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									 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

           Emergency Management and Homeland Security
                     Articles of Interest 6-8-07
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 6-1
                                               to 6-8)

 The information posted below does not necessarily represent the opinions of the editor of this
document or IAEM. This publication is meant simply to distribute and make available information
                     relevant to the Emergency Management profession.

 “Government should be where people come together and no one gets left
                              behind”
                                      NBC, the West Wing

                                  U.S. News Reports
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Storm danger on Outer Banks (North Carolina)-Video
http://www.cnn.com/video/player/player.html?url=/video/weather/2007/06/01/wolf.hurricane.cape.
hatteras.cnn

Pumps at risk in storm outages (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/local_news/epaper/2007/06/01/m1a_MCGAS_060
1.html

Post-storm aid gets new reach (Palm Beach County, FL)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/local_news/epaper/2007/06/01/s1b_canecenter_06
01.html

FCC Implements Emergency Response Katrina Panel Recommendations
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/123782

New Online Alert System to Enhance NY Emergency Response
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/123704

FCC Takes Action to Further Strengthen Nation's Emergency Alert System
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/123735

FCC Seeks Comment on Enhanced 911 Location Accuracy for Wireless Carriers and
Interconnected VoIP Providers
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/123734

Focus on sheltering, storm experts urge (Texas)
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/4839418.html

Department Readies Pandemic Flu Guidebook for Civilians
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=46209

DOE Prepares for the 2007 Hurricane Season
http://www.energy.gov/news/5090.htm
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        1
       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


FEMA Kicks Off Hurricane Season Communicating with Hurricane-Prone States
http://www.fema.gov/media/archives/2007/060107.shtm

National Guard, Army Chemical Units Criticized for Being Untrained, Unprepared
http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/issues/2007/June/NationalGuardArmyChem.htm

Simulated Biological Threat Training (Alaska)
http://www.technologynewsdaily.com/node/7052

Gov. Blagojevich appoints public safety expert Andrew Velasquez as new director of the Illinois
Emergency Management Agency
http://www.state.il.us/iema/HomePage_Content/Andrew_Velasquez.pdf

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Expands Graduate Education Program for Government
Officials
http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/releases/pr_1181075311087.shtm

Prescription info now available online in an emergency
http://govhealthit.com/article102890-06-04-07-Web

DHS seeks feedback on first responder ‘capability gaps’
http://www.washingtontechnology.com/online/1_1/30782-1.html

Army Helps Prepare Hurricane States for Heavy Season
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=46261

House Appropriations Approves Bill Providing $550M for State Homeland Security Grants
Program
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/124090

Crossing Cultural Lines with Diverse Emergency Preparedness (Delaware)
http://www.wboc.com/Global/story.asp?S=6621374

States meet 2nd time to review evacuation plan for terror attacks
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/103-06052007-1358219.html

Hazard expo aims to raise awareness (Citrus County, FL)
http://www.chronicleonline.com/articles/2007/06/01/news/news30.txt

Pinellas County: Know your zone (Florida)
http://www.tampabays10.com/news/local/article.aspx?s=rss&storyid=56075

Wildland fire academy comes to Alamosa (Colorado)
http://www.alamosanews.com/fe_view_article.php?story_id=1898&page_id=72&heading=0

NCC asks FEMA to investigate 'toxic' trailers
http://www.wfn.org/2007/06/msg00001.html

New Response Center Stocks Hurricane Supplies (Florida)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/wesh/20070601/lo_wesh/13425580


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        2
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

FEMA CHIEF VOWS NO REPLAY OF KATRINA
http://www.upi.com/Security_Terrorism/Briefing/2007/06/01/fema_chief_vows_no_replay_of_katri
na/6766/

Community Colleges now secondary shelters (Alabama)
http://www.al.com/news/mobileregister/index.ssf?/base/news/118068957966490.xml&coll=3

Who’s in charge in case of an emergency? (Chicago, Illinois)
http://www.suntimes.com/news/politics/410156,CST-NWS-trotter01.article

Police official angles for emergency post (Chicago Illinois)
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/413014,CST-NWS-topcop04.article

Lee county emergency managers ready for hurricane season (Florida)
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2007/may/31/lee_county_emergency_managers_ready_hurric
ane_seas/

Pinellas EOC: We're prepared (Florida)
http://www.tampabays10.com/news/local/article.aspx?s=rss&storyid=56049

State officials want Floridians to prepare for hurricanes
http://www.fox10tv.com/global/story.asp?s=6599589

FEMA agrees to moving expense program for hurricane evacuees
http://www.fox10tv.com/global/story.asp?s=6600544

New center to coordinate FEMA’s disaster response
http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=2803241

Emergency Operations Center is built in Charlotte County to take another Charley (Florida)
http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20070602/NEWS/706020390/1419/RSS04

Homeland Security could face transition problem
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37094&sid=60

Chief for FEMA grants program changed (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/state/epaper/2007/06/05/s1b_femamoney_0605.ht
ml?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=0

When a hurricane hits, hospital evacuations take coordinated effort (South Carolina)
http://www.beaufortgazette.com/local_news/story/6540599p-5820476c.html

James Lee Witt Ramps up Chicago Office
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0607/4320.html

Homeland Security committee to examine areas affected by Katrina
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070604/NEWS/70604002

Coverage gaps keep weather warnings from reaching all (Kansas)
http://www.kansas.com/news/story/86950.html

Think tank: Domestic emergency plans needs work
http://www.armytimes.com/news/2007/06/army_guard_randstudy_070604w/
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    3
       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Officials worried about O'Malley's security ideas (Maryland)
http://www.washingtontimes.com/metro/20070604-113200-8505r.htm

Perry signs homeland security bill (Texas)
http://www.ktre.com/Global/story.asp?S=6622182&nav=menu118_3

Emergency teams prep for catastrophic events (Texas)
http://www.kvue.com/news/local/stories/060607kvuehurricanepreps-cb.1f5214da.html

Emergency chief's goof gets some to thinking (Florida)
http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20070606/NEWS/706060588/1417/RSS02

Arlington County, Virginia honored with 2007 CIO 100 Award
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/124182

Commerce Department touts public safety grant program
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37106&sid=60

Appropriators tie many strings to DHS funds in 2008
http://federaltimes.com/index.php?S=2814326

Managing Natural and Manmade Disasters
http://www.toffler.com/publications/pub_excerpts_managing_natural.shtml

Emergency Officials Participate in Disaster Drill (California)
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=local&id=5367513




OIA document dump 'a mystery' (Florida)

An investigation into how sensitive papers belonging to the airport went missing turns up few
answers.

Jim Leusner
Sentinel Staff Writer

June 2, 2007

How an Orlando International Airport planning document with sensitive security information
somehow disappeared -- and allegedly was found in a nearby dumpster earlier this year --
remains unclear.

An investigation by the Orlando Police Department, conducted at the request of the Greater
Orlando Aviation Authority, turned up no conclusive answers on how the documents left airport
offices or who could have removed them.

"I guess it's still a mystery," OPD airport Detective Jay Mack said. "No one could give me a
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      4
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

definitive answer on how the documents could get there [in a dumpster], if it, in fact, was there,
who placed it there or whose copy it was."

The investigation was triggered by an Orlando Sentinel article March 17, which reported that a
teenage aviation enthusiast found 652 pages of documents and a map booklet that was marked
"sensitive security information." It also contained a warning from the Transportation Security
Administration threatening penalties under federal law for improper disclosure.

Though largely planning and growth-management documents available on the Internet or from
other agencies, details about fuel storage, communications lines and building inventories were
sprinkled throughout the report.

A former State Department counterterrorism official who specializes in aviation security called it
an "excellent document for terrorists planning an attack." Airport officials emphasized it was not
their ultra-sensitive security plan.

The materials were turned over to the Sentinel in the wake of reports about guns and drugs
smuggled onto a Delta Air Lines flight to Puerto Rico, allegedly by airline workers at OIA. The
teen's parent then gave the materials to a reporter after insisting on anonymity. Both said they
were acting as "good Samaritans" and did not want any publicity about the teen retrieving the
document from a dumpster outside an unfenced aviation-authority warehouse on Dowden Road
near Lake Nona.

