Physical Education and Health Certification Bachelor of Arts

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					    Physical Education and Health
         Certification (P–12)
           Bachelor of Arts
     Major in Physical Education
   with a minor in Health Teaching
           Program Review
                     February, 2011
                   Berea College Catalog 2010-2011
                http://www.berea.edu/cataloghandbook/

                       for addendum to Catalog see
http://www.berea.edu/educationstudies/ncate/2011/docs/catalogaddendum.pdf
                             16 KAR 2:010




                   Physical Education and Health 1
                              Physical Education with Health Teaching
                                     Certification Grades P-12
                                         Program Review
                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS




1. Unit’s Conceptual Framework -------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 3

2. Unit’s Continuous Assessment-------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 7

3. Program Experiences------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 10

    A. Explanation of Coursework-----------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 20

             1) Sample Course Syllabi-----------------------------------------------Pg. 20

             2) Course Descriptions--------------------------------------------------Pg. 20

             3) NCATE/SPA matrix for Health content standards---------------Pg. 26,29
             4) NASPE matrix for Physical Education content standards-------Pg. 30

    B. Alignment of Experiences---------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 42

             1) KERA Initiatives---------------------------------Pg. 46

             2) Kentucky Teacher Standards matrix-----------Pg. 44

    C. Alignment of EPSB Themes--------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 51

    D. Program Faculty----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 54

    E. Curriculum Sheet Requirements--------------------------------------------------------------Pg. 60

             a. Curriculum Guide: Physical Education with P-12 Certification------Pg. 60
             b. Curriculum Guide: Health Teaching minor-----------------------------Pg. 60

             c. Curriculum Contract--------------------------------------------------------Pg. 65




                                 Physical Education and Health 2
1.Conceptual Framework

The Physical Education and Health Program

Berea College, founded by ardent abolitionist and radical reformers, continues today as an
educational institution still firmly rooted in its historic purpose ―to promote the cause of Christ.‖
Adherence to the College’s scriptural foundation, ―God had made of one blood all peoples of the
earth,‖ shapes the college’s culture and programs so that students and staff alike can work toward
both personal goals and a vision of a world shaped by Christian values, such as the power of love
over hate, human dignity and equality, and peace with justice. This environment frees persons to
be active learners, workers, and serves as members of the academic community and as citizens of
the world. The Berea experience nurtures intellectual, physical, aesthetic, emotional, and
spiritual potentials and with those the power to make meaningful commitments and translate
them into action.

Recognizing that the world of the twenty-first century presents continuing challenges to all who
strive for a more humane world, we affirm our commitment preparing caring and thoughtful
teacher who will lead their own students to address our planet’s most pressing concerns. Our
work lies in fostering a true community of inquiry in which teachers and student together seek
thoughtful and just responses to the dilemmas facing the modern world.

We are supported in our mission by the rich traditions of Berea College. These traditions suggest
the development of an education based on concerns for community supported by careful
attention to individual needs, independent learning, interdisciplinary study, the development of
critical and creative thinking, and the respectful nurturing of the novice teachers who engage in
teaching and learning with us. We encourage our students to value and embrace the
commitments of Berea College and their significance for our work together as learners, as
teachers, and as proponents of social justice.

The Unit’s philosophical framework is the community of inquiry, which encompasses the ideas
of community and inquiry in relationship. At the heart of that relationship are the means by
which human beings convey and create meaning together. Words are a primary means of
communication, but other artistic media find their way into communities comprised of diverse
individuals working together to create and share meaning. Common to all means of expression is
the necessity of careful thinking, vision, and personal integrity. We believe the community of
inquiry is an appropriate framework for Berea’s Teacher Education Program because we share
its assumptions about the nature of human beings, the nature of learning, and the nature of
knowledge:

              Human beings are born with the capacity for wonder.
              Human beings are social beings who learn from and with others.
              Human beings construct their understandings over time by connecting the new to
               what is already known.
              Human beings have a multiplicity of intelligences.
              All knowledge is connected.
              Wisdom comes from the way in which knowledge is held.
                                Physical Education and Health 3
              Thinking is central in coming to know.
              Communicating is the matrix of thinking.
              Teachers are also learners, and students are also teachers.
              All students can learn.

Consistent with these assumptions, we believe that the goal of education is to help people
become reasonable, just, compassionate, and creative beings who will seek to determine what is
of constant value in the world and to live accordingly. The purpose is the same at every level,
preschool through post-graduate. Education requires knowledge, but transcends knowledge. It
requires reason, though reason without imagination is insufficient. Education requires wonder,
without which there can be no awe. Finally, education requires participation in the human
community, as we come to truth in dialogue with others. The goal of education may best be
described as the development of a permanent disposition: a disposition to ask questions and to
seek understanding with reason and wonder; a disposition to search for truth through ongoing
inquiry into our common and differing experiences as human beings; a disposition to think for
ourselves, while knowing that it is through engaging in the pursuit of truth with others that we
find hope and the strength to work toward good for all.

Teacher Commitments
Teacher Education Programs at Berea College seek to prepare teachers who will manifest the
values and commitments, the understandings and knowledge, and the skills and abilities
necessary to cultivate the disposition of judicious inquiry in themselves and in their students. We
believe that it is teachers' values and commitments which direct their work with students in the
classroom. We seek evidence in all prospective teachers of the following commitments, and we
seek to nurture and extend these commitments through every facet of their preparation:

              Teachers should be committed to the value of all individuals as unique,
               responsible, and worthy human beings.
              Teachers should be committed to the intellectual, social, emotional, artistic, and
               moral growth of all learners.
              Teachers should be committed to the worth of knowledge and to the value of all
               ideas as worthy of consideration and reflection.
              Teachers should be committed to role of inquiry and to reasoned discourse in the
               search for truth and wisdom.
              Teachers should be committed to the value of judicious and compassionate action
               in relationships with other human beings and with the environment.
              Teachers should be committed to an ethic of service through teaching that extends
               beyond the classroom.
              Teachers should be committed to the understanding and value of discursive
               practices that construct meaning from culturally diverse perspectives, especially
               with respect to the articulations of pedagogies and school culture.

To enact these values and commitments in their classroom and school communities, teachers
must be both knowledgeable and skillful. They must seek continually to deepen and broaden
their understandings of children, of content, of teaching, and of learning, and they must be able

                                 Physical Education and Health 4
to act on those understandings in humane, educative, and efficient ways. To guide our students’
development toward these ends, we place our work within the context of Berea College’s
mission and vision.

Teacher Education Program Goals
Berea College was founded on the personal responses of individuals to the needs of some of the
most vulnerable members of society. Its founding was an expression of personal and communal
integrity, bringing together knowledge, values, and action. It required a willingness to risk
giving one’s life in service, to risk being taught by the other, to risk choosing humility. The
founders were committed to creating a place where relationships would be based on kindness
rather than domination, on human kinship rather than power. Our work today is based upon
those values.

As we struggle to comprehend what it means for people to live in kinship together, we can also
strive to extend the boundaries of the human community. We can ask ourselves what it might
mean for people to live with all things as stewards of the earth’s household. We can ask
ourselves whether a call to responsibility can be found in everything.

Democracy comes alive when questions about how things should go on become real. If
education is to serve democracy, then the charge of those who propose to educate becomes that
of helping to bring such questions to life.

Our purpose is to bring these questions to all of our candidates, whether their intention is to serve
as teachers in our schools or to serve our world in other ways. Our work is framed by the belief
that a liberal education offers the foundation for human beings of all ages to witness our essential
humanity, to contemplate our shared responsibility for living justly in this world, and to act for
good, with humility, through our chosen means of service.

These beliefs, together with the knowledge and faith that support them, permeate the goals listed
below for all our candidates.

1)     As people who have found joy in life, learning, and teaching, and who trust in the power
       of human relationships to call forth inner strengths, teachers strive to relate to their
       students in ways that free both teacher and learner to engage in joyful, responsible and
       disciplined inquiry into the workings and possibilities of our world.

2)     As people who value difference in human interactions, ideas and nature; who understand
       that identity is shaped by diversity, experiences, and environment; and who recognize
       that we must all work together to build a more just society, teachers create learning
       environments based on democratic principles which ensure that multiple perspectives are
       valued and considered, and which encourage students to speak from their own diverse
       experiences, to give value to those expressions, to explore their own diversity, and to
       bring those experiences to the broader community.

3)     As people who appreciate the interconnectedness and interdependence of our world,

                                 Physical Education and Health 5
       teachers seek to add depth and breadth to their general knowledge as well as in-depth
       understandings of the content they teach. These teachers provide experiences that allow
       learners to recognize and value the interconnections that emerge as they explore their
       unfolding world.

4)     As people who have experienced the power and beauty of creating their own knowledge
       and constructing their own understandings, and who are committed to enabling their
       students to share this experience, teachers create dynamic learning environments
       providing both direct and vicarious experiences oriented around student interest and
       characterized by active inquiry, liberal use of time, self-correction, and engagement with
       others.

5)     As people who see the promise in every person and believe that individuals have the
       ability and duty to create a more just society, teachers attend to each and every student by
       planning, implementing, and assessing meaningful learning experiences and
       systematically engage in critical reflection and self correction.

6)     As people who understand and appreciate the capacity of tools—informational,
       technological, physical and intellectual—to extend the reach and enhance the quality of
       work to be done, teachers incorporate appropriate tools into their own work-lives and
       integrate their use into the instructional environments they create with learners.

7)     A people who are committed to thinking together with others in the search for truth,
       wisdom and beauty, teachers create learning communities grounded in inquiry where
       students come to understand the critical role of communication in inquiry and where they
       feel the confidence that grows with the development of their ability to participate in a
       community of inquiry.

       Read the full Conceptual Framework at
       http://www.berea.edu/educationstudies/ncate/2011/docs/ConceptualFramework.pdf

The preparation of teachers of physical education and health at Berea College is guided by the
Education Programs Conceptual Framework. Physical education and health candidates are
introduced to the conceptual framework and Education Programs Goals in EDS 150:
Introduction to Education. Both the Goals and the conceptual framework are fully integrated into
the curriculum completed by prospective physical education and health teachers at Berea
College. In addition, physical education and health candidates’ understanding of the conceptual
framework and the Education Programs Goals is assessed throughout the program in course
work in through the Continuous Assessment System.




                                Physical Education and Health 6
2. Continuous Assessment

Overview

Berea’s Teacher Preparation Programs are designed to emphasize the development of candidates
in the areas of content knowledge, teaching practice, and dispositions. Candidates are assessed in
each teacher preparation course and at seven points as they progress through their programs.
Assessments—both formative and summative—are closely tied to the Unit’s conceptual
framework and Program Goals. Each assessment provides critical information used to: assess
candidate progress; assess program effectiveness; and assess faculty and class effectiveness.
Most assessments are developmental in design. That is, their use with candidates focuses on
identification of strengths and challenges, developing plans for growth, and on-going
conversations between faculty, advisors, and candidates. Summative assessments occur in the
Praxis tests (Key Assessment 5), during student teaching (Key Assessment 6: Student Teaching)
and at the conclusion of student teaching (Key Assessment 7: Exit Portfolio).

When and what do we assess?

Assessment of candidates is continual from their enrollment in EDS 150: Introduction to
Education where they make a formal declaration of their intent to enroll in the teacher
preparation program. Candidates first formal assessment occurs at completion of EDS 150:
Introduction to Education when they meet individually with the course instructor. In this
meeting, the instructor and candidate discuss the Education Program Goals and complete a
dispositions assessment. Collaboratively, the instructor and candidate identify one Program Goal
and dispositions that the candidate will focus on developing or strengthening as well as a
Professional Growth and Development Plan.

At the completion of each course in the teacher preparation programs, candidates are assessed on
dispositions development. Faculty share their assessments with individual candidates and the
data becomes available to the advisor.

At the beginning of the fifth term, candidates apply to the Teacher Education Program (Key
Assessment 2). At that time they complete a formal process that includes both a written
application and an interview/discussion with the advisor. This assessment is designed to revisit
the goals set in Key Assessment 1, to assess candidates’ commitment to teaching and their
growing professional identity. It also includes verification that the candidate has met all program
requirements for admission, including, but not limited to, a GPA of 2.5 or higher and completion
of program admission prerequisites.

During the sixth term, candidates engage in a formal dispositions assessment in conference with
their advisors. At this time, disposition assessments submitted at the completion of their
preparation classes are summarized and studied collaboratively. At this point, candidates who
                                 Physical Education and Health 7
 have not made satisfactory progress in dispositions development be counseled out of the program
 and into a more appropriate course of study. New goals for development of dispositions may also
 be developed at this point. Dispositions will remain central as they complete their seventh,
 eighth, and ninth terms.

 In the eighth term, candidates submit a portfolio which serves as Key Assessment 4: Admission
 to Student Teaching. This portfolio demonstrates the candidates accumulated experiences in
 schools and individually working with children of the ages they hope to teach, their developing
 personal philosophy of teaching and learning, their understanding of content, and their ability to
 develop integrated teaching units.

 Also in the eighth term, candidates complete Key Assessment 5, the appropriate Praxis tests as
 required by the state of Kentucky.

 In the ninth term, candidates student teach. Their evaluations serve as Key Assessment 6.
 Completed by college faculty and cooperating teachers, these assessments are summative in
 nature. This is a performance based assessment which evaluates the candidate’s ability to: plan,
 implement, and deliver appropriate instruction; adjust instruction based on assessments; manage
 classrooms and develop appropriate organizational systems, and work collaboratively with
 parents and colleagues.

 Also in the ninth term, candidates complete Key Assessment 7: Exit Portfolio. This assessment
 focuses on candidates’ ability to plan, implement, and assess lessons and units; assess student
 learning, adjust plans; develop and implement lessons to meet students’ diverse needs; and
 reflecting on practice, evaluate teaching, and adjust based on evaluations.

 How is assessment data used?

 Data is studied by a subcommittee of the Unit at the completion of each Key Assessment to
 identify trends in candidate performance. These trends are used to assess program delivery, to
 make changes in courses and/or in the program. They are also used to study the curriculum and
 its effectiveness in preparing candidates to meet expectations.



 The following chart identifies the key assessment points of all Berea teacher education programs.

Key             Administered   Mode of         Measures                    Results         Analysis
Assessment                     Assessment                                  Shared With

Key             At             Interview and   Candidates’                 Unit faculty,   Results are studied
Assessment 1:                                  understanding of Program    candidate       for trends which are
Goals and       completion     Discussion—     Goals and Dispositions                      used to adjust
                               formative       Collaborative assessment.                   instruction in EDS

                                  Physical Education and Health 8
Dispositions    of EDS 150                         Establishes a baseline for                  150
                                                   future assessments.
                                                   Strengths and areas for
                                                   growth are identified and
                Pre-
                                                   goals for growth set.
                requisites: B-
                in EDS 150

Key             Fifth term       Written and       Candidates’                  Content area   Results are studied
Assessment 2:                    interview--       understanding of Program     departments,   for trends and
Admission to    Pre-requisite:   formative         Goals, minimum Program       EDS            implications for
Program                                            requirements, growth in      department,    instruction in EDS
                B- in EDS 227
                                                   dispositions, progress in    Teacher        150 and EDS
                or 228 (or
                                                   content knowledge, and       Education      227/228 (program
                Music/PE
                                                   interest in teaching, a      Committee      pre-requisites)
                equivalent)
                                                   transcript review is
                                                   included

Key             Sixth term       Interview using   Candidates’ dispositions     Candidate      Summarized results
Assessment 3:                    likert-type                                    and advisor    are shared with the
Dispositions                     scale--                                                       research committee
                                 formative                                                     to study trends which
                Pre-requisite:
                                                                                               inform course work
                Acceptance to
                                                                                               and special Unit
                Program
                                                                                               offerings.

Key             8th term         Portfolio         Candidates’ ability to       Content area   Results are studied
Assessment 4:                                      plan integrated content      departments,   for trends which
Admission to                     formative         tied to standards and        EDS            inform course work
Student                                            program goals. Transcript    department,    and special Unit
                Pre-requisite:
Teaching                                           review                       Teacher        offerings.
                Successful                                                      Education
                completion of                                                   Committee,
                Program                                                         Candidates
                coursework
                (except 8th

Key             8th Term         Standardized      Candidates’ basic content    Teacher        Results are studied
Assessment 5:                    test--            and professional             Education      for trends which
Praxis                           summative         knowledge                    Committee,     inform course work
                                                                                Content area   and special Unit
                Pre-requisite:
                                                                                departments,   offerings.
                Senior                                                          EDS
                standing                                                        department,

                                                                                candidates

Key             9th Term         Performance       Ability to plan and          Content area   Results are studied
Assessment 6:                                      implement, to work with      departments,   for trends which
                                    Physical Education and Health 9
Student          Pre-requisite:   Summative      students, and perform         EDS            inform course work
Teaching                                         within the Unit’s goals.      department,    and special Unit
                 Completion of                                                 Teacher        offerings.
                 all program                                                   Education
                 coursework                                                    Committee,
                 meeting all                                                   Candidates
                 published
                 requirements

Key              Completion of    Portfolio      Candidates’ ability to:       Content area   Results are studied
Assessment 7:    student                         Plan, implement, and          departments,   for trends which
Exit Portfolio   teaching         Summative/     assess lessons and units;     EDS            inform course work
                                  teacher Work   assess student learning,      department,    and special Unit
                 Pre-requisite:   sample         adjust plans; develop and     Teacher        offerings.
                                                 implement lessons to          Education
                 Successful
                                                 meet students’ diverse        Committee,
                 completion of
                                                 needs; reflect on practice,   Candidates
                 student
                                                 evaluate teaching, and
                 teaching
                                                 adjust based on
                                                 evaluations.




 Please review the complete Berea Continuous Assessment System at
 http://www.berea.edu/educationstudies/ncate/2011/docs/NCATE2011-Assessment-System.pdf

 3. Program Experiences

 The program in physical education with a minor in health teaching is designed to ensure that
 candidates complete courses and other experiences that will prepare them to teach in Kentucky
 schools and to adequately address Kentucky’s academic expectations in their own classrooms.
 The design of the program has been strongly influenced by the NCATE-approved Guidelines for
 Initial Physical Education Teacher Education from NASPE, the Health Teacher Education
 Standards from AAHE, and to meet the Berea College Teacher Education Program Goals. The
 matrix for the NASPE and AAHE Guidelines follows. Candidates pursuing the program in
 physical education and health undertake a series of clinical and field experiences with students in
 schools and other settings prior to the professional term. These experiences allow prospective
 teachers the opportunity to acquire increasing instructional responsibility as they develop
 necessary skills and maturity.

 The Physical Education and Health Department Curriculum was developed with an
 interrelationship of a number of courses. This curriculum was developed for Berea College’s
 course system. In order to receive a teaching certification in health, candidates are required to
 complete a major in physical education with a P-12 Certification and a minor in health teaching.


