brothers-of-the-head-production-notes by handongqp

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									               IFC Films
                Presents




Brothers of the head




 Directed by Louis Pepe and Keith Fulton
        "Historically, conjoined twins who were not, or could not be separated have lived
successful lives, even if this involved putting themselves on public display... The tragedy
for conjoined twins who spend their lives together is that they inevitably die together,
too..." - From the BBC Horizon documentary. 'Conjoined Twins' (2000)


       Short Synopsis

        With Brothers of the Head, Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe (the acclaimed directors
of Lost in La Mancha) present their much anticipated debut feature. Written by Tony
Grisoni (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas), Brothers of the Head is the feverish,
mind-bending odyssey of conjoined twins Tom and Barry Howe who were plucked from
obscurity by a 1970s music promoter and groomed into a boy band. Grappling with
impossible love, artistic rivalry, and a dark inner life, the twins embrace their
freakishness and spit it back in the form of searing Punk Rock. Brothers of the Head is a
raucous ride through the seamy underground of 70's rock, and an unsettling glimpse
into a relationship that is as beautiful as it is destructive.


       Long Synopsis

        Conjoined twins Tom and Barry Howe were born in 1956 and spent their
childhood with their father and older sister in an isolated cottage on the windswept
shores of L'Estrange Head on the east coast of England. Their mother died shortly after
the twins were born and local gossip suggests that it was the sight of her infant sons
that killed her. Like many stories told about the Howe twins, this one is not true. It is
true, however, that after their mother's death in childbirth, their father took his unusual
family to a remote corner of the country to keep them from the public eye. It is also true
that when the twins reached the age of 18 in 1974, their father sold them to the musical
impresario and former Vaudeville child star, Zak Bedderwick.
       Following their removal from the family home, the Howe brothers were taken to
Bedderwick's country house Humbleden Hall, where, under the patient tutelage of
musician, Paul Day (formerly of the ill-fated Chris Dervish band, The Noize), and the
firm hand of band manager, Nick Sidney, they began to rehearse their act. While the
good-natured Tom quickly picked up chords on the guitar, Barry, the ad hoc lead singer
was less biddable. Nick Sidney discovered that a smack in the face would usually keep
the more difficult twin in line. Barry often sported a black eye.
       While at Humbleden, the Howe brothers' musical progress and daily lives were
filmed by an American documentary-maker, Eddie Pasqua (a loyal student of DA
Pennebaker and close friend of CBGB's Hilly Crystal), who captured them and their
band, the Bang Bang, rehearsing what was to become their signature tune, "Two-Way
Romeo". The camera also followed the boys in their most private, unguarded moments:
eating together, sleeping together, bathing together and frequently, trying to escape
Nick's abuse and Eddie's prying lens together.
      Word of the secret rehearsals at Humbleden soon reached the outside world and
brought journalist and former girlfriend of a rock casualty, Laura Ashworth, eager to
write about the exploitation of the 'disabled' Howe brothers. Pretty Laura was rudely
informed that her theme did not interest the twins but it was immediately obvious that
she, Laura, did. Very soon, she had become a fixture in the studio, her tape recorder as
ubiquitous as Eddie's camera. Under ordinary circumstances, Barry, the odd-man-out,
might have carried his bitterness away to brood alone. Tragically, attached as he was to
his brother, Barry had no choice but to become intimately involved when Tom and Laura
fell in love.
       Their romantic rivalry sparked the brothers' creativity and they soon had a
repertoire of songs to perform as well as Zak Bedderwick's blessing to cut a record. In
time-honoured fashion, the boys began to increase their drug and alcohol intake. Barry
shaved his hair into a modified Mohawk. They scrawled cryptic lyrics and drew
elaborate obscenities on the walls of their bedroom. Before long, they were ready for
their debut in a London pub.
       In the cramped back room of the King's Head, the audience jeered as the
brothers took the stage. To all appearances, the Bang Bang's cute front-men couldn't
keep their hands off one another and this was the wrong place for that kind of show.
The doubters were silenced when Tom struck up the chords and Barry spat out the first
words of their opening number. The ripple of excitement that accompanied a glimpse of
the thick ribbon of flesh connecting Tom to Barry and Barry to Tom confirmed Zak
Bedderwick's intuition: the Howe twins were going to be huge. They not only looked
good. They not only sounded different. They were seriously f***ing freaky.
      Fame, as ever, came with a price and the ghostly vestige of a third, malign twin
began to rear its ugly head... .The twins quickly descended into a twilight world of envy
and betrayal. Had Laura Ashworth really written to a surgeon to investigate the
possibility of separating Tom from Barry, Barry from Tom?
        A final gig ended in mayhem. As the twins' hostility escalated, they disappeared
back to their family home and very soon thereafter, came to a grisly end when Tom
finally took the matter of separating himself from Barry into his own hands. It was left to
the supporting players in their lives to piece together the story of the brothers of the
Head's rock and roll rise and fall.


       How It Started

      Writer Tony Grisoni and directors Louis Pepe and Keith Fulton first met in Spain
on the set of Terry Gilliam's ill-fated attempt to film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
Pepe and Fulton's documentary detailing the progress and ultimate collapse of the
production, Lost in La Mancha, went on to win awards and international acclaim. As
Grisoni puts it, "They made a great film about us not making a film."
       Having formed a bond on Quixote, Grisoni, Pepe and Fulton arranged to meet to
discuss potential projects for the three of them to pursue together. In spite of the fact
that he'd been thinking about the story of Tom and Barry Howe for almost 30 years,
Grisoni recalls mentioning Brothers of the Head to Fulton and Pepe as an afterthought:
"As they were leaving, I handed them a copy of Brian Aldiss' book, the original edition
with Ian Pollock's incredibly striking illustrations, saying 'Oh, and have a look at this'," he
says.
        reading Aldiss' novel, Pepe and Fulton immediately recognized their affinity with
the material. "The story was kind of an extreme version our experience because Keith
and I live together and work together, because we've collaborated with one another for
so long," says co-director, Louis Pepe. "It asked what it would be like if you're
completely bound up with another person. How do you exist as a unit as well as
individuals within that unit?"
       "It was the most obvious, the most natural choice for Keith and Lou," says
Grisoni, whose acquaintance with the project goes back to 1977. Early on in his
filmmaking career as an assistant director and production manager, Grisoni and an
aspiring producer friend were exchanging ideas about the films they would make one
day. His friend gave him a copy of Aldiss' book.
        "It's a novella and it tells the story of Tom and Barry Howe through a series of
interviews; you never meet them, they're kind of absent," says Grisoni. "That absolutely
fascinated me - a story where the actual subjects, its protagonists were absent and their
existence was explained by people whose lives had been touched by them. My first
thought was that I'd do it as a kind of documentary, where people would talk about the
phenomenon of Tom and Barry as a real event in their lives. That was the 'great idea'. It
took up about a page and a half."
       Armed with the 'great idea', Grisoni arranged to meet the author. "There I was, in
shorts and a school cap, having a meeting with Brian Aldiss, his agent and his lawyer.
Aldiss told me that he thought mine was a very good idea and he told his people that
they should give me an option on the book for a year. Of course, his people said,
'Steady on! We need to talk about money and so forth!' But Aldiss said no, I should be
given the option. I was a kid and he didn't know me from Adam but that's the kind of
man Brian Aldiss is. So I had the option on the book but I guess the story made possible
investors nervous and I had no clout. For all sorts of reasons, nothing happened."
       That something did, at last, happen in 2004, is largely down to production
company Potboiler, and producer Simon Channing Williams, who was undaunted by a
project that involved a strange story of conjoined twins shot in a realistic way through a
documentary format.
       "Simon is the kind of producer who enables filmmakers," says Pepe. "He said all
along, 'If this is the way that you, Keith, and Tony want to make this film then I'll try my
best to make it happen'."
       Channing Williams and his partner Gail Egan put together the financing for
Brothers of the Head with the help of FilmFour and the film went into production in
September 2004 with locations including Nottingham, London and, most significantly,
Norfolk, the setting for the Howe brothers' childhood on L'Estrange Head.
        In one of the coincidental stories of life imitating art and vice versa that haunt this
particular narrative, Grisoni and the co-directors were surprised on their first recce to the
coast to discover that, according to the locals, there might be an element of historical
truth to the Brothers of the Head:
        "We stopped at a fish & chip shop at one of those desolate caravan sites on the
coast in East Anglia. The guy behind the counter was interested in us outsiders and
asked what we were doing there. I told him we were trying to track down the story of two
brothers in the area who were conjoined twins. And he said, 'Oh, yes, I think I know
what you mean!' I mention this by way of saying that it's very difficult to say what's real
and what's not... "