When Orlando police launched the probe April 4, Mack contacted the Sentinel seeking assistance
on the investigation. But Sentinel editors declined the offer, citing company policy preventing
reporters from participating in most police investigations and the desire to avoid accusations of
bias.

That eventually hampered the investigation, Mack wrote in an eight-page report. He also wrote
that there was no evidence to support any criminal conduct or charges, and that there was no
way to determine whose copy was given to the Sentinel, and later returned to airport security
officials by a reporter.

OPD's airport-division commander, Capt. Paul Rooney, said investigators found no evidence of a
burglary or a theft of such records from any offices. He also said they could not determine if the
records were ever in a dumpster.

"We don't have any evidence it was in a dumpster," he said. "I cannot say it wasn't in there,
either."

The report shows that two dumpsters outside the warehouse have been removed and that the
plans have now been numbered and signed out to specific employees.

The investigation showed that four of the 40 copies of OIA's August 2004 master plan were
missing. Among those whose copies were missing were Robert Raffel, the authority's senior
director for public safety who oversees security; an engineering-records specialist; and two
copies from an engineering-office store room.

The Sentinel turned over the documents to Raffel on March 16. At the time, he said the
documents contained sensitive information, should not have been in a dumpster and should have
been destroyed. He said he would push for stricter document controls, random inspections of
dumpsters and more security-awareness classes for employees.

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           5
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

But in the OPD report, Raffel said he did not consider the documents to be sensitive and that the
authority "overreacted" by classifying the records after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Mack
wrote that Raffel said his copy of the master plan "went missing" about a year ago when he
moved to a new office.

Raffel could not be reached for comment Friday.

Airport spokeswoman Carolyn Fennell said her agency asked for the OPD probe to get an
independent review of its document handling.

"It is material which is sensitive, and we take seriously how we will handle and store such
information in the future," she said.




Puerto Rico could be 'isolated for days' after a storm

Sprawl and poor urban planning make Puerto Rico vulnerable in an emergency.

Jeannette Rivera-Lyles
Sentinel Staff Writer

June 4, 2007

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- The threat of a major storm is enough to worry millions of Puerto
Ricans as they prepare for a busy hurricane season.

But there are other dangers lurking beneath their streets and along their coastline that could
imperil them even more, say weather forecasters and emergency managers.

Poor urban planning, overdevelopment and increased construction along the coast, coupled with
an antiquated sewer system, have rendered the island more vulnerable than ever to the wrath of
a hurricane.

"There is a paradox," said Dr. Ariel Lugo, director of the International Institute of Tropical
Forestry, a U.S. Forest Service agency. "If you compare construction in Puerto Rico to that of
Florida, Puerto Rico's is superior. We build in concrete. Our structures easily survive the wind.
But we would be in serious trouble afterwards."

The main concern is flooding. In recent years, even areas that didn't flood in the past have rapidly
gone under water with just a few inches of rain.

If a hurricane hit, the island likely would be without power, water, phone or even airline service
indefinitely. "We could be incommunicado -- isolated for days," Lugo said.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted last month as many as 17
named storms for the Atlantic region, which includes the Caribbean, of which eight to 10 could
develop into hurricanes. An average season has 11 named storms.

Israel Matos, director of the National Meteorological Center in Puerto Rico, said there is a high
probability for a Category 4 or 5 hurricane to hit the island this season.
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           6
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


"We need to prepare for the worst," Matos said.

And a hurricane does not have to make landfall for Puerto Rico to be paralyzed, cautioned
Nazario Lugo Burgos, the director of the island's Emergency Management Office.

"We don't have to be directly touched to have a serious emergency situation on our hands," Lugo
Burgos said. "We would feel the impact of a hurricane that goes through the Virgin Islands, for
instance. That's enough to generate heavy rain and storm surge."

And when the ocean comes inland, there's little that can be done in Puerto Rico other than to wait
for it to recede.

"Our draining system was designed for 1940s development, and little has been done since to
upgrade it," Lugo Burgos said.

The San Juan metropolitan area, on the Atlantic coast, has changed a lot since. For starters, it
went from about 300,000 residents to 2 million -- half of the current island's population.

"Decades of bad planning and overdevelopment have made us much more vulnerable, and that,
unlike the risk of a hurricane, is something we control," said Luis J. Rivera Herrera, an
environmental consultant.

"We have concentrated half of the population near the coast, tampered with just about every river
on the island and thrown down cement and asphalt everywhere. It is no wonder we flood."

On the upside, Puerto Rico's emergency personnel is well prepared to face a calamity,
government officials said.

At a recent news conference, Gov. Anibal Acevedo Vila said there are more than 400 certified
shelters on the island, with capacity for almost 54,000 people.

The government's emergency plan also includes evacuations up to 100 hours before the storm,
food and emergency supplies such as generators in stock, and many trained rescue personnel.

Nevertheless, Lugo Burgos with the emergency-management office said Puerto Rico would be
hurt badly if a Category 4 or 5 hurricane hit.

"We would need outside help," Lugo Burgos said.

To the residents' advantage, the official said, is that more recent hurricanes such as Hugo, in
1989, and Georges, in 1998, have raised awareness among islanders. Both storms left millions of
dollars in damage, thousands homeless and several deaths.

"These events opened people's eyes," Lugo Burgos said, "because hurricanes can't be taken
lightly."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         7
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/



June 1, 2007

Country at Highest Level of Hurricane Readiness, Bush Says
By Eileen Sullivan, CQ Staff

The nation is at the highest level of hurricane readiness ever, President Bush concluded after a
briefing by senior administration officials June 1, the first day of the Atlantic hurricane season.

Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator R. David Paulison and other federal
officials told Bush that the federal government is better prepared for this hurricane season than
the 2006 season and detailed plans about its coordination and planning efforts with federal, state
and local agencies. Forecasters have predicted a more severe season this year than in 2006.

“President Bush thanked the leaders for helping bring our nation to the highest level of hurricane
readiness to date,” White House spokesman Scott Stanzel wrote in an e-mail to Congressional
Quarterly after the briefing.

Emergency management officials have been critical of FEMA and the federal government as a
whole with regard to its level of disaster preparedness, both before and after Hurricane Katrina
struck the Gulf coast in 2005.

But Craig Fugate, director of Florida’s emergency management agency, said the nation is
certainly better prepared now than it was before Katrina.

“It’s hard to say that at any given time you’re at your best, but I think they’ve actually made some
worthwhile improvements since Katrina,” Fugate said.

Another emergency management official who requested anonymity has said he thinks the
administration has painted too rosy of a picture. “If we’re struck by another Katrina again, I’m not
sure [FEMA] is any better ready than before Katrina,” the official said.

According to an outline of the June 1 briefing, obtained by Congressional Quarterly, officials also
told President Bush of loose ends which should be tied up by the end of the month, specifically
that out-of-state shelter agreements for Louisiana need to be finalized; the departments of
Homeland Security and Defense must complete a memorandum of understanding for commercial
contract air support and sign a contract with Amtrak for rail service; and a national ambulance
contract also needs to be finalized.

The president encouraged officials to pre-position resources and work with state and local
officials to relay preparedness advice to citizens, Stanzel said.

In addition, the briefing outlined the administration’s communications strategy, which includes
increasing awareness of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA)
hurricane forecasts; and encouraging individuals to be prepared to support themselves 72 hours
after an event, know where to go and what to take, and plan for pets and the disabled.

Officials said the federal government is close to closing sheltering and transportation gaps in
Louisiana. For instance, the state is currently able to handle 93,400 evacuees, but there is a need
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work             8
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

for 250,000 evacuees, according to the briefing. The feds have already closed gaps for
commodities, security and power generators in the state.




Few stores ready if storm zaps power (Florida)

Some major grocery chains lack full-power generators in Orange, Seminole and Osceola -- but
Brevard and Volusia have many.

Mark Chediak
Sentinel Staff Writer

June 7, 2007

Have Orlando supermarkets learned anything from the 2004 hurricanes?