                                     Physical Education and Health 10
The program experiences in the Physical Education Program with a minor in Health Teaching
include three major strands: the general studies, a major in Physical Education with P-12
certification and a minor in Health Teaching.



A. The General Studies Curriculum.
   Berea College defines a standard liberal arts curriculum for all students including a series of
   ―General Studies‖ courses in addition to courses chosen representing six ―Perspectives‖ of
   knowledge. They must also complete coursework that emphasizes practical reasoning (one
   course), and practical reasoning with an emphasis on quantitative reasoning. All Berea
   College students are required to complete the Lifetime Wellness requirement of the General
   Education curriculum. A sequence of three courses totaling one full credit is designed to
   develop knowledge and skills and to establish habits and patterns of healthy choices for a
   lifetime.
   Required General Studies Coursework
      GSTR 110 Writing Seminar I: Critical Thinking in the Liberal Arts
      GSTR 210 Writing Seminar II: Identity and Diversity in the U.S.
      GSTR 310 Understandings of Christianity
      GSTR 332 Scientific Knowledge and Inquiry
      GSTR 410 Senior Seminar in Contemporary Global Issues
   Perspective Areas (students must select coursework in each of these areas)
      African-American, Appalachian, & Women
      Arts
      International (two courses)
      Religion
      Social Science
      Western History

       Lifetime Health & Fitness:

       PEH 100 Introduction to Lifetime Wellness



2. A Major in Physical Education with a P-12 Certification
      The Physical Education major requires the student to complete a series of core courses,
      with electives chosen in consultation with an academic advisor. The major in Physical
      Education with P-12 Certification has an established curriculum leading to teaching
      certification. Appropriate content in teaching students with special needs, child and
      adolescent development, and assessment in physical education are woven into PED

                                Physical Education and Health 11
       classes (i.e. PED 280: Adapted Physical Education, PED 244: P.E. Activities for
       Elementary Child and PED 362: Teaching and Evaluation in Physical Education).

       Required Core Courses:
       PED 125: Foundations of Physical Education
       PED 315: Motor Behavior Across Lifespan
       PED 335: Integrated Biomechanics & Exercise Physiology I
       PED 340: Integrated Biomechanics & Exercise Physiology II

       Additional Required PED Courses:
       PED 237: Hiking and Campcraft
       PED 244: P.E. Activities for Elementary Child
       PED 245: Dance
       PED 246: Individual and Team Sports I or PED 247: individual and Team Sports II
       PED 280: Adapted Physical Education:
       PED 362: Teaching & Evaluation in Physical Education

       Capstone Course:
       PED 492: Seminar in Physical Education

       Collateral Courses (Required, count outside the major):
       BIO 101: Human Anatomy & Physiology I
       HLT 215: Significant Issues in Health
       PEH 330: Extended School experience or
              Department-approved alternative

       Education Studies Courses (count outside the major):
       EDS 150: Introduction to Education
       EDS 349: Education and Culture in the United States
       EDS 355: Extended Field Experience: Enriching World Visions
                     Or approved alternative

       Professional Terms (count outside the major)
       EDS 481: Student Teaching Seminar (P-12, 5-12, 8-12)
       EDS 482: Student Teaching (P-12, 5-12, 8-12)

3. Minor in Health Teaching

The minor in Health Teaching provides candidates intending to go into teaching or health
promotion with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of health and their teaching skills in
personal wellness and health-related fields. Candidates will learn about health from personal,
public, community, and global perspectives, drawing from interdisciplinary studies in physical
education, physiology, nutrition, exercise science, sociology, psychology, women’s studies, child
and family studies, agriculture and sustainability, and social justice studies, as well as education.


                                 Physical Education and Health 12
To obtain a certificate in P-12 Health teaching, candidates are required to complete a minimum
of six (6) course credits:
Required Core Course—
HLT 215: Significant Issues in Health
HLT 315: Health Education
CFS 221: Fundamentals of Nutrition

Required Distribution Courses—Two (2) course credits chosen from
HLT 111: Human Sexuality
HLT 210 (also APS): Health in Appalachia
HLT 224: Addiction and Violence in the Family
HLT 236 (alsoWST): Women and Health
PSY 215: Health Psychology

Required additional HLT Course—One (1) additional course from the list above or another
HLT course approved by the department to meet this requirement (i.e., a summer travel course or
a health-related internship); selection of this course must be approved by the Health Teaching
minor advisor.

The department strongly supports the need for first aid and safety, positive behavior and attitudes
in fitness, knowledge or pertinent health concepts, and the practice of positive health behaviors.
This is manifested by the health core requirement of PEH 100: Introduction to Lifetime Wellness
and HLT 215: Significant Issues in Personal Health. Also, candidates have the option for
achieving certification in First Aid and CPR through the course HLT 109: Comprehensive First
Aid or by getting certified from an off campus agency.

Pedagogy is addressed in seven of our major’s courses, six of which are required for a major
leading to teaching certification. PED 362: Teaching and Evaluation in Physical Education has
the greatest concentration of content on pedagogy. Strategies for presenting movement concepts
and activities, motivating all persons to remain active throughout their lifespan, acquiring current
knowledge of health concepts, and encouraging positive health behavior permeates our entire
curriculum.

Along with the coursework required in the physical education and health content area, our
program works closely with the Education Studies department to provide candidates with further
experience and learning in the educational field. The professional education coursework is
created and sequenced in careful alignment with our conceptual framework, and is aligned with
the Kentucky Teacher Standards, the NASPE Teacher Preparation Standards, and the AAHE
Guidelines. It is designed to prepare diverse candidates with knowledge and skills required to
teach as defined by Kentucky’s Learner Goals, Program of Studies, and Core Content for
Assessment. Each stage in the program is defined below.



                                Physical Education and Health 13
Exploring the Major. This occurs during candidates’ enrollment in EDS 150: Introduction to
Education. This normally occurs one of the first four terms of enrollment. During EDS 150
candidates’ experiences are designed to deconstruct their existing vision of the teaching
profession so they can begin to re-conceive a model informed by our conceptual framework.
During this course, candidates become acquainted with our philosophy and learn how to reflect
on their professional identity and dispositions. Also in EDS 150, candidates are presented the
Code of Ethics for review and discussion.
Admission to Program. After successful completion of EDS 150 with grades no lower than B-
and an overall GPA of at least 2.5, candidates apply for entry into the program. At that time,
they complete a formal process that includes both a written application and an
interview/discussion with the advisor. This process is designed to assess and revise the
Professional Growth and Development Plan developed in Key Assessment 1, to assess
candidates’ commitment to teaching and their growing professional identities. As part of this
process, candidates revisit the Code of Ethics and submit a signed copy verifying their
understanding of and commitment to adhere to the expectations and responsibilities it outlines.

Program Alignment
Candidates in the Health and Physical Education Certification Program enroll in fewer professional
education courses than candidates in most other programs. The reason for this is the specialized
nature of the content and the ages they are being prepared to teach. Most candidates completing
certification programs enroll in EDS 227: Child Development or EDS 228: Adolescent Development
(depending on the age of the students they will teach); EDS 340: Elementary Special Needs or EDS
480 Secondary Special Needs (depending on the age of the students they will teach); and EDS: 479:
Assessment. However, the specific needs of candidates being prepared for K-12 certification in an
area where the needs and assessments of students are highly specialized would not benefit from
completing these courses. Therefore, in a collaborative effort involving Health and Physical
Education faculty, Education Studies faculty, a panel of practicing teachers, and a state consultant, the
program was carefully redesigned and aligned to ensure that appropriate assessment, special needs,
and k-12 development is infused into the health and physical education course offerings. The
following charts identify where the Teacher Education Programs Goals and the content related to
development and special needs are addressed.

   PREPARING CANDIDATES IN THE CONTENT AND TEACHING METHODS
  RELATED TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT, SPECIAL NEEDS, AND ASSESSMENT
            HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATION

Child development, assessment strategies, skills, and interpretations, and special needs are
infused into the health and physical education methods classes offered by Unit faculty in the

                                Physical Education and Health 14
   Physical Education Department. Working collaboratively with Education Studies faculty, this
   content is taught in ways appropriate to the special circumstances of teaching physical
   education.

   The chart below identifies the courses into which the assessment, development, and special
   needs content is integrated.

   Score                                                        Explanation
 Introduced     The introduction-level indicates that the class includes a thorough discussion and exploration of the topic,
                creating comfort with the language and content., and practicing understanding and interpretation sufficient to
                prepare candidates for further study throughout the vocal music program..
 Continued      The continued-level indicates that exploration of the related content and teaching methods is infused into the
                course content and designed to help candidates become more comfortable with their understandings and
                practice through specific classroom assignments and field experiences.
  Expanded      The Expanded/Deepened-level indicates that the exploration and competence with the content and teaching
and Deepened    practice has been identified as a special focus and that particular attention is paid to preparation and
                demonstration of competency in the course content, assignments, and field placements experiences.
  Ready to      Usually the pre-professional term, candidates must demonstrate they are ready to take on the role of a student
  Student       teacher, have an understanding of the content and teaching methods related to child development, special
   Teach        needs, and assessment , the abilities and skills required to apply that understanding in practice, and the
                dispositions necessary to successfully engage students as well as to plan appropriate experiences based on
                individual needs and developmental level, and assess student learning, lessons, and alter plans based on their
                reflections.
 Competency     This level indicates that candidates are expected to demonstrate appropriate developmental understanding and
Demonstrated    application of the content and teaching methods related to development, assessment, and/or special needs in
  in Practice   the student teaching and seminar semester.



Class        Child             Assessed              Specia        Assessed          Assessment                Assessed
             Develo                                    l
             pment                                   Needs
EDS 150                   Learning Center,                         Learning                               Learning Center,
                            Philosophy                              Center,                                 Philosophy
                                                                  Philosophy
 PED                     Writing Abstracts,
 315                    Fieldwork Reports
                               Tests
 PED                    Observation reports,                                                                  Reflections
 244                     abstracts, exams
 PED                    Skills analysis and                                                                   Reflections
 246                   progression, unit plan
 PED                       Lesson Plans                                                                       Reflections
 247                        Unit Plans
 PED                       Lesson Plans                                                                       Reflections
 245                        Unit Plans

                                        Physical Education and Health 15
 PED                     Disability Report                        Exams,                               Assessment Practices
 280                          Exams                              Disability
                                                                  Report,
                                                                Motor Skills
                                                                  Clinic
 PED                          Exams                                                                              Exam
 362                        Pedagogical
                            Assessment
 HLT                   Health Fair, Philosophy                                                               Lesson Plans;
 315                                                                                                    observation; Reflections
 PEH                     Cooperating Teacher                      Cooperating                            Cooperating Teacher
 330                         evaluation                             Teacher                                   evaluation
                                                                   evaluation
EDS 481                  Key Assessment 6:                            Key                                 Key Assessment 6:
                       Performance Evaluation                    Assessment 6:                          Performance Evaluation
                                                                 Performance
                                                                  Evaluation
 EDS                    Key Assessment 7:                            Key                                 Key Assessment 7:
 482                      Exit Portfolio                         Assessment                                Exit Portfolio
                                                                      7:
                                                                Exit Portfolio


   TEACHING FOR THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS GOALS
             HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

   The chart below identifies the courses in the Health and Physical Education
   certification program where the Teacher Education Program Goals are integrated
   into the coursework. This responsibility is shared equally with the Physical
   Education and Education Studies faculty and through collaborative planning and
   consistent communication, candidates deepen their understandings of these goals
   and develop the skills and dispositions necessary to make them operational in their
   practice.


   Score                                                     Explanation
 Introduced    The introduction-level indicates that the class includes a thorough discussion and exploration of the goal,
               creating comfort with the vocabulary and structure of the goals, and practice with interpretation of the
               statement.
 Continued     The continued-level indicates that exploration of the goal is infused into the course content and designed
               to help candidates become more comfortable with their understandings and practice applications of the
               goal through classroom assignments and field experiences.
  Expanded     The Expanded/Deepened-level indicates that the goal has been identified as a special focus in the listed
and Deepened   class and that particular attention is paid to the goal in the course content, assignments, and field
               placements experiences.

                                       Physical Education and Health 16
  Ready to       Usually the pre-professional term extended experience in the classroom, the candidates must demonstrate
  Student        they are ready to take on the role of a student teacher, have an understanding of each goal, the abilities
   Teach         and skills required to apply that understanding with others, and the dispositions necessary to successfully
                 engage students within the framework of these goals.
 Competency      This level indicates that candidates are expected to demonstrate appropriate developmental understanding
Demonstrated     and application of the goals in the student teaching and seminar semester.
  in Practice




Class           Goal 1    Goal 2      Goal 3      Goal 4      Goal 5      Goal 6      Goal 7      Evidence
EDS 150                                                                                           Journal paper
                                                                                                  Key 1 Assessment
                                                                                                  Apology Project
                                                                                                  Learning Center
EDS 349                                                                                           Education Autobiography
                                                                                                  Educational Dialogue
EDS 355                                                                                           Journal Reflections
                                                                                                  Conferences
                                                                                                  Supervisor Evaluation
PED250                                                                                            Service Learning Project,
                                                                                                  Field Work,
PED 244                                                                                           Teaching PE Observation
                                                                                                  Exercise, Presentation,
                                                                                                  Lesson Plans
PED 245                                                                                           Field Work, Exams. Journal
                                                                                                  Entries
PED 246                                                                                           Unit Plan, elf Analysis, Peer
                                                                                                  Teaching, Field Work
PED 247                                                                                           Unit Plan, elf Analysis, Peer
                                                                                                  Teaching, Field Work
PED 280                                                                                           Video Reflection, Interview,
                                                                                                  Accessibility Assessment.
                                                                                                  Field Work Report
PED 362                                                                                           Authentic Assessments,
                                                                                                  Pedagogical Assessments
HLT 315                                                                                           Philosophy, Weekly
                                                                                                  Journals, Lesson Plans,
                                                                                                  Bulletin Board
PEH 330                                                                                           Lesson Plans
                                                                                                  Faculty Observations
                                                                                                  Cooperating Teacher
                                                                                                  Evaluation
EDS 481                                                                                           Key Assessment 6: Student
                                                                                                  Teaching Performance
                                                                                                  Assessment
EDS 482                                                                                           Key Assessment 7: Exit
                                                                                                  Portfolio


                                         Physical Education and Health 17
Progress Through the Program. Candidates typically enroll in EDS 349: Education and Culture
in the United States, during their sixth term. This course causes them to evaluate their own
cultural identities and open their minds to the identities of people from other cultures.
Candidates write an education autobiography, study the history and culture of multiple minority
groups, and participate in an education dialogue with a person from a culture different from their
own. During the summer following this course, candidates enroll in EDS 355: Extended Field
Experience: Enriching World Visions. EDS 349 prepares candidates to be immersed in a culture
different from their own. In EDS 355, the experience is designed to open their minds to the
experiences marginalized individuals face in schooling experiences and in society. The hope is
that candidates will gain empathy for others and work diligently toward reaching every student in
their classroom so they can approach all their students with the openness and respect that is vital
to reaching all children.

In order to be accepted into student teaching, candidates must meet certain criteria during their
pre-professional term. These include receiving favorable recommendations from both the
Physical Education and the Education Studies departments, completing an acceptable student
teaching portfolio, and completing the Praxis Content exam and Principles of Teaching and
Learning exams. The Teacher Education Committee reviews all applications and approves those
that are complete and satisfactory.

Student Teaching. Student teaching occurs during the ninth term of enrollment for our
candidates. The student teaching experience is structured by enrollment in EDS 481 Student
Teaching Seminar (1 credit) and EDS 482 Student Teaching (3 credits). Candidates are matched
with effective teachers working with diverse children. They are encouraged to begin their
placement at the beginning of the local school year to participate in the first few weeks while
classroom procedures and culture are being established. The College supports this by allowing
them to move into their rooms early if necessary. Candidates are expected to work in their
assigned classroom all day every day for the entire term, following the placement school’s
schedule. Candidates are expected to carry a full teaching load for at least six weeks, although
we encourage as much experience as is prudent. During this experience, candidates are expected
to create instruction aligned with Kentucky’s Learner Goals, the Program of Studies, and Core
Content for Assessment. Additionally, they are expected to comport themselves professionally
at all times, attend all meetings and functions required of the cooperating teacher, and
communicate effectively with parents.
Under the guidance of both the college faculty supervisor and the cooperating teacher the
candidate is required to demonstrate his or her competency meeting all of the Kentucky Teacher
Standards and Berea’s Education Programs Goals as reflected on observation assessments and
mid-term and end-of-term evaluations. Additionally, candidates write an exit portfolio that
includes an evidence-based reflection on their professional identity using the language and
structure of the Education Programs Goals, a self-evaluation of their student teaching
                                Physical Education and Health 18
performance based upon the Kentucky Teacher Standards, a professional resume, and a teacher
work-sample analysis based upon a unit of instruction they designed and assessed during the
semester.