       Fact and Fiction

         Reality, or the illusion of reality in all of its various manifestations, was crucial to
the filmmakers' approach to the story from the very start. They agreed that the only way
to tell the Howe brothers' tale was to tell 'the truth'. Although both Keith Fulton and Louis
Pepe had made fiction short films in the past, it is their intimate knowledge of
documentary-making that gives Brothers of the Head its eerie quality of not only
possibly being based on a true story but perhaps actually being a true story and beyond
that, to examining the idea of what audiences believe to be true merely by virtue of the
way it is presented to them.
        "It was about trying to create levels of perceived truth," says Louis Pepe. "Part of
the goal of that process was to give a fictional film with a slightly absurd premise a
feeling of truthfulness and veracity that we may not have gotten if we'd used a more
traditional approach. We kept calling it 'fiction aspiring to the condition of documentary.'"
        The filmmakers were adamant that although they had decided to employ the
style of a documentary, they would not repeat a formula. "We love films like Spinal Tap
and Waiting for Guffman," says Fulton, "but we weren't interested in repeating the
'mockumentary' approach. Mockumentary is its own genre. It's broad comedy, really,
and 'it wasn't really appropriate to Brothers of the Head, which is a much darker, more
tragic and disturbing story. We wanted to use documentary techniques in a much more
rigorous and unsettling way."
        "The documentary style was suggested in the novel and it was part of the draw
with Tony when we first sat down and decided to make the film," says Louis Pepe. "But
we didn't want to fall into the traps that we feel other films shot in that style fall into. We
wanted a more truthful use of the style than something that gives a superficial illusion of
documentary observation. For example, in a lot of TV shows and films where they're
trying to imitate a documentary style, they have a script and they shoot the exact script
but they move the camera around a lot."
       "Shaky-cam!" says Fulton.
       "People shake the camera to try and get a feeling of truthfulness whereas we
know that as a documentary filmmaker, you're struggling to hold the camera as steady
as you possibly can," says Pepe. "Also, in those kind of films, the camera is magically
always in the right place at the right time whereas we know from making documentaries
that you're hardly ever in the right place at the right time."
       "It was often the case on set where we'd find ourselves falling into those traps,
where our DOP, Anthony Dod Mantle, was moving in too close to the actors," says Keith
Fulton. "We'd say, no, the subjects would be uncomfortable if you were that close. It's
not going to play as real. We were rigorous about the style, about getting the sense that
many of the scenes were not only observed but observed from halfway across the
room."
       "Anthony Dod Mantle is good enough and experienced enough to give the
impression that he was shooting things 'off the cuff' whereas it was all very controlled,"
says Tony Grisoni who spent all day, every day on set throughout the shoot. "Because
everything was so carefully controlled, he and Keith and Lou could allow things to
happen and that gave the illusion of truth. When you look at those images and hear
those sounds, you understand that it's real in a very intuitive way."
        In addition to avoiding the pitfalls of the 'fake' documentary genre, the filmmakers
were also exploring the levels of truth presented in a 'real' documentary. As Lou Pepe
explains, "We went into this process with all sorts of peeves about how documentary
films are seen in the world. One of those ways is that every time a person's face comes
up on screen and tells you a piece of information, you take it as the truth. And if a
person's face comes up on screen with a caption saying this is who this person is, you
believe it. We played with that so that in Brothers of the Head, there are 'real' people
telling lies and actors saying something else but it's all done in the style that people
perceive to be the truth."
      The end result is that the viewer is frequently and intentionally wrong-footed,
from what Fulton describes as the opening "barrage of information" to the lasting
impression that some of the talking heads are real players in Barry and Tom's drama.
       The 'documentary footage' of Tom and Barry Howe is shot in a style that the
directors intended as a tribute to American direct cinema which was their reason for
casting an American in the role of filmmaker Eddie Pasqua. "Another reference that
nobody but us will get," jokes Fulton. "Tom Bower, who plays Eddie Pasqua, is a friend
of ours and he's an amazing actor so we brought him over."
       "Eddie Pasqua's style was meant to be like that of DA Pennebaker, or the
Maysles brothers or Fred Wiseman," says Pepe. "It's meant to be a kind of
observational documentary of a non-interfering form. We had a back story for Eddie that
he was part of the New York scene that preceded the British punk scene, hanging out at
CBGB's and Max's Kansas City. He's the one main character in the adaptation who isn't
in the novel but he was crucial to the style of adaptation that Keith and Tony and I
decided to do. If you're going to adhere to strict rules about documentary, you can only
see what the documentary cameraman would have seen, and in the present if you had
this guy's footage, you'd go and talk to him. Eddie Pasqua became a stand in for me
and Keith as documentary filmmakers."
        Given that Eddie Pasqua stands in for the filmmakers, it is revealing that Pepe
adds, "Tom Bower plays him as such a likeable and insightful guy. But Eddie's footage
tells a bit of a different story. Sneaking into the bathroom as they wash, seeking them
out when they hide, filming them by flashlight as they sleep... the stuff probably passes
by an audience without too much question, but we did design Eddie's documentary
footage to make him a more morally questionable and complex character."
       Who are Tom and Barry Howe?

