IPS 2011) and NMC proficiencies

4.6   A planned programme of learning is
      developed for each student to facilitate
      achievement of learning outcomes for
      individual students and programme
      requirements




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Section 3: Action Plan

Standard                 Issue                       Action            Person(s)           Timescale   Evidence           Date           Signature of
Number                                                                 responsible for                 Required         Completed         Auditor to
                                                                       completion/follow                                                    verify
                                                                       up from                                                           completion
                                                                       University &
                                                                       Practice learning
                                                                       environment




When completed, please return this document to Joyce Troon, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Dundee, 11 Airlie Place, Dundee




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                       Page 30
Appendix 2: Letter of support for prospective students (and for withdrawn
students returning to the programme)


Letter of support for prospective students name…………………………………..


Programme of Study: Specialist Practitioner Qualification (Infection;Diseases,
Prevention and Control)

Institution: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Dundee University.


Name of student applicant:
Employing Organisation:
Address:



Telephone:
Current clinical position:


Managers Name:
Address:



Telephone:



Nominated Mentor /Clinical Supporter :
Address:



Telephone:

Pease confirm that the Mentor / Clinical supporter is on the register as a sign off
mentor      YES / NO
If no, please contact the programme leader to discuss alternative arrangements


Date of meeting to discuss application:

Item                                             Discussed Comment
SPQ programme meets applicants
professional developmental needs

SPQ programme meets the
organisations service needs

Funding/support issues have been
discussed and agreed
SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                              Page 31
Study time: while this programme
is delivered in electronic mode,
which allows flexibility for study,
each module is 15 weeks in
duration and has an estimated 300
hours theory and 300 hours
practice component.
Theory time: while there is
significant student effort there
should be set aside the equivalent
of one study day per week to allow
the student to engage with the
online learning materials.
Practice component: the student
will be engaged in work based
learning in their clinical base
however there may be
requirements for short educational
or focused visits to gain the
learning opportunities required
during the period of study that are
not available in the work place
The student has access to a
computer
The placement quality assurance
statement has been completed
satisfactorily. (and is attached)
A sign off mentor (or clinical
support) has been identified
Potential focus and educational
visits have been identified. (not all
may necessarily be identified at this
time)
Examples
     - time in the Microbiology
        Laboratory
     - visit to EHO
     - shadowing an IPCN in
        acute or community setting




Having met with the student and discussed the above SPQ programme, and
assessed the suitability of the clinical environment to provide a suitable learning
environment we are prepared to support the student during this programme of study.

Signature of Manager…...…………………………………………….. date…………...

Signature of Mentor/Clinical Supporter……………………………… date………



SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                         Page 32
To be completed by programme leader

Item                                             Comment
Student has organisational support

Sign off mentor has been identified

Learning environment audit has
been completed

Actions


Signature of Programme Leader................

Date..........................................




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                   Page 33
Appendix 3: Infection Prevention Society: Core competences for advanced-
level practice in infection prevention and control (date)

Summary of Competences

This is suggested as a guiding framework with which;

    -    to view suitability of the workplace to provide learning opportunities to gain
         the programmes outcomes
    -    to gauge the students readiness for this programme,
    -    to monitor the student progression through the programme

The competences below must be completed by the student online and on paper at
the end of each module to provide evidence of progression.

IPS Competences

The IPS (2011) competences have been structured against the four domains within
the Advanced Practitioner Toolkit for Modernising Nursing Careers (Clinical Practice;
Education; Research and Leadership and Management) and focus on the outcomes
of performance – what it is that an individual will be expected and be able to do when
they are functioning at an advance level of practice in infection prevention and
control. However, they are for all practitioners who have responsibilities within the
infection prevention and control team, to inform development and growth.

We acknowledge that, at this stage you will not be fully functioning at an advanced
level of practice, and indeed some of the competences in the document may not be
applicable to your current clinical role. For the purpose of this programme, you need
to follow the process set down in competence 7 (Education Domain: Develop own
knowledge, skills and practice), and look at what is expected at an advanced level for
each competence. Using the performance indicators and knowledge, understanding
and skills section in the competency, provide details of evidence of your progress to
each competence as set out in the tables below. This must be undertaken at the
beginning of the programme, at the end of each of your SPQ modules and on
submission of your folder of evidence at the end of the programme. This therefore
demonstrates your developing competence throughout the SPQ programme.

The full competency framework will be provided for you in each module site, but can
also be downloaded from the IPS web site: http://www.ips.co.uk




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                Page 34
Domain One: Clinical Practice


                                                                            Evidence of progress towards the competence


             Competence                              Fundamental Skills for       Advancing Skills in the Practice   Demonstrating Competency at
              Statement                             Practitioners of Infection      of Infection Prevention and      Advanced Levels of Practice
                                                     Prevention and Control                    Control

Improve quality and safety by
development and implementing
robust, high-quality policies and
guidelines that prevent and
control infection
Collate analyse and communicate
data relating to preventing and
control infection for surveillance
purposes
Manage Incidents and outbreaks
Improve quality and safety
through the application of
improvement methodologies
Advise on the design, construction
and modification of facilities to
prevent and control infection in
the built environment
Evaluate, monitor and review the
effectiveness of decontamination
processes for equipment and
environment



SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                   Page 35
Domain Two: Education


                                                                            Evidence of progress towards the competence


             Competence                              Fundamental Skills for       Advancing Skills in the Practice   Demonstrating Competency at
              Statement                             Practitioners of Infection      of Infection Prevention and      Advanced Levels of Practice
                                                     Prevention and Control                    Control

Develop own knowledge, skills
and practice
Lead the development of the
knowledge, skills and practice of
the infection prevention and
control team
Develop and implement learning
and development opportunities
and solutions to improve infection
prevention and control
Work with others to develop,
implement, evaluate and embed
infection prevention and control
within workforce development
strategies