Maybe not.

If another major storm hit the Orlando metro area, very few grocery stores are equipped with full-
power stationary generators that can provide enough electricity to keep milk fresh, water cool and
ice frozen.

Some of Central Florida's biggest grocery chains -- Publix Super Markets, Albertsons and Winn-
Dixie -- say they don't have full-power stationary generators installed in Orange, Seminole or
Osceola counties.

Nor do big-box retailers Wal-Mart, Target and Costco, leaving BJ's Wholesale Club as the only
mass merchant surveyed by the Sentinel to have a backup-power source on site that can run
refrigerators and freezers.

To be sure, the grocery chains say all stores have enough backup juice to get the lights on,
power cash registers and serve customers. But the stores' emergency generators wouldn't be
able to keep food from spoiling.

All the major grocers, big-box stores and warehouse clubs say they can bring in powerful
generators to keep produce fresh and meats frozen after a storm. But that could take some time if
there are curfews or roads are blocked -- or jammed with evacuees returning home.

And that may be little comfort for Orlando-area residents who remember having a tough time
finding an open grocer after Hurricane Charley knocked out power throughout large swaths of the
city.

Albert Cruz, who lives in Orlando's College Park, recalled having to drive to Apopka to find
sandwich meat and ice after his neighborhood grocery stores lost power.

"We had to go to other areas to get supplies," Cruz said.

Mike Stone, spokesman for the state of Florida Division of Emergency Management, said state

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work       9
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

officials have been working with retailers to coordinate post-storm relief efforts.

To that end, Publix Super Markets and Winn-Dixie said they have invested millions of dollars to
install full-power 500-watt generators at stores in coastal areas that they think are most
vulnerable to a storm strike and power outages.

Store officials note that a stationary generator does not guarantee a location will be open after a
storm. Other factors such as curfews, blocked roads or damage to a store could keep it shuttered.

Publix, Central Florida's largest grocery chain, with 141 stores, has stationary generators, which
can power coolers and freezers, in place at 22 stores in Brevard and Volusia counties, along with
two stores in Polk County and one in Lake. Winn-Dixie expects six of its stores in Brevard and
Volusia to be equipped with full-power generators by July.

"We looked at those areas more prone to hurricane strikes," Publix spokesman Dwaine Stevens
said of the placement of the full-power generators.

The Lakeland-based grocery announced in March 2006 that it was investing $100 million in
placing generators in vulnerable store locations, including coastal areas of Florida, Georgia and
South Carolina.

"That doesn't mean we're not looking at other areas," Stevens said.

Winn-Dixie spokesman Joshua Whitton said the company placed its full-power generators in
locations with a history of storm-related outages.

Tony Cristaldi, a senior forecaster with the National Weather Service in Melbourne, said
hurricanes tend to lose power as they come ashore. But the storms still can cause widespread
damage and power outages, just as Charley did.

"Hurricane-force winds can reach inland, especially since Florida is a relatively flat state,"
Cristaldi said.Emergency-operations officials say getting grocery stores back up and running after
a powerful storm can be a tremendous aid to relief efforts.

"It helps us focus on emergency responses, instead of focusing so much on providing things like
ice and water," said Preston Cook, executive director of the Orange County Office for Emergency
Management.

"If Publix and other stores have an ability to continue to operate, they could be a great partner in
a disaster," Cook said.

In 2004, residents, who could not find a nearby grocer open for business, found themselves
waiting in relief lines for hours just to get bags of ice or other supplies.

Officials say retailers already recognize that returning stores to full power after the winds die
down is not only good for residents, but also good for business. Publix, for example, said it lost
$60 million in 2004 when four hurricanes hit the state.

"When you talk to retailers, they all understand how valuable it is to make sure their stores return
their services to the communities," Stone said.

Expectations are that retailers' backup-power efforts will eventually spread to inland areas such
as Orlando, Stone added, though he didn't say when that might happen.
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work 10
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                   distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


"I think it's a timing option," Stone said. "Obviously, you're going to shore up your most vulnerable
areas first."




Union Leader Says FEMA Is Trying to Oust Him

By Stephen Barr
Tuesday, June 5, 2007; D04

A union leader at the Federal Emergency Management Agency filed a complaint yesterday
saying that FEMA is trying to force him out of his job because he urged Congress to take the
agency out of the Department of Homeland Security.

Leo Bosner, president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 4060, is an
emergency-management program analyst at FEMA and has worked at the agency since its
creation in 1979.

In his complaint, Bosner wrote that a FEMA security officer told him that "because I have a
security clearance I must resign from the union, and I can be fired if I refuse to do so."

Bosner filed his complaint with the Office of Special Counsel, an independent agency that
investigates allegations of improper personnel actions in the government, including employee
claims of retribution from their superiors because they blow the whistle on waste, fraud and
abuse.

In the weeks after Hurricane Katrina, Bosner and other AFGE leaders spoke out on what they
saw as weak management practices and inadequate staffing for disaster response. Bosner has
faulted the leadership of Homeland Security's political appointees and has spoken out in favor of
removing FEMA from the department and restoring its status as an independent agency.

"I believe I am being singled out for my disclosures to Congress and to the news media," Bosner
said in his complaint. He said he thought FEMA Administrator R. David Paulison was behind the
effort to make him choose between his job and his union membership.

Paulison's press secretary, Aaron Walker, rejected the allegation. "The notion that Administrator
Paulison has anything to do with this situation is absolutely preposterous," Walker said. "In Mr.
Paulison's 35 years of public service, he has been a strong advocate of unions, especially as the
head of the International Association of Fire Chiefs."

Bosner said his union membership became an issue shortly after he transferred to a job in
FEMA's operations planning unit. Bosner said that he has held security clearances for years and
was given top-secret clearance about two years ago but that he has been told FEMA's security
office will not process his application for a special compartmentalized information clearance until
the issue of his union membership has been resolved.


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        11
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

The security officer who contacted him said that "I could have divided loyalty because I'm a
member of an organization other than FEMA," Bosner said.

He said that his dealings with the security officer were oral and that he has asked FEMA's
security office for a written explanation, including which laws and regulations are relevant to his
case.

The AFGE local at FEMA was formed in 1990, with Bosner serving as its first president. He was
elected to a three-year term as president of the chapter in June 2005.

Bosner, who served with the 101st Airborne Division in the Vietnam war, said, "If anyone is
questioning my loyalty, I am very insulted by it."

Campus Safety and Security

Universities gear up for hurricanes (Florida)
http://www.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070604/NEWS01/706040326/-1/RSS18

Virginia Tech to reopen Norris Hall
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070605/ap_on_re_us/virginia_tech_norris_hall

Two teens arrested on terrorism charges for explosion at Frazier Mtn. High (California)
http://www.eyeoutforyou.com/home/7834992.html




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Special Needs
For additional articles on this topic feel free to visit:
http://www.eadassociates.com/news.html or
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageID=11


Special Needs Planning Guide Meeting
            th      st
On May 30 and 31 , 2007 CRCL and FEMA co-hosted a meeting to develop a Special Needs
Planning Guide for State and local emergency managers across the U.S. The document will offer
concrete guidance and recommendations on the development of emergency plans that
incorporate the needs and perspectives of special needs populations. During the two day
meeting stakeholders and disability subject matter experts conducted a comprehensive review of
the draft planning guide.

Continued Collaboration on 2007 Homeland Security Appropriations Act – Section 689 Guidelines
CRCL in collaboration with its ICC partners and FEMA have completed the Guidelines for
Accommodating Individuals with Disabilities in Disasters. The Guidelines, required by Section
689 of the 2007 Homeland Security Appropriations Act, will be available on FEMA's website
following clearance procedures.