       "In early drafts of the script the amount that you actually saw Tom and Barry
Howe was going to be very small - you only just glimpsed them," says Tony Grisoni.
"But during development there was a lot of encouragement to see more of the boys, and
in the end, there was such an extraordinary pair of performances from the Treadaways
that they became the biggest element in the film. It is amazing to me what Harry and
Luke and Keith and Lou created with those characters. Just extraordinary."
         "A strong part of the appeal for me and Lou from the start was the impossible
union of these characters," says Fulton. "I think most films about conjoined twins either
play up their freakishness, or go straight for the slapstick element. But Lou and I spent a
lot of time researching the lives and experiences of various conjoined twins. I think the
Schappell sisters inspired us most. You have these two people who are incredibly
different - one is a country singer, incredibly outgoing, and the other wants this quiet,
normal life. The fact of their inseparability brings their differences into the sharpest
relief, yet there's this beautiful acceptance that their individuality is somehow
strengthened by their union. And this absolutely mysterious way that they can't fathom
the idea of a life without the other."
       The 18-year-old conjoined twin brothers Tom and Barry Howe from Norfolk are
played respectively by identical twin brothers Harry and Luke Treadaway from Devon
who were 19 years old at the time of filming. Neither brother had appeared in a film
before.
       Fulton explains the casting process: "We initially just set out to find people who
might be able to do the job and who might look sort of alike. It wasn't so much that we
weren't looking for twins, it was more the difficulty of finding identical twins who can act,
who can play instruments and sing. Conjoined twins are always identical but because of
various birth abnormalities, they often look slightly different and we thought we could get
away with it if the actors weren't identical. We auditioned 40 or 50 guys of the right age
and it was frankly a fairly ridiculous process trying to convince ourselves that some of
them actually looked alike. We auditioned the Treadaways twice while we continued to
see other actors. I think we didn't want to just say, "Oh, yeah, they're identical twins,
we're going to cast them'. That felt like lazy casting."
       Meanwhile, following their first audition, the Treadaways were wrestling with their
resistance to being cast as twins in their film debut. They weren't convinced that they
would go if they got a call-back audition. When they'd originally decided to enrol in
drama school, they had made a virtual pact that they would not exploit the fact that they
were identical twins nor would they allow that fact to be exploited by others. Although
they may joke about double-dating the Olsen twins (for money) they are determined to
be recognised as individuals each in his own right and not to be typecast as twins. The
story that attracted co-directing partners Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe aroused nothing
but conflict in Harry and Luke Treadaway. Then they read the script.
      "It was so amazing and so touching and so haunting and so weird that it seemed
perverse not to do it because we are twins," says Harry Treadaway. "So it really came
down to whether, individually, we wanted to play either of the parts. It was such a great
story that if it was a film about Barry you would want to play that part and if it was a film
about Tom, you would want to play that part."
       "When we saw the Treadaways again, we decided to stop torturing ourselves
because Luke and Harry were obviously the guys we wanted. They had so much to
bring to the film that we could never even have conceived," says Keith Fulton.
       "As actors at the beginning of their careers you can understand that they don't
want to be typecast as twins," says Louis Pepe. "One of the things that we tried to really
use about Harry and Luke is that they are incredibly different people. Some of their
teachers at drama school can't tell them apart which I find odd because to me, even
though they look alike, they are very different in every way and when you get to know
them they don't really look like one another. Their personalities are vastly different and
that was something we tried to employ as much as possible to help make Tom and
Barry individuals. In the novel Tom and Barry are barely characters and it was an
important aspect of the adaptation to make them very tangible and distinct personalities"
       As it happened, after casting the brothers in the lead roles, the directors allowed
a period of many weeks to pass before deciding which Treadaway brother would play
which Howe brother. They would rehearse with one actor as Tom and the other as
Barry and then switch roles.
        "I'm very happy we made the decision we made," says Fulton. "Initially, we
thought that Harry would play Barry and Luke would play Tom. I guess we thought that
Harry had more confidence, that he was the more aggressive or dominant one. We
actually thought we were casting against type when we chose Luke to be Barry. The
revelation was that Luke's vulnerability was exactly what you'd want for the role of Barry
- it gave his anger and aggression real power. Tom really just wants to be normal. He
wants to fit in. And that worked very well with Harry's confidence."
       Luke Treadaway has an alternative explanation as to why he was ultimately cast
as Barry, the lead singer of the Bang Bang: "Let's put it this way. I wouldn't put Harry at
the front of a band. I've got people appeal. I can play to the masses."
       "At the beginning of the process, both of them wanted to be Tom, and Keith and I
were puzzled by that because for us, Barry was the main character," says Pepe. "We
weren't sure if it was because Tom gets the girlfriend or because Tom seems like the
nicer twin. Once we'd made the decision, though, the characters evolved based on who
Harry and Luke are and what they brought to the parts. They each made their character
the main character. In the original script, the film was much more about Barry, but Harry
and Luke fleshed out the characters such that the film is now a film about both of them."
      "I think we both wanted to play Tom because we thought that he had a bigger
journey as a character," says Luke. "But as soon as I found out that I would play Barry, I
thought that was great, too. I thought it was more of a challenge, maybe."
       While establishing who would play whom, the Treadaways were experimenting
with relentless togetherness in the form of a harness which would enable them to at
least glimpse the reality of being attached to another person. Both of them agreed that
the only way to begin to do justice to the idea of being a conjoined twin was to live like
one. During rehearsals and throughout the shoot, they remained connected to one
another for six hours each day wearing a variety of contraptions designed to keep them
together without causing them to suffocate. To the consternation of people they passed
in the park, they would go running attached together in their harness.
       "We had three months of rehearsals to work out what it might be like to be joined
together for your entire life and it would have been impossible to have done that without
being literally attached to each other," says Harry. "We felt we had to. It wasn't just a
question of how do you play the guitar if you're joined together but how do you cross the
room, lean over and plug in the amp, and then walk outside and have a fag together if
you're joined together. You've got to get it down so that it's second nature, so that you're
not even thinking about it and hopefully, the audience isn't thinking about it. We spent
three months that way. We would sleep in the same bed at night. But if you haven't got
a choice, after a while you don't think about it."
       "There are several pairs of conjoined twins in the world," says Luke. "And I
wouldn't want any of them to think we copped out and didn't make an effort to show
what it really might be like. What they have is an incredible thing and I wouldn't want to
demean it by pretending. I'll never really know what it would be like to be born attached
to my brother but it was important to try our best."
       "If you think about the idea that two actors are going to be strapped together for
the entire course of the production," says Keith Fulton, "Harry and Luke were not used
to being strapped together but they grew up together and knew each other intimately
and they were able to deal with the discomforts of the process more than two other
actors would have been able to do."
       "Psychologically it was quite a work out," says Luke. "It was a bit of a headf*** *.
I'm not sure I could have done it with anyone else but my brother. I wouldn't really fancy
being like that, nipple to nipple with another guy all the time. When it actually came to
shooting, full makeup took about 5 hours and we couldn't sit down while they did it.
Then we'd go on set and work for 10 hours. The join was super-glued to us so there
was an incentive to stick together because it hurt so much if you pulled away."
      "Yeah, but it's not like it's that a hard job, is it?" says Harry. "You're 19, you're
away from home, you get to make an album, you get to write a song on the album. I
have a feeling it's all downhill from here. "
        "By the time we started to shoot, it was as if we'd already done it in a way,
rehearsing for three months and making an album and living in a studio," says Luke. "It
was hilarious. Tom and Barry had their story but underneath it, Harry and I had our
story, too."
       The extended and intensive rehearsal period for Brothers of the Head is unusual
in feature filmmaking and the directors credit Simon Channing William's for affording
them the time to work with the actors.
       "Simon's accustomed to this sort of approach from his work with Mike Leigh, and
Lou and I are both big fans of Mike's films," says Fulton. "We actually sat down with
Mike on several occasions and tapped his brain about his rehearsal techniques. The big
difference with Mike, of course, is that he's rehearsing to develop a script, and that he
does all of his improv before production. Lou and I used a lot of the intensive character
work in the rehearsal period so that by the time we got on the set, the actors had few
questions about what their intentions were in a scene and could improv while the
cameras were rolling. We never rehearsed the script - only events before and after
scripted scenes-so that by the time we actually got to shooting, there'd be a real
freshness that suited the documentary feel. We did shoot all of the scripted scenes, but
would frequently allow the actors to improv the dialogue. By that time they understood
the characters and the motivations well enough to stay true to the drama whether or not
they were true to the words."
       During rehearsals, Harry and Luke worked with a dialogue coach to perfect the
regional Norfolk accent and in their free time, they listened to a prescribed library of
music: "We listened religiously to music from pre-1973 so we knew where the Howe
brothers were coming from," says Luke. "That was hard because I love listening to my
music, it can sort of change my personality when I put on a CD. But we were on a strict
diet of pre-1973 music: Iggy Pop, the New York Dolls, John Cale, David Bowie, Little
Richard."
        Harry and Luke also spent 12 weeks becoming a band. "We'd go home and
listen to Clive's demos and learn to play along," says Harry. "We did the album first.
When we started shooting, what we were going through, suddenly having cameras on
us all the time was the same as what Tom and Barry felt suddenly having a camera on
them the whole time. It's all about knowing it so well that you don't have to think about
it."
       "In preparing for the film and becoming a band, Harry and Luke went through the
same process that Tom and Barry go through in the story." Says Fulton. But then
because of the rehearsal techniques and the shooting style, they immersed themselves
so deeply in every aspect of the characters that at times the separation between Harry
& Luke and Tom & Barry was hard to find. As part of our process (the whole 'fiction
aspiring to the condition of documentary' thing) there was no yelling of 'action' and 'cut'
on the set. Actors were told to go into character and to stay in character until we told
them to come out. This was all part of creating a world with 'real' characters who could
then be filmed in a looser style. One of the side-effects, though, is that when actors are
so thoroughly immersed in their roles, as we encouraged them to be, it isn't always so
easy just to come out of character
       "We didn't always stay in character," says Luke. "We'd come home at the end of
the day and cook scrambled eggs together. Barry and Tom wouldn't have been doing
that. They'd have been taking speed and getting off their faces but we had a job to do.
On set, I suppose there were times when we felt that Lou and Keith would have liked to
speak to Luke and Harry and it was quite hard to find us... but in the end, hopefully you
get something that is a bit more real."
        To ensure that the element of reality remained during the shoot, the twins were
given separate direction while they were attached, sometimes with Keith Fulton
whispering in one of their ears and Louis Pepe at the other's. "It was conjoined
direction," says Fulton.
      "If you give a communal direction to the cast and crew, it reduces the privacy of
emotional intention that real people have when they're in a dramatic situation. It reduces
the element of surprise," says Pepe. "We'd tell the actors that there were certain lines
we wanted them to say and certain peaks we wanted them to hit but beyond that, we'd
tell them to be in character and to be in the moment so that if something happens, you
respond to it in character. We would tell them things that conflicted with one another to
force them into situations where they would have to respond realistically."
       "Our methods sound a little chaotic but they were actually very precise," says
Fulton. "It was a very methodical chaos. If you think about it, you may think you know
another person's intentions but you will never really know what that person is going to
do. In a lot of things we've seen about conjoined twins, they're always characterised as
one unit. But we wanted to highlight the experience of being bound to another person
where you can't control them and you can't predict what they're going to do or know
what they are thinking."


