Contemporary Letter - DOC

Document Sample
Contemporary Letter - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



Following on from the final draft release of IEC 62196-1 and 62196-2, this

document goes into the technical aspects of the standard. In particular it looks

at the power supplies the standards supports and the physical attributes of each

of the plug / socket connections defined.




IEC 61851-1 defines four modes of charging. Modes 1-3 standardize various

ways of charging EVs from the AC mains while Mode 4 provides standards for

charging through a DC connection to off-grid batteries.


The electrical supplies supported by these Modes can be seen in this table:


               Type   Phase    Current (max)     Voltage (max)


                      Single        16               250
Mode 1         AC
                      Three         16               480


                      Single        32               250
Mode 2         AC
                      Three         32               480


Mode 3         AC     Three         32               480


Mode 4         DC      n/a         400               1000




MF

                                   Page 1 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



Table 1: IEC 61851-1 Charging Modes against supported power supplies




The main difference between Modes 1 and 2 is the presence of a residual

current device (RCD). These safety devices automatically disconnect the AC

power supply if an imbalance is detected between the live and neutral

components of the current supply.


Mode 1 assumes that an appropriate RCD system is part of the electrical

supply, while Mode 2 incorporates RCD equipment within the specification. In

addition, Mode 3 includes additional safety features which make it attractive for

use in public charging points.


IEC 61851-1 also defines three Cases for cable connections: Case A, where the

cable is permanently attached to the car; Case B, where the cable is not

attached to anything; and Case C where the cable is permanently attached to

the charging station.




The IEC 62196 series builds upon this standard by providing detailed technical

standards for the plug / socket combinations for charging across all four Modes:

IEC 62196-1 defines general standards common to both AC and DC charging;




MF

                                    Page 2 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



IEC 62196-2 defines standards for AC charging (Modes 1-3); and IEC 62196-3

will define standards for DC charging (Mode 4).


The latter standard is still a working draft and is not in scope for this technical

briefing.




The standards for AC charging plug / socket combinations in IEC 62196-2 look

at both single and three-phase power supplies and define three Types of plug /

socket connectors which may be appropriate in differing circumstances.


The differences between these Types can be seen in the following table:


               Phase    Current (max)   Voltage (max)     Mode


Type 1         Single        32               250           1,2


               Single        70               480           1,2
Type 2
               Three         63               480          1,2,3


               Single        32               250           1,2
Type 3
               Three         63               480          1,2,3




MF

                                   Page 3 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



Table 2: IEC62196-2 plug / socket Types against power supply and IEC 61851-

1 Modes


This table shows a clear difference between how single- and three- phase plug /

socket combinations correlate to Modes 1-3.         Most significantly, Mode 3

charging can only be accomplished using Types 2 and 3 combinations.


Furthermore, each of these Types has different pin configurations, as described

in the following table:


           Description


Type 1     Live, Neutral and Earth, plus two data communication pins.


           Live x3, Neutral and Earth, plus two data communication pins. Two
Type 2
           of the live pins would be redundant for singe phase supplies.


           Three configurations are available: two single phase with Live,

           Neutral and Earth and one or two data communication pins; and one
Type 3
           three phase with Live x3, Neutral and Earth and two data

           communication pins


Table 3: IEC 62196 plug / socket type pin descriptions




MF

                                   Page 4 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



It should be noted that these configurations reflect designs which already enjoy

widespread support in different parts of the world.        Examples of these

configurations include the Yazaki SAE J1772 proposal for single phase supplies

in Japan and North America (Type 1); the VDE-AR-E 2623-2-2 design for single

and three phase supplies without shutters (Type 2); and the SCAME / EV Plug

Alliance design for single and three phase supplies with shutters, which is

already in widespread use in Italy (Type 3).


Photos of each of these example designs can be found at the end of this

document and the standards go into further detail about the precise structure of

each plug / socket combination.


The presence of the data communication pins is significant as it allows all the

connections to support Smart Grid and other forms of data communication. In

particular it enables Types 2 and 3 to support Mode 3 charging, which

introduces the concept of a pilot conductor in order to ensure public charging

points are as safe as possible.


In addition, the main difference between Types 2 and 3 (apart from the pin

configurations) is that the latter includes a shutter on both the plug and the

socket. This enables Type 3 to conform to IPXXD standards and means both

cable and socket are protected when they’re not coupled with one another.




MF

                                   Page 5 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



At present, many motor manufacturers are considering fitting both Type 1 and

Type 2 connectors to their vehicles in order to make them as widely

transferrable as possible.




Type 1 plug example (Yazaki SAE J1772 single phase)




MF

                                Page 6 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011




Type 2 single- and three-phase example (VDE-AR-E 2623-2-2 plug / socket

connectors)




MF

                               Page 7 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011




Type 3 three-phase example (SCAME / EV Plug Alliance plugs and socket with

shutters)




ENDS




MF

                               Page 8 of 9
Chris Milton

IEC 62196 Technical Document

14 October 2011



MEMO NOT FOR PUBLICATION:


WC 852


END OF MEMO




                               Page 9 of 9

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:70
posted:7/14/2012
language:English
pages:9