What Every American Needs to Know

Document Sample
What Every American Needs to Know Powered By Docstoc
					What Every American Needs to Know
Excerpted, with permission, from James Hightower,"Thieves in High Places"

The owners of one of Americaʹs premiere retail corporations is comprised 
of five of the ten richest people in the world, all from the same family.

Their personal wealth eclipses $100 BILLION dollars. Last year the 
companyʹs CEO was paid a cool $11.5 million, more than the annual 
salaries of 765 of his employees combined! The companyʹs profits are over 
$7 BILLION annually.

In these difficult economic times how do they do it?

* This company runs ads featuring the United States flag and proclaims 
ʺWe Buy Americanʺ. In 2001 they moved their worldwide purchasing 
headquarters to China and are the largest importer of Chinese goods in 
the US, purchasing over $10 BILLION of Chinese‐made products 
annually. Products made mostly by women and children working in the 
labor hell‐holes China is famous for.
* Their average employee working in the US makes $15,000 a year, $7.22 
per hour!
* These employees gross under $11,000 a year.
* The company brags that 70% of their employees are full time, but fails to 
disclose that they count anyone working 28 hours a week or more as full 
time.
* There are no health care benefits unless you have worked for the 
company for two years.
* With a turnover rate averaging above 50% per year, only 38% of their 1.3 
million employees have health care coverage. ‐In California alone itʹs 
estimated that the taxpayers pay over $20 million annually to subsidize 
health care benefits for these employees who get none from this behemoth 
corporation.
* According to a report by PBSʹs ʺNowʺ with Bill Moyer, their managers 
are trained in what government social programs are available for 
theseʺemployeesʺ to take advantage of so that the company can pass on 
those costs to you and me. It allows them to not only keep their $7 
BILLION in annual profits, but to do so by substituting benefits they 
refuse to provide with benefits paid for with taxpayer dollars.
* This company holds the record for the most suits filed against it by the 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. A lawyer from ʺBusiness 
Weekʺ (not exactly the bastion for supporting Labor) said, ʺI have never 
seen this kind of blatant disregard for the law.ʺ They had to pay 
$750,000.00 in Arizona for blatant discrimination against the disabled! The 
judge was so incensed that he also order them to run commercials 
admitting their guilt.
* The National Labor Relations Board has issued over 40 formal 
complaints against the corporation in 25 different states in just the past 
five years. The NLRBʹs top lawyer believed that their labor violations, 
such as Illegal spying on employees, fraudulent record keeping, falsifying 
time cards to avoid paying overtime, threats, illegal firings for union 
organizing etc., were so widespread that he was looking into filing a very 
rare national complaint against the company. (The company contributed 
$2,159,330.00 to GW Bush and the GOP in 2000 and 2002. The NLRB 
attorney was replaced when President Bush took office.).
* Nearly 1 MILLION women are involved in the largest class‐action suit 
every filed against a corporation. Although women make up over 65% of 
this corporations work force only 10% of them are managers. The women 
who have become store managers make $16,400 a year LESS then the men.
* The corporation took out nearly 350,000 life insurance policies on their 
employees. They did not tell the employees and then named the 
corporation as the beneficiary. They are now being sued by numerous 
employees, and although the corporation has stopped this practice of 
purchasing what is known as ʺDead Peasant Policyʹsʺ, a company 
spokesperson stated, ʺThe company feels it acted properly and legally in 
doing this.ʺ
* They force employees to work after ordering them to punch out. In 
Texas alone this practice of ʺwage theftʺ is estimated to have cost 
employees $30 million per year. Wage theft or ʺoff‐the‐clockʺ lawsuits are 
pending in 25 states. In New Mexico they paid $400,000.00 in one suit and 
in Colorado they had to pay $50 MILLION to settle one class‐action case 
brought against them. In Oregon a jury found them guilty of locking 
employees in the building and of forcing unpaid overtime.
* With 4,400 stores they practice ʺpredatory pricing.ʺ They come into a 
community and sell their goods at below cost until they drive local 
businesses under. Once they have captured the market the prices go up.
* Locally owned and operated businesses put virtually all of their money 
back into the community which helps keep the local economies vibrant. 
This corporation sucks the money out of the local community, decreases 
wages and benefits and ships the profits out of state.
* This company doesnʹt buy locally or bank locally. They replace three 
decent paying jobs in a community with two poorly paid ʺpart‐timersʺ.
* In Kirksville, Missouri when this company came to town, four clothing 
stores, four grocery stores, a stationary store, a fabric store and a lawn‐
and‐garden store all went under. Eleven businesses are now gone.