       Sex and drugs and rock 'n' roll

       "Back in 1977, when I asked him where the story had come from, Brian Aldiss
told me it came to him in a dream," says Tony Grisoni. "He had a holiday home in
Norfolk and he and his wife were driving there and had an argument. Suddenly, during
the course of this argument, he remembered this dream. The drugs, sex, rock 'n' roll -
he remembered all of it in precise detail. At the centre of the dream were these
conjoined twin brothers but there was a third, hidden sibling. I loved the fact that all this
came to him in a dream and that he remembered it during the course of an argument
with his wife. It somehow made the characters bigger, they became a kind of metaphor."
       Although they consciously avoided pursuing the allegorical aspects of the story
or looking for a moral in Tom and Barry's story, there were evident themes in the
directors' discussions about the film, many of them centring on the myths and
archetypes of rock 'n' roll. Among the ideas they entertained while honing the script and
working with the actors was that of the 'dual being' composed of two halves. They saw
Tom and Barry as complementary forces struggling to maintain a balance in the face of
outside influences.
       "At their best, they each bring strengths to the union that make them as a unit
very powerful, charismatic, successful, and attractive," says Pepe. "But when they are
pitted against each other, they somehow cancel each other out and they discover that in
the absence of one, neither can exist."
       Fulton and Pepe found precedent for this in the rock 'n' roll myth of the partners
in a band whose creative union is destroyed when they are separated by the
introduction of a third (usually female, sometimes Japanese) party. In this myth, after
the spell has been broken, neither of the partners is ever able to rise to the same
creative heights again. This myth informs the narrative of Brothers of the Head and,
coupled with what Pepe terms the 'rock 'n' roll, rags-to-riches and usually-back-to-rags
myth' and the 'live fast, die young myth' provided clues to entering Tom and Barry
Howe's world.
       Brian Aldiss' novel did not specify the kind of music played by the Bang Bang, his
lyrics were fantastical, with a sci-fi flavour that implied a stadium rock, super-group
along the lines of Led Zeppelin. Grisoni and the directors, however, saw that the story
lent itself to another genre entirely: "The aesthetic of Tom and Barry Howe was 'us
freaks against the world' and that fit perfectly with the punk ethos," says Grisoni. "It was
a great conceit - it meant that they could fit into the world as we know it."
        Fulton and Pepe were persuaded that the punk scene fit, they were wary of
introducing the Bang Bang in that context. "Somehow we were convinced that if we set
the film in the heart of the punk era we would just fall into clichés all over the place,"
says Keith Fulton. "So we were set on getting the moment right before punk broke. In
our minds, Tom and Barry's band was something like the missing link between T-Rex
and The Sex Pistols. We kept insisting to everyone on the crew that this was not a punk
movie and that was very important to us."
         "The concept of a freak show and this kind of violent energy coming out of Tom
and Barry Howe suggested a punk thing," says Pepe. "But we wanted to make a rock 'n'
roll film that has music that's full of familiar 60's and 70's references, but that's really
difficult to pin down. We thought that would much more interesting and provocative than
just to create a simulation of punk."
       Pepe is also quick to point out that this freak show factor in performance is not
limited to any era. "Keith and I come from a background that is very heavily rooted in
classical music as well as early 70s rock 'n' roll. There's a strand running through all of
that which is very much the performer as freak. You can go back to the virtuosos of the
Romantic era, like Paganini or Liszt and they were essentially freaks - they played that
up. You look at the early 70s thing of David Bowie, Lou Reed and Iggy Pop and it's all
about courting something darker and more mysterious to an audience. There's a
fascination with the performer who doesn't fit in, who has an incomprehensible energy
or eccentricity."
         "We had to learn a lot," admits Fulton. "Reading Legs McNeil and Gillian
McCain's book Please Kill Me* was very important to both of us in terms of learning
about what the scene was like. We listened to a lot of different music, much of it for the
first time. The Nuggets anthology was really important - all of this late 60's garage band
stuff which we felt would have been an influence on The Bang Bang. The kind of grass
roots stuff that musicians wanted to re-capture in the face of all the early 70's stadium
band fare. Ultimately, though, I think that punk was more about the scene than it was
about the music."
       His impression is corroborated by Clive Langer, producer and composer of much
of the Bang Bang's music in the film. A world-class record producer (Madness, Elvis
Costello, Bush) as a member of Deaf School and later the leader of The Boxes, Langer
was on the London pub rock scene throughout the pre-punk and punk eras.
      "You didn't go to see the Pistols to hear the music," says Langer. "You went to
see Johnny Rotten being weird and Jordan standing by the stage and Malcolm McLaren
jumping about. It wasn't about listening to the songs. It was about the freak show."
       "Clive Langer was absolutely incredible," says Luke Treadaway. "We could ask
him anything about that period. To get someone who was really there was amazing.
And it wasn't just about the music and the costumes. He gave us a lot of good acting
advice as well. He told us why people were singing like that at the time. He really gave
us a lot of authenticity that wouldn't have been there otherwise."
       "Musical ability is not necessarily a precondition of playing punk rock so we
figured we could get away with people who didn't have it but it helped hugely that Harry
and Luke did," says Keith Fulton. "They've been in bands since they were about 11
years old and it was definitely a benefit."
       "It was one of the briefs we gave to the casting director, Nina Gold, that whoever
the two people were who played these roles, they had to be convincing as the front-men
of a band," says Louis Pepe. "Musical ability was obviously a huge part of that but they
had to have an attitude and a confidence and a charisma that would allow them to be
the leads."
       In true rock 'n' roll fashion, Clive Langer initially became involved in the project
through the serendipitous meeting of his manager and a music supervisor, Steve
Dagger, as one was riding a motorcycle through Soho and the other emerged from the
Potboiler offices after a meeting with the filmmakers. Although Dagger did not finally
become involved with the project, Langer did and for him, the assignment had elements
of wish fulfilment:
      "It was perfect for me because I knew the era and I could create the band that I
wanted to be in. The band I was in at that time was a bit more like Roxy Music, a bit
more theatrical, a bit more art college. And the band I wanted to be in was The Clash
who came a bit later. So I could pretend that The Bang Bang was The Clash even
though it had conjoined twins in it."
        As a student at the Canterbury Art College, Langer would go to the gigs of one of
the college tutors who happened to moonlight in a band. The tutor was Ian Dury and his
band was Kilburn and the Highroads (the band's name can be glimpsed on a poster in
the film). "Ian Dury was an incredible influence on punk, "says Langer. "Without the
Pistols and without the Kilburns, I wouldn't have known where to go, really. Rotten and
Dury were my main influences. Fortunately, Barry and Tom were much more naïve than
either of them because I'm nowhere near as smart as those two. "
       Reconfirming the filmmakers' idea that the scene was as important as the songs,
Langer explains that simply listening to Ian Dury's band from those days gives no
indication of the atmosphere of menace and danger felt by an audience at one of the
early gigs. "When I first saw the Kilburns, they presented a very powerful image. They
had a front man who limped - Ian Dury had callipers on his legs when he was kid. They
had a black drummer, a guitar player who was really rocking around. I honestly
remember it as a bit of a freak show and they were pre-punk."
       In addition to re-working some of his old songs from around the same period,
Langer says, "There was freedom to write Buzzcocks-style songs. For 'Doola and
Dawla' I nicked something from Magazine which was Pete Shelley's band before the
Buzzcocks. I told him I'd stolen it and he laughed and said he thought that was great."
(The Buzzcocks ghostly presence was felt in the earliest stages of production when,
during the casting process, co-directors Fulton and Pepe subjected actors auditioning
for Tom and Barry Howe to "punk karaoke". The actors were provided with an
instrumental CD of punk classics, one of which they would have to learn and perform
cold as part of their audition. The most popular choice was "Ever Fallen in Love With
Someone". Fulton and Pepe listened to dozens of variations on the Buzzcocks' hit over
that period and confess that as a consequence, it will be years before they can ever
listen to it again.)
       It was Clive Langer's responsibility to put together the band around the twins.
"Keith and Lou initially thought they'd get away with one guitar, bass and drums and a
lead singer - a four-piece. I thought it would better to have another guitar as a back up
so you could get some more interesting music in there. I'd worked with a band called
Crackout, a young, English, grungy pop band when they were 17; they are now in their
early twenties and I knew they were free. So the idea was that we'd get a three piece
behind the twins. It was great that Bryan Dick, the actor who plays Paul Day, was a
really good bass player. They all got on well. We rehearsed and rehearsed. Keith and
Lou would talk about what they wanted and I would talk about what I wanted. I wanted a
real band - no compromise, no drama school. And I wanted to feel that if I was in that
band, I would be proud of it."
       "It was really critical to us that the band be able to play live gigs," says Fulton.
"We wanted to do a music movie with no playback whatsoever. No miming to the music.
We felt that this was often a pitfall of rock movies - the thing that makes them ring false.
And it would have been disastrous with our rough and real aesthetic."
       Bang Bang recorded an album during rehearsals before the film began shooting.
"We recorded in a kind of punk manner," says Langer. "We did things very quickly, we
recorded live. If there was a cracked guitar sound, we'd turn it up." According to
Langer's manager, watching the Bang Bang in rehearsals or in performance "was just
like watching a new band".


