The Welfare of Children

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                                              .
     You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother
                                       Albert Einstein



                             SOWK 386: The Welfare of Children
                                        Fall 2011

                  This is a paired course. Students must be concurrently enrolled in
             Educ 262: Children’s Literature & Educ 067 or SOWK 390 to enroll in this class.



Instructor:              Paula M. Sheridan, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work
Course Time:             Monday, Wednesday, 9:00 – 10:20
Course Location:         Mendenhall 305
Contact Information:     psheridan@whittier.edu
Office Location:         Platner 109
Office Hours:            Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 – 10:45; Wednesday, 2:00 – 3:00; and by
                         appointment



Course Description
Overview. This class is part of a paired course that addresses children’s experiences in literacy
and life. You do not have to be a social work major to enroll in this course. However, you must
enroll in the two other designated courses to benefit from the designed learning environment.
We will explore policies, practices, and issues that support and deter children’s life experiences in
our world today.

Course Content. Our pair is organized around two themes:
           Literacy, a human right, is essential for a democratic, economically and socially
              just society; and
           Social workers are committed to creating and sustaining environments (physical,
              social, political, spiritual) that enhance the quality of life for children, families,
              and communities.

We aim for holistic knowledge about children and the systems that affect their lives - an
encounter that builds your knowledge, skills, and values in this content area. Since we believe
that knowledge is more complete with an enactment of our ideas, we have planned a one-unit
praxis experience that allows you to partner as a Whittier College Reading Friend with a child at
Lydia Jackson Elementary School. We will use your experiences as a context for examining
theory, skills, ethics, and issues that children and their families encounter. We welcome your
thoughtful suggestions about the content and process of this learning adventure.

Course Objectives
What are your benchmarks for success in this course? At the end of this course, you should
know how to:
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    1.   Critique selected theories for its usefulness in understanding children’s neurological,
         physical, social, spiritual and psychological well-being;
    2.   Critique and apply selected social work practice models/theories and research that
         inform our work with children and their families;
    3.   Cultivate mentoring relationships with children in a developmentally appropriate and
         culturally competent manner;
    4.   Enact social work values, ethics and the intentional, mindful use of self while
         collaborating with children, including attending demonstrating professional demeanor in
         behavior, appearance and communication;
    5.   Explore ways that schools, social service organizations, and other contexts can empower
         children and their families through policy and practice;
    6.   Using Paulo Friere’s (1973) pedagogical model as a guide, reflect how your learning
         experience can possibly empower your own life, your reading friend, and your class
         colleagues.

Course Format
Your participation is essential for a successful class. Your ideas are needed here. While I am
eager to learn about the ways that you best learn, here’s an overview of some methods that have
been successful in this particular course:
              Student-initiated class discussions about relevant and controversial topics;
              Your personal ongoing reflections of how this material relates to your mentoring;
                 relationship, your role as a learner, and your life experiences through weekly
                 journals and final praxis papers;
              Experiential activities (role-playing, simulations, - the sky is the limit!);
              Praxis – your interactions with your reading friend at Lydia Jackson Elementary
                 School;
              Audio-visual materials;
              Guest educators sharing practice experiences;
              On site visits to organizations that serve children and families; and
              Lecture and student/faculty/guest educator dialogue.



Keys to Success in this Paired Leaning Experience:
    Personal reflection – thinking about your ideas, actions, ethics and the implications of
        your actions;
    Participation –making choices that support your learning and the learning of others;
    Punctuality – show up! Arrive to class and to meet your Reading Friend on time! Be
        ready to experience, think and learn.
    Collaboration – facilitating your learning and the learning of others; sharing your talents
        to enhance our class;
    Flexibility – adapting to the changing needs and opportunities that develop throughout
        the semester;
    Initiation and healthy risk-taking – Show up! Step up! What you do in this class
        influences you and others; and
    A great sense of humor – Children are hilarious! So are we! Enjoy this assembly of
        humanity.
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This pair is part of the Social Work Curriculum. We provide you with some background
information about the Social Work Program, which shapes the design of this pair.

Whittier College Social Work Program Mission Statement
The Whittier College undergraduate Social Work Program seeks to prepare diverse students to
become self-reflective, compassionate, ethical, knowledgeable, and skilled generalist social
workers who are committed to life long learning. We prepare students to practice in the aid and
empowerment of diverse groups, particularly vulnerable and oppressed communities. We work
for the advancement of human rights in local, national, and global environments.