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                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Global Warming and Hazard Research and News

Mayor casts doubt on TB patient's Greek wedding
http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/conditions/06/01/tb.flight/index.html

Report: TB patient maintains he is married
http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/conditions/06/01/tb.flight/index.html

Parents of TB patient are 'in hell'
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070604/ap_on_re_us/tuberculosis_infection

TB patient insists he was never banned from travel
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/06/06/tb.borders/index.html

Homeland Security probes TB fugitive case
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070601/wl_canada_nm/canada_tuberculosis_usa_col_1

TB patient's relative to be investigated
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070603/ap_on_re_us/tuberculosis_infection

Border crossing by TB carrier prompts DHS, Hill reviews
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37095&sid=60

Border officials change procedures in wake of TB incident
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37117&sid=60

UF wind machine to blast homes in quest to reduce storm damage (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/state/epaper/2007/05/31/m1a_WIND_0531.html

Hurricane season no longer breezily dismissed
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/local_news/epaper/2007/05/28/m1a_CANE_0528.
html

THE LAKE OKEECHOBEE DIKE (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/storm/reports/2006/lakeo_dike.html

Tornado pounds eastern Iowa towns
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/02/iowa.tornado.ap/index.html

Storm brings needed rain (Florida)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/02/tropical.storm.ap/index.html

Is killer storm still taking a toll? (Louisiana)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070602/ap_on_he_me/katrina_still_killing

Can California's Power Grid Handle the Summer Heat?
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=capitol_reports&id=5354261

JFK plots fuels concern about spread of extremism (New York)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070603/ts_nm/usa_plot_caribbean_dc


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                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

A down-and-out JFK terrorism suspect
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-jfkplot4jun04,0,251086.story?coll=la-
home-center

Group denies link to NYC terror plot
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070604/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/terrorism_plot_trinidad

Police: Fourth suspect in JFK airport plot surrenders
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/05/jfk.terror.plot/index.html

NRC doubts terror risk from spent nuclear fuel
http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070605/NEWS/706050321

Informant plays key role in JFK plot
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070603/ap_on_re_us/terrorism_plot

Plot shows dangers of mundane targets (New York)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070605/ap_on_re_us/terrorism_hidden_targets

Source: JFK plot could reach farther
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070608/ap_on_re_us/terrorism_plot

El Nino, La Nina cycle needs watching: experts
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070606/sc_nm/weather_la_nina_dc

Villaraigosa asks residents to conserve water (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-conserve7jun07,0,7305615.story?coll=la-home-center

Terrorist bullet still digs deep (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sarah7jun07,0,3614827.story?coll=la-home-center

US scientists discover new, potentially deadly bacteria
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070607/sc_afp/ushealthbacteria

Climate change blunders mirror Iraq war: Gore
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070602/pl_afp/usenvironmentpolitics_070602165507;_ylt=AkkSk
XinlVLdx.AmPv.mLq3POrgF

Blame Coal: Texas Leads Carbon Emissions
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/954241/blame_coal_texas_leads_carbon_emissions/index
.html

Airline sector puts global warming high on meeting agenda
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070602/wl_afp/airlinesectoriataenvironment_070602030118

Research Challenges Rain Forecast Models
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/953186/research_challenges_rain_forecast_models/index.
html

Earthquakes rattle New Hampshire Coast
http://wbztv.com/local/local_story_154103357.html


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     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Louisiana aims to unleash Mississippi River
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070603/sc_afp/usenvironmentstorm_070603224255;_ylt=AtHcEs
mr0wT7CY5T4H0miZvPOrgF

U.S. says Climate Satellites to costly
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/04/tech/main2884426.shtml

How do States compare on Global Warming?
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/02/tech/main2877995.shtml

Eastern Iowa Towns Clean Up From Twister
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/954411/eastern_iowa_towns_clean_up_from_twister/index
.html

News from BSSA's June issue -- Identifying nuclear blasts, examining earthquakes, and more
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-06/ssoa-nfb052907.php

Airline sensor could pinpoint germs
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/06/04/airlinesensor_tec.html?category=technology&guid=20
070604093000

FEMA to dredge bay
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/955180/fema_to_dredge_bay/index.html?source=r_scienc
e

Firefighter gets two years in prison for setting fires (Arizona)
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0604bateman-ON.html

UCF researchers hope virtual reality can help to prevent wildfires (Florida)
http://www.physorg.com/news100354470.html

NASA contractors concerned about security checks
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2007-06-06-nasa-security-checks_N.htm

Surge in hurricane activity is only a return to normal: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070606/sc_afp/scienceclimatewarming_070606174141;_ylt=AujW
23nqSVAsmb4AQ9QUiPXPOrgF

Current Hurricane Amount at "Normal" Level, Study Says
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/06/070606-hurricanes.html

House subcommittee authorizes center to study bio-threats
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37130&sid=60

Tornadoes, hail hammer Upper Midwest
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/08/severe.weather.ap/index.html

Homes at the end of the road (Mississippi)
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-trailerkids8jun08,0,676493.story?coll=la-
home-center

Report Downplays Threat to Rail System
http://firechief.com/hazmat/disaster-management/threat_rail_06062007/
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       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                   distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/



May 29, 2007

A Bridge Restores a Lifeline to a Battered Town
By ADAM NOSSITER

BAY ST. LOUIS, Miss., May 24 — Sometimes a bridge is more than just a bridge. The new span
across the copper-colored St. Louis Bay connects today’s diminished reality to memories of a
more generous past, a hopeful link to the return of better days.

The soaring bridge was dedicated last week amid jubilation in a ceremony attended by hundreds,
20 months after Hurricane Katrina blew out the old span. That tangible sign of pushing forward
and of a quickening pace — commutes now are drastically shortened — has left people in this
battered waterfront town of 8,000 quietly giddy about a future recently in doubt.

And it has ended the isolation, physical and mental, of a place that once considered itself a jewel
of the Gulf Coast, a sun-baked collection of picturesque old frame houses that Hurricane Katrina
smashed, then severed from its brethren to the east. The surge from the storm wiped out the
concrete bridge carrying U.S. Highway 90 that had stood for a half-century.

The recovery is creeping along. Wind off the bay is still the loudest noise in the empty-seeming
downtown, whistling through ruined buildings and banging loose siding. Before the storm Bay St.
Louis was a favored seaside retreat for New Orleanians — the historian Stephen E. Ambrose had
lived and written here before his death in 2002 — and, coming from the east, a genteel respite
from the garishness of Biloxi’s casinos.

The 30-foot surge from Hurricane Katrina destroyed about half the houses here. But looming now
in the distance is the sparkling two-lane bridge with its whizzing cargo of cars and promise of new
life. Some here spoke of cruising across the new two-mile span, for the sheer pleasure of it. It is
the latest sign of the region’s slow renaissance, and a rare example of efficient government
intervention.

“It’s major, psychologically,” said Alicein Chambers, who opened the Mockingbird Cafe a year
after the storm. “It just feels like we’re moving, we’re making progress, we’re going forward.”
Before, “we were all just on this little cut-off island,” she said; now, “we’re happy to be part of the
coast again.” It galled residents to shop for building supplies across the Louisiana state line.

The partly illusory feeling of isolation — the east-west Interstate 10, just 10 miles to the north, has
been available throughout — was nonetheless pervasive. The old way of communicating with the
neighbors in Pass Christian and Biloxi, first by way of the wooden bridge of the 1920s, then the
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concrete one of the 1950s, had been wiped out. And a seven-minute dash across the bay had
turned into a 45-minute commute.

“After the storm, we were an island unto ourselves,” said Brian Rushing, a minister at the First
Baptist Church. “We truly have been isolated from the rest of the Gulf Coast community.”

The bridge-builders worked like demons, completing in 10 months what normally might take twice
as long, working at night under floodlights and booming the pile drivers during the day. The new
bridge rises 85 feet above the bay at its highest point, 55 feet more than the old.

For weeks the contractor, Granite Archer Western, worked around the clock on the $267 million
bridge. “He pulled out all the stops,” said the chief engineer in Mississippi’s highway department,
Harry Lee James. Only a few cranks in town complained about the constant noise.

“Most people, it would not have mattered what they were doing, it was O.K. with them,” said the
town’s mayor, Eddie Favre, a cousin of the Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre. “People
saw it as an absolute necessity.”