                              Physical Education and Health 19
A. Explanation of Coursework
COURSE SYLLABI
For sample syllabi refer here:
http://www.berea.edu/educationstudies/ncate/2011/course-syllabi.asp

Course Descriptions: Physical Education and Health

EDUCATION COURSES
EDS 150         Introduction to Education: Thinking about Teaching, Learning & Schooling
This course is an introduction to the study of education for prospective teachers and others
interested in education. The course will offer students the opportunity to explore the following
essential questions: 1) What does it mean to learn? 2) What does it mean to teach well? 3) What
are schools for? 4) What knowledge, dispositions, and skills are needed in order to teach well? 5)
How does diversity affect teaching, learning, and schooling? The course will introduce some of
the foundational ideas, issues, and beliefs--historical, political, economic, philosophical,
sociological, psychological, cultural, and social--that impact the current educational climate.
Students will be introduced to the Department’s conceptual framework, portfolio requirements,
and other academic, experiential, and professional expectations and requirements for those
pursuing teacher certification. The course will include both field-based experiences and
volunteer/service-learning experiences with school-aged children and/or adolescents. Course
Fee: $20.                                                               1 Course Credit
EDS 349          Education and Culture in the United States
This course is designed to help classroom teachers and others gain an understanding of how
education and schooling may be used to limit or expand individual freedom and opportunities.
This course provides a critical examination of contending views of the impact of race, ethnicity,
culture, social class, religion, language, nationality, gender and sexual orientation on teaching
and learning in the United States. Participants will explore historical and contemporary issues of
equity and inequality in society that maintains institutionalized support of privilege in and
through schools. Students will be encouraged to view educational issues from a variety of
perspectives. Students will critically examine their own sociocultural identities to better
understand how their way of thinking, behaving, and being is influenced by birth, status and
experiences. Students will have multiple opportunities to reflect on how their personal beliefs
and experiences will influence their teaching philosophy and practice. 1 Course Credit.
EDS 355         Extended Field Experience: Enriching World Visions
In consultation with the instructor, students will arrange a field experience with a school or
service agency that places them in a setting with people of racial, cultural, ethnic, or religious
backgrounds different from their own. All field experiences locations must be located within the
United States and may be a school or non-school setting. Students will undertake field
experiences in settings that will challenge them sufficiently to see life through the eyes of those
with whom they will work. Students will examine and challenge their beliefs and attitudes about
working with others different from themselves and encouraged to adopt an affirming attitude and
disposition. Students are expected to increase their self-awareness of how interpersonal
relationships and community involvement may have a positive impact on teaching and learning
for students. Students will be expected to build positive relationships with others, gain an
                                 Physical Education and Health 20
understanding of barriers and obstacles that some students may face, and begin to consider how
they may become change agents to assist schools in being more equitable over time. 1 Course
Credit.
EDS 481                 Student Teaching Seminar: P-12, 5-12, 8-12
Emphasis in this course is on the development of appropriate instructional units for the assigned
Student Teaching settings. Students work with classroom teachers and College faculty to plan
and develop activities and materials focused on the specific subject matter in which the student is
seeking certification. Other topics include classroom-management techniques, evaluation and
assessment of student learning, and motivational techniques. Student teachers are to reflect the
values and commitments undergirding Berea’s Teacher Education Program in their work and
relationships with children, peers, parents, mentors, and other colleagues, and they are expected
to meet Berea’s program goals prior to completion of the Professional Year. They will be
required to submit a satisfactory exit portfolio addressing the New Teacher Standards established
by the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board. Taken concurrently with EDS 482.
                                               1 Course Credit
EDS 482                 Student Teaching (P-12, 5-12 and 8-12)
This course involves observation, participation, teaching, and a wide variety of school-related
activities under the guidance of supervising teachers and staff members of the Education Studies
Department. Student teachers will spend at least twelve (12) weeks, five (5) full days per week,
in their assigned placement(s). Students will be expected to complete satisfactory entries for the
Eligibility (exit) Portfolio required for initial teacher certification. Taken concurrently with EDS
481. 3 Course Credits
BIOLOGY COURSES
BIO 101         Human Anatomy and Physiology I
A study of the gross and microscopic anatomy of the human body and how it relates to body
function. Emphasis is on basic chemistry, cells, tissues, and skeletal, muscular, nervous, and
cardiovascular organ systems. This course deals with physiology as an integrating process within
the body. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory period each week.
       1 Course Credit
HEALTH COURSES
HLT 215                Significant Issues in Health
An introduction to the field of Health Studies and to possible careers in health. Students will
study several significant problems in public health and begin to develop the knowledge and skills
to understand and solve these problems, including a basic introduction to use of approaches, such
as health education, health promotion, and primary prevention. NOTE: Noncredit for students
who completed HLT 115. 1 Course Credit
HLT 109                  Comprehensive First Aid
A comprehensive course in the latest techniques and procedures in meeting accident and illness
emergencies, such as stoppage of breathing, cardiac arrest, airway obstruction, severe bleeding,
poisoning, fractures, burns, shock, heat or cold related emergencies, seizures, and sudden illness. Two
American Red Cross certificates--Community CPR and Community First Aid and Safety--can be earned.
Course Fee: $5. NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed this course as HLT 209. 1 Course Credit
HLT 111                  Human Sexuality
                                 Physical Education and Health 21
This class examines the biological, physiological, psychological, social, and ethical factors that affect
human sexuality and interpersonal relationships. Through lecture, small- and large-group discussions,
debates, audiovisuals, guest speakers, and directed reading assignments, the focus will be on reality-
oriented sexual behavior and attitudes; needs and interests of college students; positive satisfaction,
obligations, and responsibilities to self and others; sexual deviance; influence of society; and changing
mores, roles, and lifestyles.                                                        1 Course Credit
HLT 210                   Health in Appalachia (APS)
Health in Appalachia explores various dimensions of the environment that impact the health of
individuals and the communities in which they live within the Appalachian region. The overarching
frameworks used in this exploration consist of Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model and the Six
Dimensions of Health Wellness Model. Specific topics addressed include: education, religion,
industrialization, economic development, access to health care, sexuality, domestic violence, race and
ethnicity, and substance abuse. This course is designed for the non-professional interested in the health
needs of all people living in the Appalachian region and will include directed readings, lectures,
discussions, films, guest speakers, and field trips. African Americans’, Appalachians’, and Women’s
Perspective.                                                                         1 Course Credit

HLT 215                   Significant Issues in Health
An introduction to the field of Health Studies and to possible careers in health. Students will study several
significant problems in public health and begin to develop the knowledge and skills to understand and
solve these problems, including a basic introduction to use of approaches, such as health education, health
promotion, and primary prevention. NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed HLT 115. 1 Course
Credit
HLT 224                   Addiction & Violence in Family
This course explores family dynamics from a family systems perspective and examines how those
dynamics are affected by addiction and violence. Topics covered include: the development of family
theories; the structure of a family system; the impact on children and their future relationships; the
interplay between substance abuse and the family system; domestic violence; and trauma healing.
Prevention, intervention, and treatment options for addictions will be emphasized. 1 Course Credit
HLT 236                   Women and Health (WST)
This course will help students understand women’s health from a personal perspective and then connect
that understanding to the health of women in other parts of the world. Emphasis will be on reproductive
health, including pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding, but we will also study issues such as environmental
health, violence against women, and AIDS as a global health problem.                 1 Course Credit
HLT 315                   Health Education and Promotion
This course will help students develop knowledge and skills toward becoming effective health educators
for both adults and children in settings of P-12 schools, public health, community health, medical offices,
and work sites. Emphasis will be on theories of health education leading to creative and effective teaching
with a goal of healthy behavioral change. The course also will explore health promotion at a larger public
health level.                                                                        1 Course Credit
CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES COURSES
CFS 221                   Fundamentals of Nutrition
This course integrates the principles of nutrition and the promotion of personal health and well-being
through dietary disease prevention. It emphasizes the functions of basic nutrients within the human body
and in outstanding dietary sources, as well as factors that have an impact on food sources and selection of
an adequate diet. Class discussions and activities survey current consumer issues, nutritional concepts and
controversies, myths, and factors that influence dietary habits.                     1 Course Credit
PSYCOLOGY COURSES
PSY 215                  Health Psychology
                                   Physical Education and Health 22
A course designed for Psychology majors, but with relevance for Nursing majors, Physical Education
majors, pre-med and pre-dental students, and interested others. Interdisciplinary in content, the course
examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact with and effect health, chronic
disease, health-promotion efforts, medical treatment, and stress management. Course content also will
examine sound research principles, alternative or complementary treatments, and application techniques
for health-habit changes. NOTE: Noncredit for students who completed PSY 315. 1 Course Credit
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND COURSES
PEH 330                 Extended School Experience- PED/HLT
This course is designed as an advanced-level practicum to allow students an opportunity to
integrate teaching skills and understandings in a school setting. This experience enables students
to compile evidence that they meet the performance indicators required for admission to Student
Teaching. In the course of the practicum, students will be expected to demonstrate the ability to
teach in a manner that invites integration with their students, including the ability to formulate
and use appropriate and effective questioning strategies. Students also will keep a journal of
daily reflections that reveals the depth of their ability to learn from their own teaching. Students
will be expected to plan and implement at least one unit (related sequence of lessons) of
instruction, including: 1) a completed unit plan with goals and objectives; 2) a supporting
rationale; 3) a detailed activity outline; 4) a statement describing modes of assessment and
samples of student work; 5) an annotated bibliography of materials and texts for students; and 6)
an annotated bibliography of readings done in preparation for teaching the unit. It is expected
that students will draw from the materials created in this course for entries in their Education
portfolios and written assessments; therefore, a reflective self-assessment should be included
with the unit and a statement of evaluation should be obtained from the cooperating teacher.
                1 Course Credit
PED 125                  Foundations of Physical Education
This course introduces the student to the discipline of physical education including key concepts and
professional applications. Historical trends, contemporary issues, and ethical questions are addressed.
Students explore information technology and movement analysis technology relevant to the discipline of
physical education.                                                                1 Course Credit
PED 237               Hiking and Campcraft
This course is designed to familiarize students with the outdoors through a variety of activities.
Hiking, backpacking, and camping techniques will be introduced along with lessons in survival
skills. 1/4 Course Credit

PED 244                   Physical Education Activities for the Elementary Child
This course is a study of the theory and principles of movement for the elementary child with emphasis on
the analysis of basic movement, motor development, games, sports, creative movement, and gymnastics.
Selection and progression of skills in physical-education classes is based on knowledge about movement,
learning theory, and development of the elementary child. Curriculum development principles for P-12
physical education will be investigated. Students will have the opportunity to work with children in both
public school and community settings.                                               1 Course Credit
PED 245                   Dance
A comprehensive dance course dealing with basic-movement skills and creative-teaching approaches in
folk, social, and creative dance and rhythmic gymnastics. Study of dance as an art form and the place of
dance in education will be included. A portion of the class will be focused directly on dance for children,

                                  Physical Education and Health 23
especially creative dance and elementary folk and square dance. Arts Perspective. NOTE: May be
approved on a term-by-term basis to meet the Active Learning Experience. (Check the Schedule of
Classes to see if this course is approved for the term in which the student plans to take the course). 1
Course Credit
PED 246                    Individual and Team Sports
Explores tactics, skills, teaching, and coaching methods for badminton, basketball, bowling, soccer,
tennis, and track and field, as well as teaching the philosophy of competition and coaching and practical
officiating. Individualized teaching procedures will be used. This course will include a two-hour
laboratory experience.                                                                 1 Course Credit
PED 247                    Individual and Team Sports II
Explores tactics, skills, teaching, and coaching methods in archery, football, golf, softball, volleyball, and
introduction to racquetball, as well as teaching the philosophy of competition and coaching and practical
officiating. Individualized teaching procedures will be used. This course will include a two-hour
laboratory experience.                                                                 1 Course Credit
PED 250                    Aquatics
Provides the student with knowledge and skills to teach swimming basics and water safety to all ages, and
provides the opportunity to earn the American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor certification. This
course also provides training in community water safety and basic water rescue skills, as well as
introduces water as a fitness and therapeutic medium.                                  1 Course Credit
PED 280                    Adapted Physical Education
This course will focus on developing knowledge of current concepts and practices in adapted physical
education. Course topics will include assessment, planning, and implementation of physical education
activities for people with unique needs and abilities. The topic of working with special-needs populations
will be approached from a developmental perspective using a ―person-first‖ model. Students will be
expected to acquire the skills necessary to understand typical and atypical motor performance, assess
motor skills and fitness, evaluate performance, and create goals and objectives that can be implemented.
Students will learn about the history of Adapted Physical Education and the current legislation in the
field, as well as the legal framework for the Individual Education Program (IEP). 1 Course Credit
PED 315                    Motor Behavior Across the Lifespan
The focus of this course is the study of basic principles of motor learning, motor control, and motor
development as they relate to human voluntary movement. The course will involve applications of
principles through observations and assessment of motor behavior and motor development from learning
to performance (acquisition of skill), throughout the life span, from infancy to older adulthood. 1 Course
Credit
PED 335                    Integrated Biomechanics and Exercise Physiology I
The goal of this course is to provide a foundation of knowledge to allow students to be able to apply the
content to optimize human performance in sports and physical activity. The content will include an
integration of sub-disciplines, such as Anatomical Kinesiology, Biomechanics, and Exercise Physiology.
The course will be divided into two parts, the first being basic introductions to the content and the second
being a more detailed study of the content as it applies to Aerobic Sports, Intermittent Activities, and
Anaerobic Sports and activities. Throughout the course, students will be required to write exercise
prescriptions, write technical papers (laboratory write-ups), interpret literature of the disciplines, and
understand statistical methodology. This course serves as a prerequisite to PED 340. It is a required
course for all Physical Education majors and recommended to any student interested in studying the
science of movement.                                                                   1 Course Credit
PED 340                    Integrated Biomechanics and Exercise Physiology II
This course is a continuation of PED 335. The goal of the course is more advanced applications of the
principles and concepts learned in the previous course. Emphasis will be placed on the clinical aspects of
the sub-disciplines including the areas of cardiac, pulmonary, metabolic, orthopedic and other prominent

                                   Physical Education and Health 24
disease conditions, and appropriate activity interventions. Throughout this course, students will gain
experience in using the HU-M-AN movement analysis and Dartfish software programs, and in creating
and presenting in-depth material to external audiences (campus-wide, community, na∩ve audiences). This
course is required for Physical Education majors. Students who are interested in working in medical
rehabilitation settings are encouraged to take this course.                         1 Course Credit
PED 362                   Teaching and evaluation in Physical Education
Curriculum design and theory and application of various teaching strategies and methods for Physical
Education required for P-12 Certification majors. Introduction to basic statistical procedures. A review of
evaluative techniques for individual and program accomplishments.                   1 Course Credit
PED 492                   Physical Education Seminar
Emphasizes exploration of professional opportunities and scientific investigation in the field of physical
education. Students explore areas of personal career interest, prepare a review of recent literature or a
paper based on their primary research, and make a formal oral presentation. Discussion and evaluation of
oral reports and presentations by resource persons are included. Required of all Physical Education
majors.                                                                             1 Course Credit

GENERAL STUDIES COURSES
GSTR 110:         Writing Seminar I: Critical Thinking
This course is designed to help students with transitions from their past experiences to the challenges of
College academic life and culture, also emphasizing writing, reasoning, and learning as foundations for
continuing academic success in General Education and beyond. Each section of the course involves
explicit, continuing attention to writing, reasoning, research, and reflective engagement with various
texts, written and non-written. All sections initially address with students questions about the nature of
education, liberal-arts education, and links to lifelong learning and living. Offered in multiple sections
each year; taken in one’s first regular term. NOTE: Effective Fall 2010, transfer students who meet
certain criteria may waive this requirement. See General Education Program for details.1 Course Credit
GSTR 210:         Writing Seminar II: Identity &Diversity
This course is designed to develop and build upon the reasoning, writing, research, and learning emphases
of GSTR 110, while engaging all students on issues close to the historic mission of the College--race,
gender, Appalachia, and class. Initially, each section explores the story of Berea, including as it relates to
the unifying themes of GSTR 210. Each section of the course involves explicit, continuing attention to
writing, reasoning, research, and reflective engagement with various texts, including instruction in the
processes of producing a research paper. Taken in one’s second regular term.1 Course Credit
GSTR 310:         Understandings of Christianity
This course invites students to imagine and consider Christianity from stances both inside and outside the
faith, from the vantage of various disciplines, as an instance of the general phenomenon of religion, and
as a way of understanding life’s purpose and meaning that remains important for many around the world.
All sections explore together some historical understandings of Christianity, and then individual sections
each explore a selected contemporary issue in light of historical and biblical perspectives. Each section
applies and builds on the reasoning, research, and writing emphases of GSTR 110 and 210. 1 Course
Credit
GSTR 332:         Scientific Knowledge& Inquiry
This course invites students to explore a variety of scientific disciplines in order to understand what
science is, does, and tells us about the natural world around us. Employing an integrative approach to the
natural sciences, the course emphasizes the historical development of laws, models, and theories, as well
as basic scientific literacy important to contemporary concerns. Each section of the course includes
inquiry-based learning (laboratory) experiences. NOTE: See the ―General Education Program‖ section of
this publication for an alternate way to meet this requirement by taking two approved courses, at least one
of which must be a laboratory course.1 Course Credit

                                   Physical Education and Health 25
   GSTR 410:         Senior Seminar-Contemporary Global Issues
   As a capstone experience for General Education, this course invites students to synthesize and integrate
   their learning by using their developing abilities to reason, research, and communicate to investigate
   aspects of a significant issue for the world today. Each section explores a topic determined by the
   instructors, and is structured to model broadly multi-disciplinary approaches needed to understand
   complex problems. Each section involves faculty working closely with students’ independent research
   leading to presentation of a project to others in the course. 1 Course Credit



   How are Candidates in Health and Physical Education Taught Content Teaching Methods?

   Candidates preparing to teach health and physical education participate in a rigorous program that
   emphasizes from the beginning the connection between theory of health and physical education and
   the practice of teaching the content, Candidates learn to plan individual and group lessons and
   practice implementing their lessons in elementary, middle, and high schools in the area. Both the
   content standards and the Kentucky Teacher Standards are carefully woven into the coursework to
   ensure that candidates receive the most up-to-date instruction, that they develop skills in best
   practices, and that they develop the dispositions necessary to teach in the most positive and
   supportive ways possible.

                   TEACHING FOR THE KENTUCKY TEACHER STANDARDS
                    HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATION

   The chart below demonstrates where candidates preparing for certification in Health and
   Physical Education encounter the Kentucky Teacher Standards in their coursework and
   related field experiences. The descriptions below identify the various gradations of
   emphasis in each course, ranging from not addressed in the class (when the standard does
   not match the course content) to demonstration of competency.


Score                                                                     Explanation
        Not addressed          These standards are not addressed in this course.
           Foundational        The fundamental elements, dispositions, and skills necessary to engage the concepts at the
                               appropriate developmental levels are introduced in this course.
     Supporting Context        Although indirect, experiences and content that support a rich understanding of the contexts
                               that support the candidate’s ability to develop the dispositions, skills, and practices are
                               provided in this course.
    Expanded/Deepened          This level indicates that the standard has been identified as a special focus in the listed class
 Understanding and Practice    and that particular attention is paid to the standard in the course content, assignments, and
                               field placement experiences.
   Ready to Student Teach      During the pre-professional term experience in the classroom, candidates must demonstrate
                               they are ready to student teach, have an understanding of each standard, the abilities and skills
                               required to apply that understanding with others, and the dispositions necessary to

                                       Physical Education and Health 26
                               successfully engage students within this framework.
Competency Demonstrated in     This level indicates that candidates are expected to demonstrate appropriate developmental
         Practice              understanding and application of the standards in the student teaching and seminar semester.