(The above information can be found in ʺThieves in High Placesʺ, James Hightower, The Penguin 
Group, New York, NY, 2003 p. 166 ‐ 193.)


Now you know how they can claim, ʺAlways low prices.ʺ Wal‐Mart is the 
largest corporation in the world, larger than General Motors and 
ExxonMobil. Wal‐Mart will reap over 250 billion in sales in 2003, which is 
larger than the entire gross national product of Israel and Ireland 
combined. It has over 1.3 million employees. It sells more groceries, 
jewelry, photo processing, dog food, and vitamins than any other chain in 
the world. Wal‐Mart refuses to stock Emergency Contraception at its 
pharmacies. Wal‐Mart & Samʹs Club is owned by the Walton family.

They will also never see a dime from my wallet again.

Please feel free to circulate this memo to everyone on your email lists.



Is Wal-Mart just Evil?
Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price
Reviewed by Dan DiMaggio
THE NEW film by Robert Greenwald, Wal‐Mart: The High Cost of Low 
Price, exposes the brutal nature of the world’s largest corporation. In an 
indication of the intensifying anger at the corporate domination of US 
society, of which Wal‐Mart is the central symbol, hundreds of thousands 
of people flocked to libraries, union halls, and campuses to see the film in 
the first week of its release in November 2005.

The film shows Wal‐Mart doing what it does best: making huge profits 
while keeping its workers in poverty, driving small businesses into 
bankruptcy, exploiting workers in poor countries, and disregarding the 
environment. Wal‐Mart’s strategy is based on ruthlessly cutting costs, 
allowing it to undersell its competitors and earn enormous profits.

As Jim Hightower put it: ʺWal‐Mart and the Waltons got to the top the 
old‐fashioned way – by roughing people up. The corporate ethos 
emanating from the Bentonville headquarters dictated two guiding 
principles for all managers: extract the very last penny possible from 
human toil and squeeze the last dime from every supplierʺ. 
(CorpWatch.org)

The strategy has worked well for the owners of Wal‐Mart, the Walton 
family, who now make up five of the top ten wealthiest Americans, with a 
combined fortune worth nearly $100 billion. While the Waltons all live on 
vast estates, Wal‐Mart workers earn poverty wages and are forced to rely 
on food stamps, section eight housing, Medicaid, and other publicly‐
funded welfare provisions to take care of their families.

Wal‐Mart is probably the fiercest anti‐union company in the US, and even 
the slightest hint of an effort by workers to form a union is enough to 
warrant a call to the company’s 24‐hour hotline and a visit from their anti‐
union ‘Rapid Response’ team.

Nothing stands before Wal‐Mart’s profits, not even the safety of its 
customers. Wal‐Mart parking lots have been the scene of hundreds of 
crimes including murders and rapes, but Wal‐Mart has refused to hire 
security guards to monitor their lots because it would cut into their 
profits.

Wal‐Mart also shows nearly complete disregard for the environment. Like 
many other corporations, Wal‐Mart often finds it more profitable to pay 
millions of dollars in fines for environmental damage and continue 
polluting, while also lobbying politicians to abolish environmental 
regulations.

The film provides a sharp indictment of Wal‐Mart, but unfortunately it 
suffers from serious political shortcomings. The filmmaker tends to depict 
Wal‐Mart as an ‘evil’ corporation, different to others.

As Greenwald recently said, ʺWal‐Mart is abusive in ways that other 
corporations that are committed to profits are not. They have a culture 
that says it’s okay to do anything as long as it’s good for profits. It’s okay 
not to give employees health insurance. It’s okay to take money away 
from communities to build Wal‐Marts. I don’t believe there is any other 
company that is as aggressively exploiting people as Wal‐Martʺ (Reuters, 
2 December, 2006).
The makers of the film argue that the solution to Wal‐Mart is more ethical, 
smaller scale American corporations that pay living wages and benefits. 
But as the film itself shows, it is companies like Wal‐Mart that are the 
most successful, not ‘ethical’ companies.