The place has a long way to go, and the mayor’s relaxed post-Katrina garb — in a style common
all over the coast right after the storm, but since discarded in most places — is testimony to the
fact: a Hawaiian shirt adorned with cocktail glasses and the words, ‘It’s 5 o’clock Somewhere,’
sneakers and the shorts he has vowed to wear until Bay St. Louis is back on its feet.

Mayor Favre is still living in a trailer, and the old City Hall downtown is still empty. He has moved
municipal functions to a former utility company building on the highway. Downtown, on a deserted
street, an injunction scrawled on a vacant frame house — “Please respect our loss. Do not enter”
— seems superfluous, as there is nobody around to read it.

With the fancy dwellings on the beach wiped out, property tax revenue fell by half. Sales tax
revenue dropped by more than two-thirds. Though Bay St. Louis is now reunited with its neighbor
on the other side of the water, precious little is waiting in Pass Christian: that old resort city is still
mostly a tabula rasa on its once-proud beachfront.

Still, the reopened galleries on Main Street in Bay St. Louis, hopefully painted and primped, are
waiting, and some claim an uptick in traffic already.

“It’s more than emotional,” said Dave Moynan of Maggie May’s. “It’s starting to translate into
dollars.” There was precious little arts-and-crafts shopping on a recent quiet midweek afternoon,
though.

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Mayor Favre calls the bridge a tremendous psychological and emotional boost.

“For 626 days, we felt that isolation,” he said. “The bridge, in so many ways, whether it was
walking or fishing, it was just so much a part of our daily life.”




May 31, 2007

Louisiana Sets Deadline for Storm Damage Claims
By LESLIE EATON

The Road Home, the Louisiana grant program for homeowners who lost their houses to
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, is expected to cost far more than the $7.5 billion provided by the
federal government, in part because many more families have applied than officials had
anticipated.

As a result, Louisiana officials on Tuesday night set a July 31 deadline for applicants, who can
receive up to $150,000 to repair or rebuild their houses. With the cutoff date, the state hopes to
be able to figure out how much more money it needs to pay for the program; the shortfall is
projected to be $2.9 billion.

The financial woes of the Road Home have set off a frenzy of finger-pointing between federal and
state officials, who blame one another for the projected shortfall.

But it has stirred something close to despair among some Louisiana residents, who were already
bemoaning the sluggish way the program has given out the money it does have; only 22,000
families statewide, out of 140,000 applicants, have received grants so far, for a total of $1.3
billion.

The new problem has reinforced the fears of many in New Orleans that they are being
abandoned by the federal government, even as it acknowledges that its levee system failed
during Hurricane Katrina.

“There’s no way they can ever make everybody whole, but they need to fix the thing they broke,”
said Frank A. Silvestri, a New Orleans lawyer and co-founder of the Citizens’ Road Home Action
Team, which has been critical of the program.
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Evidence that the program is likely to run out of money has been building for several weeks as
the state has finally begun making a significant number of grants since the inception of the Road
Home nine months ago. The grants have averaged about $76,000, which is more than the
roughly $60,000 the state predicted last August.

State officials say that many more houses turned out to have had severe damage than federal
data indicated back when the program was created. They have also been surprised by a recent
surge in applications, which are running at several hundred a day, almost two years after the
storms, said Gentry Brann, director of communications for the program.

The state also expected private insurance companies to cover a larger percentage of the
damage, said Walter J. Leger Jr., a lawyer and member of the Louisiana Recovery Authority,
which created the Road Home program.

“Anecdotally, the companies aren’t paying,” Mr. Leger said. “National Flood Insurance paid out,
but private insurers didn’t.” Insurance benefits are generally subtracted from grants awarded by
the program.

But Mr. Leger and other state officials concede that many homeowners may have preferred to try
to get larger grants from the Road Home, rather than fight with their insurers.

The Bush administration contends that the state itself created the shortfall by paying for home
damage caused by wind, rather than limiting the program to flood damage. Insurance policies are
more likely to cover wind damage than flood damage.

The decision to pay for wind damage added about 43,000 houses to the likely total covered by
the program, at a cost of about $2.6 billion, according to data from the office of Donald E. Powell,
President Bush’s coordinator for Gulf Coast rebuilding.

Even so, Mr. Powell “is not opposed to additional funding — if the state can make a clear case for
more funds,” his spokeswoman, Susan Aspey, wrote in an e-mail message. “He wants to get this
resolved as quickly as possible for the people of Louisiana, and he’s indicated his willingness to
sit down with the governor and her staff to work towards that end.”

State officials, from the governor on down, say the program has always covered wind damage,
and that they do not understand why Mr. Powell is raising the issue so late in the game. The state
had a similar run-in with the Department of Housing and Urban Development over the way it paid
out the grant money, and ended up changing the program in April.



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Louisiana is also fighting the Federal Emergency Management Agency for more than $1 billion it
was counting on for the Road Home program. FEMA says it cannot release the money —
intended for hazard-mitigation efforts like elevating houses — because the Road Home
discriminates against younger people by exempting people 65 and older from a requirement that
grant recipients live in their rebuilt houses for three years.

Further complicating the financial picture is the fact that the state treasury is running a budget
surplus of about $3 billion, which some in Washington have argued should be used to bail out the
Road Home.

A United States Senate subcommittee that held a hearing on the program last week is likely to
recommend ways to fix it in a report to be released in June, said Stephanie Allen, a
spokeswoman for Senator Mary L. Landrieu, the Louisiana Democrat who is chairwoman of the
subcommittee.

“She doesn’t think the federal government should be responsible for the entire bailout,” Ms. Allen
said. “It should be a combined effort of the federal government and the state.”




Deal for Smallpox Vaccine Could Jump-Start BioShield

By Renae Merle
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, June 7, 2007; D01

The government has agreed to spend as much as $1.6 billion to buy millions of doses of a
smallpox vaccine tailored for people with impaired immunity.

In a step toward getting the troubled Project BioShield program back on track, a Danish company,
Bavarian Nordic, will begin delivering 20 million doses of the vaccine, enough for 10 million
people, in 2008 under an initial contract worth $500 million. The deal could be extended to cover
an additional 60 million doses as Bavarian completes clinical studies proving its safety for
children, the elderly and people with HIV.

"We are on the road to having a countermeasure for smallpox" beyond the large vaccine stockpile
that already exists for people with normal immunity, said Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), who pushed
legislation to revamp the BioShield program. "Smallpox is a top priority for the country in terms of
threats."

The announcement, made Monday, followed several stumbles for the $5.6 billion BioShield
program, one of President Bush's signature efforts to ensure the country's defense against
terrorists. The program has been plagued by delays, scientific hurdles and management

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problems and has completed few of its goals, prompting sharp complaints from both parties on
Capitol Hill.

Last year, the Department of Health and Human Services scuttled the largest BioShield contract,
an $877.5 million deal with a small California firm, VaxGen, to develop an anthrax vaccine after
the company missed a deadline to begin human testing. In March, the department withdrew plans
to buy 100,000 doses of a radiation sickness treatment, saying none of the available drugs met
requirements. Even the lengthy bidding process for the smallpox contract, started in 2005, has
come to exemplify the program's problems.

In recent months, the department has moved to improve the program, issuing a plan outlining its
priorities and taking initial steps toward contracting for a next-generation anthrax vaccine and a
radiation sickness drug.

"We're applying all the lessons that we have learned in the . . . history of Project BioShield, the
lessons from VaxGen," said Carol Linden, acting director of the Biomedical Advanced Research
and Development Authority, the Health and Human Services unit that has assumed responsibility
for BioShield.

Bavarian's contract will be the first test of a key BioShield reform. Because few large drug
companies have been interested in supplying products for BioShield, which they see as a tiny
market, the government has had to rely on small biotechnology firms.

Previously, participating companies were not paid until they delivered drugs for a national
stockpile, creating what some termed a "valley of death" as the companies struggled to fund
development on their own. Under legislation passed last year, the department can make interim
payments as firms reach certain milestones. This is a standard technique in military contracting,
but it hasn't been used much in biodefense.

Bavarian is eligible for as much $150 million in early payments. "We see it as a partnership," said
Paul Chaplin, Bavarian's chief scientific officer. "In a partnership there has to be an investment on
both sides for it to be a success."