                             EDS EDS EDS         PED     PED PED          PED        PED    PED      PED PEH EDU              EDS
                             150 349 355         244     245  246         247        250    280      362 330 481              482

  Standard 1         1.1
                     1.2
 The Teacher
                     1.3
 Demonstrates
Applied Content      1.4
  Knowledge          1.5
  Standard 2         2.1
                     2.2
 The Teacher
                     2.3
 Designs and
    Plans            2.4
  Instruction        2.5
 Standard 3          3.1
                     3.2
 The Teacher
                     3.3
 Creates and
 Maintains a         3.4
   Learning          3.5
 Environment
  Standard 4         4.1
                     4.2
   Teacher
                     4.3
Implements and
   Manages           4.4
  Instruction        4.5
  Standard 5         5.1
                     5.2
 The Teacher
                     5.3
 Assesses and
Communicates         5.4
  Learning           5.5
   Results           5.6

                                       Physical Education and Health 27
  Standard 6       6.1
  The Teacher      6.2
 Demonstrates
                   6.3
      the
Implementation     6.4
 of Technology     6.5
  Standard 7       7.1
Reflects on and
   Evaluates
 Teaching and      7.2
    Learning       7.3
  Standard 8       8.1
                   8.2
  Collaborates
                   8.3
with Colleagues,
  Parents, and     8.4
     Others
  Standard 9       9.1
                   9.2
  Evaluates
                   9.3
Teaching and
 Implements        9.4
 Professional
 Development
 Standard 10       10.
   Provides         1
  Leadership       10.
  within the        2
   School,         10.
Community and
                    3
  Profession
                   10.
                    4




                         Physical Education and Health 28
American Association of Health Education Standards

Standard                                   Courses/Activities/Assessments

1. assess individual and community needs   PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio
for health ed.
                                           HLT 111, 215, 224, 236: candidates investigate human sexuality, significant issues in health, addictions and violence, and
                                           women’s health issues. Candidates create projects, media analysis, public service announcement and presentations.

                                           HLT 315: incorporates physical, cognitive, and affective domains in teaching and learning health concepts. Candidates create
                                           lesson plans, participate in town meeting discussions on community health topics

                                           All HLT courses include designing and making presentations to the class. In various years, several include making digital stories
                                           of concepts related to health.

2. Plan effective Health Education         HLT 111 and 215: include candidates planning and making health education presentations to other students on campus.
programs.
                                           HLT 315: curricular planning and institutional patterns of a health education program for P-12. Candidates demonstrate
                                           understanding and use of national and state education standards and their application to developing and improving school health
                                           and physical education programs. Candidates develop and utilize creative methods of teaching health-related concepts; display
                                           for local health fair on selected topic. Candidates create lesson plans.

                                           PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio

                                           EDS 480: Response Papers, Classroom Observations, Special Needs Research, Case Study/IEP, Interview
                                           EDS 481 & EDS 482: Teaching and observation by supervisor and cooperating teacher, Self-evaluation of practice, Exit
                                           portfolio including Teacher Work Sample Analysis
3. Implement Health Ed programs.           HLT 111 and 215: include candidates planning and making health education presentations to other students on campus.

                                           HLT 315: candidates develop lesson plans and develop and utilize creative methods of teaching health-related topics, through
                                           health fair displays and town meetings

                                           PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio

                                           EDS 480: Response Papers, Classroom Observations, Special Needs Research, Case Study/IEP, Interview
                                           EDS 481 & EDS 482: Teaching and observation by supervisor and cooperating teacher, Self-evaluation of practice, Exit
                                           portfolio including Teacher Work Sample Analysis



                                                                 Physical Education and Health 29
4. Evaluate effectiveness of Health Ed         PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio
programs.

5. Coordinate provision of Health Ed           PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio
programs and services.

6. Act as a resource in health ed.             HLT 315: methods of developing ways to teach health-related topics, create a display for local health fair on selected topic,
                                               observations in schools, lesson plans

                                               PEH 330: field experience in local schools, creating teacher education professional portfolio



7. Communicate health and Health Ed            HLT 315: candidates create their philosophy of health education, observations in schools, create a display for local health fair on
needs, concerns, resources.                    a selected topic, lesson plans




                                             2011 National Initial Physical Education Teacher Education Standards
                                                                             NASPE

                 STANDARDS                                                         COURSE EXPERIENCES & ASSESSMENTS
Standard 1: Scientific and Theoretical
Knowledge

Physical Education teacher candidates know and
apply discipline-specific scientific and theoretical
concepts critical to the development of physically
educated individuals.

                                                       1:1
1:1 Describe and apply physiological and               PED250: Candidates complete experiential lab in the pool, verbally critiquing self and peers.
biomechanical concepts related to skillful
movement, physical activity and fitness.               PED 280: Disability Fact Sheet – candidates research a disability and create a fact sheet. They will present this
                                                       material to the class.
                                                       PED 280: Exam material – growth and development of the CNS; Sensory-Integrative-Motor-Sensory-Feedback
                                                       System; understanding of typical and atypical motor performance.

                                                       PED 245: Candidates describe and demonstrate the importance of core support skeletal alignment in dance

                                                                      Physical Education and Health 30
                                                      technique.

                                                      PED 315: motor learning, motor control, motor development: classification stages & theories as they relate to
                                                      skillful movement, physical activity and fitness.



1:2 Describe and apply motor learning and             1:2
psychological/behavioral theory related to skillful   PED250 Candidates practice teach from each Red Cross program, incorporating appropriate objectives and
movement, physical activity and fitness.              activity for various ages and abilities, enabling progressing from nervous novice to advanced swimmer while
                                                      implementing appropriate motivational and behavior management strategies.; Completion of American Red
                                                      Cross Fundamentals of Instructor Training certification program.

                                                      280: Exam material – Neurological basis of movement; the Developmental Model; planning for
                                                      developmentally appropriate activity.

                                                      PED 315: Text & handouts reading assignments, lectures, power point presentations, class discussions and
                                                      various exams over: motor learning, motor control & motor development classifications and theories.
                                                      PED 315: Each candidate will (1) complete one individual experiment on themselves, collect data and turn in a
                                                      write up (2) administer to classmates, collect data and write up (descriptions and results and conclusions) &
                                                      turn in for evaluation one experiment (in either motor learning, motor control or motor development), using
                                                      class members as subjects. Lab time will also be used to observe or work with movement groups in the
                                                      community, e.g., schools, day care or senior centers, etc., according to availability and appropriateness.
                                                      PED 315 Detailed section of course on anatomical structure & functions of the neuromuscular system which
                                                      requires passing an exam on the material at a 65% or higher score to show mastery of this content/ Of 65% not
                                                      reached on the initial exam a parallel exam must be passed at the 65% level, three chances are given to pass
                                                      outside of class time. Failure to pass results in failure of the course.

1:3 Describe and apply motor development              1:3
theory and principles related to skillful             PED 246/247: Candidates create and implement a lesson plan involving specific sport related skill to teach
movement, physical activity and fitness.              peers (in class) and to teach in surrounding community schools (k-12). Candidates analyze assigned sport skills
                                                      for presentation to class.

                                                      PED250 Candidates practice teach from each Red Cross program, incorporating appropriate objectives and
                                                      appropriate skill progression activity for various ages and abilities, enabling progressing from nervous novice
                                                      to advanced swimmer while implementing appropriate motivational and behavior management strategies;
                                                      Completion of American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor certification.

                                                      PED 280: Exam Material - Neurological basis of movement; the Developmental Model; planning for
                                                      developmentally appropriate activity.

                                                      PED 245: Candidates demonstrate and describe developmental patterns by doing and teaching ―the Brain
                                                      Dance.‖ (Anne Green Gilbert)

                                                                     Physical Education and Health 31
                                                    PED 244: Observe and critique fundamental motor skill movement.

                                                    PED 315 Text & handouts reading assignments, lectures, power point presentations, class discussions and
                                                    various exam over: motor learning, motor control & motor development classifications and theories.

                                                    PED 315 Each candidate will administer, collect data and write up (description, results & conclusions) & turn
                                                    in for evaluation, one experiment (in either motor learning, motor control or motor development using class
                                                    members as subject. Lab time will also be use to observe or work with movement groups in the community,
                                                    e.g., schools, day care or senior centers, etc., according to availability and appropriateness.




1:4 Identify historical, philosophical and social
perspectives of physical education issues and       1:4
legislation.                                        PED 280: Exam material – historical perspectives on APE; legal contexts; inclusion; professional roles and
                                                    preparation; categorical and non-categorical approaches; developing a meaningful program.

                                                    PED 245: Candidates write and send a letter to legislators explaining the importance of dance for all
                                                    individuals.

                                                    PED 244: Written test over material covered in class.

                                                    PED 125 an introductory survey course emphasizing the historical, sociological and philosophical aspects of
                                                    physical education with introductory study of biological, psychological perspectives.
                                                    PED 125; three to five examinations, 6 to 8 page paper, various reaction papers, annotated bibliographies of
                                                    periodicals, personal philosophy of physical education, sport or physical activity.
                                                    PED 125 relationship of legislative & judicial process to sports and education, e.g., historical progress of Title
                                                    IX.

                                                    PED 362 Rework and/or initially develop, state and defend a personal philosophy of physical education – these
                                                    would be evaluated on quality of statement on defense of philosophy.

                                                    PED 246/247: Candidates create and present a sport skill analysis to class. Analysis includes video of sport
                                                    skill performance, flaws detected and drills created to correct flaws.

                                                    PED 250: Candidates evaluate peer skills using stroke analysis checklists; teach American Red Cross aquatic
                                                    programs (multi-session program), evaluating their students, providing motivation and skill refinement,
                                                    assessing critical exit skills acquisition according to Red Cross standards.

1:5 Analyze and correct critical elements of
motor skills and performance concepts.

                                                                   Physical Education and Health 32
                                                  1:5
                                                  PED 280: Administration of the Test of Gross Motor Development to special needs students; hands-on work
                                                  with special needs students in areas of motor skills, fitness and swimming.

                                                  PED 245: Weekly self and peer feedback on movement skills; Skills checks by instructor

                                                  PED 244: Candidates observe each other’s teachings and complete and turn in an observation summary.

                                                  PED 315 Involvement as an administrator or as a subject in 15 or more lab experiments in motor learning,
                                                  motor control, or motor development (BOT2, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency) will give
                                                  Teacher Candidates some basic hands on experience in analyzing and correcting critical elements of motor
                                                  skills and/or performance concepts.
Standard 2: Skill-and-Fitness-Based               PED 244: Physical Education for the Elementary Child-- Candidates participate in health-related physical
Competence                                        fitness assessments.

Physical education teacher candidates are
physically educated individuals with the
knowledge and skills necessary to demonstrate
competent movement performance and health-
enhancing fitness as delineated in the NASPE K-
12 Standards.

                                                  2:1
                                                  PED 246/247: Candidates perform skill tests for selected team and individual sports.
2.1 Demonstrate personal competence in motor
skill performance for a variety of physical       PED250 Candidates’ skills/swim strokes are evaluated according to the American Red Cross Progressive
activities and movement patterns.                 Learn-To-Swim exit criteria, requiring an acquisition of skills through Level Four in order to attain Water
                                                  Safety Instructor certification. Demonstrate the skills in leadership/teaching roles.


                                                  2:2
                                                  PED 245: Regular skills checks in a variety of movement styles.
2.2 Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing
level of fitness throughout the program.


                                                  2:3
                                                  PED 245: Dancing in class at least three hours each week, candidates demonstrate aerobic fitness, flexibility,
                                                  strength, and stamina.
2.3 Demonstrate performance concepts related to

                                                                 Physical Education and Health 33
skillful movement in a variety of physical
activities.                                          PED250 Candidates’ skills/swim strokes are evaluated according to the American Red Cross Progressive
                                                     Learn-To-Swim exit criteria, requiring an acquisition of skills through Level Four in order to attain Water
                                                     Safety Instructor certification.

                                                     PED 245: Candidates learn and demonstrate three different dance types: Folk/social, creative/expressive, and
                                                     rhythmic gymnastics.

                                                     PED 244: Physical Education for the Elementary Child-- Observation and personal reflections.
Standard 3: Planning and Implementation

Physical Education teacher candidates plan and
implement developmentally appropriate learning
experiences aligned with local, state and national
standards to address the diverse needs of all
students.



                                                     3:1
3:1 Design and implement short-and –long-term        PED250: Candidates develop and implement a block plan and lesson plans; evaluating/revising block/lessons
plans that are linked to program and instruction     based on their students’ progress throughout program sessions.
goals, as well as a variety of student needs.
                                                     PED 280: Data Collection from TGMD; assessment of gross motor skills and swimming skills; writing an IEP;
                                                     participating in the Motor Fitness Clinic where candidates write weekly lesson plans, including short and long-
                                                     terms goals, for a special needs students; provide instruction in motor skills, fitness and swimming based on the
                                                     goals.

                                                     PED 245: Candidates teach three-lesson mini units designed to meet program goals in each of two different
                                                     settings: pre-school and grades 4-5.

                                                     PED 244: Evaluate lesson plans that the students complete and the teaching demonstrated through the
                                                     conducting of those plans.

                                                     PED 362 Lesson plans, lesson sequences (unit), and/or mini teaching (teaching peers or assisting full time
                                                     physical education teachers during activity periods in area school for a limited time, e.g.
                                                     class lab time spent in various schools throughout a semester.)
                                                     PED 246/247: Lesson plans designed for specific age groups. Written reflections containing self critique.


                                                     3.2
3:2 Development and Implement appropriate            PED250: Candidates must implement appropriate, reasonable, measurable objectives (at least one per domain)
(e.g., measurable, developmentally appropriate,      in their lesson plans (one plan per each program session for which they are lead instructor). Candidates practice

                                                                    Physical Education and Health 34
performance-based) goals and objectives aligned    writing/articulating measurable lesson objectives in affective, psychomotor and cognitive domains.
with local, state and/or national standards.
                                                   PED 280: Writing an IEP; developing, writing and implementing lesson plans based on goals from the NASPE
                                                   Standards.

                                                   PED 245: Candidates prepare a total of nine different lessons designed to meet Kentucky Core Content
                                                   Standards and National Dance Standards.

                                                   PED 244: Compare objectives on lesson plans to state and national standards.

                                                   PED 362 Evaluation of assignments: for lesson plans teacher would point out strengths and where more work is
                                                   needed , for video or DVD of TC’s teaching a self-evaluation written report: for the knowledge of instructional
                                                   and program goals and curriculum(program of studies) in general would usually be done by take home or open
                                                   book test.



3:3 Design and Implement content that is aligned
with lesson objectives.                            3:3
                                                   PED 246/247: Lesson plans designed for specific age groups. Written reflections containing self critique.

                                                   PED250: Candidates teach/lead meaningful activity (games, safety knowledge, review skills and new skills,
                                                   use of equipment, repetition/practice time) which enable learners to meet lesson objectives aligned with
                                                   American Red Cross standards for program level.

                                                   PED 280: Exam material – strategies for meeting individual needs; planning developmentally appropriate
                                                   activities; MFC preparation, participation and experience

                                                   PED 245: Candidates design lesson plans to achieve learning objectives they set.

                                                   PED 244: Observation of teaching.

                                                   PED 362 Knowledge of teaching strategies would be assessed by tests, e.g., chapter test of Judith Rink- text,
                                                   Teaching Physical Education for Learning
                                                   PED 362 Professor will evaluate rubrics used in various lesson plans/sequence lessons or unit plans.

3:4 Plan for and manage resources to provide
active, fair and equitable learning experiences.   3:4
                                                   PED 246/247: Lesson plans designed for specific age groups. Written reflections containing self critique. Peer
                                                   teaching lesson plans for specific sport skills.

                                                   PED250: Student Lesson Leaders plan for individualization within group lesson by assigning teacher’s aide or
                                                   assistive equipment, to enable individuals to fully participate in the lesson.

                                                                  Physical Education and Health 35
                                                     PED 280: Preparation for and participation in the Motor Fitness Clinic.

                                                     PED 245: Candidates organize teaching plans and materials to include all students.

                                                     PED 362: Equity behavior that supports justness and impartiality in all curricula or co-curricular activities will
                                                     be emphasized in developing lessons and units, e.g., enough correct equipment and space for activities to be
                                                     safe for all.

3:5 Plan and adapt instruction for diverse student
needs, adding specific accommodations and/or
modifications for student exceptionalities.          3:5
                                                     PED 246/247: Lesson plans designed for specific age groups. Written reflections containing self critique. Peer
                                                     teaching lesson plans for specific sport skills.

                                                     PED 250: Simulate disabilities and explore possible movement skills and entry/exits in the water. Complete
                                                     American Red Cross Fundamental of Instructor Training course and Water Safety Instructor Course
                                                     certification requirements. Provide individuals/small groups with teacher’s aide or assistive equipment to
                                                     enable full participation in the lesson.

                                                     PED 280: Candidates select appropriate accommodations for special needs students in the areas of games,
                                                     sports, fitness and swimming.

                                                     PED 244: Observation.

                                                     PED 245: Candidates take individual student needs into account in planning classes in each setting.
3:6 Plan and implement progressive and
sequential instruction that addresses the diverse
needs of all students.
                                                     3:6
                                                     PED 246/247: Lesson plans designed for specific age groups. Written reflections containing self critique.

                                                     PED250: Student Lesson Leaders plan for individualization within group lesson by assigning teacher’s aide or
                                                     assistive equipment and modifying activity to enable individuals to fully participate in the lessons which
                                                     progress in skill acquisition according to the American Red Cross standards/criteria.

                                                     PED 280: Exam material – developmental activities for reflex development and inhibition; sensory stimulation
                                                     and discrimination; motor-sensory responses, motor patterns and motor skills; the developmental model.

                                                     PED 245: Candidates teach two mini-units of three lessons each focused around a single goal and building
                                                     sequentially toward it.
                                                                    Physical Education and Health 36
                                                    PED 244: Observation.

                                                    PED 362 Class discussion on importance of progressive exercising, e.g., using the democratic high jump using
                                                    a slanted rope, safely positioned on two standards, each student picks where on the slant he/she will jump.
3:7 Demonstrate knowledge of current
technology by planning and implementing
learning experiences that require students to
appropriately use technology to meet lesson         3:7
objectives.                                         PED 245: Candidates use audio and video technology in preparing classes. Their students use books, music and
                                                    props in learning experiences.
Standard 4: Instructional Delivery and
Management

Physical education teacher candidates use
effective communication and pedagogical skills
and strategies to enhance student engagement and
learning.

                                                    4:1
4:1 Demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal     PED 246/247: Candidates will peer teach 1-2 lessons of assigned sport skills. Candidates will participate in
communication skills across a variety of            team teaching in surrounding community schools (k-12). Peer teaching performance involving community of
instructional formats.                              inquiry and written reflections.

                                                     PED250: Candidates articulate safety lessons and skill lessons to children and/or adults, enhancing
                                                    communication with verbal cues and using written signage and equipment as visual aids.

                                                    PED 280: Evaluation and reflection of teaching experiences
                                                    PED 280: Exam material – adaptation techniques to use for instruction of material.

                                                    PED 245: Candidates teach children and their peers, give individual feedback to others in the class, and make
                                                    presentations.




                                                    4:2
4:2 Implement effective demonstrations,             PED 246/247: Candidates will peer teach 1-2 lessons of assigned sport skills. Candidates will participate in
explanations and instructional cues and prompts     team teaching in surrounding community schools (k-12).
to link physical concepts to appropriate learning    Peer teaching performance involving community of inquiry and written reflections.
experiences.
                                                    PED250: Candidates acquire Red Cross Learn-To-Swim skills prior to demonstrating them within the
                                                                   Physical Education and Health 37
                                                      Community Aquatic Program; provide meaningful games, use verbal cues, use visual aids to develop and
                                                      practice skills, meeting lesson plan objectives.