The reality is that the system of capitalism, which is based on short‐term 
profit maximization, forces companies to place profits above people and 
the environment. Wal‐Mart has been so successful not because it is ‘evil’ 
but because it has ruthlessly followed the logic of this system.

Wal‐Mart’s success illustrates a basic law of capitalism – the inevitable 
tendency toward greater and greater concentrations of wealth and power, 
first predicted by Karl Marx over 150 years ago in The Communist 
Manifesto. Through competition, smaller companies tend to be driven out 
of business or bought out by their rivals until a few giant monopolies 
come to dominate the industry.

For example, whenever a new Wal‐Mart bullies its way into town, the 
surrounding small retail outlets are squeezed out of business. They simply 
can’t match the low prices Wal‐Mart achieves through its ruthless 
methods and global purchasing power. Wal‐Mart has even used the tactic 
of moving into a small town, running the local stores out of business and 
cornering the local market and then either raising prices or relocating 10‐
20 miles outside of town to a cheaper location!

Retail is not the only industry in the US to witness the growth of 
enormously powerful corporations in recent years. Industries like airlines, 
software, autos, and the media are now controlled by a few huge mega‐
corporations.

The trend toward global concentration of wealth is accelerating. The 
richest 356 people in the world now enjoy a combined wealth greater than 
the annual income of 40% of the human race. The 100 biggest companies 
in the world control 70% of global trade; the combined sales of the top 200 
companies are greater than the combined GDP of all but ten nations on 
earth.

There is a growing movement against Wal‐Mart, including communities 
fighting to prevent the opening of Wal‐Marts in their town, lawsuits 
against sexism and labor law violations, and attempts to pass legislation to 
force the company to pay more towards healthcare for its workers.

While these are important efforts, history has shown that fundamental 
change does not happen by relying on the courts or politicians, which are 
beholden to giant corporations like Wal‐Mart, but by building a mass 
movement of workers and the oppressed from below to challenge 
corporate power.

Such a mass movement can win important reforms, including 
unionization, higher pay, healthcare, and laws that bring more control 
over Wal‐Mart. But as long as corporations continue to privately control 
the resources of society, they will attack the living conditions of working 
people at every opportunity, and use their vast resources to dominate the 
political system. They are forced to do so to compete with other 
corporations around the world.

There can be no ‘democracy’ when the owners of Wal‐Mart have so much 
power and wealth that they can completely warp the priorities of our 
society around their narrow need for private profit, dictating laws, 
diverting resources, reducing millions to poverty, and destroying our 
environment.

The only fundamental solution to this outrage is to take Wal‐Mart out of 
the hands of the Walton family and instead bring it under public 
ownership and control. Only such a step could end the undemocratic 
power of Wal‐Mart’s owners over society and allow society to 
democratically and rationally decide how to use our resources according 
to our needs.

But why stop at only one corporation? Don’t the inequities of Wal‐Mart 
fundamentally apply to the rest of the giant corporations, like Microsoft, 
ExxonMobil, McDonalds, GM, etc, that lord over our economy and 
society? Wal‐Mart may be extreme, but the same basic situation exists 
with all of Corporate America.

Rather than pointing in the direction of trying to reform or tame the 
corporate‐dominated system of capitalism, as some argue, the case of Wal‐
Mart powerfully illustrates the need for a complete overturn of that 
system. Not just Wal‐Mart, but all of the top 500 giant corporations that 
control the US economy should be publicly owned and democratically 
controlled by the workers and consumers.

This would allow for a new, democratic system based on human needs – 
socialism. Rather than a race to the bottom among workers in the US and 
around the world so that a handful of huge multinational corporations can 
rake in profits, under socialism the resources of society could be 
harnessed to raise the living standards of ordinary people all over the 
world, to make possible a new, truly human culture of solidarity and 
cooperation.




Fast Facts about Wal-Mart

* Wal‐Mart CEO Lee Scott earned $27 million in 2004, while the average 
Wal‐Mart worker made $13,861. In just two weeks, Scott earns as much as 
the average Wal‐Mart worker would earn in a lifetime.