       How it all came together

        "Initially we were terrified because we're used to making documentaries where
you have 120 hours of material you can cull from," says Keith Fulton. "Because we were
shooting on film and the cost of your average day is much higher than when you're
making a documentary, we were worried that we would not be able gather enough
material even though we were very thorough about creating a world we could document
and we shot in a very loose, improvisational way. As it turned out, we had ample
material and we ended up editing the way that you would edit a documentary in that we
reinvented the film in the editing process. We shot the script but when it came to Tom
and Barry, we were quite liberal. When we got to the editing room, a lot of the scripted
interviews were no longer needed to tell the story."
       "The actors in the 1970s footage had all read the script and they really absorbed
and interpreted that information," says Pepe. "In the script, there are pages and pages
of detail about the music of the period and all of that information was digested by
everybody. It was digested by Clive in terms of the music that he wrote and by the
actors in terms of what they went home and listened to. All of those musical influences
ended up being in the fabric of the film and Tony's script was very much a blueprint for
the process. As a result, many of the interviews with the older versions of the characters
became redundant."
      Pepe explains that much of what we see in the finished film is a result of the
extended rehearsal process involving the main cast in improvisations that would allow
the actors to think back on real events in their lives when being interviewed about
events in the lives of their characters: All of the main actors (Sean Harris, Bryan Dick,
David Kennedy, Tania Emery, Diana Kent, Tom Bower, Elizabeth Rider) went through
an extensive research and rehearsal period to build their characters:
        "A lot of the improvs that we did were done to build the back-stories between
characters (between Paul Day and Laura, between Laura and Nick, etc.) We also did a
lot of rehearsals for contemporary characters (none of whom had any scripted scenes
with Harry and Luke) so that they could spend time with the twins and build a history
and "memories" with them. David Kennedy, Diana Kent and Elizabeth Rider all
rehearsed extensively with Harry and Luke so that they would have actual experiences
to draw on when they were interviewed in character. The scene of Laura meeting the
twins was filmed with Tania, but we spent a day rehearsing it with both Tania and Diana
so that when contemporary Laura talks about her first impressions of Tom and Barry,
she's actually referring to an event that was real for her.
       Elizabeth Rider did a full day of improvs with Harry and Luke where they were all
kids so that she would know just what it was like to grow up with them. Sean Harris met
Harry and Luke in character (and strapped together in a harness) so that he could
experience Nick Sidney's shock at seeing Tom & Barry for the first time. Tom Bower
spent days watching all of Eddie Pasqua's "footage", revisiting all the material that his
character had shot. None of the rehearsals were for scripted scenes in the film, but they
were all part of a process in which Keith and I wanted the events of the story to be as
real as possible for the actors playing the characters."
         "It was such a well written script," says Fulton. "A lot of people think that if you
make a lot of changes to the script or get rid of dialogue that you're being disrespectful
to it. In this case, the script was like a bible or a handbook for the production. The script
was essential to the production but, like we do with documentaries, in post-production,
you write another one
       "I like things to change," says screenwriter Tony Grisoni. "Filmmaking is a social
pact. I never, ever want to work on a film that arrives stillborn, just as it was on the
page. I really don't consider that my job is done until the final cut. A lot of things in the
original script no longer exist in the film but in a way, they make soil for what is there.
The fact that you don't see them doesn't matter - it just lends a greater reality to it.
       In the script there was a dream sequence with a field of daisies and in the
finished film, there's only one daisy and it's tucked behind Laura Ashworth's ear... I love
that."


       Extract from the Crackout website:

       "It all started when our producer friend Clive Langer called us up to see if we
would be interested in playing on a film soundtrack that he had been asked to score , to
which we wholeheartedly agreed to do for it is such a delight and honour working with
the man . Before long , we were invited to meet the film's directors who promptly cast us
in the film and - after the soundtrack had been recorded - we were put into acting
rehearsals , which turned out to be the most horrifically terrifying experiences of our
lives.
       Beforehand it seemed a very romantic , idyllic little job we were embarking upon,
being movie actors and clearly on the right road to the Oscar that my mantelpiece and I
(Nick , your modest news teller) have always so rightly deserved - my acceptance
speech promised to be a work of enlightened prose , rich in life nourishing humility ,
ready to help the human race to new, wonderful heights of ecstasy! After my speech
there would be nothing left in the world but LOVE! But NO!
       The truth of the situation soon set in : that these rehearsals were ungodly ,
nightmarish experiences . We would wake in the morning thinking it was all a horrible
dream and then reality would dawn : we were up at 5 am for a reason ... to get on the
train to London to try and act but instead make fools of ourselves in front of very
talented , very professional actors who were probably coming to terms with the hellish
knowledge that they were having to work with a troupe of perpetually hung-over, flaky
musician -types who were devoid of any acting skill whatsoever!
       However , with the tortuous rehearsals over , and the first day of filming under
our belts , we could not be happier . What started off as a great time recording a
soundtrack that turned into a hideous practise-acting ordeal , swiftly ended up becoming
perhaps the greatest experiences of our lives, surrounded by hugely talented people
with abilities that will forever be beyond our comprehension .
        *From a review of Please Kill Me in New York Rock: "It's much to the authors'
credit that they choose the quasi-documentary style - otherwise one might have found it
hard to believe the material contained within."


      Cast


      HARRY TREADAWAY (Tom Howe)

       Brothers of the Head is Harry Treadaway's first feature film. He was 19 years old
at the time of filming and continues to study acting at LAMDA (London Academy of
Music and Dramatic Arts). He was raised in Devon, England where as a young
teenager, he played the guitar in a band he'd formed with his brother, Luke. Harry
Treadaway recently completed an episode of Miss Marple: Sleeping Murder for ITV
Television.


      LUKE TREADAWAY (Barry Howe)

      Brothers of the Head is Luke Treadaway's first feature film. He was 19 years old
at the time of filming and continues to study acting at LAMDA (London Academy of
Music and Dramatic Arts). He was raised in Devon, England where, as a young
teenager, he sang in a band he'd formed with his brother, Harry.


      BRYAN DICK (Paul Day)

       Bryan Dick is a familiar face to UK television audiences from his roles in popular
series and dramas including Blackpool, Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky, and
The Virgin Queen for the BBC. Other small screen credits include the dramas White
Teeth and The Long Firm and appearances in Dalziel & Pascoe, Merseybeat and The
Bill. He will also be seen in the BBC's upcoming production of Andrew Davies'
adaptation of Bleak House co-starring Gillian Anderson.
      On the big screen, he has appeared in Peter Weir's Master and Commander,
opposite Russell Crowe and Lynne Ramsay's Morvern Caller. He will soon be seen in
Colour Me Kubrick with John Malkovich.
     Bryan Dick's stage appearances include Plasticine and Sliding with Suzanne at
London's Royal Court and in School Play at the Soho Theatre.


      SEAN HARRIS (Nick Sidney)

       Sean Harris received outstanding reviews for his portrayal of Ian Curtis, the
legendary Joy Division singer, in Michael Winterbottom's acclaimed 24 HOUR PARTY
PEOPLE. Other recent film credits include David Mackenzie's ASYLUM with Natasha
Richardson and Ian McKellen, ISOLATION directed by Billy O'Brien, Christopher
Smith's CREEP, and Juliet McKoen's acclaimed FROZEN starring Shirley Henderson.
Earlier credits include Marc Evans' TRAUMA, THE HARE, TRUE LOVE (ONCE
REMOVED) and Jeroen Krabbe's THE DISCOVERY OF HEAVEN.
      Harris has been seen on television in STRANGE (BBC), THE VICE (Carlton),
JUDGE JOHN DEED (BBC), A MUG'S GAME (BBC) and SIGNS AND WONDERS
(BBC).
     Theatre credits include A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM (Leicester
Haymarket), ANGELS RAVE ON (Nottingham Playhouse), THE PLEASURE MAN,
DON JUAN, ROMEO AND JULIET, SOLDIERS and CHATSKY (all Glasgow Citizens).


      Crew


      KEITH FULTON AND LOUIS PEPE (Co-directors)

      Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe first teamed up while pursuing graduate film
degrees at Temple University in Philadelphia and have been collaborating on
documentary and fiction films for over a decade.
       While they were still in film school, director Terry Gilliam screened a collection of
their short films and asked the duo to document his production of 12 Monkeys. Against
expectations, Fulton and Pepe produced a full-length feature, The Hamster Factor and
Other Tales of 12 Monkeys (1996), a startlingly candid portrait of Gilliam and an
in-depth chronicle of the odd marriage of art and commerce in Hollywood filmmaking.
Acclaimed by the Los Angeles Times as "a rare look at the conflicts raging just outside
the frame of a feature," The Hamster Factor screened at film festivals worldwide and
became a broadcast staple in the UK.
        Returning to Gilliam as a documentary subject in 2000, the pair followed him to
Spain to chronicle the pre-production of his long-anticipated Don Quixote adaptation. As
Gilliam's project struggled and then foundered, Fulton and Pepe stuck with the story and
emerged from the experience with the documentary feature Lost in La Mancha (2002),
the first-ever cinéma vérité chronicle of the collapse of a major motion picture. Lost in La
Mancha premiered at the 2002 Berlin Film Festival and was subsequently released
theatrically worldwide. A testament to its dark sense of humour, the documentary went
on to win the Evening Standard's Peter Sellers Award for Best Comedy in 2003.
       Fulton and Pepe's fiction work includes Moments of Doubt (1998), a trilogy of
dramatic short films, which won the Best Short Film award at the 1999 Hamptons
International Film Festival. They are also alumni of the Sundance Institute's
Screenwriters and Directors Labs (2003) with their project An Awfully Good Alibi, written
by Fulton and to be directed by Pepe.
        The team also continues to make documentaries. Most recently, their television
documentary Malkovich's Mail (2003) furthered their exploration of eccentric characters
in the film industry by profiling a group of aspiring screenwriters who had all sent bizarre
pitch letters to John Malkovich and his production company.
      Fulton, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History
from Haverford College and an MFA from Temple University's film program. Pepe, who
was raised in central Pennsylvania, holds two Bachelor of Science degrees from MIT -
one in Computer Science and one in Film Studies - and a Master of Fine Arts in Film
from Temple University. They currently live in Los Angeles.