                                                      PED 280: Authentic assessments with special needs students; evaluation and reflection of teaching experiences
                                                      and written goals and objectives.

                                                      PED 245: Candidates practice appropriate explanations and cues in teaching a variety of dance types.




                                                      4:3
                                                      PED 246/247: peer teaching performance involving community of inquiry and written reflections.
4:3 Provide effective instructional feedback for
skill acquisition, student learning and motivation.   PED250: Candidates practice positive and corrective feedback with their participants while developing water
                                                      safety and progressive swim skills within the Community Aquatic Program.

                                                      PED 280: Evaluation of teaching experiences
                                                      PED 280: Exam material – creating appositive environment for learning; novelty; complexity; closure; intrinsic
                                                      and extrinsic motivators; rules; positive behavior support, positive reinforcement, contingency management,
                                                      shaping.

                                                      PED 245: Candidates give feedback to others in the class and to students in the classes they teach.

                                                      PED 244: Observation of and evaluation of student’s teaching.



                                                      4:4
4:4 Recognize the changing dynamics of the            PED 246/247: Candidates will peer teach 1-2 lessons of assigned sport skills. Candidates will participate in
environment and adjust instructional tasks based      team teaching in surrounding community schools (k-12). Peer teaching performance involving community of
on student responses.                                 inquiry and written reflections.

                                                      PED 250: Candidates plan for learner’s success by placing students in appropriate water depth; and challenge
                                                      those ―ready‖ for more advanced skills by progressing to deeper water.

                                                      PED 280: Reflection of teaching experiences
                                                      PED 280: Discussion of teaching strategies for all students; program adaptations involving space, equipment,
                                                      number of players; rules and objectives.

                                                      PED 245: Candidates teach in pre-school, home-school, and public school settings, and adapt to changing
                                                      needs of each environment.

                                                      PED 244: Reflection on what worked and didn’t work with their lesson.
                                                                     Physical Education and Health 38
                                                     4:5
                                                     PED 246/247: peer teaching performance involving community of inquiry and written reflections.
4:5 Use managerial rules, routines and transitions
to create and maintain a safe and effective          PED250: Candidates reinforce pool rules and water safety information within Community Aquatic Program.
learning environment.
                                                     PED 280: Write a behavior management plan and implement it with a special needs student.
                                                     PED 280: Reflection of teaching experiences

                                                     PED 245: Candidates practice class management strategies and organize classes to transition from one section
                                                     to the next.

                                                     PED 244: Observation and reflective paper.




                                                     4:6
4:6 Implement strategies to help students            PED 246/247: peer teaching performance involving community of inquiry and written reflections.
demonstrate responsible personal and social
behaviors in a productive learning environment       PED250: Candidates present water safety lessons to peers and participants, incorporating American Red Cross
                                                     WHALE Tales water safety lessons.

                                                     PED 280: Development of a behavior management plan for special needs students
                                                     PED 280: Exam material –behavior support strategies; behavior management; analyzing behavior; support
                                                     strategies; antecedent management; contingency management; Premack principle; punishment; planned
                                                     ignoring; signal interference; proximity control, reduction of tension through humor; hurdle lesson;
                                                     restructuring the classroom program; verbal removal; physical restraint

                                                     PED 245: Candidates practice strategies to encourage productive and supportive group work among students.

Standard 5: Impact on Student Learning

Physical education teacher candidates use
assessments and reflection to foster student
learning and inform decisions about instruction.




                                                                   Physical Education and Health 39
                                                    5:1
5.1 Select or create appropriate assessments that   PED250: Candidates must implement appropriate, reasonable, measurable objectives (at least one per domain)
will measure student achievement of goals and       in their lesson plans (one plan per each program session for which they are lead instructor); Implement
objectives.                                         American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor skills acquisition checklists.

                                                    PED 280: Test of Gross Motor Development used to asses special needs students in motor skills; ongoing
                                                    authentic assessment; IEP written goals and objectives written based up the TGMD and swimming skills
                                                    assessment.

                                                    PED 245: Candidates practice a variety of assessment techniques to measure goals and objectives.

                                                    PED 244: Candidates report established goals along with success of student achievement.




                                                    5:2
5.2 Use appropriate assessments to evaluate         PED250: Lesson Leaders reflect on lesson, determining if/who met lesson objectives, which leads to planning
student learning before, during and after           appropriate activity for next lesson.
instruction.
                                                    PED 280: Authentic assessment used when teaching
                                                    PED 280: Written reflections of teaching experiences.
                                                    PED 280: Exam material – formal and informal testing; measurement at the developmental level; assessing the
                                                    whole child (intelligence, adaptive behavior and language)

                                                    PED 245: Candidates practice giving formative feedback during lessons and summative assessment at the
                                                    conclusion of lessons.


                                                    5:3
                                                    PED 246/247: Written reflection responding to group feedback (community of inquiry) and self critique.
5.3 Use the reflective cycle to implement change
in teacher performance, student learning and/or     PED250: Complete American Red Cross self-assessment following each lesson leadership experience.
instruction goals and decisions.
                                                    PED 280: Written reflection of teaching experiences where specific areas of teaching are addressed on each,
                                                    such as behavior management, revising goals strategies for motivation, effective instruction. Questions such as
                                                    ―What was the best part of the lesson?‖ and ―What would you change about the lesson to make it better?‖
                                                    would be included in the reflective paper.

                                                    PED 245: After each teaching experience, candidates engage in written or verbal reflections on their teaching,
                                                    on student learning, and on lesson planning.



                                                                   Physical Education and Health 40
Standard 6: Professionalism

Physical education teacher candidates
demonstrate dispositions that are essential to
becoming effective professionals.



                                                    6:1
6.1 Demonstrate behaviors that are consistent
with the belief that all students can become        PED 250: Simulate disabilities and explore possible movement skills and entry/exits in the water. Complete
physically educated individuals.                    American Red Cross Fundamental of Instructor Training course and Water Safety Instructor Course
                                                    certification requirements. Provide individuals/small groups with teacher’s aide or assistive equipment to
                                                    enable full participation in the lesson.

                                                    PED 245: Candidates work with each student at the level at which they meet that student and encourage them
                                                    to develop beyond that point.




6.2 Participate in activities that enhance
                                                    6:2
collaboration and lead to professional growth and
                                                    PED 246/247: Written reflection of experiences at State Professional convention.
development.
                                                    PED250: Candidates work in committees (including Public Relations and Registration) to implement a
                                                    Community Aquatic Program by engaging contact, conversation and observation of the Service-Learning
                                                    Community Partner; Candidates are placed in leadership roles providing community water safety information
                                                    and activity to adults/families in the community.

                                                    PED 280: E-mail and face-to-face communication with Special Education Teachers.
                                                    PED 280: Observation of special needs students in their school, in the classroom.

                                                    PED 245: Candidates communicate with partnering teachers in planning and preparation of lessons and receive
                                                    feedback from partner teachers after each lesson.



6.3 Demonstrate behaviors that are consistent
                                                    6:3
with the professional ethics of highly qualified
                                                    PED 280: Evaluation and observation of candidates teaching and work with special needs students.
teachers.
                                                    PED 280: Appropriate dress and behavior on MFC days.

                                                    PED 245: Behaviors demonstrating such characteristics as honesty and confidentiality are observed in class and
                                                    in teaching experiences.

                                                                   Physical Education and Health 41
                                                  6:4
6.4 Communicate in ways that convey respect       PED 280: Candidates are required to use inclusion language throughout the class.
and sensitivity.                                  PED 280: Candidates are required to demonstrate appropriate communication with the special needs students
                                                  they are working with.
                                                  PED 280: Candidates write progress reports to the teachers and parents of the special needs student they are
                                                  working with.

                                                  PED 245: Candidates are expected to communicate verbally and in writing in a professional manner
                                                  demonstrating respect for each other, their instructor, and their students.

                                                  PED 244: Physical Education for the Elementary Child--Observation.



B. Alignment of Experiences

Kentucky Learning Goals, Academic Expectations, Program of Studies & Core Content for Assessment

                Courses                       Kentucky Learning              Program of Studies                                      Core content for Assessment
                                              Goals & Academic
                                              Expectations
 PEH 100 Introduction to Lifetime             2.29-2.35                    PL-P-LPW-S-9; PL-7-LPW-S-8-11; PL-H-                      PL-EP-2.2.3
 Wellness                                                                  LPW-S-1, 2, 5, 7-10; PL-P/6-PS-U-6; PL-7-                 PL-07-2.2.3
                                                                           LPW-6, 7; PL-H-LPW-U-1, 2,5-7                             PL-HS-2.2.1, 2.2.3
 PED 125 Foundations of Physical              2.31                         PL-6-LPW-S-4,5; PL-7-LPW-S-1, 2, 6; PL-                   PL-06-2.2.2
 Education                                                                 8-LPW-S-1, 2, 6; PL-6-LPW-U-3; PL-7-                      PL-06-2.2.1
                                                                           LPW-U-1, 2; PL-8-LPW-U-1, 2                               PL-08-2.2.1
 PED 244 Physical Education                   1.15, 2.31, 2.34, 2.35       PL-P-PS-S-1-8; PL-P-LPW-S-1-8; PL-6-                      PL-EP-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1,2.2.4,
 Activities for Elementary Children                                        LPW-S-7:PL-P-PS-U-1, 2; PL-P-LPW-U-1-                     2.2.5
                                                                           5; PL-6-LPW-U-4, 5                                        PL-06-2.2.4, 2.2.5
 PED 245 Dance                                1.15, 2.34, 2.35, 4.5        PL-P-PS-S-1-8; PL-P-LPW-S-1, 2, 4, 5; PL-                 PL-EP-2.1.1, 2.1.2,2.2.1
                                                                           6-PS-S-1-4; PL-7-LPW-1-3; PL-8-PS-S-1-5,                  PL-06-2.1.1, 2.1.2
                                                                           7; PL-P-PS-U-1, 2, PL-P-LPW-U-1, 2; PL-6-                 PL-07-2.1.1, 2.1.2
                                                                           PS-U-1, 2                                                 PL-08-2.1.1, 2.1.2
 PED 246/247 Individual and Team              2.34, 2.35                   PL-P-PS-S-1-8; PL-P-LPW-S-1, 2, 4-8; PL-                  PL-EP-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1,2.2.2,
 Sports I/II                                                               6-PS-S-1-6; PL-6-LPW-1-7; PL-7-PS-S-1-5;                  2.2.4, 2.2.5
                                                                           PL-7-LPW-S-1, 2, 6; PL-8-PS-S-1-7; PL-8-                  PL-06-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1, 2.2.2,
                                                                 Physical Education and Health 42
                                                       LPW-S-1- 7; PL-H-PS-S-1-7; PL-H-LPW-S-     2.2.4, 2.2.5
                                                       3-6; PL-P-PS-U-1, 2; PL-LPW-U-1-5; PL-6-   PL-07-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1, 2.2.2,
                                                       PS-U-1, 2; PL-6-LPW-U-1-5; PL-7-PS-U-1,    2.2.4, 2.2.5
                                                       2; PL-7-LPW-1-5; PL-8-PS-U-1,2; PL-8-      PL-08-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1, 2.2.2,
                                                       LPW-U-1-4; PL-H-PS-U-1-3; PL-H-LPW-        2.2.4, 2.2.5
                                                       U-1-4                                      PL-HS-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.1,
                                                                                                  2.2.2, 2.2.4, 2.2.5
PED 280 Adapted Physical          2.35, 4.6            PL-6-LPW-S-1, 2, 3, 6; PL-7-LPW-S-1, 2, 6; PL-06-2.2.1
Education                                              PL-8-LPW-S-1, 2, 6; PL-H-LPW-S-1-5; PL- PL-07-2.2.1
                                                       6-LPW-U-1, 2; PL-7-LPW-U-1, 2; PL-8-       PL-08-2.2.1
                                                       LPW-U-1, 2; PL-H-LPW-U-1-3                 PL-HS-2.2.1, 2.2.2
PED 315 Motor Behavior Across     2.31                 PL-P-PS-S-1, 2, 6; PL-6-PS-S-1; PL-6-      PL-EP-2.1.1, 2.1.2
Lifespan                                               LPW-S-2,3; PL-7-LPW-S-1; PL-8-PS-S-1,      PL-06-2.1.1,2.1.2, 2.2.1
                                                       3; PL-H-PS-S-1-6; PL-P/6/7/8/H-PS-U-1, 2   PL-07-2.1.1, 2.1.2
                                                                                                  PL-HS-2.1.1
PED 335 Integrated Biomechanics   2.35                 PL-P-LPW-S-2, 3, 5, 9; PL-6-LPW-S-6; PL- PL-EP-2.2.1, 2.2.3
and Exercise Physiology I                              7-LPW-S-8, 10, 11; PL-H-PS-S-1-6; PL-H-    PL-06-2.2.3
                                                       LPW-S-7-10; PL-P-LPW-U-1, 2, 6; PL-6-      PL-07-2.2.3
                                                       LPW-U-6; PL-7-LPW-U-6, 7; PL-H-PS-U-       PL-HS-2.1.1, 2.2.3
                                                       1, 2;PL-H-LPW-U-6, 7
PED 340 Integrated Biomechanics   2.35                 PL-P-LPW-S-2, 3, 5, 9; PL-P-LPW-S-6;       PL-EP-2.2.1, 2.2.3
and Exercise Physiology I                              PL-7-LPW-S-8, 10, 11; PL-H-PS-S-1-6; PL- PL-06-2.2.3
                                                       P-LPW-U-1, 2, 6; PL-6-LPW-U-6; PL-7-       PL-07-2.2.3
                                                       LPW-U-6, 7; PL-H-PS-U-1, 2;PL-H-LPW-       PL-HS-2.1.1, 2.2.3
                                                       U-6, 7
PED 362 Teaching and Evaluation   2.31-2.35            PL-6-PS-S-1-6; PL-7-PS-S-1-5; PL-7-LPW- PL-EP-2.2.1
in Physical Education                                  S-3-5; PL-8-PS-S-1-7; PL-8-LPW-S-3, 4, 5; PL-06-2.1.1, 2.1.2
                                                       1, 7; P L-H-LPW-S-1-4; PL-P-LPW-U-1, 2; PL-07-2.1.1, 2.1.2
                                                       PL-6/7/8-PS-U-1, 2; PL-7/8-LPW-U-3; PL-    PL-07-2.2.2
                                                       H-PS-U-2; PL-H-LPW-U-1-3                   PL-08-2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.2.2
                                                                                                  PL-HS-2.1.1, 2.2.1, 2.2.2
PED 492, Senior Seminar in        4.1                  Understandings, skills and concepts are put into   Content is assessed on an individual
Physical Education                                     practice in a professional manner.                 basis as it applies.




                                              Physical Education and Health 43
 EDS 150 Introduction to Education 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 3.4, 4.2, 5.2, N/A                                                          N/A
                                   6

 EDS 349 Education and Culture          4.5, 4.6                       N/A                                                    N/A


 EDS 355 Extended Field                 4.5, 4.6                       N/A                                                    N/A
 Experience: Enriching World
 Visions
 EDS 481/482 Student Teaching           3.1, 3.3,3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7,   Understandings, skills and concepts are addressed in   Content is addressed on an
 Seminar & Student Teaching (P-         6.1-6.3                        the classroom as it becomes pertinent and necessary    individual level as it becomes
                                                                       during their experiences—reflected in lesson plans     necessary during a candidates
 12, 5-12, 8-12)                                                                                                              student teaching experience—
                                                                                                                              reflected in lesson plans



Health KERA Initiatives

Kentucky Learner Goals & Standards                                              HLT 215, 315, CFS 221


Program of Studies                                                              HLT 111, HLT 210, HLT 215, HLT 224, HLT 236, HLT 315, CFS 221, PSY 215


Core Content for Assessment                                                     HLT 111, HLT 210, HLT 215, HLT 224, HLT 236, HLT 315, CFS 221, PSY 215




The Physical Education and Health Program meets or exceeds many of the requirements of the Academic Expectations. For example all
coursework, especially the pedagogy courses, have activities and laboratory/field experiences that require them to observe (1.3), organize
information (1.10), write using appropriate forms (1.11), communicate ideas through movement (1.15) and use technology (1.16). Additionally, all
physical education and health coursework emphasizes content present in Academic Expectations 2.29-2.35. These courses require candidates to
become proficient in their own execution of movement skills as well as learn appropriate techniques to teach and evaluate them in the P-12
classroom. The coursework in the health field requires candidates to learn about health from many different perspectives (i.e. personal, public, community,
and global perspective), and learn how to address different health issues in the P-12 classroom. Additionally, the professional education and methods
course sequence is heavily inquiry oriented with explicit instruction regarding how to facilitate both short- and long-term inquiry for students.
In addition to providing pedagogical knowledge and skills, all professional education coursework within the Physical Education and Health
Program provides our candidates with diverse perspectives supporting their work with colleagues, students and parents from diverse backgrounds.

                                                           Physical Education and Health 44
This is because all coursework is intentionally aligned with our conceptual framework honoring diversity-EDS 349/355-(2.16, 2.17, 4.5, & 4.6),
learning in a community of inquiry –EDS 150/481/482-(2.16, 2.17, 4.1-4.4, 4.6, 5.1-5.3, 6.2, & 6.3), democratic classrooms-EDS
150/349/355/481/482- (2.14, 2.16, 2.17, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.6, 5.4), and integrating learning across content areas-EDS 150/481/482-(4.6, 5.1-5.5, &
6.1-6.3).

The Physical Education and Health Program meets and exceeds many of the understandings, skills and concepts present in the Program of Studies
and Core Content for Assessment under the Big Ideas of Psychomotor Skills, Lifetime Physical Wellness, Personal Wellness, Nutrition & Safety.
For example, all the courses in the core (PED 125: Foundations of Physical Education, PED 315: Motor Behavior Across Lifespan, PED 335:
Integrated Biomechanics & Exercise Physiology I, and PED 340: Integrated Biomechanics and Exercise Physiology II) focus on the foundations
(both historical and contemporary) of physical education, and the basic sciences behind movement and exercise. The core courses required in the
health minor (HLT 215 Significant Issues in Health, HLT 315 Health Teaching, and CSF 221 Fundamentals of Nutrition) focus on important
aspects of health and nutrition. All physical education and health majors are also required to become CPR and first aid certified either through
enrolling HLT 109: Comprehensive First Aid, or another certification course. The remaining required courses (PEH 100: Introduction to Lifetime
Wellness, PED 244: P.E. Activities for Elementary Child, PED 245: Dance, PED 246/247: Individual and Team Sports I/II, PED 280: Adapted
Physical Education, PED 362: Teaching & Evaluation in Physical Education, HLT 111: Human Sexuality, HLT 210: Health in Appalachia, HLT
224: Addiction and Violence in the Family, HLT 236: Women and Health, PSY 215: Health Psychology) provide candidates with the study and
experience of particular psychomotor movements and abilities along with the promotion and importance of a healthy lifestyle.