* Wal‐Mart is currently facing lawsuits in 31 states in the US for stealing 
hundreds of millions of dollars from hundreds of thousands of workers, 
who were forced to work overtime without pay.

* A California jury recently ordered Wal‐Mart to pay $172 million to 
116,000 workers who were not given meal breaks as required under state 
law.




Always Low Wages, Always
 
Not your average Walmart employee 
DEAR WALMART, MCDONALDʹS AND STARBUCKS: How Do You 
Feel About Paying Your Employees So Little That Most Of Them Are 
Poor? 

What do you call a trio of companies that made $35 billion in profits last 
year and yet the majority of their employees make $12 an hour or less? 
Shrewd? Cheap? Exploitative? Despicable?
The reality is that Walmart, McDonaldʹs and Starbucks can pay more and 
it would actually probably cost them less to do so. Better paid employees 
stay longer, work harder and spend more of their money at their place of 
work.

But why do they pay such crappy wages to begin with?



The consensus about these low‐wage service jobs is that theyʹre low‐wage 
because theyʹre low‐skilled. 
But thatʹs not actually true. Theyʹre low‐wage because companies choose 
to make them low‐wage. 
No, you say. Low‐wage service jobs are low‐wage because theyʹre low‐
skilled. Itʹs a free market. Companies should pay their employees 
whatever the market will bear. If those low‐skilled, low‐wage workers had 
any gumption, theyʹd go get themselves skilled and then then theyʹd be 
able to get high‐paying, high‐skill jobs. Employers shouldnʹt have to pay 
employees one cent more than the market will bear. This argument 
overlooks three things:   
First, all those good‐paying manufacturing jobs that the U.S. has lost 
werenʹt always good‐paying. In fact, before unions, minimum‐wage laws, 
and some enlightened thinking from business owners (see below), they 
often paid terribly. 
Second, the manufacturing jobs also werenʹt high‐ or even medium‐
skilled. In fact, most of these manufacturing jobs required no more 
inherent skill than the skills required to be a cashier at Walmart, a fry cook 
at McDonaldʹs, or a barista at Starbucks. (Yes, people who work on 
assembly lines building complex products need training. But cashiers, fry 
cooks, and baristas need training, too. Donʹt believe this? Go volunteer to 
be a Walmart cashier or a Starbucks barista for a day. ) 
Third, it is often in companiesʹ interest—as well as the economyʹs 
interest—to pay employees more than the market will bear. For one thing, 
you tend to get better employees. For two, they tend to be more loyal and 
dedicated. For three, they have more money to spend, some of which 
might be spent on your products.
I donʹt expect monstrous corporations to do right by the people working 
for them unless they are forced to do so. And itʹs time to force these 
massive corporations to pay their employees livable wages, it isnʹt like 
they canʹt afford to and those massive profits (at least in Walmartʹs case) 
arenʹt doing anyone any good sitting in the Walton family reserves (the 
Waltonʹs have donated a pathetically paltry 2% of their income to charity 
compare that to Bill Gates at 48% and Warren Buffettʹs 78%)

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
More at:
http://walmartispureevil.blogspot.com/2005/11/what‐every‐american‐needs‐to‐know.html




Walmart Unaccountable to Consumers’ Demands
April 17th, 2012


 A Statement From the Coalition Pressuring Walmart Not to Sell GE Sweet 
CornWashington, D.C. — In January, Food & Water Watch launched a 
campaign to pressure Walmart to refuse to sell Monsanto’s GE sweet corn. 
In coordination with CREDO Action, SumOfUs, Center for Food Safety, 
Center for Environmental Health, and Corporate Accountability 
International nearly 500,000 people signed petitions asking Walmart to 
refuse to stock Monsanto’s genetically engineered (GE) sweet corn, more 
than 150 events have taken place at Walmart stores across the country and 
over 8,500 people have called Walmart executives, store and regional 
managers, and Walmart’s customer service line.

Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director of Food & Water Watch: “Walmart 
says it cares about customers’ safety and satisfaction but in response to the 
nearly half a million concerned citizens who asked Walma rt not to sell 
this unlabeled, untested and potentially unsafe GE sweet corn it only 
offered the glib statement that it ‘does not specifically source foods that 
have been genetically modified’ and it ‘follows all federal and state 
regulations.’