Linden said: "We determined that it would be necessary and beneficial to the success of the
project; we looked at the principle of sharing risk with company."

Smallpox, which killed 300 million to 500 million people in the 20th century and disfigured many
others, was eradicated in the 1970s by a worldwide vaccination campaign using an older type of
vaccine.

In the late 1990s, national security experts began to fear that the virus, against which people are
no longer vaccinated, created opportunity for terrorists or rogue states to use to unleash a
pandemic if they got their hands on it.

The government has stockpiled enough of the older type of vaccine for every American, but
concerns about its effect on people with compromised immune systems prompted a search for an
alternative.

"Some people have died from receiving the live vaccine, so there is a whole host of concerns
around it," said Robert Kadlec, former director for biodefense on the White House's Homeland
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        22
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Security Council. All smallpox vaccine is made from a weakened virus that resembles smallpox,
but Bavarian's version appears less likely than the standard vaccine to cause illness in vulnerable
people.

Bavarian has already completed a study of the vaccine on healthy people and has launched a
study with 400 HIV patients, Chaplin said. Enrollment in the HIV study should be completed by
the end of the year with data on the immune response ready early next year, he said.




Ex-worker at OIA says he smuggled guns, drugs (Florida)

Meanwhile, Puerto Rico moves to tighten lax airline rules on firearms.

Pedro Ruz Gutierrez and Jeannette Rivera-Lyles
Sentinel Staff Writers

June 8, 2007

An airline worker who used his badge to foil security checkpoints at Orlando International Airport
pleaded guilty Thursday to federal charges he smuggled drugs and guns to his native Puerto
Rico.

As Zabdiel Santiago-Balaguer, 22, admitted his role in Orlando federal court, senators in the U.S.
commonwealth passed a bill that would close the loophole in airline procedures that allows
legitimate travelers to easily transport firearms to the island.

For years, gunrunners have been taking advantage of lax airline rules to import the weapons that
have fueled the island's illegal-gun market. The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
estimates that up to two-thirds of the guns come from Florida.

In March, Santiago-Balaguer was arrested and named the ringleader in a gun- and drug-
smuggling operation after a fellow airline employee was arrested at San Juan's airport with 14
guns and 8 pounds of marijuana he had carried onto a Delta Air Lines flight.

The incident prompted Congress to mandate a full review of security procedures at the nation's
airports and call for background checks of all employees with access to secure areas by the
Transportation Security Administration. OIA has already begun to screen all workers.

The case also highlights the widespread problem of stolen guns that runs parallel to a growing
crime wave in Central Florida. The Sentinel recently reported that several Orange County
residents suspected in area gun-shop thefts sold firearms to Santiago-Balaguer and other co-
defendants.

On Thursday, Santiago-Balaguer, shackled at the feet and wearing an Orange County Jail
jumpsuit, told U.S. District Court Judge John Antoon II he was responsible for the contraband.

"I was smuggling guns and marijuana through the airport as an airline employee," Santiago-
Balaguer said in federal court. The Kissimmee resident, who is being held without bail, is the first
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Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

to work out a deal with the government. There are at least five other defendants who have been
charged in the case.

Santiago-Balaguer is a former employee of Comair, a Delta subsidiary. He faces up to 15 years in
prison on charges of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute at least 10 pounds of
cocaine and using and carrying a firearm in relation to a drug-trafficking crime.

According to a 20-page plea agreement he signed with the U.S. Attorney's Office on Monday,
Santiago-Balaguer will cooperate with authorities and as a result may get a reduced prison term
at his Sept. 5 sentencing.

FBI and Metropolitan Bureau of Investigation agents began tracking Santiago-Balaguer in
January, the plea says. At Super Bowl XLI in Miami, the Kissimmee resident unknowingly
introduced his source of cocaine on the island to an undercover agent.

During the game, according to court records, Santiago-Balaguer "discussed shipping guns and
marijuana to Puerto Rico and obtaining cocaine and heroin from Puerto Rico."

Assistant U.S. Attorney Vincent Citro said Santiago-Balaguer acted as a translator and go-
between when he set up a cocaine deal with the undercover agent in Miami. Assistant Federal
Public Defender Stephen Langs would not comment Thursday.

The bill in the Puerto Rico Legislature, sponsored by Sen. Lucy Arce, will require airlines and
cruise ships to ensure that people entering Puerto Rico with guns have a valid license. If they
don't, the bill mandates that the airline or cruise line hold and turn over the weapons to police.

If a resident of Puerto Rico, the gun owner could apply for a license to legally possess the gun on
the island. If the gun owner is a tourist, he or she would have to relinquish the weapons and get
them back when ready to leave the island. A companion bill to the one passed Thursday could be
taken up in the Puerto Rico House of Representatives as early as next week. The sponsor, Rep.
Jorge Colberg Toro, predicted it would pass without opposition. "It will be the law of the land in 30
days or less," Colberg Toro said.

Currently, no federal government agency regulates the transport of guns by passengers on
domestic flights. Instead, airlines regulate themselves.

American Airlines allows up to five guns, three rifle-type weapons and 11 pounds of ammunition
per passenger. The weapons must be unloaded, secured in locked boxes and packed in checked
luggage.

But in order to legally carry weapons in Puerto Rico, a state-issued license is required. Thus,
passengers who bring guns in from other destinations are breaking the law unless they secure a
Puerto Rico license.

The airlines, Arce and Colberg Toro said, have not opposed the measure so far.

"I don't know what's there for them to oppose," Colberg Toro said. "It is unconceivable to let
things go the way they have. We have investigated, and the findings show that this loophole in
the law is fueling the illegal-weapons market."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           24
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Other
Satellites to Watch for Darfur Violence
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/06/world/main2892645.shtml

Flight 93 donation box angers families
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070607/ap_on_re_us/flight93_memorial_cash_box



Tax-plan impasse in Tallahassee ruffles economy (Florida)
John Kennedy
Tallahassee Bureau Chief

June 4, 2007

TALLAHASSEE -- Several pioneer-era buildings that were moved to Orange County's Fort
Christmas Historical Park will gather dust a while longer as county officials slow down spending
and brace for the Legislature's special session next week to cut property taxes.

Across the state, the tax debate is sending a tremor through the economy as many companies
that rely heavily on government spending are suddenly seeing work dry up.

"It just seems like the whole state has taken a wait-and-see attitude right now," said Larry Gerwig,
executive vice president of a Clearwater construction company that builds schools, firehouses,
jails and other public projects.

And in the road-construction industry, "growth is pretty flat," said Bob Burleson, president of the
Florida Transportation Builders Association.

"A lot of governments are watching pretty carefully what they're doing, worried that things are
going to be tough next year," he said.

Realtors have complained that the protracted debate over lowering property taxes is adding new
challenges to a stalled housing market. They say prospective buyers and sellers are unwilling to
close deals until they learn the outcome of the session set to begin June 12.

The uncertainty also has sparked hiring freezes in many cities and counties.

A special legislative committee plans to meet today to hone a tax-cutting plan facing lawmakers,
who ended the regular session in May at an impasse.

But now joining anxious real-estate professionals is a sizable chorus of contractors, road builders,
engineers and landscapers worried about cash flow.

"A lot of what we normally do is contract work, hiring people, and that pushes along the local
economy," said Bill Potter, Orange County's manager for parks and recreation. "Everything is on
hold now."

Along with postponing restoration work planned on the three new buildings at Fort Christmas, the
county also has deferred action on a planned roller-skating park near Ocoee, Clarcona
Horseman's Park in Apopka, an environmental center and a boat ramp near Windermere.

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        25
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


The county has curtailed its seasonal hiring, which usually includes as many as 500 temporary
employees in the parks and recreation department.

"If the budget cuts come, we'd rather keep what we already have open and working rather than
have a groundbreaking, get everybody's picture in the paper, and then have people upset
because we can't open a facility," Potter said.

Orange's reductions are being mirrored across the state, said Eleanor Warmack, executive
director of the Florida Recreation and Park Association.