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                   Page 36
Domain Three: Research


                                                                            Evidence of progress towards the competence


             Competence                              Fundamental Skills for       Advancing Skills in the Practice   Demonstrating Competency at
              Statement                             Practitioners of Infection      of Infection Prevention and      Advanced Levels of Practice
                                                     Prevention and Control                    Control

Access, appraise and apply
robust evidence of all types from a
range of research and other
sources, to the domains of the
role
Build the evidence and knowledge
base of IPC practice through
participation in, or completion of,
research and other related
activities
Share best practice through the
dissemination of evidence and
knowledge




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                   Page 37
Domain Four: Leadership and Management



                                                                              Evidence of progress towards the competence


             Competence                              Fundamental Skills for         Advancing Skills in the Practice   Demonstrating Competency at
              Statement                             Practitioners of Infection        of Infection Prevention and      Advanced Levels of Practice
                                                     Prevention and Control                      Control

Improve quality and safety
through networking, influence,
proactivity and challenge
Improve quality and safety
through the design, planning,
monitoring and development of
services
Lead the infection prevention and
control service
Lead and manage the work of the
infection prevention and control
team to achieve objectives


Signature of student                                                   Date

Signature of Mentor/Clinical Supporter                                 Date




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                     Page 38
Appendix 4: Keeping a record of student’s support and planning meetings with
mentor /clinical supporter

This document is not prescriptive in regards the number of student/mentor / clinical
supporter meetings, nor the number of educational visits. Each student’s needs are
unique, with some requiring two or more per module and other less. In some
instances students may require more support early in the programme and this need
tails off as the student gains confidence and practice. Clinical support is an ongoing
process and although in each module there should be a midway and final
assessment meeting. Please use any available opportunity to discuss progress,
learning needs, opportunities and outcomes. This is a 3-way dialogue.

The number of educational visits required very much depends on the learning
opportunities available in the clinical work place to enable the student to meet the
outcomes of the pathway modules.

There is no set time that support meeting should last for, this depends on the
students needs, and the time available.

It is the student’s responsibility to ensue that this record is maintained online and on
paper and signed by the mentor / clinical supporter.

Pre-Application discussion                 Specific areas discussed    Date and signature
SPQ programme meets the
applicants and the
organisations service needs
Funding/support issues
Study time
Computer access
The notion of focus and
educational visits
1. First meeting - Orientation
Plan
Discussion of SPQ pathway
modules
Review of work hours and
identification of study hours
Discussion of module(s)
outcomes
Identification of potential
focused/educational visit(s)
Drafting leaning contract(s)
Planning for subsequent
meetings

2. Record of student                       Specific areas discussed    Date and signature
/mentor/clinical supporter
meetings
2.1
Review progress
Review learning contract(s)
Review focused/educational
visit
End of module clinical

SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                 Page 39
assessment in relation to
IPS/NMC domain/competency
statements


3. Record of Educational                   Specific areas discussed    Date and signature
visits/focused visits
3.1
Purpose and nature of visit
discussed and justified
Learning contract written
Visit negotiated and agreed
Learning contract completed
and evaluated

3.2
Purpose and nature of visit
discussed and justified
Learning contract written
Visit negotiated and agreed
Learning contract completed
and evaluated

4. Final meeting
Review progress over whole
SPQ programme

Discuss the evidence to be
presented in the
‘Demonstrating Specialist
Practice Competency’ folder of
evidence.

End of pathway clinical
assessment and mentor
report, in relation to IPS/NMC
domain/competency
statements

Submission of record with
folder




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                                 Page 40
Appendix 5: Mentor / Clinical supporter’s report
NMC Specialist practice statements IPS Competency Domains              Demonstrating Specialist        Mentor/Clinical Supporter’s statement
                                                                       Practice competency –           identifying student’s achievement of the NMC
                                                                       Integration Module              specialist practice statements in current
                                                                                                       practice.
Specialist Clinical Practice                     Domain One
1 Assess health, health related &                Clinical Practice
nursing needs of                                                       Discuss the factors and
patients/carers/service users & plan                                   assumptions, within and
& initiate appropriate effective care.                                 out with the profession that
                                                                       are influential in the
2. Set, implement & evaluate                                           expression and
standards of nursing interventions                                     understanding of the
across a range of care provision                                       different concepts of
                                                                       expertise
3. Support & empower
patients/carers/service users                                          Demonstrate higher level
participation in decision making                                       analytic reflective skills by
processes regarding their care and                                     examination of the
use suitable available health &                                        students own practice,
social services                                                        thus identifying practice
                                                                       expertise
4 Facilitate patients/carers/service
users learning regarding their
health needs

5. provide counselling &
psychological support for
patients/carers/service users

6. Act independently within a multi-
disciplinary multi-agency context


SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                             Page 41
NMC Specialist practice statements               IPS Competency Domains   Demonstrating Specialist       Mentor / Clinical Supporter’s statement
                                                                          Practice competency –          identifying student’s achievement of the NMC
                                                                          Integration Module             specialist practice statements in current
                                                                                                         practice.
Care Programme Management                        Domain Four              Critically evaluate
1.Supervise & manage clinical                    Leadership and           leadership models and
practice to ensure safe & effective              Management               reflect on his/her
holistic research based care                                              leadership behaviours and
2. initiate/contribute to strategies                                      personal effectiveness as
that promote & improve health,                                            a change agent.
prevent disease by selecting from a
range of appropriate health & social
services
3. Recognise ethical & legal issues
which have implications for nursing
practice & take appropriate action
Clinical Practice Leadership                     Domain Four              Critically evaluate
1.Lead & clinically direct the                   Leadership and           leadership models and
professional team in the                         Management               reflect on his/her
implementation & monitoring of                                            leadership behaviours and
quality assured standards by                                              personal effectiveness as
effective & efficient management of                                       a change agent.
resources
2. Use appraisal effectively to
advice & facilitate other
practitioners to develop their                                            Analyze how guided
knowledge & clinical expertise                                            reflection through clinical
3. Facilitate learning through the                                        supervision or reflective
use of mentorship, counselling,                                           partnerships can help
clinical supervision & provision of                                       practitioners to explore and
an educational environment                                                develop their work
                                                                          effectiveness


SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                               Page 42
NMC Specialist practice statements               IPS Competency Domains   Demonstrating Specialist     Mentor/Clinical Supporter’s statement
                                                                          Practice competency –        identifying student’s achievement of the NMC
                                                                          Integration Module           specialist practice statements in current
                                                                                                       practice.
Clinical Practice Development                    Domain Two               Explore the literature and
1.Create an environment in which                 Education                debate the characteristics
clinical practice development is                                          of specialist/expert
fostered, evaluated and                          Domain Three             practice.
disseminated                                     Research
                                                                          Demonstrate a high level
2. contribute to clinical teaching &                                      of understanding of the
learning in a multi-disciplinary                                          nature of evidence and the
environment with scope of                                                 relationship between
expertise & knowledge base                                                evidence and work-based
                                                                          learning
3. initiate and lead practice
developments to enhance the
nursing contribution to quality care

4. Identify, apply & disseminate
research findings relating to
specialist nursing practice.

5 Explore & implement strategies
for quality assurance and quality
audit and their monitoring and
evaluation.
I have seen and discussed the                                             Produce a folder which
students folder of evidence and it                                        displays the achievement
reflects the depth and complexity of                                      of the key elements of the
his/her current practice                                                  specialist/ advanced
                                                                          practitioner role.


SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                               Page 43
SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                   Page 44
Appendix 6: Process for mentors / clinical supporters to demonstrate preparation to sign off
mentor standard




                          Recognition of
                         Prior Experience
                                and
                             Learning
                           (Mentorship)




SPQ Student and Mentor /Clinical supporter guidance and requirements
Revised January 2012                                                           Page 45
Contents:




Introduction                                p3

RPEL Process Flow Chart                     p4

Aims and Learning Outcomes                  p5

Use of the RPEL process                     p6

What is a mentor?                           p7

What is a sign-off mentor?                  p8

Self Assessment                             p9

Establish Effective Working Relationships   p 14

Facilitation of Learning                    p 16

Assessment and Accountability               p 18

Evaluation of Learning                      p 24

Creating an Environment for Learning        p 25

Context of Practice                         p 26

Evidence Based Practice                     p 28

Leadership                                  p 29

Appendices

1. Action Plan                              p 31

2. RPEL Verification Sheet Copy 1           p 32

3. RPEL Verification Sheet Copy 2           p 33

Reference and further reading               p 34

Acknowledgements                            p 35
               Introduction

               Welcome to the Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning (RPEL) process,
               successful completion of which will lead to annotation on the local register of
               mentors. In 2006 (updated 2008) the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)
               published Standards to support learning and assessment in practice which requires
               all mentors who will be supervising and assessing nursing students, demonstrate
               that they meet the NMC standards.


The standards also require that placement providers develop and maintain local registers and a
central database of current mentors, sign-off mentors and practice teachers.

Universities and colleges will use the register to confirm that there are sufficient mentors, sign-off
mentors and practice teachers to adequately support the number of students undertaking
approved NMC programmes. It is an NMC requirement that all midwives are sign-off mentors.

Managers initially identified experienced mentors who met the standards and they were annotated
on to this local and central database.

From the 1st September 2008 the NMC requires that registered Nurses and Midwives who have
previous mentorship experience and feel that they meet the standards for mentorship but whose
name has not been previously annotated on the local database can only have their name added
by undertaking this Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning (RPEL) process endorsed by
the local education providers i.e. University of Dundee and University of Abertay Dundee.

The RPEL route is not appropriate for more recently qualified practitioners with no mentoring
experience or associated learning. These practitioners should undertake the Mentor Preparation
Programme delivered by the University of Dundee. If you are unsure of what route to mentorship
is more appropriate to you please see the Algorithm on Page 4.


NMC the Code: standards of conduct, performance and ethics identifies:

   •   You must keep your knowledge and skills up to date throughout your working life

   •   You must be willing to share your skills and experience for the benefit of your colleagues

   •   You must facilitate students and others to develop their competence

   •   You are personally accountable for actions and omissions in your practice and must
       always be able to justify your decisions


                                                                                         (NMC 2008)




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  Recognition of Prior Experiential Learning for Nurses and Midwives as
   Mentors and other Registered Professionals as Supervisors (RPEL)

   Procedure for Practitioners to provide evidence leading to inclusion on the
                             Local Mentor Register


                               Does the Practitioner have previous
                                     mentoring experience


                                 NO                          YES
                                           Can the Practitioner provide evidence of
                                           having been included on a Local Mentor
                                                           Register?


                                              YES                             NO

                                                             Holder of the Mentor Register contacts
                                                              PEF / CHEF to start RPEL process




                                                             Practitioner will complete the RPEL
      Undertake an approved Mentor                        process; provide evidence from previous
    Preparation Programme providing a                      experience and learning to demonstrate
    Portfolio of Evidence mapped to the                   their knowledge and skills. The evidence
    NMC Standards to support learning                          will be mapped against the eight
    and assessment in practice (2008)                          domains and outcomes in NMC
      and verified by the University of                      Standards to support learning and
    Dundee Quality Assurance Process                            assessment in practice (2008).