       Fulton & Pepe Biography - SHORT
      Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe began their 15-year collaboration in the MFA
program at Temple University in Philadelphia. Together they have produced, directed,
and written both documentary and fiction films.
       Their first documentary feature, The Hamster Factor and Other Tales of 12
Monkeys (1996), is a startlingly candid portrait of Gilliam and an in-depth chronicle of
the odd marriage of art and commerce in Hollywood filmmaking. Acclaimed by the Los
Angeles Times as "a rare look at the conflicts raging just outside the frame of a feature,"
The Hamster Factor screened at film festivals worldwide and became a broadcast
staple in the UK.
       Their second feature, Lost in La Mancha (2002), was the first-ever cinema vérité
chronicle of the collapse of a major motion picture. The film premiered at the 2002
Berlin Film Festival and was released theatrically worldwide. La Mancha received the
Evening Standard's Peter Sellers Award for Best Comedy in 2003.
       Fulton and Pepe's fiction work includes Moments of Doubt (1998), a trilogy of
dramatic short films, which won the Best Short Film award at the 1999 Hamptons
International Film Festival. They are also alumni of the Sundance Institute's
Screenwriters and Directors Labs (2003) with their project An Awfully Good Alibi.
        The team also continues to produce documentaries. Most recently, their
television documentary Malkovich's Mail (2003) furthered their exploration of eccentric
characters in the film industry by profiling a group of aspiring screenwriters who had
solicited John Malkovich's company with bizarre pitch letters.
       Fulton and Pepe currently live in Los Angeles.

       Fulton & Pepe Biography - LONG
      Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe first teamed up while pursuing graduate film
degrees at Temple University in Philadelphia and have been collaborating on
documentary and fiction films for over a decade.
       While they were still in film school, director Terry Gilliam screened a collection of
their short films and asked the duo to document his production of 12 Monkeys. Against
expectations, Fulton and Pepe produced a full-length feature, The Hamster Factor and
Other Tales of 12 Monkeys (1996), a startlingly candid portrait of Gilliam and an
in-depth chronicle of the odd marriage of art and commerce in Hollywood filmmaking.
Acclaimed by the Los Angeles Times as "a rare look at the conflicts raging just outside
the frame of a feature," The Hamster Factor screened at film festivals worldwide and
became a broadcast staple in England.
       Returning to Gilliam as a documentary subject in 2000, the pair followed him to
Spain to chronicle the pre-production of his long-anticipated Don Quixote adaptation. As
Gilliam's project struggled and then floundered, Fulton and Pepe stuck with the story
and emerged from the experience with the documentary feature Lost in La Mancha
(2002), the first-ever cinema vérité chronicle of the collapse of a major motion picture.
Lost in La Mancha premiered at the 2002 Berlin Film Festival and was subsequently
released theatrically worldwide. A testament to its dark sense of humour, the
documentary went on to win the Evening Standard's Peter Sellers Award for Best
Comedy in 2003.
       Fulton and Pepe's fiction work includes Moments of Doubt (1998), a trilogy of
dramatic short films, which won the Best Short Film award at the 1999 Hamptons
International Film Festival. They are also alumni of the Sundance Institute's
Screenwriters and Directors Labs (2003) with their project An Awfully Good Alibi, written
by Fulton and to be directed by Pepe.
        The team also continues to make documentaries. Most recently, their television
documentary Malkovich's Mail (2003) furthered their exploration of eccentric characters
in the film industry by profiling a group of aspiring screenwriters who had all sent bizarre
pitch letters to John Malkovich and his production company.
      Fulton, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History
from Haverford College and an MFA from Temple University's film program. Pepe, who
was raised in central Pennsylvania, holds two Bachelor of Science degrees from MIT -
one in Computer Science and one in Film Studies - and a Master of Fine Arts in Film
from Temple University. They currently live in Los Angeles.

      FULTON & PEPE FILMOGRAPHY (as Co-Directors, except where noted)
       Brothers of the Head (2005) - Fiction/Documentary, 93 min. The tale of conjoined
twins Tom and Barry Howe who were plucked from obscurity by a music promoter and
groomed into a rock-and-roll act.
      Malkovich's Mail (2003) - Documentary, 46 min. An original television
documentary for American Movie Classics (AMC) about aspiring screenwriters from
across the US and the bizarre pitch letters they send to actor John Malkovich and his
production company.
       Lost in La Mancha (2001) - Documentary, 89 min. A documentary about Terry
Gilliam's decade-long attempt to mount a film production of "Don Quixote", and the first
vérité chronicle of the collapse of a major motion picture. Evening Standard British Film
Award for Comedy (2003)
      Moments of Doubt (1998) - Fiction, 44 min. (written & directed by Pepe;
produced by Fulton) A collection of three short films - "French Fries", "Cow Song", and
"The Dictionary Artist" - that explore characters in crises of self-doubt. Hamptons Int'l
Film Festival Golden Starfish for Best Short Film (1999)
        The Hamster Factor and Other Tales of 12 Monkeys (1996) - Documentary, 87
min. An intimate portrait of director Terry Gilliam and a glimpse at the strange marriage
of art and commerce in Hollywood filmmaking.


      SIMON CHANNING WILLIAMS (Producer)

      Simon Channing Williams recently produced Fernando Meirelles' The Constant
Gardener, adapted from the best-selling novel by John le Carré and starring Ralph
Fiennes and Rachel Weisz.
       As the producer of Mike Leigh's Secrets & Lies, Channing Williams was
nominated for an Academy Award. In addition to its Best Picture nomination, the film
was also an Oscar nominee for Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress (Brenda
Blethyn), and Best Supporting Actress (Marianne Jean-Baptiste). Secrets & Lies won
the top prize, the Palme d'Or, at the 1996 Cannes International Film Festival.
      Simon Channing Williams' longstanding partnership with Mike Leigh began when
he worked as first assistant director on the 1980 BBC television film Grown-Ups. After
working together again, as co-producer of the BAFTA Award-nominated short film The
Short and Curlies and as producer of the award-winning feature film High Hopes, the
two men set up Thin Man Films to formalize their partnership.
      The first Thin Man project was the feature Life is Sweet, which was applauded by
critics, garnered awards worldwide, and won new international audiences for the
director's work. Next came A Sense of History, which was named Best Short Film at the
Clermont Ferrand Film Festival. This was followed by several features: the
multi-award-winning Naked; Secrets & Lies; Career Girls; Topsy-Turvy (which won two
Academy Awards, for Best Costume Design and Best Makeup); All or Nothing; and,
most recently, Vera Drake. Vera Drake's numerous awards include the top prize, the
Golden Lion, and the Best Actress prize at the 2004 Venice International Film Festival;
and three Academy Award nominations, for Best Actress (Imelda Staunton), Best
Director, and Best Original Screenplay.
       Beyond the Thin Man productions, Channing Williams has produced a variety of
projects. These include Tony Palmer's UK telefilm Puccini; Clive Rees' When the
Whales Came; Tim Sullivan's Jack and Sarah; Doug McGrath's Nicholas Nickleby
(which received a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Picture); and Paddy
Breathnach's Man About Dog.
       He was executive producer of the BAFTA Award-nominated Little Pig Robinson,
directed by Alan Bridges; the short film The Pan Loaf, winner of a Silver Hugo at the
Chicago Film Festival and named Best Short Film at the Cork Film Festival; and Irwin
Winkler's De-Lovely.
     In 2000, Channing Williams formed, with Gail Egan, the independent production
company Potboiler Productions Ltd.


      GAIL EGAN (Producer)

      In 2000, Gail Egan formed, with Simon Channing Williams, the independent
production company Potboiler Productions Ltd.
      Egan most recently served as executive producer on Fernando Meirelles' The
Constant Gardener adapted from the best-selling novel by John le Carré and starring
Ralph Fiennes and Rachel Weisz. She executive produced Mike Leigh's multi-award
winning Vera Drake; Douglas McGrath's Nicholas Nickleby (which received a Golden
Globe Award nomination for Best Picture); Irwin Winkler's De-Lovely; and Paddy
Breathnach's Man About Dog.
       Gail Egan is also a qualified barrister. She practiced commercial law at Lincoln's
Inn before joining Price Waterhouse Corporate Finance. She later worked for the
international media group Carlton Communications.