In small counties across Florida, where government spending often becomes a key economic
driver, the fear of lost property-tax revenue is having a more profound effect, officials said.

Rural Sumter County two weeks ago planned to hold a groundbreaking ceremony for a new 200-
bed county jail. But with legislative proposals in play that could slash the county's $29.5 million in
property-tax collections by about a third, commissioners have put the jail plans on hold. A hiring
freeze also has led the county to close four library branches one day a week.

"Part of me is a property owner, and I support cutting taxes," Sumter County Commissioner
Randy Mask said. "But these decisions to wait on projects or freeze hiring are being felt by
people across the county."

During the regular session this spring, the House and Senate failed to resolve deep differences
over how to lower property taxes, which have soared with rising home values in a once-booming
housing market that has since turned sluggish.

The House had pushed a plan leaders said could save property owners $40 billion to $50 billion
during five years. The Senate's more modest approach would save $15 billion to $20 billion in the
same period.

Gov. Charlie Crist weighed in with a split-the-difference approach he said would save $33.5 billion
during five years.

Since then, Crist and legislative leaders have edged closer. On Friday, lawmakers announced
they had agreed on a framework that includes rolling back property taxes and expanding the
state's $25,000 homestead exemption.

Sen. Mike Haridopolos, R-Melbourne, co-chairman of the Joint Committee on Property Tax Relief
and Reform, which meets today, said it's clear there is a rising economic urgency to resolve the
standoff.

He predicted industries relying on city and county spending would follow the money to a private
sector that he said is certain to surge after tax cuts are OK'd.

"These professions have been doing a lot of work with local governments because that's where
the money is the last few years," he said. "But the market will correct itself when we cut these
high property taxes."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work          26
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/




Orange leaders get list of programs that might take hit from property tax rollback (Orange
County, FL)
David Damron
Sentinel Staff Writer

June 5, 2007, 2:59 PM EDT

When state lawmakers roll back property taxes, Orange County residents could face cuts to after-
school programs for teens, canceled mass transit bus routes, longer possible waits for
emergency response services, and no new parks or sidewalks for a while.

Top county officials handed Orange elected leaders a laundry list of service cuts to make room
for a likely 20 percent budget hit after a first wave of property tax rollbacks by state lawmakers
who plan to push tax relief in a special session later this month.

"It's a dismal situation," said Commissioner Teresa Jacobs after the county's likely belt-tightening
scenario was laid out.

A 20 percent cut in property tax revenues would likely force up to $145 million in budget cuts at
the county level.

Top county budget officials laid out a menu of likely cuts, stressing that certain public safety
services -- such as sheriff's deputies and jail personnel -- would actually have to climb due to a
recent crime spike in the region.

However, that would mean deeper cuts to other services, such as neighborhood improvement
grants, which would likely be eliminated. Health care clinics for the working poor and those
without insurance would also have to scale back hours or see some facilities close, officials
predicted.

But that's not the worst of it, County Administrator Ajit Lalchandani warned. A plan gaining steam
in the capital would usher in property tax cuts swiftly and then send a ballot measure to voters
that could mandate even deeper local tax cuts.

None of today's presentation addressed where those cuts would come from.

"It is far-reaching at the first step," Orange County Mayor Rich Crotty said. "But we have yet to
realize the second step."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           27
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                            International News Stories
Web site offers too much detail on new U.S. Embassy
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/06/01/embassy.plans.ap/index.html

146 German police officers injured in violent G8 protests
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/02/g-8.protest.ap/index.html

Sources: U.S. fires at al Qaeda target in Somalia
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/africa/06/01/somalia.strike/index.html

Putin: Military backlash possible
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/04/russia.putin.ap/index.html

Bush says Russia won't attack Europe
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070606/ap_on_re_eu/bush

China: Economy before environment
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/06/04/china.climate.ap/index.html

Legal victory for Gitmo detainees
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/05/guantanamo.trials/index.html

Madrid case: 2 join prime suspects
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/04/madrid.trial/index.html

10 charged with alleged Laos plot
http://www.cnn.com/2007/LAW/06/04/laos.arrests/index.html

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-laos6jun06,1,6000506.story?coll=la-headlines-california

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-hmong6jun06,1,6452406.story?coll=la-headlines-
california

Spain braces for ETA attacks after end of ceasefire
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070606/wl_afp/spainbasqueseta

Turkish officials say troops enter Iraq
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070606/ap_on_re_mi_ea/turkey_iraq

Homegrown terrorism and extremism 'an enduring threat' (Australia)
http://www.abc.net.au/news/opinion/items/200706/s1943497.htm

Powerful cyclone pounds Mideast oil region
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/06/cyclone.ap/index.html

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070606/ap_on_re_mi_ea/cyclone_gonu

Thousands evacuated after Oman cyclone warning
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070604/wl_mideast_afp/omanweathercyclone_070604182344;_ylt
=AnAYlzFLDg3BwOa0e2.0XCnPOrgF


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    28
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

At least 35 dead as storm swamps Omani capital
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/08/cyclone.ap/index.html

Oil dips on profit-taking, Gonu relief
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070608/ap_on_bi_ge/oil_prices

UK, Italian police in terror swoop
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/07/italy.qaeda.reut/index.html

Thunder? It's the sound of Greenland melting
http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/science/06/06/greenland.warming.reut/index.html

Nigeria: LASG Creates 22 Emergency Mgt Units (Africa)
http://allafrica.com/stories/200706010692.html

EU law puts chemicals through safety tests
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070601/sc_nm/eu_chemicals_dc;_ylt=Avjygv6WfT2yJaANzc.e8A
MhANEA

Greenpeace talks Finnish nuclear security with EU commissioner
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070601/sc_afp/finlandeuenvironment_070601192255;_ylt=AutRIn
MkeJPJkzZMwBQrSgLPOrgF

Identify disaster zones - ODPEM wants corrupt developers brought to book (Jamaica)
http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20070603/lead/lead1.html

CDERA speaks on management of hurricane shelters (Caribbean)
http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/NewViewNewsleft.cfm?Record=31296

Cuba's emergency plans well-rehearsed
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/frontpage/index.ssf?/base/news-8/1180855886297430.xml&coll=1

China earthquake injures 300, 3 dead: Xinhua
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070603/sc_nm/china_quake_dc;_ylt=Al_KJ9W0s3T3bxaUoMqHw
IkhANEA

G-8 security fence troubling for Germans
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070604/ap_on_re_eu/g8_fence

China mobilizes Quake rescue efforts
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/955645/china_mobilizes_quake_rescue_efforts/index.html

Indonesia threatened by global warming, rising sea levels
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070604/sc_afp/indonesiaenvironment_070604120344;_ylt=AsKwv
lXjdncWmbrK9J8uKUHPOrgF

Locals invited to world leading bushfire research forum (Australia)
http://www.euroa-gazette.com.au/articles/7547.aspx

UN chief concerned over impact of travel on climate change
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070605/sc_afp/unenvironmentclimate_070605192647;_ylt=ApoNv
Zpll2VDI7kKH5lrDWLPOrgF

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    29
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

UN urges global action on climate change, natural disasters
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070605/sc_afp/unenvironmentwarming_070605150752;_ylt=AufB
HSF_FfUsIUaCPq7KP4TPOrgF

G-8 Leaders Reach Climate Deal
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/07/world/main2897770.shtml

Inaction on disasters is not an option
http://www.alertnet.org/thefacts/reliefresources/118010059499.htm

'Kill Americans' plot: Syrian held
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/08/spain.terror/index.html




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    30
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                          Reports
The Day After: Action in the 24 Hours Following a Nuclear Blast in an American City
http://iis-db.stanford.edu/pubs/21872/DayAfterWorkshopReport.pdf

Large Floods in the United States: Where they happen and why
http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/2003/circ1245/pdf/circ1245.pdf




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    31
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                               Additional Information
World Health Organization, Field Manual for Capacity Assessment of Healthcare Facilities in
responding to Emergencies
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/lib.nsf/db900SID/EVOD-72RHHL/$FILE/WHO.pdf