“It is well‐known that the company routinely asks its suppliers to jump 
through rigorous hoops and agree to unfair terms in order to keep 
Walmart’s profit margins high. Walmart wields a lot of power over its 
suppliers and can easily get a commitment from them that their corn is not 
genetically engineered. If Walmart tells its suppliers that it does not want 
GE sweet corn, it would stop the product in its tracks.

“While the non‐answer Walmart offers is misleading, it is clear in one 
definitive way. The company states that it ‘requires our suppliers to be in 
strict compliance with all labeling and disclosure laws,’ which, 
incidentally, don’t exist for GE foods. Therefore, it is clear that retailers 
like Walmart will continue to be unresponsive to consumers’ concerns 
around the risks of GE foods until the law forces them to be accountable.”

Charles Margulis, Sustainable Food Program Coordinator at the Center for 
Environmental Health: “In the past few years, CEH has found high levels 
of lead in backpacks, jewelry, toys, and even honey purchased from 
Walmart. In each case, Walmart quickly required its supplier to clean up 
the problem. Walmart could easily be proactive and refuse this risky new 
GMO corn. Walmart shoppers should know that experimental corn is 
coming to the world’s largest retailer.”

Heather Whitehead, True Food Network Director at the Center for Food 
Safety: “It’s unfortunate that Walmart has chosen to ignore its customers. 
Walmart claims to be responsive to customer concerns, yet they have 
ignored the pleas of half a million people to reject this new genetically 
engineered sweet corn. If companies like Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods and 
General Mills can inform their suppliers that they don’t want Monsanto’s 
GE sweet corn, Walmart could certainly do the same.”

Taren Stinebrickner‐Kauffman, executive director and founder of 
SumOfUs: “Walmart’s decision to sell Monsanto’s new genetically 
modified corn is irresponsible and dangerous to its customers and to 
farmers around the country. Consumers have made clear that they don’t 
want to eat genetically modified corn that’s untested on humans — but 
Walmart is effectively giving them no choice since the new Monsanto corn 
won’t even be labeled when it’s sold to you.”

SumOfUs.org is a global movement of consumers, investors, and workers 
all around the world, standing together to hold corporations accountable 
for their actions and forge a new, sustainable and just path for our global 
economy.

CREDO Action has 2.7 million members across the U.S. who fight for 
progressive change and raise money for organizations like Food 
Democracy Now! and the Organic Consumers Association. Since 1985, 
CREDO and its membership have donated over $65 million to progressive 
causes. www.credoaction.org

The Center for Food Safety is a national, non‐profit, membership 
organization founded in 1997 to protect human health and the 
environment by curbing the use of harmful food production technologies 
and by promoting organic and other forms of sustainable agriculture. The 
Center for Food Safety’s True Food Network is a national grassroots 
network with over 200,000 members where concerned citizens can voice 
their opinions about critical food safety issues, and advocate for a socially 
just, democratic, and sustainable food system. On the web at 
www.centerforfoodsafety.org and www.truefoodnow.org

The Center for Environmental Health protects people from toxic chemicals 
and promotes business products and practices that are safe for public 
health and the environment. www.ceh.org

Corporate Accountability International (formerly Infact) is a membership 
organization that has, for the last 35 years, successfully advanced 
campaigns protecting health, the environment and human rights. 
StopCorporateAbuse.org

Contact:

Anna Ghosh, Food & Water Watch 415‐293‐9905

Kaytee Reik, SumOfUs, 267‐334‐6984

Center for Environmental Health: Charles Margulis, 510‐697‐0615

Center for Food Safety: Heather Whitehead, 415‐826‐2770

Food & Water Watch works to ensure the food, water and fish we 
consume is safe, accessible and sustainable. So we can all enjoy and trust 
in what we eat and drink, we help people take charge of where their food 
comes from, keep clean, affordable, public tap water flowing freely to our 
homes, protect the environmental quality of oceans, force government to 
do its job protecting citizens, and educate about the importance of keeping 
shared resources under public control.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Categories:
Stats:
views:3
posted:7/14/2012
language:
pages:11
Description: Check the truth, buy elesewhere. +++ Adevárul despre firma pirat Wal-Mart.