Affirming the historical roots and mission of Whittier College, the social work program provides
learning experiences that inspire students to become advocates for peace and social and economic
justice. Students’ learning is a combination of “knowing” and “doing” grounded in the liberal
arts foundation and interdisciplinary, research-based knowledge and problem solving. We value
generalist skill development that prepares reflective social work practitioners committed to
promoting human well being and shaping and nurturing the profession for the twenty-first
century.



Understanding Generalist Social Work Practice
Generalist social work practitioners promote human well being for both diverse and oppressed
groups in individual, family, group, organizational, community, and global settings. They utilize
self-reflection, critical thinking, evidence-based knowledge, professional values, and a wide
range of skills to collaborate with others to create “personal and social transformation”.
Generalist social work practitioners, under supervision, engage in socially just practice through
an interactive process of change which includes:
 1. engagement – collaborating with clients/partners to promote helping relationships;
 2. teaching & learning – a mutual process of discovering client/partner strengths and
      challenges and planning for strategic change;
 3. action and accompaniment – working together with clients/partners to create meaningful
      change;
 4. evaluation & critical reflection – assessing the process with clients/partners and reflecting on
      one’s personal and professional experience; and
 5. celebration and new engagements – affirming success and planning with clients/partners for
      sustained growth and change.

Reference: Finn, J.L. & Jacobson, M. (2008). Just practice: A social justice approach to social
work. 2nd Edition. Peosta, Iowa. eddie bowers publishing co, inc.

Social Work Program Learning Principles
When you are admitted into the Social Work Program, you become a member of both an
academic major and a profession. This membership is both a privilege and responsibility that is
informed by your own judgment, the Social Work Program’s guidelines, and the NASW Code of
Ethics (1999). All students enrolled in social work classes, whatever their declared majors, are
held to the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics (1999).

Our social work classes and field placements reflect a professional culture of “best practices” that
call out the highest standards of social work values and ethics. We behave this way now, not just
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in the future. We learn more than information. We also learn to behave in ways that promote
growth for ourselves and for our community.

The social work value of “competence” shapes our own Social Work Program (NASW Code of
Ethics, 1999). When we are competent, we honor both our abilities and limitations. We show up.
We do our best. We are prepared to participate in class and in field. We contribute by completing
assignments in a timely and thoughtful manner. We are actively engaged in discussions that
benefit our learning as well as our colleagues. We respect confidentiality and the limits of
confidentiality as guided by our instructors. We ask for support when we need it. We invest in
others when we are able. We are engaged in our community partnerships and field placements,
honoring the guidelines of the agency, our field educators, our faculty, and our own professional
wisdom. We listen, reflect, and learn - about ourselves, our colleagues, our discipline, and our
world. And we have fun in the process!

Statement of Need
Students desiring accommodations on the basis of physical, learning, or psychological disability
for this class are to contact Disability Services. Disability Services is located on the ground floor
of the Library, room G003, and can be reached by calling extension 4825.



Pathways to Success
  1. Required Email Address: You must activate your Whittier College email address no later
     than 9.15 in order to fully participate in this class. We will use email for message board,
     communicating between classes, and other purposes. We will also use Moodle, a new
     course management tool to communicate with each other and access course information
     such as assignments and required readings.



 2.        Required Readings
            Text: Siegel, D. & Hartzell, M. (2003). Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-
                    understanding can help you raise children who thrive. New York, New York: Jeremy
                    P. Tarcher/Penguin Press.

             Articles:        Additional readings are in electronic format in the Welfare of Children
                     course (Moodle), facilitated by our library. Log in to Moodle, selecting SOWK
                     386 as the designated class. Choose the file titled “Course Readings” for articles
                     not included in the assigned text.