The next New Orleans? (Interactive Presentation)
http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/_national/hurricanes_cities/index.html?SITE=FLPAP&S
ECTION=HOME

Get Ready 07 (New FEMA Preparedness Campaign)
http://www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/hu_season.shtm

IAEMs Universities and College Special Interest Sector Committee
http://www.iaem.com/Committees/College/

World Health Organization, TB and Air Travel Guidelines for Prevention and Control
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2006/WHO_HTM_TB_2006.363_eng.pdf

Center for Disease Control, Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)
http://www.cdc.gov/tb/xdrtb/

U.S. Department of Justice, Americans with Disabilities Act Website
http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm

National Council on Disability, Public Consultation on Homeland Security, Emergency
Preparedness, Disaster Relief and Recovery
http://www.nod.org/Resources/PDFs/ncd_consult.pdf

June Newsletter of the International Emergency Management Student Association - Metropolitan
College of New York chapter
http://www.iaem.com/about/membership/regions/studentregion/documents/MCNYChapterNews0
607.pdf

Pandemic Pandemonium - A Neighborhood Tabletop Exercise (American Red Cross, Capital
Area Chapter, Florida)
http://redcross.tallytown.com/panflu/

European Emergency Exercise 2007
http://www.eulux2007.eu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=23&Itemid=54

Earthquake Quiz
http://www.livescience.com/php/trivia/?quiz=quake

Video: Recreating an Ancient Tsunami
http://www.livescience.com/php/video/player.php?video_id=AncientTsunami


UWEM Director Chosen to Speak at S. American Conference
UWEM Director Steven Charvat has been selected as part of a 5-member US delegation to make
a presentation on disaster management to the Argentina Institute of Standardization. This late-


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    32
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

June weeklong conference will involve over 200 emergency management and engineering
professionals from throughout South America.
http://www.iram.org.ar/


Join the Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
Disabilities Listserv
The Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
Disabilities (ICC) has created a listserv. Please join our listserv to receive the ICC’s Monthly
Updates and Quarterly Newsletter, Emergency Preparedness NOW, and access other
information pertinent to emergency preparedness and individuals with disabilities.

To join please visit http://listserv.access.gpo.gov/archives/icc-dispreppubs-l.html or go to
http://listserv.access.gpo.gov/ and click “Online Mailing List Archives,” then select “ICC-
DISPREPPUBS-L” and complete the subscription form.


RE: Results of House Appropriations Markup of DHS FY 2008

From: Martha Braddock
      Policy Advisor
      IAEM

Date: June 7, 2007

I am writing a detailed memo now that I have the draft committee report, bill, and manager's
amendment, but wanted to get this information to you sooner.

The Committee expects the DHS Appropriations bill to be considered on the House Floor next
week.

The Committee's press release is attached.

Some highlights are as follows:

EMPG

       $300 million
       keeps it as separate account.
       includes bill language "shall be distributed based on the formula used by the Department
        of homeland Security in FY 2007: provided further, That total administrative costs shall
        not exceed 3 percent of the total amount appropriated under this heading."
       Report language as follows:
            o "The Committee does not agree to transfer EMPG to State and Local Programs,
                and continues to fund the EMPG program as a separate appropriation. EMPG is
                the one true all-hazard source of funding for emergency managers. While EMPG
                is a 50-50 matching program, the latest estimate is that State and local
                governments are overmatching by $96 million each year. The Committee
                includes bill language directing FEMA to continue EMPG grant practices used in
                fiscal year 2007, including a continued emphasis on all-hazards activities and
                permitting the use of funds for personnel expenses. Up to three percent of
                funding awards may be used by recipients for administrative expenses."
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         33
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

UASI--$800 million
State Homeland Security Grant Program $550 million
Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Grants $400 million
Fire Fighter Assistance Grants --$800 million
MMRS $50 million
Urban Search and Rescue $35 million
Port Security $400 million
Citizen Corps $17 million

FEMA Management $685, $17 m above President's request

Disaster Relief Fund $1.7 billion
Flood Map Modernization $230 million, $35 above request
PDM $120 million

Principal Federal Official
Language in Bill-- Under General Provisions
Sec. 541. None of the funds provided by this or previous appropriation Acts shall be used to fund
any position designated as a Principal Federal Official during any declared disasters or
emergencies.

Full Appropriations Committee Markup

An amendment by Mr. Roger (R-KY) for an across the board cut of 5.7% failed.

There were no changes in the Full Approp. Committee markup on EMPG funds, but there was
language in the manager's amendment to be added to the report on FEMA trailers, Hurricane
Katrina and Toxic Pollutants, and Post Disaster mitigation.


       Office of Health Affairs is to evaluate health effects associated with presence of
        formaldehyde gas in FEMA trailers.
       FEMA directed to report on the work of the Federal On-Scene Coordinator
        (OCS) following Hurricane Katrina, including any efforts to conduct an assessment and
        how the OCS is assisting communities in identifying and responding to toxicant
        vulnerabilities.
       FEMA is directed to work with Dept. of Veteran Affairs and other relevant federal
        agencies on a feasibility study to determine how unused surplus FEMA trailers can be
        used to house homeless veterans. (report in six months from enactment)
       FEMA is directed to report in 30 days of enactment on its analysis of this failure to
        employ post-disaster mitigation and plans for getting the program seriously underway.
        ($1.47 billion currently available in LA, only $18, 895.495 million been expended; in
        Mississippi, $24, 301, 967 of possible $433,895, 495 expended)




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      34
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

June 7, 2007

MEMORANDUM FOR:                 All FEMA Employees
FROM:                           R. David Paulison, Administrator

SUBJECT:                        New Director for FEMAs Transformation Management

I am pleased to announce Josh Dozor as the new Director for Transformation Management (TM)
within the Office of Policy and Program Analysis. Mr. Dozor is the former Director of
Preparedness Policy for the Homeland Security Council at the White House. In this capacity, he
developed and coordinated the Administration's policies related to preparedness assistance
programs, emergency communications, planning, and professional development.

Prior to joining the White House, Mr. Dozor served as Counsel for the Subcommittee on
Emergency Preparedness, Science and Technology within the House of Representatives
Committee on Homeland Security. Mr. Dozor began his government service as a Legislative Aid
to former Congressman Curt Weldon from Pennsylvania where he was responsible for the
Congressman's activities on the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on
Science, as well as the operations of the Congressional Fire Services and Homeland Security
Caucuses.

Under the direction of Mr. Dozor, the Transformation Management team will assist us in
successfully achieving the vision of the New FEMA, and fully integrating the missions and
functions of Preparedness, by centralizing the management of organizational change across the
agency.

The Transformation Management team will provide not only the expertise necessary to execute
agency-level change initiatives, but also the continuity necessary to ensure that change and
transformation are directed towards cumulative agency improvements. The team will provide that
expertise by helping FEMA to manage transformation in achievable, measurable stages and
administer new and improved business practices which will support a governance structure to
drive change management across the agency. In addition to assisting with managing
transformation toward a New FEMA, Mr. Dozor's team will assist with transition planning for a the
new Administration in 2009.

Please join me in welcoming Josh to FEMA.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    35
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                     Contributions
The following individuals or groups contribute to the Emergency Management and Homeland
Security Articles of Interest.

Regular Contributors
    International Association of Emergency Managers
    National Emergency Management Association
    Florida Emergency Preparedness Association
    Emergency Management Institute, Higher Education Program
    King County, WA Office of Emergency Management
    Natural Hazards Observer Newsletter
    Department of Homeland Security
    Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
       Disabilities
    National Organization on Disabilities, Emergency Preparedness Initiative
    EAD & Associates, LLC
    Nena Wiley
    Dave Freeman
    Gregory Banner
    Arthur Rabjohn
    Martha Braddock

Guest Contributors
    University of Washington Office of Emergency Management
    Dave Bujak
    Joseph Mastandrea
    Chris Floyd
    Kay Goss

Special Thanks
Special thanks always to Ines Pearce and the California Emergency Services Association,
Southern Chapter who posts the Articles of Interest to their websites at:
http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html and http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    36
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.

								
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