                                                              The Holder of the Register will
                                                               evaluate the evidence and agree
                                                               inclusion to the Local Mentor
                                                               Register
                                                              Completed documentation retained
                                                               by the Practitioner
   PRACTITIONER IS ADDED TO THE                               One copy of Verification Sheet
     LOCAL MENTOR REGISTER                                     returned to PEF/CHEF
                                                              Identified Learning Needs will be
                                                               agreed with the Register Holder and
                                                               signed-off within the Practitioner’s
                                                               CPD, (Continued Professional
                                                               Development)



NOTE: EVIDENCE WILL BE REQUESTED REGULARLY FOR INCLUSION IN THE UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE QUALITY
                                   ASSURANCE PROCESS


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Aims and Learning Outcomes of Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning process.



Aims:

   •    Reflect upon existing knowledge and previous experience of mentorship in relation to the
        NMC Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. (NMC, 2008)
   •    Provide evidence to demonstrate competence within the eight domains and learning
        outcomes defined in the NMC standards in order to be annotated to the local register as a
        mentor.


Learning Outcomes:

   •    The mentor demonstrates that they possess the knowledge and skills required to
        competently carry out the role of the mentor in keeping with the Standards to support
        learning and assessment in practice (NMC,2008) through the provision of evidence of
        previous experience and learning.




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How to use the Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning (RPEL) process

Please familiarise yourself with the roles and responsibilities of mentors and sign-off mentors,
read the aims and outcomes and then complete the self assessment (pages 10 -12).

Self Assessment

It is important to familiarise yourself with the NMC publication (2008) Standards to support
learning and assessment in practice www.nmc-org.uk

You are then required to carry out a self assessment of your existing knowledge, skills and
mentoring experience and document your strengths and your learning needs.

Strengths

To identify your strengths you should consider your experience as a mentor and what type of
evidence you could use to demonstrate your achievement of the learning outcomes. This should
be gathered from a range of mentorship activities and experiences that you have undertaken or
participated in, when supporting learners in practice. This provides you with an opportunity to
identify what learning you have done in the past and how it relates to the work you are being
asked to carry out now. Most of us have life experiences that are strengths in relation to learning.
Try to think positively about what you have accomplished in the past. You might also want to
consider previous training, courses, student support activities, resources used or developed to
support student learning in practice etc. When you have decided on your strengths, you will have
to consider how you will provide evidence of these for your verification to mentor status.

Learning Needs

After identifying your strengths it is likely that you will also have identified areas requiring further
development. You will need to decide how you will achieve these and what evidence you will
present to your manager as part of your Ongoing and Continuing Professional Development.

It may be useful to set yourself goals and the action plan on page 39 could be used to plan and
discuss any continued learning and development needs with your manager.

You should then complete the relevant activities linked to each domain which should effectively
provide evidence of your competence with regards to each element of the eight domains of the
NMC standards. It is anticipated this process will be completed within a maximum of 12 weeks
but this can be agreed locally.

Verification

The completed evidence should be given to your manager/holder of the Mentor Register for
verification. If they are satisfied that the evidence presented demonstrates that you possess the
knowledge and skills required of an effective mentor they can arrange to have your name
annotated to the local register and central database. You should both complete the RPEL
Verification Sheets, one copy of which should be kept for your personal files and the second copy
sent to your PEF or Care Home PEF.

In line with NMC requirements and to ensure a robust approach a selection of completed RPEL
folders will be requested for inclusion and review at the University of Dundee Quality Assurance
Process for the Mentor Preparation Programme.




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What is a mentor?

The NMC standards define a mentor as a registrant who, following successful completion of an
NMC approved mentor preparation programme, has achieved the knowledge, skills and
competence required to meet the defined outcomes (2008).

Being assigned a mentor is a mandatory requirement for pre-registration nursing and midwifery
students in clinical practice.


New Mentors:

The NMC Standards (2008) indicate that from September 2007 all new mentors will have to
undergo mentor preparation. Practitioners should be qualified a minimum of one year prior to
commencing a mentor preparation programme. This should follow completion of NHS Scotland
Flying Start™ programme.

The University of Dundee and Abertay University Dundee jointly deliver an approved Mentor
Preparation Programme. Further information regarding this programme and how to apply can be
found by accessing www.cppsu.dundee.ac.uk and click on mentors, then mentor preparation
programme.


Mentors:

There are no requirements for existing mentors to repeat any mentor preparation, as long as you
provide evidence that you can achieve the eight domain outcomes identified in the NMC
standards to support learning and assessment in practice. As previously mentioned in the
introduction it is an NMC requirement that you update your skills annually.

Mentors are responsible and accountable for:


   •   Organising and coordinating student learning activities in practice
   •   Supervising students in learning and providing them with constructive feedback on their
       achievements
   •   Setting and monitoring achievement of realistic learning objectives
   •   Assessing total performance – including skills, attitudes, behaviours and values
   •   Providing evidence as required by programme providers of student achievement or lack of
       achievement
   •   Liaising with others (mentors, sign-off mentors, practice facilitators, personal tutors/
       learning team facilitators and programme leaders) to provide feedback, identify any
       concerns about the students’ performance and agree action as appropriate
   •   Providing evidence for, or acting as, sign-off mentor with regard to making decisions about
       achievement of proficiency at the end of a programme




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What is a Sign-off Mentor?