      4.     Related Websites: Suggested resources for Community Analysis Paper
             Websites for USA
                    Children’s Defense Fund: www.childrensdefense.org
                    Child Welfare League of America: www.igc.apc.org/handsnet2/cwla
                    City of Whittier website: www.cityofwhittier.org
                    Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information:
                    www.calib.com/nccanch
                    Council on Social Work Education: www.cswe.org
                    Dr. Daniel Siegel website: dr.dansiegel.com
                    Greater Good Science Center: www.greatergoodscience.org
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               Human Trafficking web resource: www.humantrafficking.org
               Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center: laglc.org
               Los Angeles Network to End Slavery: www.lahumantrafficking.org
               Lydia Jackson Elementary School website: whittiercity.k12.ca.us
               Mindful Awareness Research Center: www.marc.ucla.edu
               National Association of Social Workers: www.naswdc.org
               National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse: www.childabuse.org
               National Gay and Lesbian Archives: onearchives.org
               National Gay and Lesbian Task Force: www.ngltf.org
               Census Data: www.factfinder.census.gov/
        Global Websites:
               Child Rights Information Network: www.crin.org
               International Association of Schools of Social Work: www.iassw.org
               International Federation of Social Workers: www.ifsw.org
               World Health Organization: www.who.org
               UNICEF: www.unicef.org.



Course Requirements                     Grading Points                  Grading Scale
1. Attendance and Participation          100 points                     90 – 100%        A
2. Weekly Praxis Journals 5 @ 20 pts     100 points                     80- 89%          B
                                                                        70 – 79%         C
3. Portfolio Peer Review                  50 points                     60 – 69%         D
4. Integrative Portfolio                 200 points                     0 – 59%          F
5. Community Description Paper           100 points
6. Introduction & Conclusion Paper 2@ 50 100 points
Total Points                             650 points



Portfolio Assignments 1 - 6
Portfolio Assignment 1: Bring these Required Supplies to Class on Monday, September 19:
     A three-ring binder for your portfolio;
     Tabbed dividers to organize your portfolio work into sections;
     Plastic sheets that hold cards, formatted for a 3 ring binder;
     A journal – bring to class daily for brainstorming, taking notes, etc. that inform your
        typed journals, Praxis paper, your interaction with your Reading Friend, your agency
        visits; and
     Crayons and/or colored pencils – bring to class daily.



Learning Assignments:
The Integrated Portfolio is your Final Exam. Your Portfolio is due Wednesday, 12. 5 at the
beginning of the Welfare of Children class.
Portfolios are used in many disciplines to demonstrate talents, abilities, competencies,
achievements, and potential (Cournoyer & Stanley, 2002). A portfolio is both a process and a
product.
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In this class, we use the portfolio as a tool to help you reflect on and integrate important ideas
and find ways to make these ideas meaningful to your other classes, your life and vocation. You
will work on your portfolio bit by bit, throughout the semester, as you complete the required
activities in both courses. You will also be asked to reflect on your work, as you encounter new
ideas and begin your portfolio, when you complete your portfolio and again at the semester’s
end.

Since this is an ongoing process and product, we will discuss your portfolio experience
throughout the semester, providing class time for discussion, portfolio workshops, peer review
and faculty feedback.

Each learning experience outlined below is designed to contribute to others, all leading to a
coherent and creative conclusion – your own unique portfolio. Keep all graded assignments.
You will need to review and reflect on your work at the end of the semester in order to complete
your portfolio.



Your portfolio should be divided into sections, having at least the following items:
    Title page
    Table of contents
    Introduction Paper
    Concept Cards
    Skill Cards
    Praxis Journals
    Community Analysis Paper
    Conclusion Paper
    Backing Papers/Appendix



Portfolio Assignment II: Introduction Paper                                (50 Points)
You will write a 3-4 page paper at the beginning of the semester that is typed-double spaced, has
APA citations and bibliography and is due on Monday, 9.26. You will respond to the following
prompts below:
      How, if at all, is cultural diversity a strength in a learning community? For our Reading
         Friends? For our pair?
      Identify systems that shape the learning experience of our Reading Friends. What
         theories help you understand the influence of institutions and societies on a child’s
         academic success?
      What skills are you developing in working with children? What knowledge (concepts)
         are you developing in working with children? Define them and give examples of how
         you might use them with your Reading Friend.
      Discuss ethical issues that are relevant in working with children. Cite relevant ethical
         codes and guidelines.
      Identify and discuss the strategies that you use to promote your Reading Friend’s word
         recognition, comprehension, and writing skills.
      Explain how you integrate theory, skills, research-based practice, and literary insights
         and apply them in your interaction with your Reading Friend, Use Friere’s praxis model
         as a format for your discussion.
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Portfolio Assignment III: Assigned Readings and Class Discussion. (100 Class participation
Points).
You are expected to complete all reading assignments prior to the day of class. You can find your
daily assignments listed in this syllabus. I am interested in your thoughts about the
readings/assignments. Think boldly about the content and learning experience.

