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Unidentified Trojan Served Via Fake USPS Postal Notification by obengmin

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									Unidentified Trojan Served Via Fake USPS
Postal Notification




Failed delivery notifications purporting to come from “USPS Mail Service” are making
the rounds once again, carrying nasty pieces of malware.

MX Lab researchers have discovered a series of emails, apparently coming from
mail.service@birmingham.com, which warn recipients that their parcels haven’t been
delivered because the “fee isn’t paid.”

The fake notifications look something like this:

Postal label is enclosed to the letter.
Print your label and show it in the nearest post office of USPS
Information in brief:

If the parcel isn’t received within 30 working days our company will have the right to
claim compensation from you for it’s keeping in the amount of $16.41 for each day of
keeping of it.
You can find the information about the procedure and conditions of parcels keeping in the
nearest office.

Thank you.
USPS Customer Services.

They all come with an attachment – Label_Details_USPS_Tracking_ID36920.zip –
which allegedly contains more information. However, instead of tracking details, the
archive file hides a malicious executable called USPS_Print_Label.exe.

The worrying thing about this particular piece of malware is that at press time only Panda
Security solutions catalogue it as a “suspicious file.” None of the other vendors whose
antivirus engines are present on Virus Total identifies it as posing a threat.

Since it’s clear that in many cases, especially if new Trojan variants are involved,
commercial security solutions can’t keep you out of trouble, it’s best to avoid opening
suspicious attachments altogether.

Some of our readers have argued that fake FedEx or USP emails are so old that everyone
knows by now that they should be avoided.

However, it seems that there are still a number of internauts who fall for these plots and
unwittingly install malware onto their systems. If currier emails wouldn’t be able to do
their “job” properly, cybercriminals wouldn’t want to waste brand new Trojans on the
them.

								
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