      A nurse or midwife who is responsible and accountable for making judgements about
       whether a student has achieved the required standards of proficiency for safe and
       effective practice leading to a registration on the NMC register
      It is an NMC requirement that all student midwives must be mentored and assessed by a
       sign-off mentor

                                                                                      (NMC 2008)

Sign-off mentors must:

      Work in the same field of practice as that which the student intends to qualify i.e. adult,
       child or mental health
      Have clinical currency and capability in the field in which the student is being assessed
      Have an understanding of the NMC registration requirements and contribution they make
       to the achievement of these requirements
      Have a working knowledge of the current programme requirements, practice assessment
       strategies and relevant changes in education and practice for the students they are
       assessing
      Have an in depth understanding of their accountability to the NMC for the decision they
       must make to pass or fail a student when assessing proficiency requirements at the end of
       a programme



If you are not already identified as a sign-off mentor, to become one you must:

      Have undertaken an NMC recognised form of mentor preparation
      Be on the mentor register as a mentor
      Be supervised by an existing sign-off mentor, on 3 occasions signing-off a student in their
       final placement or undertaking one supervised sign off after completing the approved Sign-
       Off activities




Further information can be obtained by contacting the Practice Education Facilitator or Care
Home Education Facilitator for your area.




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  Self Assessment

  The following table sets out the eight domains of mentoring and their expected outcomes as
  outlined by the NMC (2008). You should assess yourself against these domains (skills) and:

         Acknowledge your existing knowledge and skills
         Identify any learning needs
         Work through the relevant activities within this booklet to evidence your current knowledge
          and skills based on any previous experience or learning in respect to mentorship.

                                                                           I am      I need to   I need to
Domain & Outcomes for Mentors                                              confident update      develop
                                                                           in my     my skills   my skills
                                                                           skills

1- Establish effective working relationships

Demonstrate an understanding of factors that influence how students
integrate into practice settings

Provide ongoing and constructive support to facilitate transition from
one learning environment to another

Have effective professional and interprofessional working
relationships to support learning for entry to the register


2- Facilitation of learning

Use knowledge of the student’s stage of learning to select
appropriate learning opportunities to meet their individual needs

Facilitate selection of appropriate learning strategies to integrate
learning from practice and academic experiences

Support students in critically reflecting upon their learning
experiences in order to enhance future learning


3- Assessment and accountability

Foster professional growth, personal development and accountability
through support of students in practice

Demonstrate a breadth of understanding of assessment strategies
and the ability to contribute to the total assessment process as part of
the teaching team

Provide constructive feedback to students and assist them in
identifying future learning needs and actions


(Continued overleaf)




  NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                  53
                                                                          I am      I need to   I need to
Domain & Outcomes for Mentors                                             confident update      develop
                                                                          in my     my skills   my skills
                                                                          skills

3- Assessment and accountability (continued)


Manage failing students so they may either enhance their
performance and capabilities for safe and effective practice or be
able to understand their failure and the implications of this for their
future

Be accountable for confirming that students have met, or not met, the
NMC competencies in practice

As a sign-off mentor confirm that students have met, not met, the
NMC standards of proficiency in practice and are capable of safe and
effective practice


4- Evaluation of learning

Contribute to evaluation of student learning and assessment
experiences – proposing aspects for change as a result of such
evaluation

Participate in self and peer evaluation to facilitate personal
development, and contribute to the development of others


5- Creating an environment for learning

Support students to identify both learning needs and experiences that
are appropriate to their level of learning

Use a range of learning experiences, involving patients, clients,
carers and the professional team, to meet the defined learning needs

Identify aspects of the learning environment which could be
enhanced, negotiating with others to make appropriate changes

Act as a resource to facilitate personal and professional
developments of others


6- Context of practice

Contribute to the development of an environment in which effective
practice is fostered, implemented, evaluated and disseminated

Set and maintain professional boundaries that are sufficiently flexible
for providing interprofessional care

Initiate and respond to practice developments to ensure safe and
effective care is achieved and an effective learning environment is
maintained



  NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                 54
                                                                         I am      I need to   I need to
Domain & Outcomes for Mentors                                            confident update      develop
                                                                         in my     my skills   my skills
                                                                         skills

7- Evidence based practice

Identify and apply research and evidence based practice to their area
of practice

Contribute to strategies to increase or review the evidence base used
to support practice

Support students in applying an evidence base to their practice area


8- Leadership

Plan a series of learning experiences that will meet student’s defined
learning needs

Be an advocate for students to support them accessing learning
opportunities that meet their individuals needs – involving a range of
other professionals, patients, clients and carers

Prioritise work to accommodate support of students within their
practice roles

Provide feedback about the effectiveness of learning and assessment
in practice




  NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                55
Having completed the self assessment please take time to reflect on your findings and summarise
your existing knowledge and strengths as well as any identified learning needs.

Take a note of any previous formal learning or preparation you may have had with regards to
mentorship i.e. study days, conferences, study sessions, local updates, SVQ Assessors course.



Summary of strengths and learning needs




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                56
Please consider the following activities related to each of the domains. Think about your previous
experience and learning in relation to mentorship and provide evidence of how you transfer your
knowledge and skills into the practice setting.




Establish Effective Working Relationships                                         p 14

Facilitation of Learning                                                          p 16

Assessment and Accountability                                                     p 18

Evaluation of Learning                                                            p 25

Creating an Environment for Learning                                              p 26

Context of Practice                                                               p 27

Evidence Based Practice                                                           p 29

Leadership                                                                        p 30




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                57
Establish Effective Working Relationships is the first NMC (2008) domain and indicates the
mentor should:

      Demonstrate an understanding of factors that influence how students integrate into
       practice
      Provide ongoing and constructive support to facilitate transition from one learning
       environment to another
      Have effective professional and interprofessional working relationships to support
       learning for entry to the register

1. Take 10 minutes to consider and record how you develop effective working relationships
   based on trust and mutual respect.

2. Consider how you welcome and socialise students into your area. Capture what you do well,
   and consider if there is something you can enhance or have implemented to enhance this
   process.

3. Take 10 minutes to reflect and record how you provide ongoing and constructive support to
   facilitate transition from one area to another? Upon reflection is there anything you feel you
   can change to improve your practice as a mentor?

Take time to reflect and record your experiences in relation to the above activities.