Our daily routine: at the beginning of each class, you will contribute an idea gained from your
reading and reflection of the assignments by responding to the topics listed below. Class begins
as soon as you enter the room.
         What’s Hot? What are the major “take away” ideas from the readings?
         What’s Not? Unclear or confusing areas that need further discussion.
         Skills gained from readings that you record as a skill card
         Concepts gained from readings that you record as a concept card.

Attendance and participation in all class sessions is required. Regardless of whether you start the
course late, become sick or have to work, etc., you can miss three classes. On the fourth absence,
your grade drops by one letter grade. Also, if you chronically arrive late or leave early, or arrive
in class not having done the readings, I reserve the right to mark you absent. A sign-in sheet will
be sent around each class period. If you do run into a severe personal difficulty that affects your
attendance, please see me. Participation is expected and indicates your preparation,
commitment, and level of interest. We ask you to silence your cell phones and use computers only
when prompted by your instructor. We want to create and sustain a learning environment that is
safe, creative, and knocks your socks off.



Portfolio Assignment IV: Concept Cards and Skill Cards         50 Points each @100 points
As we discover new ideas and concepts, I will provide you with note cards to capture your
understanding of concepts and skills as they inform your work with children.

Concepts are ideas that help us build theory, understand why we do what we do, and help us
develop questions for our next steps. Skills are behaviors that we intentionally use to develop
and sustain a working relationship with our Reading Friend.

During the semester, I will provide you with note cards to keep track of your developing social
work and literacy concepts and skills. We will spend time in class identifying concepts and skills,
applying them in role play, enacting them with our Reading Friend, and reflecting on our work
together. You will build on your knowledge of use of concepts and skills throughout the
semester. You will also record your new concepts and skills on your cards as you learn. You will
include these concept cards and skill cards in your Integrative Portfolio. Each concept and skill
card will have the following information:

       Name of skill (front side)
       Definition of the skill – in your own words (back side)
       Example of how you have used the skill with your reading friend (back side).
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Portfolio Assignment V: Community Description and Comparison
Due Wednesday, 10.5.                                      (100 points).

       Purpose of the Assignment: To develop your skills in identifying and analyzing the
       systems in a community that may enhance or deter the lives of children and their
       families. You will assess the communities of two Whittier elementary schools: Lydia
       Jackson Elementary and Ocean View Elementary School, analyzing the similarities and
       differences in the geographic, social, and economic systems of both communities.
       This assignment meets Course Objectives 2 & 5.

        Children shape - and are shaped - by the physical and social environment in which they
       live. You will develop a Community Description and Comparison that identifies aspects
       of the community of children who attend Lydia Jackson Elementary School and Ocean View
       Elementary School (agencies, support services, significant physical characteristics, income
       levels, and environmental challenges). Your Community Description should be about 6-
       8 pages and will include the provided maps as well as a narrative that discusses the
       implications of your findings. Identify possible supports and challenges that children in
       these schools face as a result of living in these particular communities.

       Community Description for Lydia Jackson and Ocean View Elementary Schools

           I.     Describe how you collected the information for this paper:
                o Where did you go? How many times did you go? What time of day did you
                  visit? Use more than one method of collecting data. How did you collect your
                  data (walking, driving, etc or a combination of methods.)
                o Who did you talk to? (Provide person’s name, job title, and organization)
                o What published/printed materials/web sites did you use? (attach copies of any
                  printed materials you used to your paper.
                o Discuss the strengths and limitations of your methods.



                II. Describe the Physical Setting of each Community:
                o Is it metropolitan, industrial, residential, suburban, rural, etc.? Explain and
                   describe what you observed.
                o Describe any unique geographical characteristics (e.g. any rivers, parks, major
                   freeway links, railroads, large empty lots or wasteland). Is the community
                   divided into segments (e.g. residential areas and business or industrial areas)?
                o To your knowledge, are there social status divisions, such as “the people on the
                   hill” or “on the other side of the tracks”?
                o Describe the predominant housing type and conditions (e.g. single-family
                   housing, apartment buildings, projects, unoccupied or rundown housing units).
                o Compare and contrast your findings. What could these findings mean in terms
                   of education for the children attending these schools?