      TONY GRISONI (Screenwriter)

      Born in London in 1952, Tony Grisoni worked in many different areas of
filmmaking before turning to screenwriting. Queen of Hearts directed by Jon Amiel
(1989) was his award-winning first feature. Since then, he has worked closely with a
number of directors including John Boorman and Terry Gilliam (Fear & Loathing in Las
Vegas, 1998 and the forthcoming Tideland, 2005). Grisoni is also proud to count himself
amongst the crew on board the ship of fools: The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
        Vanished - A Video Séance, 1999 was made in collaboration with performance
artist and poet, Brian Catling, Jonathan Romney writing for The Guardian referred to the
piece as "genre busting - an encounter between mainstream movie story telling and the
art avant-garde..." Grisoni and Catling also collaborated on The Cutting, a film based on
the finding of the 2000-year-old Grauballe Man in Denmark.
       In 2001, Tony Grisoni made the trek along the people-smugglers' route from the
Pakistan/Afghan border, through Iran and Turkey to Europe with director Michael
Winterbottom. The resulting film, In This World, 2002 won numerous awards including
the Berlin Film Festival's Golden Bear and the BAFTA award for Best Film Not in the
English Language.
        Grisoni currently has two projects in production: The Lives of the Saints
co-directed by photographer, Rankin and Chris Cottam and Death Defying Acts directed
by Gillian Armstrong and written in collaboration with Brian Ward.
     He is also adapting How I Live Now from the novel by Meg Rosoff for director
Thomas Vinterberg (Festen).


      ANTHONY DOD MANTLE DFF, BSC (Cinematographer)

       Anthony Dod Mantle grew up in Oxford before settling in Denmark in 1983 when
he enrolled in the country's National Film School. His first feature as a cinematographer
was a German film, Terrorists in 1991. Since then, he has become one of Europe's
most distinctive and sought-after DOPs with work including Lars von Trier's latest
Manderlay and it's predecessor Dogville; all of Thomas Vinterberg's feature films
including Dear Wendy, Festen and It's All About Love, and Danny Boyle's 28 Days
Later, Vacuuming Completely Nude in Paradise and Strumpet.
      Most recently, Dod Mantle shot The Last King of Scotland a fictional work based
on the life of Idi Amin and filmed in Uganda for Oscar-winning director Kevin
Macdonald.


      CLIVE LANGER (Composer)

       Clive Langer began his music career during the mid-1970s as a guitarist in the
band Deaf School before going solo with his backing band the Boxes in 1979 and
releasing the album 'I Want the Whole World'. Together with partner Alan Winstanley,
Langer was among the top British producers of the new wave era, helming records for
Madness, Elvis Costello and Lloyd Cole & the Commotions. With Madness' 1979 debut
LP 'One Step Beyond', Langer and Winstanley inaugurated a partnership which
continued for several decades. After collaborating on Madness' 1980 record
'Absolutely', they moved on to the Teardrop Explodes' 'Kilimanjaro'; a year later, they
produced Madness' 'Seven' and Teardrop's 'Wilder' before teaming with Costello for
1983's 'Punch the Clock', the album which launched his first American hit, 'Everyday I
Write the Book'.
      Other works include Bush's 'Science of Things' for UNI/Interscope and
producer/engineer/mixing credits for The Adventurers' 'Trading Secrets With The Moon',
Aztec Camera's 'Frestonia', David Bowie & Mick Jagger's 'Dancing In The Streets'
single, Bowie's 'Absolute Beginners' single, and Elvis Costello's 'Goodbye Cruel World'
album - to name but a few.


      JON HENSON (Production Designer)

       Jon Henson's credits as production designer include the feature films Pure for
director Gilles Mackinnon, Billie Eltringham's This is not a Love Song, Jasmin Disdar's
Beautiful People, Arnaud Despleschin's Esther Kahn and the quasi-animated Y
Mabinogi. His television credits include the drama series 40 with Eddie Izzard and Kerry
Fox. As art director, Henson worked on Hideous Kinky and the television drama
Dirtysomething.


      MARIANNE AGERTOFT (Costume Designer)

       Marianne Agertoft recently designed costumes for the chiller Cold and Dark
starring Luke Goss and the BAFTA Award winning short film, The Banker. Her feature
credits include John Irvin's Dot.Kill and Frank Van Passels Villa des Roses.


      SARAH MONZANI (Hair and Make-up Designer)

      Sarah Monzani won both the Oscar and the BAFTA for her work on
Jean-Jacques Annaud's Quest for Fire. As makeup designer, her credits include
De-Lovely, The
       Reckoning and Nicholas Nickleby. Her credits as hair stylist and/or make up artist
include Evita (for which she was nominated for a BAFTA), Interview with the Vampire,
Bugsy Malone, Midnight Express and Alien.


      NIC GASTER (Editor)

       Editor Nic Gaster's credits include Roger Michell's "Enduring Love" and "The
Mother"; Peter Brook's "The Tragedy of Hamlet" and "Mahabharata", Chris Menges' "A
World Apart", Volker Schlondorf's "The Ogre", Tom Stoppard's, "Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern are Dead", Milcho Manchevski's "Dust" and "Before the Rain", Lavinia
Currier's "Passion in the Desert", and Lindsay Anderson's "The Whales of August".
Cast (In order of appearance)
Henry Couling (Two-Way Romeo)   Jonathan Pryce
Boatman (Two-Way Romeo)         John Simm
Ken Russell                     As Himself
Brian Aldiss                    James Greene
Roberta Howe                    Elizabeth Rider
Young Zak                       Luke Wagner
Zak's Mum                       Anna Nygh
Zak Bedderwick                  Howard Attfield
Nick Sidney                     Sean Harris
Chris Dervish                   Ed Hogg
Paul Day (1970's)               Bryan Dick
Tubs                            Nicholas Millard
Paul Day (Present Day)          David Kennedy
Henry Couling                   Ken Bones
Roberta Howe(Two-WayRomeo)      Jane Horrocks
Old Howe (Two-Way Romeo)        Roger Watkins
Rita Bedderwick                 Anna Nygh
Barry Howe                      Luke Treadaway
Tom Howe                        Harry Treadaway
Spitz                           Steven Eagles
Druggy                          Raymond Pickard
Druggy Friend                   Joe Van Moyland
Eddie Pasqua                    Tom Bower
Ray Cooper                      As Himself
Pub Manager                     Kenneth Hadley
Concert Vox Pops                Isabel Skinner
                                Michelle Bayton
                                Gillian Farr
                                Ruthe Spottiswoode
                                Neil McKay
                                Matthew Pearson
                                Kieran Rushby
                                Kristel George
Stylist                         Brian 'Dawn' Chalkley
Cilla                          Anne Lambton
Laura Ashworth (1970s)         Tania Emery
Laura Ashworth (Present)       Diana Kent
Roadie                         Jack Dunkley
Sir Allardyce Stevens          Jeffry Wickham
Barry Howe (Two-Way Romeo)     Tom Sturridge
Dr Janice Marsden              Barbara Ewing