                                                        Physical Education and Health 45
Kentucky Teacher Standards: Physical Education and Health
                  Standard                                  Courses Addressing Standard                     Program Assessment of
                                                                                                                   Standard
Standard 1: The teacher demonstrates             EDS 150, EDS 481/482, PED 125, PED 237, PED             Key 1: Goals and Dispositions
applied content knowledge current and            244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 247, PED 250, PED            Key 2: Application to Program
sufficient in the certified content areas to     280, PED 315, PED 335, PED 340, PED 237, PED            Key 4: Application to Student
develop student knowledge and performance in     362, PED 492, , HLT 215, BIO 101, CFS 221*, HLT         Teaching
those areas.                                     111*, PSY 215*, HLT 224*, HLT 236*                      Key 5: Praxis
                                                                                                         Key 6: Student Teaching
                                                 Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Apology            Performance Assessment
                                                 Project, Micro teaching, lesson plans, field trips,     Key 7: Exit Portfolio
                                                 reflective writings, peer teaching, field experience,
                                                 community service projects (246/247), wellness
                                                 profile/HBC projects (PSY 215), doctor-patient
                                                 dialogues, community-based health program reports

                                                 Class Assessments: Mentor and co-op teacher, rubrics,
                                                 evaluations, skill analysis, exams, quizzes, reflective
                                                 writing, peer teaching, research projects (492)
Standard 2: The teacher designs and plans        EDS 150, EDS 349, EDS 355, EDS 481/482, PED             Key 4: Application to Student
instruction that develops student abilities to   244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 247, PED 280, PED            Teaching
use communication skills, apply core concepts,   362, HLT 315*, PSY 215*                                 Key 6: Student Teaching
become self-sufficient individuals, become                                                               Performance Assessment
responsible team members, think and solve        Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Learning Center Key 7: Exit Portfolio
problems, and integrate knowledge.               Project, IEPs, Case study, Performance, Lesson Plans,
                                                 Units, field experiences, peer teaching, wellness
                                                 profile/HBC projects (PSY 215), doctor-patient
                                                 dialogues, community-based health program reports,
                                                 health fair presentation, ice-breaker/warm-up activity

                                                 Class Assessments: Mentor and co-op teacher, rubrics,
                                                 evaluations, exams, quizzes, field experiences, peer
                                                 teaching, lesson plans
                                                        Physical Education and Health 46
Standard 3: The teacher creates and              EDS 150, EDS 349, EDS 355, EDS 481/482, PED           Key 3: Dispositions Assessment
maintains learning climate that supports the     244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 247, PED 280, PED          Key 4: Application to Student
development of student abilities to use          362, HLT 315*                                         Teaching
communication skills, apply core concepts,                                                             Key 6: Student Teaching
become self-sufficient individuals, become       Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Apology          Performance Assessment
responsible team members, think and solve        Project, Micro teaching, lesson plans, field          Key 7: Exit Portfolio
problems, and integrate knowledge.               experiences, peer teaching, ice-breaker/warm-up
                                                 activity, inspirational poem, song or saying, town
                                                 meeting

                                                 Class Assessments: Mentor and co-op teacher,
                                                 rubrics, evaluations, exams, quizzes, field
                                                 experiences, peer teaching
Standard 4: The teacher implements and           EDS 150, EDS 349, EDS 355, EDS 481/482, PED           Key 4: Application to Student
manages instruction that developments            244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 247, PED 280, PED          Teaching
student abilities to use communication skills,   362, HLT 315*                                         Key 6: Student Teaching
apply core concepts, become self-sufficient                                                            Performance Assessment
individuals, become responsible team             Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Apology          Key 7: Exit Portfolio
members, think and solve problems, and           Project, Micro teaching, lesson plans, field
integrate knowledge.                             experiences, peer teaching, ice-breaker/warm-up
                                                 activity, inspirational poem, song or saying, town
                                                 meeting

                                                 Class Assessments: Rubrics, Papers, Tests, quizzes,
                                                 field experiences, peer teaching




                                                       Physical Education and Health 47
Standard 5: The teacher assesses and              EDS 481/482, PED 280, PED 244, PED 246, PED             Key 4: Application to Student
communicates learning results to students         247, PED 250, PED 362, HLT 315*                         Teaching
and others with respect to student abilities to                                                           Key 6: Student Teaching
use communication skills, apply core concepts,    Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Micro teaching,    Performance Assessment
become self-sufficient individuals, become        lesson plans, communications with parents, design       Key 7: Exit Portfolio
responsible team members, think and solve         sample assessments, design systematic assessment
problems, and integrate knowledge.                program, peer teaching, observations, field
                                                  experiences, ice-breaker/warm-up activity,
                                                  inspirational poem, song or saying, town meeting,
                                                  health fair group presentation, awareness bulletin
                                                  board

                                                  Class Assessments: Peer Evaluations, Rubrics, Papers,
                                                  Tests, field experiences, presentations, health fair
                                                  presentation
Standard 6: The teacher demonstrates the          EDS 150, PED 246, PED 247, PED 315, PED 335,
implementation of technology to support           PED 340, HLT 315*, PSY 215*
instruction; access and manipulate data;
enhance professional growth and productivity;     Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Apology
communicate and collaborate with colleagues,      Project, Micro teaching, lesson plans, incorporation
parents, and the community; and conduct           of audio-visual in projects, assessing on-line
research.                                         resources, spread sheet management of data,
                                                  presentation design, health fair presentation, video
                                                  reviews, health-in-the-news presentation

                                                  Class Assessments: Rubrics, peer evaluations, motor
                                                  skill analysis, power point presentation, fitness
                                                  assessment, exercise prescription




                                                        Physical Education and Health 48
Standard 7: Reflects on and evaluates            EDS 150, EDS 349, EDS 355, EDS 481/482, PED                Key 1: Goals and Dispositions
teaching and learning situations and/or          244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 247, PED 280, PED               Key 2: Application to Program
programs.                                        362, HLT 315*                                              Key 4: Application to Student
                                                                                                            Teaching
                                                 Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Weekly                Key 6: Student Teaching
                                                 journals, reflection papers, peer assessments, field       Performance Assessment
                                                 experiences, peer teaching, health journals                Key 7: Exit Portfolio

                                                 Class Assessments: Final reflective evaluation, tests,
                                                 presentations, peer teaching
Standard 8: Collaborates with                    EDS 150, EDS 349, EDS 355, EDS 481/482, PED            Key 6: Student Teaching
colleagues/parents/ others to design,            125,PED237, PED 244, PED 245, PED 246, PED 280, Performance Assessment
implement, and support learning programs that    PED 315, PED 335, PED 340, PED 362, PED 492,           Key 7: Exit Portfolio
develop student abilities to use communication   PED 250, HLT 315*, PSY 215*
skills, apply core concepts, become self-
sufficient individuals, become responsible       Class projects, papers, Assignments: Extensive group
team members, think and solve problems, and      work, simulated parent letters, field experiences, peer
integrate knowledge.                             teaching, health fair presentation, bulletin board
                                                 assignment, community based program presentation

                                                 Class Assessments: Peer evaluations, Faculty/group
                                                 meetings, reflective self-evaluations, cooperating
                                                 teacher assessments, field experiences, peer teaching,
                                                 tests, quizzes

Standard 9: Evaluates teaching and               EDS 481/482, PED 244, PED 362, PED 280                     Key 6: Student Teaching
implements professional development with                                                                    Performance Assessment
respect to Kentucky’s learning goals, refines    Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Practicing core       Key 7: Exit Portfolio
the skills and processes necessary, and          teaching skills, KAPHERD convention, peer teaching,
implements a professional development plan.      lesson plans, field experiences
                                                 Class Assessment: Peer assessments, reflective
                                                 writing, peer teaching, lesson plans, field experiences,
                                                 tests, quizzes



                                                       Physical Education and Health 49
Standard 10: Provides leadership within           EDS 481/482, PED 125, PED 246, PED 247, PED 362 Key 7: Exit Portfolio
school/community/profession to improve
student learning and well-being.                   Class Projects, Papers, Assignments: Field
                                                   placements, community service projects, identification
                                                   of leadership possibilities at the national, state and
                                                   local levels
                                                   Class Assessment: reflective writing
*Indicates courses that are required to obtain a minor in health teaching.




                                                        Physical Education and Health 50
C. Alignment of EPSB Themes

Diversity

Berea’s vision that ―God has made of one blood all peoples of the Earth‖ and its unique focus on providing education to students
of economic need provides an important mandate and framework from which we have created our teacher education program.
This vision creates an imperative for us that unifies the issues of honoring diversity and addressing the needs of all students
(closing the achievement gap). All courses provide the perspective that diversity has many dimensions, and that teachers must
address each child’s unique identity. From this vision, we intentionally nurture dispositions and the consequent skill development
enabling our candidates to reach all students. This begins in EDS 150 where we help candidates deconstruct their existing models
of learning and teaching. EDS 349: Education and Culture in the United States, and EDS 355: Extended Field Experience:
Enriching World Vision, work together to engage candidates in a long discussion helping them identify themselves among the
broad spectrum of American cultures and to understand the long and intricately wound history that has gotten each of us to our
unique place in history. The culminating experience in EDS 355 is an ―experience in settings that will challenge them
sufficiently to see life through the eyes of those with whom they will work. Candidates will examine and challenge
their beliefs and attitudes about working with others different from themselves and are encouraged to adopt an
affirming attitude and disposition. Candidates are expected to increase their self-awareness of how interpersonal
relationships and community involvement may have a positive impact on teaching and learning for students.‖In this
course, candidates have worked in inner city Baltimore, on several different Native American reservations, with local migrant
populations, and in the Muslim School in Lexington.

In supplement to the professional education courses, the Department of Physical Education and Health at Berea College
has a unique program that provides an opportunity for our candidates to study with peers and faculty from diverse
backgrounds in the field of physical education. The program is the Danish American Exchange program. Currently
this program brings a Danish faculty to campus each year to teach in our department. Our candidates have the
opportunity to take classes and take part in clubs with this visiting faculty as well as participate in a travel course where
candidates go to Denmark and both take and lead classes in schools with Danish students of the same age. Several of
our majors have made use of this program.

The Department of Physical Education and Health at Berea Colleges provides the opportunity for our P-12 majors to
work with diverse populations. This is done mainly through our course offerings and field experiences in the following
ways:
      PED 280: Adapted Physical Education – Motor Fitness Clinic – candidates work one-on-one to assess, plan, and
      implement fitness and motor skills with special needs students from a local public school.

        PED 244, 245, 246, 247, 250, 362 – Field experiences where the candidates work with students of various skill
        levels and learning styles. Candidates are expected to utilize a variety of teaching strategies addressing
        differing levels of skill as well as differing modes of learning.

Assessment

Similarly, assessment is a central focus of several courses, both in the form of reflective self-assessment based on
evidence and the form of a series of developmentally progressive learning opportunities, beginning in the methods and
pedagogy courses and progressing through the teaching practica. Candidates are exposed to a variety of tools and

                                              Physical Education and Health 51
strategies that assess learning in the three domains – cognitive, affective and psychomotor. Authentic assessment,
formative and summative assessment are included in the assessment tools we work encourage our candidates to utilize.
PED 362: Teaching and Evaluation in Physical Education addresses the topic of assessment at the curriculum and
program level as well.

In the methods and pedagogy courses that our candidates take assessment of learning is addressed. These courses are:

PED 244: P.E. Activities for the Elementary Child:
 A study of the theory and principles of movement for the elementary child with emphasis on the analysis of basic
movement, motor development, games, sports and creative movement. Through creating prescriptive fitness programs,
creating lesson plans, and teaching loco motor, non-loco motor & manipulative skills in local elementary schools,
candidates learn different methods of assessing the three domains-cognitive, affective and psychomotor.

PED 245 Dance
In this course, candidates are immersed in the various forms of dance so that they may develop teaching competencies in them and
to engage them in thoughtful reflection and evaluation of one’s own work and that of peers and children. The course is directly
aligned with the National Standards for Danish Education and Kentucky Core content Standards in Dance in Elementary and
Secondary Education, and prepares candidates to teach and assess these standards in their students through lesson plans, peer
teaching, and teaching in schools.

PED 246: Individual and Team Sports I
This course prepares candidates to learn, teach and assess skills, rules and coaching methods for a variety of individual and team
sports. Extensive professional laboratory experiences are required, basic skills analysis and peer teaching are methods used to
address assessment of learning.

PED 247: Individual and Team Sports II
This course prepares candidates to learn, teach and assess skills, rules and coaching methods for a variety of individual and team
sports. Extensive professional laboratory experiences are required, basic skills analysis and peer teaching are methods used to
address assessment of learning.

PED 280: Adapted Physical Education
This course prepares candidates to assess physical education activities for people with unique needs and abilities. A major part of
the course includes participation in the Motor Fitness Clinic where candidates assess motor skills, swimming skills and/or fitness
skills to create goals, lesson plans, activities and a behavior management plan to address their specific needs.

PED 362: Teaching and Evaluation in Physical Education
This course provides candidates instruction in the theory of curriculum design and the theory and applications of various teaching
strategies and methods for physical education K-12. Introduction to basic statistical procedures and a review of evaluative
techniques for individual and program accomplishments are also included in this course.

HLT 315: Health Education and Promotion
This course provides the background information and skills health educator candidates need to implement health education and
promotion programming in a variety of environments, including schools, community and clinical settings. The major emphasis of
this course is to develop curricula that teach and promote health. Focus is on creative teaching, introduction to philosophy/history
or health education, and applications of certain priority health topics at the elementary and secondary (P-12) and community
levels. In this course candidates participate in observations, creation of lesson plans, and various health research projects to
broaden their understandings of health issues in the community and in schools.

PSY 215: Health Psychology Syllabus

                                               Physical Education and Health 52
This course examines how biological, psychological and social factors interact with and effect health, chronic disease, health-
promotion efforts, medical treatment, and stress management. In this course, candidates learn to recognize health problems, and
how to asses them. Through a wellness profile and a health behavior change project, candidates learn how to assess their own
health behaviors and create a plan to change or adapt health behaviors.

Lastly, in their culminating experience, student teaching, our candidates create a teacher work-sample analysis as part
of their exit portfolio.

Literacy

The crucial role literacy plays in student success is a central concept addressed in all the physical education and health
teacher preparation classes. We understand literacy as more than basic reading and writing. Instead, we see it as sets of
fully integrated and tightly woven skills, knowledge, abilities, dispositions, and interests. We know that success across
the content and learners’ ability to identify, manipulate, and respond to that content relies largely on learners’
development of these broad literacy competencies. Candidates’ understanding of the centrality of literacy knowledge
and skills in students’ ability to identify curricular links and connections, engage in exploration and discovery, and
experience personal empowerment and joyful learning through literacy are emphasized. We further understand that
literacy competencies are central to students’ full participation as learners, community members, and citizens.
Moreover, we understand the connection between the development of literacy skills and students’ access to
educational, professional, and economic opportunities.

Because we recognize and value these skills and the importance of candidates’ abilities to teach literacy skills across
the curriculum, our program fully integrates literacy skills in every aspect of our preparation program. Beginning in
EDS 150: Introduction to Education with emphasis on diverse reading levels and the responsibility to teach every child,
literacy is at the center of all physical education preparation experiences and content. As candidates continue through
the physical education methods courses, candidates are given the opportunity to integrate components of literacy into
the physical education content through creating lesson plans that include activities that reinforce reading and writing
skills.

Achievement Gap

In the same way Berea's vision illuminates our understanding of diversity, Berea's Teacher Preparation Programs are
grounded in a social justice philosophy that informs every programmatic decision we make and instructional design we
create. From Berea's founding, its faculty has been mission-bound to erase inequalities between men and women,
blacks and whites, rich and poor. Our current understanding is informed by a broader conception of diversity that
motivates us to examine not only the experiences we design for candidates, but also the outcomes of those experiences
from the perspective that every person should have the same access to all the benefits of their talent, creativity,
intelligence, and effort. To this end, we incorporate elements into almost every course explicitly addressing those
aspects of children's experience of school that create an "achievement gap." For example, EDS 150 moves our
candidates away from typical conceptions of grading and "good studentship" that alienate children from non-majority
middle class households. EDS 349 and EDS 355 ask our candidates to deconstruct their own experience of school and
examine with a compassionate perspective the lived experience of individuals representing a different economic or
cultural perspective. All the methods coursework asks our candidates to address the needs of every individual in the
classroom-going out of their way to communicate with the families of struggling students.

                                              Physical Education and Health 53
As our candidates progress through the Physical Education and Health Department, they learn to recognize the
importance of the connection between movement and learning, and how it can provide students with the same access to
all the benefits of their talent, creativity, intelligence and effort. We address this important topic in most of our courses
from motor learning, biomechanics, creative movement, dance, gymnastics, individual and team sports and aquatics
and strive to help our majors recognize the importance of maximum participation for all students regardless of skill
level and movement background. Throughout our curriculum we reinforce the belief that learning can be enhanced
through meaningful movement and developmentally appropriate skill acquisition. As a department we recognize the
importance of the recent scientific studies showing the connection between exercise and learning as well as the strong
connection between brain development and movement.

Through these experiences, candidates are prepared to recognize the factors that contribute to the achievement gap, to
assess their practice and student learning in ways that help them combat the achievement gap, and to plan and teach in
ways that allow all students access to success.