                III.     Describe Community’s “Attractiveness”:
                 Anything you think that makes each community an attractive place to live (e.g.
                  recreation facilities, job opportunities, convenience to transportation or highways
                  that link people to jobs or stores, low cost of living, public service resources, etc.);
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  and
 Anything you think detracts from the attractiveness of each community as a
  place to live (e.g. housing conditions, “poor” reputation of schools, few local
  public amenities, recreation areas or services, etc.).
 Compare and contrast your findings, discussing how this information could
  possibly impact the learning opportunities for the children of both schools.




IV. Describe the Community’s Population:
 Provide a general socio-demographic profile of the population in this community
  (include population characteristics, such as, size, race and ethnic composition,
  age, gender, household characteristics, employment, income, poverty, etc.)
  Available census data will provide you with this. Please refer to census website
  listed in this syllabus.
 Discuss evidence of ethnicity and culture. How can you discern the cultural
  identity of this community?
 Compare and contrast your findings. How, if at all, could your findings
  influence the culture of each school?

V.    Describe the Economic, Political & Social Base of the Community:
 Types of industry and employment.
 Does it have its own local government? Who are the political representatives (i.e.
  whose district is this community in?).
 Give a brief, general description of the types of resources that are available in the
  community (e.g. educational, health care, recreational, religious, social services,
  civic, housing, transportation, utilities) (the Yellow Pages will help you here).
 Also, give a more specific description of resources (organizations and
  associations) that focus activities for children and families. You may identify a
  family service agency that you might like to visit for another assignment.
 Compare and contrast your findings. How, if at all, do you think economic and
  political factors influence the quality of education in each school?



 VI. Thinking Ecologically – Identifying Relevant Issues for Children and
       Families
  Identify one issue (problem/challenge/ risk) that children/families might
    encounter. Discuss why this issue might be a challenge for members of each
    community. This could be an unmet need, lacking community resources, etc.
    (underemployment, lack of health care, insufficient family income, etc.).
 Briefly discuss this issue, defining relevant terms, explaining how this issue
  might be a threat to children and families.
 Identify supports or resources that help children/families address this issue in
  our community. This could be agencies that provide services, support groups,
  information, programs, etc. Include this information with your paper.
 Provide at least three bibliographic references to demonstrate that you have read
  about this issue. In your discussion, provide a brief discussion of current
  literature about the topic.
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             VII. Data analysis and Reflections (the “so-what” questions!!!)
              How, if at all, does this assignment help you understand the multiple system
               levels, physical and social environment that is discussed in the ecological
               perspective?
              How, if at all, do your findings help you understand the cultural context of
               children at Lydia Jackson? At Ocean View?
              How, if at all, can this information be helpful in understanding the multiple
               systems in a child’s life who attends Lydia Jackson Elementary School? For
               example
             o What resources do the children at Lydia Jackson Elementary School have
               available to them? At Ocean View?
             o Based on your data analysis, what needs might the children and families of each
               community have?
             o How, if at all, can this information help social workers and educators understand
               children’s systemic needs?
             o How can this data be used as an empowering tool? A tool for oppression and/or
               social control?
              What did you learn from completing this assignment that you will take away
               from this class? About yourself? About other issues? How will you use this
               information?
              What suggestions do you have that can make this assignment more meaningful?
               For yourself? For the instructors?



Portfolio Assignment VI: Praxis Journals                      5 @ 20 pts = 100 Points
   Purpose of this Assignment: To provide you an opportunity for structured reflection that
   informs your practice with children. This assignment meets Course Objective 3, 4 & 6.

   Your journal must be two – three pages, typed, single-spaced, contain references to
   readings, relevant skill and concept cards, and include a bibliography. Journals are due on
   designated Mondays, with one copy for each professor, unless designated otherwise.