CREW
Co-Directors                   Keith Fulton
                               Louis Pepe
Executive Producers            Tony Grisoni
                               Lisa Marie Russo
Producers                      Gail Egan
                               Simon Channing Williams
Screenplay                     Tony Grisoni
Based on the novel by          Brian Aldiss
Cinematography                 Anthony Dod Mantle
Editor                         Nic Gaster
Production Designer            Jon Henson
Sound                          Tim Barker
Music                          Clive Langer
Art Director                   Patrick Rolfe
Set Decorator                  Michelle Day
Props Master                   Nick Thomas
Standby Props                  Arwel Evans
Dressing Props                 Dave Jeffries
                               Chris Lightburn-Jones
Graphics Art Director          Mark Larkin
Assistant Art Director         Gareth Cousins
Art Department Assistant       Kathryn Pyle
Assistant Standby Props Hand   Prue Howard
Chargehand Painter             Sophie Geliot
Painters                       Keith Brown
                               David Gray
                               Ken Hook
                               Alex Lynch
Location Manager                         Henry Woolley
Script Supervisor                        Sylvia Parker
Archive Researcher                       Lucy Whitton
Assistant Archive Researcher             William Fowler
Camera Operator                          Anthony Dod Mantle
First Assistant Camera                   Simon Tindall
Second Assistant Camera                  Chris Connatty
B Camera Operator                        Curtis Radcliffe
Steadicam Operator                       Paul Edwards
Stills Photographer                      Nick Wall
Camera Trainees                          Neil Johnson,
                                         Tim Morris
Costume Supervisor                       Emma Fryer
Costume Design Assistant                 Alice Wolfbauer
Costume Standby                          Tabitha Doyle
Costume Assistants                       Jenni Allen
                                         Katarina Borosova
                                         Fiona Gibsey
Costume Researcher                       Nat Turner
Prosthetic Designer                      Aaron Sherman
Prosthetic Make-up Artist                Maralyn Sherman
Prosthetic Technicians                   Martin Hodgson
                                         Daniel Woodley
Make-up and Hair Assistant               Jennifer Lenard
Additional Hair Artist                   Francesco Alberico
Additional Make-up and Hair Assistants   Carolyn Cousins
                                         Carolyn Deacock
                                         James Pavlov
                                         Sarah White
                                         Louise Young
First Assistant Director                 Mike Elliott
Second Assistant Director                Anthony Wilcox
Third Assistant Director                 Dan Channing Williams
Script Executive                         Sarah Golding
Art Director                             Patrick Rolfe
Set Decorator                            Michelle Day
Props Master                             Nick Thomas
Standby Props                  Arwel Evans
Dressing Props                 Dave Jeffries
                               Chris Lightburn-Jones
Graphics Art Director          Mark Larkin
Assistant Art Director         Gareth Cousins
Art Department Assistant       Kathryn Pyle
Assistant Standby Props Hand   Prue Howard
Chargehand Painter             Sophie Geliot
Painters                       Keith Brown
                               David Gray
                               Ken Hook
                               Alex Lynch
Location Manager               Henry Woolley
Script Supervisor              Sylvia Parker
Archive Researcher             Lucy Whitton
Assistant Archive Researcher   William Fowler
Camera Operator                Anthony Dod Mantle
First Assistant Camera         Simon Tindall
Second Assistant Camera        Chris Connatty
B Camera Operator              Curtis Radcliffe
Steadicam Operator             Paul Edwards
Stills Photographer            Nick Wall
Camera Trainees                Neil Johnson
                               Tim Morris
Costume Supervisor             Emma Fryer
Costume Design Assistant       Alice Wolfbauer
Costume Standby                Tabitha Doyle
Costume Assistants             Jenni Allen
                               Katarina Borosova
                               Fiona Gibsey
Costume Researcher             Nat Turner
Prosthetic Designer            Aaron Sherman
Prosthetic Make-up Artist      Maralyn Sherman
Prosthetic Technicians         Martin Hodgson
                               Daniel Woodley
Gaffer                         Thomas Neivelt
Best Boy                       Andy Cole
Spark                                  Frank Dawson
Rigger                                 John Law
Stunt Co-ordinators                    Clive Curtis
                                       Paul Herbert
Marine Co-ordinator                    Willie Athill
Sound Recordist                        Tim Barker
Boom Operator                          Oli Cohen
Production Manager                     Andy Stebbing
Production Co-ordinator                Imogen Bell
Assistant Production Manager           Tracy O'Riordan
Directors' Assistant                   Hayley Williams
Production Secretaries                 Ameenah Ayub
                                       Bob Sohanpal
Floor Runner                           Dom Channing Williams
Production Runners                     Alex Protherough
                                       Theodore Cook
                                       Gemma Coombs
Production Trainees                    Peter Courridge
                                       Heloise Vokins
                                       Ella Woolner
Assistant to Simon Channing Williams   Abbie Browne
Assistant to Gail Egan                 Claire Broughton
Trainee Producer                       Penny Linfield
Extras Casting                         Kate Rudge
Runners                                Kelly Bassett
                                       Tristan Goligher
                                       Greg McManus
                                       Emma Yeomans
Location Finders                       Richard Knight
                                       Nick Darvill
                                       Leon Ballin
Location Assistants                    Michael Myrie
                                       Aaron Boughtflower
Post Production Supervisor             Alistair Hopkins
First Assistant Editors                Mark Eckersley
                                       Justinian Buckley
Second Assistant Editors               Richard Smither
                                  Sean Lyons
Sound Effects Editor              Zane Hayward
Foley Editor                      Oli Cohen
ADR/Foley Recording               Goldcrest Post, London
ADR/Foley Mixer                   Andy Thompson
Foley Artists                     Jack Stew
                                  Andrea King
Foley Recording                   Universal Sound
Foley Mixer                       Dave Croft
Foley Artist                      Dave Poulton
ADR Recording                     Mayflower Studios Ltd
ADR Mixer                         Jonathan Rimas
Re-recorded at                    Goldcrest Post, London
Re-recording Mixer                Andy Thompson
Assistant Re-recording Mixer      Mark Appleby
Bang Bang Sound Engineer          Lenny Franchi
Live PA Engineer                  Alan Shearsmith
Bang Bang live music
Vocals                            Luke Treadaway
Guitar/Vocals                     Harry Treadaway
Guitar                            Steven Eagles
Drums                             Nicholas Millard
Live Bass Player                  Bryan Dick
Technician / Studio Bass Player   Jack Dunkley
Plectrum Calibration              Snarby Richard
Musical Engineer                  Johnny Langer
Music Consultant                  Jim Benner
Music Supervisor                  Ian Neil
Music Co-ordinator                Hugh Gadsdon
Choreographer                     Anna Nygh
Dialogue Coach                    Jan Haydn Rowles
Production Accountant             Christine Gayford
Accounts Assistant                Graham C. Gayford
Additional Accounting             Bek Leigh
Transcripts                       Richard Brenin
Trainee Script Assistant          Tony Kelly
Kenyan Unit
Executive Producer for Blue Sky Films   Mario Zvan
Production Manager                      Hemal Shah
First Assistant Director                Bernard Gathogo
Location Manager                        Chris Wilding
Grip                                    Steve Obunde
Production Assistants                   Harriet Stanes
                                        Shiv Mandavia
                                        Consolata Karani
                                        Muthoni Ngacha
                                        Phylis Andika
                                        Angela Kombu
For FilmFour
Head of Production                      Tracey Josephs
Production Co-ordinator                 Gerardine O'Flynn
Head of Business Affairs                Paul Grindey
Business Affairs Executive              Chris Irvine
Clearances Advisor                      Jeremy Kimberlin
For EM Media
Lawyers                                 Abigail Payne
                                        Harbottle & Lewis
Location Services and Communications    Emily Lappin
                                        Dan Hodgett
                                        Nic Smith
                                        Sally Hodgson
For Invicta Capital
Managing Director                       Niall Bamford
Operations Director                     Shauna Johal
For Screen East
Head of Production                      Sheryl Crown
Completion Bond                         Film Finances Inc
                                        Graham Easton
Legal                                   Richards Butler
                                        Richard Phillips
                                        Robert Norris
Insurance                               Media Insurance Brokers
Banking Services                        Barclays Bank plc
Sound Equipment                         First Sense Audio Ltd
Walkie Talkies                   Audiolink
Publicity                        McDonald & Rutter
                                 Jonathan Rutter
EPK Camera                       Susi Rowell
Post Production Script           Sapex Scripts
Laboratory                       Soho Images
Laboratory Project Supervisors   Tone Davies
                                 John Taylor
Telecine Services                The Machine Room
Technical Director               Darryl Huxley
Rushes Co-ordinator              Wendy Saunders
Rushes Colourist                 Lorraine Lydon
Digital Intermediate             Framestore CFC, London
Colourist                        Adam Inglis
Producer                         Marcus Alexander
Production Executives            Claire McGrane
                                 Jan Hogevold
Digital Grading Assistant        Mike Morrison
Film Editorial                   Gavin Round
Scanning & Recording Manager     Andy Burrow
Scanning & Recording             James Clarke
                                 Dan Perry
                                 Matina Skouteri
                                 Joe Godfrey
                                 Kevin Lowery
                                 Paul Doogan
Digital Clean Up                 Jonathan Dredge
                                 Annabel Wright
                                 Paola Varvaro
                                 Jason Burnett
Data Operators                   Dianne Gordon
                                 Stuart Nippard
                                 Charlie Habanananda
                                 Maria Michalopoulou
Film Mastering Engineer          Alistair Hamer
Title Designer                   Chris Allies
Production Graphics              Frameline Productions Ltd
Graphic Designer                   Roger Phillipps
Production                         Nick Comley
Rostrum Camera                     Nick Summers
Editing Equipment                  Edit Hire
                                   London Editing Machines Ltd
Sound Editing Equipment            MovieTrack
Neg Cutters                        Professional Negative
                                   Cutting Ltd
Video Conform                      True Media Ltd
                                   Tony Appleton
                                   Ben Peters
Visual Effects                     Framestore CFC, London
VFX Supervisor                     Adrian de Wet
VFX Producer                       Piers Hampton
VFX Co-ordinator                   Kirsty Morgan
Compositors                        John Sharp
                                   Sule Bryan
Head of VFX Editorial              Roz Lowrie
Head of Data Operations            Cal Sawyer
Music Orchestrated & Produced by   Clive Langer
Music Score Recorded at            Lyme Terrace

								
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