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                    58
Did you include any of the following points in your reflective piece?

      Plan ahead to ensure you were prepared for the student arriving
      Introduce yourself as their mentor, and then to the other team members within the area
      Provide information on the learning opportunities available within the area
      Within 48 hours of their arrival had taken the time to discuss their learning needs, and how
       you would facilitate this
      Use a learning contract or discuss and agree how you would work together to ensure trust
       and respect
      Set dates for future midway and final assessments, and discuss how you would provide
       ongoing feedback to support their learning




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                 59
  Facilitation of Learning is the second NMC domain and indicates the mentor should:

        Use knowledge of the student’s stage of learning to select appropriate learning
         opportunities to meet their needs
        Facilitate learning strategies to integrate theory into practice
        Support students in critically reflecting upon their experiences in order to enhance
         future learning

     1. Are you up-to-date and familiar with what the students who come to your area are being
        taught at University? Do you know where to access information with regards to the current
        curriculum summaries? Are you familiar with the Assessment Documentation used by the
        Universities in the region?

     2. Your placement setting provides a unique learning experience. Think about the
        opportunities that are available within your area. How do you enable the student to
        experience these when on placement? Have you developed or are you considering
        developing something for the area which would heighten awareness of available learning?

     3. Your daily practice is essential to learning. What strategies have you developed to involve
        students with everyday experiences; do you reflect on their practice with them? Do you
        break down situations and use them as learning experiences, linking the theory and
        practice. Take a few minutes and reflect on the above questions.




Record your actions/experience in relation to the above activities




  NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011              60
Continue here




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011   61
Assessment and Accountability is the third NMC domain and indicates mentors should:

      Foster professional growth, personal development and accountability through
       support of students in practice
      Demonstrate a breadth of understanding of assessment strategies and the ability to
       contribute to the total assessment process as part of the teaching team
      Provide constructive feedback to students and assist them in identifying future
       learning needs and activities
      Manage failing students so they may either enhance their performance and
       capabilities for safe and effective practice or be able to understand their failure and
       the implications of this for their future
      Be accountable for confirming that students have met, or not met, the NMC
       Standards competencies in practice. As a sign-off mentor confirm that students
       have met, or not met, the NMC Standards of proficiency in practice and are capable
       of safe and effective practice

   1. How does the NMC Code of Conduct (NMC, 2008) identify a registered nurse’s
      accountability in relation to mentorship?




   2. Students may pose questions regarding areas of practice that may test our knowledge.
      What strategies do you use to develop both the student’s and your own knowledge?




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011             62
You may have considered:

      Asking the student to research the topic and bring back the results to discuss with you
      Conducting your own research on the topic and use the knowledge learned to discuss with
       the student
      Both researching the topic and sharing the knowledge gained
      Plan an opportunity for your student, and perhaps yourself, to discuss the subject with
       another professional with the relevant expertise and knowledge

   3. Students can achieve competencies in a number of ways. What different methods of
      assessing students do you and your team use?




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Assessment strategies could include:


      Observation of the student’s practice in the clinical areas
      Participation in the delivery of patient care
      Simulation of practice, e.g. asking a student to display basic life support skills with the use
       of a mannequin
      Questioning, probing and discussion to elicit the student’s knowledge
      Discussing the student’s performance with other members of the team
      Asking the student to self-assess their performance
      Set work-based learning tasks to encourage the student to research specific subjects
      Reflect with the student about the learning that has taken place
      Utilise learning contracts to identify what learning objectives have been achieved and what
       still needs to be focussed on


Effective feedback should:


      Be delivered as soon as possible after the event
      Be specific, constructive and objective
      Afford privacy with time for the student to assimilate the information and ask questions
      Involve the student self-assessing their performance
      Use open ended questions and give reasons to evidence any comments
      Ensure the student understands what is expected of them
      Clarify any problems and form an agreed action plan if necessary

                                                                                        (RCN, 2007)


There are a number of feedback strategies, the most familiar of which is probably the sandwich
technique where negative feedback is sandwiched between positive feedback at the beginning
and end of the session.


Other feedback strategies may include:


BOOST:

      Balanced- include both good and constructive points
      Observed- only give examples of what you have seen the person say or do
      Objective- should be factual and not an attack on someone’s personality. Should focus on
       actions and not your feelings about the person
      Specific- always use specific examples
      Timely- should be given as close to the event as possible. This will ensure accuracy.




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                   64
ABCDE Model:

      Advance preparation
      Build a therapeutic relationship
      Communicate clearly
      Deal with reactions
      Encourage and validate emotions


FAST Model:

Frequent: Each employee has his or her own unique frequency. Giving employees feedback at
their unique frequency is the key behaviour. Identifying and seizing opportunities for giving that
feedback are the key skills.

Accurate: Every instance of feedback affects trust and performance. Giving feedback that is
correct, balanced and appropriate is the key behaviour. Stopping to reflect, questioning
assumptions, checking facts and rehearsing are the key skills.

Specific: Telling people exactly what they do right and what they do wrong is not specific enough.
You have to tell people exactly what you want them to do next. That is the key behaviour. Setting
concrete goals and deadlines with clear guidelines are the key skills.

Timely: The closer feedback comes in proximity to the performance in question, the more impact
the feedback will have. The key behaviour is giving feedback immediately. Effective time
management is the key skill.


   4. Have you had experience of feedback that was not constructive? Consider how this made
      you feel and what affect it had on your development?




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                     65
   5. Consider the purpose of the initial, midway and final interviews and demonstrate how you
      would relate this to the management of a student who is underachieving.