       Praxis Journal 1: How does theory shape my practice? (One copy to each professor)
           a. What does Freire mean by the idea of “praxis”? How, if at all, does this shape
               the way you plan to work with your Reading Friend? Cite specific ideas that
               Freire suggests that can be helpful to you.
           b. How does ‘mindfulness” relate to your work with your Reading Friend?
               Identify specific aspects of mindfulness that can help you be intentionally
               effective in this partnership.
           c. What literacy goals do you have for your Reading Friend? Discuss and briefly
               describe how you can evaluate the effectiveness of your goals.
               .
       Praxis Journal 2: Observing and Joining. (one copy to each professor).
           a. What have I observed about the LJES environment that helps me join with my
               Reading Friend? What strengths and limitations might I experience as evidenced
               by my observation? How can I evaluate my success and identify areas that need
               continued growth?
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            b.   Using your skills and concepts, what am I doing to intentionally join with
                      i. The school
                     ii. The teacher
                    iii. The child – this discussion should have the greatest detail
                    iv. My learning community – the students and faculty in our class



        Praxis Journal 3: Reflecting on My Literacy Skills (for Dr. Ralph only)
        What skills do I intentionally use in the joining, working, ending and transition work
        with my Reading Friend? Describe what you do. How do you know you are effective?

        Praxis Journal 4: Reflecting on My Social Work Skills (for Dr. Sheridan only)
        What skills do I intentionally use in the joining, working, ending and transition work
        with my Reading Friend? Describe what you do. How do you know you are effective?

        Praxis Journal 5: Evaluating your Work (one copy to each professor).
        Restate the goals that you developed at the beginning of the semester. Did you change
        any of your goals? If so, discuss the rationale. How did you evaluate the attainment of
        your goals? What did you learn? What did your Reading Friend learn? What would you
        do differently next time, if anything?

Portfolio Assignment VII: Concluding Reflection                                    (50 points)
You will write a 3-4 page paper at the beginning of the semester that is typed-double spaced, has
APA citations and bibliography and is due on &&&&&&&. CHANGE thE PROMPTS to reflect a
conclusion paper. You will respond to the following prompts below:
      How, if at all, is cultural diversity a strength in a learning community? For our Reading
         Friends? For our pair?
      Identify systems that shape the learning experience of our Reading Friends. What
         theories help you understand the influence of institutions and societies on a child’s
         academic success?
      What skills are you developing in working with children? What knowledge (concepts)
         are you developing in working with children? Define them and give examples of how
         you might use them with your Reading Friend.
      Discuss ethical issues that are relevant in working with children. Cite relevant ethical
         codes and guidelines.
      Identify and discuss the strategies that you use to promote your Reading Friend’s word
         recognition, comprehension, and writing skills.
      Explain how you integrate theory, skills, research-based practice, and literary insights
         and apply them in your interaction with your Reading Friend, Use Friere’s praxis model
         as a format for your discussion.
                                                                                              P a g e | 12


                                               Course Schedule

        Dates                                    Topic and Assignments

Unit I: Theoretical Perspectives that Inform our Work with Children

        Monday, 9.12 Introduction to the course and to each other
                       What do you want to learn in this course?
                       How do you learn? How does your learning style influence the way you
                          relate to others?
                       How can your strengths contribute to building a creative learning
                          community?
                          “Making sense” of our own life story as an empowering act

                        Empowerment with ourselves: Siegel, D. & Hartzell, M. (2003). Introduction. In
                        Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-understanding can help you raise
                        children who thrive. New York, New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin Press,
                              Introduction, pp. 1-12.



        Wednesday, 9.14 Empowerment Perspectives
                          Freire’s Pedagogy: Empowering pathways to social change
                          Does social work mean social change?
                      Assignments:

                        Friere, Paulo. (translated by Marilynn Moch). (1990) A Critical Understanding of
                        Social Work. Journal of Progressive Human Services, Vol 1 (1). Pp. 3-9.



        Monday, 9.19    Portfolio Assignment Due: Binder, Skill Card Pages, Labeled Tabs, etc.
                        The Strengths Perspective
                             Comparing and contrasting the Strengths and Deficit Perspectives
                             Constructing our life story through a strengths perspective: How we
                                perceive reality
                             Applying the strengths perspective to our work with children

                        Assignment:
                        Saleeby, D. (May 1996). The Strengths Perspective in Social Work Practice:
                        Extensions and Cautions. Social Work 41 (3), 296-305.

                        Lambie, R. (2008). Community Factors in Resilience. In Family Systems within
                        Educational and Community Contexts: Understanding Children who are At-Risk or
                        have Special Needs. (3rd Ed). Love Publishing Company.