D. Program Faculty Matrix

  Name        Highest Degree,      Assignment: Faculty               Scholarship, Leadership in                    Relationship
                 Field, &          Indicate the   Rank          Professional Associations, and Service                  to
                University           role(s) of                                                                    Institution,
                                    the faculty                                                                       Unit,
                                     member                                                                         Program
Ambrose,      Master of            PEH 100,     Assistant      Publications:                                       Institution- FT
Thomas        Science in           PED 223,     Professor      McClung, JA & Ambrose, TK (2010). A                 Unit-PT
                                                               comparison of two instructional methods for         Program-PT
Kelly         Physical             PED 226,                    teaching the racquetball forehand to novices. The
              Education            PED 236,                    International Journal of Sport and Society, 1(4):
              Eastern              PED 237,                    45-52.
              Kentucky             PED 246                     McClung, JA, and Ambrose, TK, (2011) "Using
              University           PED 247,                    Directed Mimicry to Teach Archery to Novices."
                                                               The International Journal of Health, Wellness and
                                   PED 362                     Society, In Review

                                                               Presentations:
                                                               Ambrose, TK, McClung, JA, ―Human Need for
                                                               Physical Activity‖, PE PAYS Lecture Series,
                                                               University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland, March
                                                               16, 2010

                                                               Certifications:
                                                               Kentucky P-12 certification Physical Education
                                                               Kentucky Pupil Personnel Certification
                                                               Experience:
                                                               15 yrs grades 6-12
                                                               12 yrs Athletic Director
Beagle,       Ed.D Physical        PED 125,        Professor   Scholarship:                                        Institution-FT
Martha        Education            PED 254,                    Kentucky Health Catalyst Grant                      Unit-PT
                                                                Fall 2006 $2,000 to initiate the Walk Smart!       Program-PT
              University of        PED 362,                    Active Schools pedometer program as a pilot
              Kentucky             PED 492                     study for fourth graders at Shannon Johnson
              Lexington, KY
                                                               Publications:

                                             Physical Education and Health 54
                                                          Social Networking in Education, co-authored
                                                          with Don Hodges (PELinks4U)June 2009

                                                          Presentations:
                                                          Presenter, ―Able and Balanced‖
                                                          Co-presented with Physical Education major,
                                                          Jennifer Breneman American Alliance for Health,
                                                          Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance
                                                          Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana, March 2010

                                                          Certification:
                                                          New York State Physical Education and Health
                                                          K-12

                                                          Experience:
                                                          Physical Education Grades 5-12       11 years

                                                          Administration:
                                                          Chair of Department of Physical Education and
                                                          Health, Berea College    7 years
Brooks,    BA               PED 206           Staff       Berea College Head Women’s Basketball Coach          Institution-PT
Terence    Physical                                                                                            Unit-PT
                                                                                                               Program-PT
           Education/Health
           Education

           Murray State
           University
Cahill,    M.S. in Wellness   PED 235,        Part-time   Leadership:                                          Institution-PT
Nashwa     and Fitness        PED 248         Faculty     Vice President of Dance (2011) KAHPERD               Unit-PT
                                                          (Kentucky Association for Health and Physical        Program-PT
                                                          Education, Recreation and Dance).
           Eastern
           Kentucky                                       Presentations:
           University                                     (2010) SD-AAHPERD (Southern District,
           KY                                             American Association for Health and Physical
                                                          Education Recreation and Dance)
Johnson,   Ph.D in Physical   PED 244         Associate   Publications:                                        Institution-FT
Mike       Education                          Professor   Dissertation on the validation of Power Tests        Unit-PT
                                                          Leadership:                                          Program-PT
           Administration                                 Berea College Cross Country and Track and Field
                                                          Coach
           Ohio State
           University
Messer,    Ph.D. Cognition    PSY 100,        Associate Publications:                                          Institution-FT
Wayne      and Sensory        PSY 208,        Professor Messer, W. S., & Porter, D. B. (2009). The             Unit-PT
                                                          capstone research course: A case study in the        Program-PT
           Processes          PSY 212,                    evolution of educational efficacy. In D. S. Dunn,
                              PSY215,                     B. C. Beins, M. A. McCarthy, & G. W. Hill, IV
           University of      PSY 420                     (Eds.), Best practices for teaching beginnings and
           Florida, 1990                                  endings in the psychology major: Research, cases,
                              Chair of the                and recommendations. New York: Oxford
                                                          University Press.
                              Department
                              of                          Worrell, F. C., Casad, B. J., Daniel, D. B.,
                                         Physical Education and Health 55
                            Psychology               McDaniel, M., Messer, W. S., Miller, Jr., H. L.,
                                                     Prohaska, V., & Zlokovich, M. S. (2009).
                                                     Promising principles for translating psychological
                                                     science into teaching and learning. In D. F.
                                                     Halpern (Ed.), Undergraduate education in
                                                     psychology: A blueprint for the future of the
                                                     discipline (pp. 129-144). Washington, D. C.:
                                                     American Psychological Association.

                                                     Scholarship:
                                                     Teaching, Learning and Technology Initiative &
                                                     DuPont Foundation Grant, (Berea College
                                                     Faculty Development Program), Enhancing
                                                     Introductory Psychology with Digital Video,
                                                     $20,600. (2000-2001). With Gene Chao.

                                                     Appalachian College Association Technology
                                                     Grant, New Tools for Teaching: An Online
                                                     Laboratory and Guided Discovery in Psychology
                                                     Using the World Wide Web, $120,000. (1999-
                                                     2001). With Royce Simpson, Vicki Garlock, and
                                                     Chuck Huffman, Project Director.
                                                     Cutting Edge Award. (1999-2000). Appalachian
                                                     College Association



McClung,   Ph.D. Exercise   BIO 101,     Associate Publications:                                          Institution-FT
Jeffrey    Physiology       PED 335,     Professor McClung, JA, and Ambrose, TK, (2010) ―A                Unit-PT
                                                     Comparison of Two Instructional Methods for          Program-PT
                            PED 492                  Teaching the Racquetball Forehand to Novices.‖
           University of                             The International Journal of Sport and Society.
           Mexico                                    Vol. 1, No. 4, pp 71-75.
           Albuquerque,
           NM                                        Georgiev, KG, Beagle, ME, McClung, JA (2007),
                                                     ―Comparative Analysis on the Effects of Caffeine
                                                     and Coffee on the Blood Pressure and Heart Rate
                                                     Response during Rest and Exercise among
                                                     College Age Women.‖ Virginia AHPERD, fall,
                                                     pp 15-18.

                                                     Presentations:
                                                     McClung, JA, and Ambrose, TK, (2010) ―Using
                                                     Directed Mimicry to Teach Archery to Novices.‖
                                                     International Conference on Health, Wellness,
                                                     and Society, Berkeley, CA. January, 2011.

                                                     McClung, JA, Ambrose, TK, and Todd, K,
                                                     ―Academic Performance and Time Spent in
                                                     Physical Education.‖ Annual meeting of
                                                     KAHPERD, November 15, 2010.

                                                     McClung, JA, ―Physical Literacy: Beyond Sport
                                                     and Games‖, International Conference on Science
                                                     and Society, Carlos III University of Madrid,
                                                     Madrid, Spain, November 13, 2010


                                    Physical Education and Health 56
                                                             Ambrose, TK, McClung, JA, ―Human Need for
                                                             Physical Activity‖, PE PAYS Lecture Series,
                                                             University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland, March
                                                             16, 2010 (Kelly Ambrose presented our work and
                                                             research agenda while on sabbatical in Ireland.)
Moretz,     M.S.                CFS 103,        Instructor   Publications:                                        Institution-FT
Natalie     Food/Nutrition      CFS 109,                     Bartke, A., Peluso, M., Moretz, N., Wright, C.,      Unit-PT
                                                             Bonkowski, M., Winters, T., Shanahan, M.,            Program-PT
                                CFS 115,
                                                             Kopchick, J., Banz, W. Effects of Soy-derived
            Southern Illinois   CFS 221,                     diets on plasma and liver lipids, glucose
            University at       CFS 225,                     tolerance, and longevity in normal, long-lived and
            Carbondale,         CFS 334,                     short-lived mice. Horm. Metab. Res. 2004, 36(8):
            2002                CFS 372,                     550-558.
                                CFS 441
                                                             Dettenmeier P, Consolino J, Ridley C, Moretz N,
                                                             Moore M, Kleinhenz M, Nayak R, Rejent A,
                                                             Albers G. Development of a Quality Initiative for
                                                             Nutrition [abstract]. Pediatric Pulm. 2005; Suppl
                                                             28:333. Abstract 407.

                                                             Albers GM, Brusatti JD, Moretz NJ, Rejent AJ,
                                                             Noyes BE, Kemp JS. Improved Nutritional Status:
                                                             Quality Improvement Works [abstract]. Pediatric
                                                             Pulm. 2006; Suppl 29:367. Abstract 449.

Phelps,    MA,                  HLT 315,        Part-time Certification:                                          Institution-PT
Shannon    Professional         PEH             Instructor Certified Health Education Specialist                  Unit-PT
                                                             KY certification: Elementary Education (K-5)         Program-PT
           Program in           221/222                      Special Education (K-12)
           Health Education
           with                                              Experience:
           specialization in                                 4th/5th grade teacher, Saint Agatha Academy,
           Human Sexuality                                   Winchester, KY
           Education
           New York,
           University
Saderholm, Ph.D. in             EDS 215,        Assistant    Publications:                                        Institution-FT
Jon        Curriculum and       EDS 249,        Professor                                                         Unit-PT
                                                             Starnes, B., Saderholm, J., & Webb, A. (2010). A     Program- PT
           Instruction          EDS 332,                     community of teachers. Phi Delta Kappan 92(2),
           University of        EDS 325,                     14-18.
           Louisville           EDS 385,
                                                             Saderholm, J., Ronau, R. N., Brown, E. T., &
                                EDS 485,
                                                             Collins G. (2010). Validation of the Diagnostic
                                EDS 481,
                                                             Teacher Assessment of Mathematics and Science
                                EDS 482,
                                                             (DTAMS) instrument. School Science and
                                GSTR 332                     Mathematics Journal 110(4), 180-192.
                                                             Saderholm, J.C., & Tretter, T. R. (2008).
                                                             Identification of the most critical content
                                                             knowledge base for middle school science
                                                             teachers. Journal of Science Teacher Education
                                                             19(3), 269-283.

                                                             Certification:

                                           Physical Education and Health 57
                                                       Kentucky Math and Physics Grades 7-12
                                                       Experience:
                                                       5 years Science Teacher at Sandy Spring Friends
                                                       School, Sandy Spring, MD.
                                                       10 years Science and Mathematics Teacher at
                                                       Spencer County High School, Taylorsville, KY.
Srsic,     M.S. in            PEH 100,     Assistant   Leadership & Service:                              Institution-FT
Melody     Education,         PED 103,     professor   AAPAR Council for Aquatic Professionals            Unit-PT
                                                       Adapted Aquatic Instructor training and            Program-PT
           Health, Physical   PED 105,                 credential attained Nov. 2010
           and Recreation     PED 200,                 Ongoing research and implementation of Berea
           Education          PED 203,                 College's swim competency as a graduation
           University of      PED 209,                 requirement
           Pittsburgh,        PED 218,                 Experience with students with special needs in a
                                                       unique therapy setting as a volunteer in a
           Pittsburgh, PA     PED 220,                 Hippotherapy program, summer 2009
                              PED 222,
                              PED 250,
                              PED 280,
                              PED 310,
                              HLT 209
Starnes,   Ed.D in            EDS 150,     Professor   Publications:                                      Institution- FT
Bobby      Teaching           EDS 335,                 ―Thoughts on Teaching: On Angry Mobs,              Unit-FT
                                                       Converts, and the Man of Steel,‖ Phi Delta         Program-PT
Ann        Curriculum and     EDS 385,                 Kappan, Vol. 92, No. 5 (February 2011):
           Learning           EDS 485                  Starnes, Bobby Ann, Jon Saderholm, and Althea
           Environments                                Webb. 2010.
           Harvard            Education
           Graduate School    Studies                  ―A Community of Teachers,‖ Phi Delta Kappan,
                                                       Vol. 92, No. 1 (October 2010): pp. 14-18.
           of Education       Chair
                                                       ―Thoughts on Teaching: Rethinking Diversity,‖
                                                       Phi Delta Kappan, Vol. 92, No. 1 (September
                                                       2010): pp. 74-75.

                                                       Starnes, Bobby Ann, Denise Juneau, and Mandy
                                                       Broaddas (eds). 2006. Special Issue Phi Delta
                                                       Kappan ―Indian Education for All: A Vision for a
                                                       Democratic Future‖ (Eds).

                                                       Service:
                                                       Consultant: Developing Historically Accurate
                                                       Teaching Materials (August 2008-2010) Standing
                                                       Rock Reservation, North and South Dakota.

                                                       Certifications:
                                                       Ohio: Grades 1-8 Certification, Kindergarten
                                                       Certification, Reading Specialist Certification,
                                                       Montana k-5 certification

                                                       Experience:
                                                       Reading Specialist 3 years (grades 1-5, 2 years,
                                                       grades 7-9, 1 year)
                                                       Elementary 4 years
                                                       Middle School 6 years
                                      Physical Education and Health 58
                                                       Multiage Non-Graded 9 years
                                                       Early Childhood-3 years

                                                       Independent School Founder/Administrator 9
                                                       years
                                                       Early Childhood Director 3 years
Walker,     Ph.D. in           HLT 111,    Assistant   Publications:                                        Institution-FT
Elizabeth   Psychology &       HLT 210,    Professor   Alpha-Theta Neurofeedback Therapy Workshop.          Unit-PT
                                                       Organizer and sole presenter. For professional       Program-PT
            Women’s            HLT 215,
                                                       psychologists, social workers, and counselors,
            Studies            HLT 236,
                                                       with 16 CE credits from EEGSpectrum. Seattle,
            Union Institute    PED 208,
                                                       WA, May, 2008.
            Cinncinati, OH     PED 221,
            1997               PEH 100                 Walker, Elizabeth. August, 2005. Cooling
                                                       inflammation with diet. PCC Sound Consumer,
                                                       and on the web at
                                                       www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/sc/0508/sc0508-
                                                       inflammation.html

                                                       Walker, Elizabeth. January, 2005. Vitamin D, the
                                                       sunshine vitamin. PCC Sound Consumer, and on
                                                       the web at
                                                       www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/print/phprint_sc.php

                                                       Walker, Elizabeth (with support from Marsha
                                                       Linehan, University of Washington). 2004.
                                                       Research grant submitted to the Borderline
                                                       Personality Research Foundation: Neurofeedback
                                                       as a treatment for Borderline Personality
                                                       Disorder. (Peer-reviewed, not funded.)

                                                       Experience:
                                                       Health educator, counselor and biofeedback
                                                       therapist in Seattle Washington

                                                       Health Arts and Sciences Program, Goddard
                                                       College

                                                       Taught classes in nutrition and prenatal nutrition
                                                       for Seattle Midwifery School
Webb,       Ph.D., in Higher   EDS 227,    Assistant    Publications:                                       Institution-FT
Althea      Education          EDS 349,    Professor    Bobby Starnes, Jon Saderholm, and Althea            Unit-FT
            University of      EDS 355                 Webb. ―A Community of Teachers,‖ Phi Delta           Program-PT
                                                       Kappan 92(2), 2010.
            Kentucky
            Lexington, KY                              Presentations:
                                                        ―Reflecting on Dispositions: Berea College’s
                                                       Identification, Implementation, and Assessment
                                                       of Teacher Dispositions,‖ Dispositions: A Decade
                                                       of Progress? Symposium, Northern Kentucky,
                                                       Newport, Kentucky, November 2010

                                                       ―Called to Teach: Multiculturally Responsive
                                                       Teaching at Christian Colleges,‖

                                      Physical Education and Health 59
                                                      panelists Alison Jackson Tabor, Georgetown
                                                      College and Althea Webb, National
                                                       Association of Multicultural Educators
                                                      Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, November 2010

                                                       ―Preparing Teachers to Teach in a Diverse
                                                      World,‖ A Winning Education: Challenging
                                                       Racism with Community Alliances, invited
                                                      panelist Jacqueline Burnside, Kennaria Brown,
                                                       Althea Webb, Donald Smith, Loretto
                                                      Motherhouse, Nerinx, Kentucky, July 2010
                                                      Service:
                                                      Ad Hoc Reviewer for The Griot: The Journal of
                                                      African American Studies, January 2011
                                                      Ad Hoc Reviewer for Youth and Society, March
                                                      2010

Williams,   MS in Sports     PED 100,     Assistant   Leadership & Service:                              Institution-FT
Sandra      Administration   PED 105,     Professor   Served as Vice President for Kentucky Athletic     Unit-PT
                                                      Trainers Society 2004-2009.                        Program-PT
            Eastern          PED 213,
            Kentucky         PED 214,
            University       PED 218,
                             PED 220,
                             PED 226,
                             PED 260,
                             PED 360,
                             HLT 109
Woodie,     MFA Dance and    PEH 100,     Assistant   Leadership& Service:                               Institution-FT
Stephanie   Choreography     PED 204,     Professor   Director and Choreographer for Kinetic             Unit-PT
                                                      Expressions 2006 – 2010; Workshop Participant      Program-PT
            University of    PED 224,                 (by invitation only) in the Bill Evans Hands-On
            North Carolina   PED 229,                 Pedagogy of Dance Technique Workshop, 2007
            Greensboro       PED 244,                 & 2010; Interdisciplinary Hatha Yoga Teacher
                             PED 245,                 Training, 200 Hour Alliance RYT Certification,
                             PED 249,                 2008.
                             PED 280,                 Certifications:
                             PED 332                  Kentucky Provisional Certification for Physical
                                                      Education 7-12 grades
                             Department               North Carolina Dance Education Certification
                             Chair
                                                      Experience:
                                                      Substitute 7-12   2 years

                                                      Administration:
                                                      Department Chair Physical Education and Health,
                                                      fall 2010 to present
                                                      Director of Dance Programs ,fall 2010 to present




E. Curriculum Sheet Requirements
                                             BEREA COLLEGE

                                     Physical Education and Health 60
                                         2010 – 2011 CURRICULUM GUIDE (revised 8/20/10)
                          B.A. in PHYSICAL EDUCATION WITH P-12 CERTIFICATION
     NOTE: This guide is subject to change and represents actions approved by Faculty to date. Please refer often to the 2010-2011
     Online Catalog & Student Handbook (www.berea.edu/cataloghandbook), which will be updated with the most current information.
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
NOTE: No single college course transferred into Berea
can meet more than one General Education requirement.
Core Courses                                                                                 Term                       Credit
MAT 010: Prealgebraa                                                                         _____                       NC
MAT 011: Elementary Algebra Ia                                                               _____                       NC
MAT 012: Elementary Algebra IIa                                                              _____                       NC
GSTR 110: Writing Sem. I: Critical Thinking in
the Liberal Artsb                                                                            _____                        ___
GSTR 210: Writing Sem. II: Identity and Diversity
in the United States                                                                         _____                          1
GSTR 310: Understandings of Christianity                                                     _____                          1
GSTR 410: Sr. Sem. in Cont. Global Issues                                                    _____                          1

Scientific Knowledge and Inquiry
GSTR 332: Scientific Knowledge & Inquiry                                                      _____                       ___
                     OR
Two approved science courses, one of which must be an
approved lab course. At this time, only the following courses
have been approved to meet this alternative (all of which meet
the lab course stipulation): ANR 110, 130, BIO 100,
BIO 101, 110, CHM 113, 131, 134, PHY 111, 217, or 315
______ ____: _______________________                                                          _____                       ___
______ ____: _______________________                                                          _____                      ___

Lifetime Health & Fitness: PEH 100 & Phys. Activity
PEH 100: Introduction to Lifetime Wellness                                                    _____                      .50c
(if swimming proficiency test not passed, take PED 200)
PED 2___: _________________________                                                           _____                       .25
PED 2___: _________________________                                                           _____                       .25

Practical Reasoning Across the Curriculum (PR & PRQ)
Two courses—at least one firmly grounded in math or statistics
(PRQ); the other can be an approved practical reasoning (PR) course
or another PRQ course.
______ ____: _______________________                                                          _____                        1
______ ____: _______________________                                                          _____                        1
Perspectives—Six Areas Required
Students will satisfy each of the six areas by taking or waiving a
course, or through an approved experience. Individual courses may
be approved to satisfy more than one Perspective, but no single
course may satisfy more than two Perspective areas.
1. Arts ____________________________                                                          _____                     _____
2. Social Science ___________________                                                         _____                     _____
                                               Physical Education and Health 61
3. Western History __________________                                      _____    _____
5. Afr. Amer., Appal., Women’s _________                                   _____    _____
6. International (two courses either in area 6A or area 6B):
A) Same Non-English Language _________                                     _____    _____
Same Non-English Language _________                                        _____    _____
(one course may be waived by placement exam)
                      OR
B) World Culture (Non-western) _______                                      _____   _____
World Culture (Western/non-western)____                                     _____   _____
Active Learning Experience (ALE)
An approved experience, taken for credit or as noncredit.
______ ____: _______________________                                        _____   _____
aMay be waived on basis of test scores.
bTransfer students might waive GSTR 110 if they took
College Composition as a degree-seeking student at
another college AND earned a grade of B or higher.