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011             66
Initial Interview:


       Welcome the student, introduce and integrate into the team
       Provide induction and orientation
       Identify learning outcomes and implement a learning contract to meet them
       Set dates for the midway and final assessments
       Take account of any action plan the student brings with them from a previous placement,
        or that they have constructed with their Personal Tutor/Learning Team Facilitator
       Ensure that students have ongoing constructive feedback. Any issues identified, should
        not come as “a surprise” and should be discussed as they arise, giving the student the
        opportunity to address them. Mentors should seek advice and support from peers, SCN,
        PEF and Personal Tutor/Learning Team Facilitator
       Document any lack of progress, providing specific examples as evidence, and any
        discussions with the student
       Formulate an action plan with the support of the Personal Tutor/Learning Team Facilitator
        and the PEF


Midway Interview:


       Provide feedback on performance to date, identifying strengths and areas for development
       Review objectives and consider whether achievable or achieved
       Encourage the student to self-assess to elicit their perception of their performance and
        learning experiences
       If problems with the students’ performance persists despite constructive feedback and
        support, document as above, ensuring the student has a clear understanding of the
        problem areas


Final Interview:


       Provides a summative assessment to identify strengths and whether the student has
        achieved competencies, including any skills achieved specific to the area
       Competencies that are not met should be recorded and evidence of failing to achieve
        satisfactory performance recorded accurately, giving specific examples
       The assessment goes back to the Personal Tutor/Learning Team Facilitator to look at the
        management of student’s performance

.




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011               67
.Evaluation of Learning is the fourth NMC domain and indicates that mentors should:

      Contribute to evaluation of student learning and assessment experiences –
       proposing aspects for change as a result of such evaluation
      Participate in self and peer evaluation to facilitate personal development, and
       contribute to the development of others

Consider your experiences of mentorship. What happens in your area?

Were you aware that students evaluate their practice placement on return to university, and this
information is returned to the placement area on a yearly basis? Have you read and considered
the student evaluations?

Does your local area invite feedback from students at the end of their placement?

Can you give an example of your development as a mentor or positive changes to your clinical
learning environment you have made as a result of feedback from a student?




Describe how you evaluate learning. Have you identified an area for improvement?




The most important aspect of evaluation is to take action from your feedback




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                   68
   Creating an Environment for Learning is NMC domain 5 and indicates that mentors should:

          Support students to identify both learning needs and experiences that are
           appropriate to their level of learning
          Use a range of learning experiences, involving patients, clients, carers and the
           professional team, to meet the defined learning needs
          Identify aspects of the learning environment, which could be enhanced negotiating
           with others to make appropriate changes
          Act as a resource to facilitate personal and professional developments of others

   SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. After reading the
   above undertake a SWOT analysis considering how your practice as a mentor enables you to
   meet the above points. A SWOT analysis is an extremely useful tool for understanding and
   decision making for all kinds of situations in business and organisations. Identify points you feel
   you may need to strengthen.


Criteria examples            STRENGTHS                 WEAKNESSES                 Criteria examples

Learning resources?                                                               Gaps in provision?
Experience/                                                                       Gaps in capabilities?
knowledgeable staff?                                                              Lack of support for
Capabilities?                                                                     education?
Location?                                                                         Reputations?
Management?                                                                       Resources issues?
Staffing levels?                                                                  Reliability of planning?
Qualifications?                                                                   Morale, commitment,
Process, systems?                                                                 leadership?
Cultural, attitudinal                                                             Insufficient management
behaviour?                                                                        or succession planning?
Philosophy and values?


Criteria examples            OPPORTUNITIES             THREATS                    Criteria examples

Educational                                                                       Political effects?
developments?                                                                     Legislative effects?
Promote good practice?                                                            IT developments?
Technical/care                                                                    Competitive Demands?
development and                                                                   New systems?
innovation?                                                                       Insurmountable
Partnerships, liaison?                                                            weaknesses?
Seasonal influences?                                                              Loss of key staff?
                                                                                  Economic influences?
                                                                                  Seasonal influences?




   NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                      69
 Context of Practice is the sixth domain and indicates that mentors should:

        Contribute to the development of an environment in which effective practice is
         fostered, implemented evaluated and disseminated
        Set and maintain professional boundaries
        Initiate and respond to practice developments to ensure safe and effective care is
         achieved and an effective learning environment is maintained

 As a professional it is essential that you demonstrate to the student how to set and maintain
 professional boundaries and to ensure they adopt a professional attitude.
      Look at the NMC Code (2008) and / or Midwives rules and standards (2004) and reflect on
        your responsibilities to the students.
      Consider actions you would undertake to address unprofessional behaviour and record
        any examples of experience with this.

 Students are learning responsibility and accountability from you.

        Can you think of a mentor you aspired to?
        What qualities do you possess that make you an effective mentor?

 The main reason for placement experiences is to enable students to relate the theory to practice.
 You are ideally placed to involve students in care delivery, ensuring that they have the skills to
 deliver safe and effective evidenced based care.

        Are there any national and local policies that your clinical area is working towards e.g.
         infection control, NMC Standards, Better Health Better Care, and SIGN?
        How do you involve students in audits or practice development in the area?


Record your actions in relation to the above activities




 NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                    70
Continue here:




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011   71
Evidence-based Practice is the seventh NMC domain. It indicates that the mentor should:

      Identify and apply research and evidence-based practice to their area of practice
      Contribute to strategies to increase or review the evidence base used to support
       practice
      Support students in applying evidence to their practice



1. Give examples of evidence-based resources that you have used in relation to your mentoring
skills.




2. Consider and give examples of guidelines available to support practice in your area and any
other ways you and/or your area enhances practice? Have you involved students in any
audit/research pertinent to your area?