        Wednesday, 9.21 Visit Lydia Jackson Elementary School at 12:30
                      Contributions from Neuroscience: The Developing Mind
                                                                                       P a g e | 13

                      Our remarkable brains
                      Emotional Communication and Mindful Behavior
                      Integrating our minds and our life story

               Assignment:
               Siegel, D. & Hartzell, M. (2003). In Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-
               understanding can help you raise children who thrive. New York, New York: Jeremy
               P. Tarcher/Penguin Press.
                    Chapter 1: How we remember: Experiences shape who we are. pp 13-38.
                    Chapter 2: How we perceive reality: Constructing the story of our lives.
                        pp 39-56.
                    Chapter 3: How we feel: Emotion in our internal and interpersonal
                        worlds pp.57-79.



Monday, 9.26   Portfolio Introduction Due
               Reading Friends Partnership begins today at 12:30!
               Applying the Ecological Perspective
                   Awareness of Multiple systems that affect our lives (micro, macro,
                      mezzo, historical)
                   Applying the Ecological perspective in working with children and
                      families
                   Building our own Eco-Maps for self knowledge and self-reflection
                   Critiquing the Ecological perspective

               Finn, J.L. & Jacobsen, M. (2008) Just Thinking: Theoretical Perspectives on Social
                    Justice-Oriented Practice. In Finn and Jacobsen. Just practice: A social
                    justice approach to social work. Peosta. Iowa: Eddie Bowers Publishing. Pp
                    163-208.




Wednesday, 9.28 Ethical Standards in Working with Children
                   The NASW Code of Ethics, 1999 (USA)
                          o Social Work CoreValues
                          o Section II: Responsibilities to Clients
                   International Social Work Organizations and Respective Ethical Codes
                          o Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles. (October 2004).
                              International Association of Schools of Social Work.
                              www.iassw.org
                          o Declaration of the Rights of the Child. (November 1959). United
                              Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human , Rights.
                              General Assembly Resolution 1386(XIV).
                                                                                              P a g e | 14

Unit II: What’s in your toolbox? Continuing our skills in working with children
         Monday, 10.3: Faculty Portfolio In-Class Review
                             Dynamics of Interviewing/Interacting with a Child (Intentional Strategies)
                             Understanding the child’s perspective
                             Making a positive connection with a child
                             Ethical and culturally competent interactions with children
                             Enacting our skills: role plays and simulations

                            Assignments:
                            Zwiers, M. & Morrissette, P.J. (1999). Effective interviewing of children: A
                            comprehensive guide for counselors and human service workers. Philadelphia, PA:
                            Accelerated Development.
                               Ch.1: Child Variables, pp. 1-22.
                               Ch.2: Professional Variables, pp. 23-48.

        Wednesday, 10.5     Community Description & Comparison Paper Due
                             Selected Skills for Interacting with a Child (MindfulnessStrategies)
                             The phases of interaction (beginning, middle, termination/end)
                             Selecting skills for different phases of interaction
                             Facilitating intentional interactions (coherent and contingent)
                             Workshop: Role-playing the beginning, middle, and end of a session
                             Creating Social Work Skill Cards for our Portfolio

                            Assignments:
                            (Reflect and review) Siegel, D. & Hartzell, M. (2003). In Parenting from the
                             inside out: How a deeper self-understanding can help you raise children who
                             thrive. New York, New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin Press.
                                      Chapter 4: How We Communicate: Making Connections. Pp 80-
                                         100.

        Monday, 10.10    Selected Skills & Troubling Scenarios: Reframing Challenges as Strengths
                        Supporting a child’s emotional regulation
                             Acting out behaviors: anger
                             Acting-in behaviors: withdrawn behaviors
                             Reframing perceived resistance

                            Assignments:
                            Zwiers, M. & Morrissette, P.J. (1999). Effective interviewing of children: A
                               comprehensive guide for counselors and human service workers. Philadelphia,
                               PA: Accelerated Development.
                                     Ch. 4: Language of the Interview, pp. 69-92.