MAJOR COURSES
Minimum of 11.25 credits in the major, plus collateral courses.
Must earn C or higher in major requirements, including
prerequisites and collaterals.

Core Courses                                                               Term     Credit
PED 125: Foundations of Physical Educ.c                                    _____      1
PED 315: Motor Behavior Across Lifespan                                    _____      1
PED 335: Integ. Biomech. & Exer. Phys. Ic                                  _____      1
PED 340: Integ. Biomech. & Exer. Phys. IIc                                 _____      1
Additional Required PED Courses
PED 237: Hiking and Campcraft                                              _____      .25
PED 244: P.E. Activities for Elem. Child                                   _____       1
PED 245: Dance                                                             _____     1
PED 246: Individual and Team Sports I OR
PED 247: Individual and Team Sports II                                     _____     1
PED 280: Adapted Physical Education                                        _____     1
PED 362: Teaching & Eval. in Phys. Educ.                                   _____     1

Capstone Course
PED 492: Seminar in Physical Education                                     _____     1
(Junior standing preferred; see College Catalog.)

Distribution Course (Required; counts inside the major)
One (1) course chosen from: PED 246, 247, or 250
PED _____: _______________________                                         _____      1

Collateral Courses (Required; count outside the major)
BIO 101: Human Anatomy & Phys. Ic                                          _____      1
HLT 215: Significant Issues in Pers. Health                                _____      1

                                        Physical Education and Health 62
PEH 330: Extended School Experience OR
Department-approved alternative                                            _____        1
**See Education Studies courses on next page**
c Should be completed by the end of the first year to make
Satisfactory Academic Progress. BIO 101 is a prerequisite
for PED courses in Science Core. BIO 101, PEH 100, and
PED 125 can be taken as early as the first term.

Admission Requirement: An interview with faculty members
of the department and departmental recommendation are
required for admission to the major. Students interested in
this major should contact the department as early as possible
in their college career to explore areas of concentration.

Labor Requirement: Students in this major are expected to
hold a Labor position for at least one regular term within the
Physical Education Department, Seabury Center, or
intramurals.

Proficiency Requirement: Certification in First Aid/CPR.
Must be completed by first term of Senior Year. May be met
by taking HLT 109: Comprehensive First Aid.
NOTES: Students in this major are encouraged to minor in
Health. See the minor requirements in Catalog.
(continued on next page)

B.A. in PHYSICAL EDUCATION WITH P-12 CERTIFICATION—CONTINUED
Education Studies Courses (count outside the major)
EDS 150: Introduction to Education                       _____                      1
EDS 349: Education and Culture in the United States      _____                      1
EDS 355: Ext. Field Experience: Enriching World Visions
OR approved alternative                                  _____                      1

Professional Terms (count outside the major)
EDS 481: Student Teaching Seminar (P-12, 5-12, 8-12)                       _____    1d
EDS 482: Student Teaching
(P-12, 5-12, 8-12)                                                         _____   3d

ELECTIVES (count in 20 credits outside the major,
unless course is in PED rubric)
Dept. & No. Title Term Credit
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                        _____   _____

                                        Physical Education and Health 63
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
__________ ________________________                                       _____   _____
d Offered Fall Term only; must be taken in the ninth term.




                                       Physical Education and Health 64
                                                    Last Updated 8/26/10
                                  2010-2011 HEALTH TEACHING MINOR
                                               (Requires six course credits)
Must earn a ―C‖ or higher in each minor, prerequisite, and collateral course
Health Teaching minor provides students pursuing a degree in Physical Education with P-12
certification with the opportunity to enhance their teaching skills through the understanding of
one’s capacity to create health and wellness; and to learn about the effects of personal health on
the teaching and learning environment. Students will learn to implement an interdisciplinary
approach to teaching health within their chosen course of study.

                                                     Requirements
The following course credits are required:
HLT 215: Significant Issues in Health                         ______        1
HLT 315: Health Education                                     ______        1
CFS 221: Fundamentals of Nutrition                            ______        1
              AND
Two (2) course credits chosen from the following:
HLT 111: Human Sexuality                                      ______        1
HLT 210: Health in Appalachia (also APS)                      ______        1
HLT 224: Addiction and Violence in the Family                 ______        1
HLT 236: Women and Health (also WST)                          ______        1
PSY 215: Health Psychology                                    ______        1
              AND

One (1) additional full-credit HLT course chosen from the list above or another HLT course
approved by the department to meet this requirement (i.e., a summer travel course or a health related internship);
selection of this course must be approved by the Health Teaching minor
advisor.

HLT_____: ____________________________________                ______        1

Admission to the Minor—An interview with members of the Health faculty in the Department, as well
as a departmental recommendation, are required for admission to the Health minor.

Proficiency Requirements for Retention in and Completion of the Minor—A grade of C (2.0 GPA)
or higher in each required Health Teaching minor course, as well as in each prerequisite and collateral
course, is required for continuation in the minor. Students not receiving a grade of C or higher may
repeat that particular course to raise the grade while remaining in the minor program. In addition to the
course GPA requirement, certification in first aid, including adult, child, and infant cardio-pulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) with Automated External Defibrillator (AED) must be completed by the first term of
the senior year. This may be met by taking HLT 109 or through successful completion of an outside
course with certification.

Additional considerations for the Health Studies Minor—Designated Summer One or Summer Two
courses may be used for the Health Teaching Minor.



                                            Physical Education and Health 65
                                                         BEREA COLLEGE
                                                       BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                                Physical Education Certification, P-12
                                                  with a Minor in Health Teaching
                                               STUDENT CURRICULUM CONTRACT


Name___________________________________              Student ID Number _______________              CPO________

Number of terms at Berea (including present term) ______                Are you a transfer candidate? _______

Purpose. The Curriculum Contract serves as the basis for advising candidates who are pursuing a program of study leading to teaching
certification. The Contract includes checklists of Requirements for Admission to the Teacher Education Program and to the Student Teaching
term. Candidates enrolled in EDS 150 will be assigned an Education Advisor with whom they will consult and jointly review the expectations
outlined below. While the candidate is enrolled in EDS 150, he/she and the Education Advisor will sign the Contract, and the candidate will
turn in the original Contract, together with the signed Kentucky Code of Ethics, to the Education Studies Department office after making a copy
of both documents for his/her own reference.

Commitments and Values The Teacher Education Program at Berea College is based on a set of values and commitments that we believe
provide an essential moral basis for good teaching in any setting. We will expect to see these values and commitments reflected in each teacher
education candidate:
 Teachers should be committed to the value of all individuals as unique, responsible, and worthy human beings.
 Teachers should be committed to the intellectual, social, emotional, artistic, and moral growth of all learners.
 Teachers should be committed to the worth of knowledge and to the value of all ideas as worthy of
    consideration and reflection.

   Teachers should be committed to the role of inquiry and to reasoned discourse in the search for truth and wisdom.
   Teachers should be committed to the understanding and value of discursive practices that construct meaning from culturally diverse
    perspectives, especially with respect to the articulation of pedagogies and school culture.
   Teachers should be committed to the value of judicious and compassionate action in relationships with other human beings and with the
    environment.
   Teachers should be committed to an ethic of service through teaching that extends beyond the classroom.


Performance Goals. To prepare educators whose teaching will reflect a shared holding of these values and commitments, we have developed
seven performance goals to guide Berea College's teacher preparation programs. These goals are:



        1) As people who have found joy in life, learning, and teaching, and who trust in the power of human relationships to call forth inner
           strengths, teachers strive to relate to their students in ways that free both teacher and learner to engage in joyful, responsible and
           disciplined inquiry into the workings and possibilities of our world.
        2) As people who value difference in human interactions, ideas and nature; who understand that identity is shaped by diversity,
           experiences, and environment; and who recognize that we must all work together to build a more just society, teachers create
           learning environments based on democratic principles which ensure that multiple perspectives are valued and considered, and
           which encourage students to speak from their own diverse experiences, to give value to those expressions, to explore their own
           diversity, and to bring those experiences to the broader community.
        3) As people who appreciate the interconnectedness and interdependence of our world, teachers seek to add depth and breadth to
           their general knowledge as well as in-depth understandings of the content they teach. These teachers provide experiences that
           allow learners to recognize and value the interconnections that emerge as they explore their unfolding world.
        4) As people who have experienced the power and beauty of creating their own knowledge and constructing their own
           understandings, and who are committed to enabling their students to share this experience, teachers create dynamic learning
           environments providing both direct and vicarious experiences oriented around student interest and characterized by active inquiry,
           liberal use of time, self-correction, and engagement with others.


                                                   Physical Education and Health 66
        5) As people who see the promise in every person and believe that individuals have the ability and duty to create a more just society,
           teachers attend to each and every student by planning, implementing, and assessing meaningful learning experiences and
           systematically engage in critical reflection and self correction.
        6) As people who understand and appreciate the capacity of tools—informational, technological, physical and intellectual—to
           extend the reach and enhance the quality of work to be done, teachers incorporate appropriate tools into their own work-lives and
           integrate their use into the instructional environments they create with learners.
        7) As people who are committed to thinking together with others in the search for truth, wisdom and beauty, teachers create learning
           communities grounded in inquiry where students come to understand the critical role of communication in inquiry and where they
           feel the confidence that grows with the development of their ability to participate in a community of inquiry.

Requirements for Admission to the Teacher Education Program
NOTE: Candidates for admission to the Teacher Education Program will apply in their Declaration of Major term. Typically this will occur
between the 4th and 6th term of college.

Criteria for Admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP)

      ___Demonstrate a commitment to high standards of academic effort and achievement, and a minimum 2.5 overall GPA.
      ___Earn no grade lower than a C in major and/or certification field, collateral, academic specialization (5-9), and Education Studies
          courses with at least a B- in EDS 150 and EDS 227/ 228 or in the case of Physical Education and Music, an appropriate equivalent.
      ___Submit a satisfactory Education Written Assessment which represents the candidate as an individual who intends to become a teacher
          and complete a timely and satisfactory conference with candidate’s Education Advisor to discuss the written assessment.
      ___Submit the following required forms: Application to TEP; Health and Character Profile; Student Curriculum Contract; signed
          commitment to abide by the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board’s Code of Ethics for Kentucky Educators and show
          no evidence of willful failure to maintain that commitment; and three waivers.
      ___Demonstrate appropriate qualities of judgment, disposition, and temperament in classroom and field settings together with a genuine
          commitment to children, to teaching and to learning.
      ___Show no evidence or history of physical or psychological impairments that would preclude teaching success; no record of felonies or
          serious misdemeanors; no history of, nor existing problem with, substance abuse or chemical dependency.
      ___Exhibit proficiency in communication in all areas essential to teaching as displayed in classes, course work, written statements, and
          interviews. (Candidates’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills are essential considerations in the Education Studies
          Department recommendation.)
      ___Attain clearance that the candidate is not on academic, labor, or social probation.
      ___Receive a favorable recommendation from the Education Studies Department. For students seeking certification in Physical
          Education and Music, a recommendation from those departments is also required.

Additional specific expectations are embodied in the requirements of the TEP Education Written Assessment and the description of required
courses in the candidate’s Curriculum Guide for each major with teacher certifications.

Retention in the Teacher Education Program. Retention in the program requires that candidates continue to abide by the Code of Ethics; that
they demonstrate commitment to academic excellence; that they maintain grades and grade point standing no less than the level required for
admission to the Student Teaching Term; that they continue to acquire evidence of ongoing substantive experiences with children of the age for
which they are preparing to teach; that they continue to evidence the values and commitments undergirding the Berea College Teacher
Education Program; that they demonstrate continued growth in oral and written communication skills; and that they maintain physical and
psychological health necessary for teaching success.

Requirements for Admission to Student Teaching


 Stage I: Due at submission of portfolio in the eighth (8 th) term (spring semester).

      ___ Admission to the Teacher Education Program, and continued meeting of all requirements for admission and retention in the TEP.



                                                    Physical Education and Health 67
      ___ Demonstration of commitment to high standards of academic effort and achievement, with attainment of a minimum grade-point
          standing of 2.50 in major, collateral, specialization, and Education Studies courses and overall.

      ___ Demonstration of moral, social, and ethical behavior consistent with the values and commitments of Berea's Teacher Education
          Program and with the Kentucky Education Professional Standard Board's Code of Ethics.

      ___ Satisfactory Student Teaching Portfolio for the major teaching field in which certification is sought, submitted to the Education
          Advisor by the date specified. (See Student Teaching Portfolio Guidelines for each specific certification area and Portfolio Rubric
          for Admission to the Student Teaching Term)

      ___ A favorable recommendation from the classroom teacher with whom candidate worked during pre-professional placement. (To be
          placed in Education Portfolio.)
      ___ Favorable recommendations from a) Education Studies Department; b) the Education Advisor in the secondary department; c) the
          Berea College Labor and Student Life Office.

      ___ Completion of application materials by the dates required.

 Stage II: Must be completed prior to the start of the ninth (9 th ) term (Student Teaching term).

      ___ Grade of ―B‖ or above in each EDS course taken in the pre-professional semester

      ___ Submit evidence of taken the Praxis content test(s) and Principles of Learning and Teaching(PLT) test

      ___ Verification of a current medical examination, including a negative tuberculosis test.

      ___ Criminal Background Check clearance (national and state checks initiated by mid-may through assigned student teaching
          placement)

Criteria for Recommendation for Certification


    ___ Favorable recommendations from cooperating teachers and College supervisor(s) based upon performance in meeting the Kentucky
        Teacher Standards and Berea College’s Teacher Education Program Goals

    ___ Favorable recommendation from the Education Studies Department based upon the candidate’s reflection of the values and
        commitments which underlie Berea College’s Teacher Education Program and adherence to Kentucky’s Code of Ethics.

    ___A passing score on the appropriate Praxis II content test(s) and Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) test required for
       certification. *Teacher certification test requirements are subject to change. Before registering for any PRAXIS tests please refer to the
       Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) website at: www.epsb.ky.gov for current requirements.

    ___ No grade lower than a "B" in any Student Teaching course.

    ___ Satisfactory Eligibility Portfolio demonstrating competency in each field in which certification is sought which meets all Kentucky
        Teacher Standards

    ___ Completion of application for certification and related materials.

Statement of Contractual Agreement

             I have discussed with my Education Advisor all of the prerequisites and conditions required for admission to the Teacher
        Education Program at Berea College and for admission to the Student Teaching term. I understand the academic and professional
        experiences necessary for the recommendation for teaching certification in Kentucky. I am aware of the demands of the teaching field
        that I wish to enter, and of the increasing complexity of the teaching profession today. I fully understand the expectations for class
        work, for continuous and substantive experiences working with young people of the age I wish to teach, and for the need to develop in
        portfolio form satisfactory evidence of my developing abilities as a teacher.


                                                    Physical Education and Health 68
Candidate's Signature_________________________________________________                      Date________________

Education Advisor's Signature_________________________________________                      Date________________




                                               CODE of ETHICS for KENTUCKY EDUCATORS
                                                 Education Professional Standards Board, 2006

Section I. Certified personnel in the Commonwealth:
1. Shall strive toward excellence, recognize the importance of the pursuit of truth, nurture democratic citizenship, and safeguard the freedom
to learn and to teach;
2. Shall believe in the worth and dignity of each human being and in educational opportunities for all;
3. Shall strive to uphold the responsibilities of the education profession, including the following obligations to students, to parents, and to the
education profession:
To STUDENTS:
1. Shall provide students with professional education services in a non-discriminatory manner and in consonance with accepted best practice
     known to the educator.
2. Shall respect the constitutional rights of all students.
3. Shall take reasonable measures to protect the health, safety, and emotional well-being of students.
4. Shall not use professional relationships or authority with students for personal advantage.
5. Shall keep in confidence information about students which has been obtained in the course of professional
     service, unless disclosure serves professional purposes or is required by law.
6. Shall not knowingly make false or malicious statements about students or colleagues.
7. Shall refrain from subjecting students to embarrassment or disparagement.
8. Shall not engage in any sexually related behavior with a student with or without consent, but shall maintain a professional approach with
     students. Sexually related behavior shall include such behaviors as sexual jokes; sexual remarks; sexual kidding or teasing; sexual
     innuendo; pressure for dates or sexual favors; inappropriate physical touching, kissing, or grabbing; rape; threats of physical harm; and
     sexual assault.
To PARENTS:
1. Shall make reasonable effort to communicate to parent’s information, which should be revealed in the interest of the student.
2. Shall endeavor to understand community cultures and diverse home environments of students.
3. Shall not knowingly distort or misrepresent facts concerning educational issues.
4. Shall distinguish between personal views and the views of the employing educational agency.
5. Shall not interfere in the exercise of political and citizenship rights and responsibilities of others.
6. Shall not use institutional privileges for private gain, for the promotion of political candidates, or for partisan political activities.
7. Shall not accept gratuities, gifts, or favors that might impair or appear to impair professional judgment, nor
     offer any such to obtain special advantage.
To the EDUCATION PROFESSION:
1. Shall exemplify behaviors which maintain the dignity and integrity of the profession.
2. Shall accord just and equitable treatment to all members of the profession in the exercise of their professional rights and responsibilities.
3. Shall keep in confidence information acquired about colleagues in the course of employment, unless disclosure serves professional
     purposes or is required by law.
4. Shall not use coercive means or give special treatment in order to influence professional decisions.
5. Shall apply for, accept, offer, or assign a position or responsibility only on the basis of professional preparation and legal qualifications.
6. Shall not knowingly falsify or misrepresent records of facts relating to his/her own qualifications or those of other professionals.

Signature_________________________________________________________

Date _________________

                                                     Physical Education and Health 69

				
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