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011                 72
Leadership is the last domain NMC (2008) domain and indicates that the mentor must
demonstrate the following skills:

      Plan series of learning experiences that will meet the student’s defined learning
       needs
      Be an advocate for students to support them accessing learning opportunities that
       meet their individual needs – involving a range of other professionals, patients,
       clients and carers
      Prioritise work to accommodate support of students within their practice roles
      Provide feedback about the effectiveness of learning and assessment in practice



Reflect on these key points of leadership; consider how you as a mentor have used these skills to
integrate the above into practice.




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011               73
Good leadership can direct the mentor and student experience. When mentoring, do you consider
the following?

      Effective communication
      Use of resources
      Effective use of time
      Setting dates for midway, final assessment and giving feedback
      Informing other mentors of the student’s needs
      Acting as an advocate to ensure that the student is not detracted from the agreed learning
       plan




NHS Tayside and NHS Fife Practice & Care Home Education Facilitators August 2011               74
Appendix 1

Action Plan: This may assist you to plan any future learning




               Learning outcome          Action to achieve learning outcome   Time/ Date   Evidence of achievement
                                                                              completion




                                                                                                                     75
                      RPEL VERIFICATION SHEET

Practice Placement Area: ………………………………………

Name of RPEL candidate: ……………………………………..

Signature: ………………………………………………………..

   NMC DOMAIN                 EVIDENCE           EVIDENCE VERIFIED
                              PROVIDED           Register Holder-Please
                           Practitioner-Please            Initial
                                   Initial
Establishing Effective
Working Relationships
Facilitation of Learning

Assessment and
Accountability

Evaluation of Learning

Creating an
Environment for
Learning
Context of Practice

Evidence Based
Practice

Leadership


I verify that the RPEL candidate has provided sufficient evidence to
warrant addition to the register with Mentor Status.

Name of Register Holder: ……………………………………….

Signature: ……………………………………………………….

Date: …………………………………………………………….

Comments: ………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………...
…………………………………………………………………...



                                                                     76
    Please retain one copy for your own records and send one copy to
                    your Practice Education Facilitator
                      RPEL VERIFICATION SHEET

Practice Placement Area: ………………………………………

Name of RPEL candidate: ……………………………………..

Signature: ………………………………………………………..


   NMC DOMAIN                 EVIDENCE           EVIDENCE VERIFIED
                              PROVIDED           Register Holder-Please
                           Practitioner-Please            Initial
                                   Initial
Establishing Effective
Working Relationships
Facilitation of Learning

Assessment and
Accountability

Evaluation of Learning

Creating an
Environment for
Learning
Context of Practice

Evidence Based
Practice

Leadership


I verify that the RPEL candidate has provided sufficient evidence to
warrant addition to the register with Mentor Status.


Name of Register Holder: ……………………………………….

Signature: ………………………………………………………….

Date: ………………………………………………………………..



                                                                     77
Comments: …………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………….........
………………………………………………………………….........

      Please retain one copy for your own records and send one copy to
                      your Practice Education Facilitator

References and Further Reading:

E library:
NHS Scotland e-Library

Flying Start NHS:
http://www.flyingstart.scot.nhs.uk

Nursing and Midwifery Council:
Midwives rules and standards. NMC London 2004

Nursing and Midwifery Council:
The Code: Standards of conduct, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives.
NMC London 2008

Nursing and Midwifery Council:
Standards of proficiency for pre-registration nursing education. NMC London 2004


Nursing and Midwifery Council:
Standards of proficiency for pre-registration midwifery Education. NMC London 2004


Nursing and Midwifery Council:
Standards to support learning and assessment in practice (2nd Ed). NMC London
2008

NHS Education for Scotland:
National approach to Mentor Preparation for nurses and Midwives: Core curriculum
Framework Edinburgh 2007

NHS Education for Scotland:
Generic Guiding Principles for those supporting learning in the workplace. Edinburgh
2008
http://www.nes.scot.nhs.uk/documents/publications/classa/181208_supporting
_learning_blues.pdf


Royal College of Nursing
Duffy K: Failing Students: a qualitative study of factors that influence the decisions
regarding assessment of students in practice
London (2004)

Royal College of Nursing (2007)
RCN toolkit: guidance for mentors of nursing students and midwives
http://www.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/78677/002797.pdf


                                                                                         78
University of Abertay Dundee University: Tayside Institute for Health Studies


University of Dundee: School of Nursing and Midwifery University of Dundee




Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning Group

Suzanne Croy, Care Home Education Facilitator, NHS Fife.
John Hammerton, Practice Education Facilitator, NHS Tayside.
Annette Moody, Care Home Education Facilitator, NHS Tayside.
Lisa O’Hare, Practice Education Facilitator, NHS Fife.
Laura Rew, Practice Education Facilitator, NHS Tayside.




ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Thank you to the NHS Tayside Practice Education Facilitator Team for their
permission to allow the Mentor Update Workbook developed by them to be
adapted for use in the Recognition of Prior Experience and Learning Process.




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Appendix 7 Role of the Academic Practice Contact


                               UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE

                      SCHOOL OF NURSING AND MIDWIFERY


       Role of the Academic Practice Contact (APC) for Specialist Practice
    Qualifications: Adult Nursing (Infection; Diseases, Prevention and Control)



The APC is the named contact in the School for all issues relating to a learning
environment in a practice area for students undertaking the SPQ in Adult Nursing.
APCs are members of the module team and may have responsibility for more than
one practice area.

Specific aspects of the role include:

        Reviewing audits of the practice area prior to the student commencing on the
         programme. This includes follow up of action plans and appropriate recording
         and reporting of the audit.

        In conjunction with personal tutors, and in line with the Cause for Concern
         policy, responding to, recording, reporting, and following up Causes for
         Concern in the practice area.

        Being primary contact for the line manager, mentor / clinical supporter on all
         learning environment related issues.

In addition an APC will:

    Contribute to mentor update at regular intervals throughout the programme


    Address particular issues and report these to the module team




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