                            Zwiers, M. & Morrissette, P.J. (1999). Effective interviewing of children: A
                               comprehensive guide for counselors and human service workers. Philadelphia,
                               PA: Accelerated Development.
                               Ch. 5: Dealing with Unique Children and Circumstances, pp. 93-126.
                                                                                         P a g e | 15



Wednesday, 10.12    Children’s Literature at 9:00 and 10:30 AM
                    Paula at Commission on Accreditation Meeting, Council on Social Work
                    Education Office, Alexandria, VA



Monday, 10.17 &        Theory and Skills of Attachment and Conflict in Helping Relationships
Wednesday, 10.19
                    Healthy Adult attachment
                     Responses to stress (the high road and the low road)
                     Making sense of ourselves and our Reading Friend

                Assignment:
                Siegel, D. & Hartzell, M. (2003). In Parenting from the inside out: How a deeper self-
                understanding can help you raise children who thrive. New York, New York: Jeremy
                P. Tarcher/Penguin Press
                     Chapter 5: How We Attach: Relationships Between Children and Parents
                         Pp 101-121
                     Chapter 6: How We Make Sense of Our Lives: Adult Attachment:
                         Pp 122-153
                     Chapter 7: How We Keep it Together and How We Fall Apart: The High
                         Road and the Low Road pp. 154-184
                Adjust Tutoring Time with Reading Friend – Parent Conferences at LJES

Monday, 10.24     Special Topic and Field Visit: Practice Wisdom from the Field: A Language
                  Development Perspective
                   Guest Educator: Laurie W. Peel, M.A., CCC-SLP Speech Pathologist
                                     WACSEP Infant-Family Program
                     Leffingwell School
                     10625 Santa Gertrudes Avenue
                     Whittier, CA. 90603
                Assignment:
                Miller, Carol A. (May 2006). Developmental Relationships between Language
                and Theory of Mind. American Journal of Speech - Language Pathology, (15), 142-
                154.



Wednesday, 10.26 Workshop and Planning for Day on Campus
              Portfolio Workshop – Short Version



Monday, 10.31 Helle Strauss????



Wednesday, 11.2 Day on Whittier College Campus for Lydia Jackson Reading Friends and
                     Family
                                                                                    P a g e | 16

Unit III: Contemporary Issues and Policies in Child Welfare
Monday, 11.7
               Understanding Children and their Families: An Eco-Systems Perspective
                    Family Dynamics
                    Family Structures
                    Family Interactions and Communication Patterns
               Assignment:
               Lambie, R. (2008). Family Interaction Patterns. In Family Systems within
               Educational and Community Contexts: Understanding Children who are At-Risk or
               have Special Needs. (3rd Ed). Love Publishing Company.



Wednesday, 11.9 Site Visit: Residential Mental Health Services to Children
               5 Acres
               760 Mountain View Street
               Altadena, CA 91001-4996

Monday, 11.14
& Wednesday, 11.17 Enhancing Child Welfare when Children are At-Risk
               Risk Factors for Children and Families
               Chemical Dependency
               Family Violence
               Substance Abuse
               Incarceration and the Justice System

                Assignment:
                Lambie, R. (2008). At-Risk Children from Challenged Families. In Family
                Systems within Educational and Community Contexts: Understanding Children who are
                At-Risk or have Special Needs. (3rd Ed). Love Publishing Company.
                Lambie, R. (2008). Community Factors in Resilience. In Family Systems within
                Educational and Community Contexts: Understanding Children who are At-Risk or
                have Special Needs. (3rd Ed). Love Publishing Company.



Wednesday, 11.16 Child Trafficking: A Global Perspective
              Assignment: TBA

Monday, 11.21
                Enhancing Child Welfare and Valuing Sexual Identity & Orientations
                 Honoring the child’s body, mind and spirit
                 Sexuality in an economic and political context
                 Coming out as a personal and family process throughout the life span
                 Resources for support
                Assignment:
                UPDATE Ryan, S., Pearlmutter, S. & Garroza. V. (January 2004). Coming out of
                the Closet: Opening Agencies to Gay and Lesbian Adoptive Parents. Social Work,
                vol 49. National Association of Social Workers. Pp. 85-96.
                                                                         P a g e | 17

Wednesday, 11.23 Building Child Resilience and Advocacy
              The Children’s Defense Fund
              The United Nations
              Local Resources



Monday, 11.28 Portfolio Peer Review in Class

Wednesday, 11.30 Celebrating Young Authors! Last Day of Tutoring
                Sharing and Ending our Work with Reading Friends, LJES

Monday, 12.5   Portfolios Due to Instructors

Wednesday, 12.7       Topic TBA – Building in Wiggle Room

Final Exam Time: Tuesday, December 13, 1:00 – 3:00 PM
        Celebrating our Success
        Course Evaluation
        Reclaim your Portfolios

				
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