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Genealogy

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					Genealogy
Prerequisites
Introduction to the Internet or
Basic knowledge of the Internet

Number of Students
Maximum 10

Level of Expertise
Beginner

Training Objectives
Introduction to genealogy
Introduction to various on-lone courses on genealogy
Create a search and recording keeping method

Length
90 minutes

Lesson Content
Look at various genealogy related websites
Look at on-line tutorials on Genealogy
Create a plan for research
Genealogy-Library Database
Digital Sanborn Maps

Preparation Resources
o   Computer projector
o   Handouts at each computer – See handouts
o   Pencils
o   Class roster
o   Headphone for each computer
o   Bookmark the following sites:
    http://www.pbs.org/kbyu/ancestors
    http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Home/Welcome/welcome.asp
    http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/index.htm
    http://www.cyndislist.com/
    http://www.myfamilyinc.com
    www.ancestry.com

Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
    www.rootsweb.com
    www.myfamily.com
    www.ancestry.co.uk
    http://www.hibbing.lib.mn.us
    http://www.genealogy.com
    http://www/rootsweb.com/~jfuller/gen_mail.html
    http://www.pcmag.com/print_article/0,3048,a=30353,00.asp
    http://www.ironrangeresearchcenter.org/
    http://www.ellisisland.org/
    http://www.mnhs.org

Handouts
o   Genealogy brochure
o   Family Group Record
o   Pedigree Chart
o   Research Questions
o   Research log
o   Source notes
o   Digital Sanborn Maps
o   Evaluation

Introduction
Write outline of class on dry erase board
Write on dry erase board any upcoming computer classes.

1. Introduce yourself.
2. Go over the Class Outline.
   During this 90 minute class we will be looking a few genealogy website. I
   will encourage you to create a plan and a methodically for researching
   genealogy. We will also talk about sources in this library and other libraries.
3. Note any upcoming computer classes.
4. Ask if there are any questions.
   Note
   It helps with communication if the questions are written down on the white
   board for all to see. This will remind yourself of the question and is a way to
   say “Yes, I heard your question.” Note that all the questions do not need to be
   answered right away as they may be dealt with later during the session, in
   another class, or one on one.




Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
Exercise
1. Introduction
   Before we begin I would like to get a quick show of hand. Who is currently
   doing genealogy? Who is just starting out? People may spend hours, days,
   years doing Genealogy or searching their family history. It can be a hobby or
   obseation ( and I don’t mean that as a bad thing). Genealogy may also be a
   career.
2. Beginnings
   Public Broadcasting Station or PBS, with the KBYU-Brigham Young
   University, has developed a television series on family history and genealogy.
   http://www.pbs.org/kbyu/ancestors
   o Looking at the site
   Before click on anything just here look at the webpage.
   On the left hand side is information on
   o beginning your research
   o helpful resource – including the 5-step process
   o Online tools
   Center of the page
   o Beginning your search – types of records, links, and glossary
   o Family history newsline
   o Helpful tips
   o Broadcast Schedule
   Right hand side of the page
   o Information on the program Ancestors
   o Teacher’s guide
   o Web course
   o List of sponsors
    Note: we want to have people start noticing things. Picking up detail and
   bits of information.
   Ask: What gabs your attention, Is there any information that is repeated.
   Remember positive reinforcement is transferable/ or positive comments will
   encourage other similar behavior – say good… or write comment on the
   board… use affirming body language

   Part of Genealogy is to dig for information. To do that you have to slow down,
   take your time and look.
   o Web course
   This site offers a Web course on genealogy. One the right hand side, click on
   Web course
   We are going to go through the 5-step process.
   o Charts
   In your handout there are several charts.
   o Pedigree Chart – this a visual chart or a family tree.
Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
       Ask how are the name written – first middle and last (all upper case)
       How do you write (person name with Van or Von, Des)
       Ask how dates are written - day month four digit year
       Ask how places are written – town, county, state, country
       Extending this chart - each chart is numbered. To continue first fill out
       the Statement at the top “No. ___ on pedigree chart no.___
   o Family Group Record – This is where you give more information on
       family, such as list of children and other marriages. Note children are
       listed in birth order and checkmark if born male or female, note place for
       sources.
   o Source Notes – quote your sources. If you run into conflicting
       information you save time because you listed your source. Your work
       becomes credible. Think – according to…(name source) …(tell
       information).
       The source – may be a person (interviewed a relative), object (medal,
       award), or a record (court record, military record, will). Get copies of the
       source when possible. Print on acid free paper and keep in archival files.
   o Research Question- note that the research question form is similar to
       the Source notes. Write down – what you are looking for. This saves time
       when you go back to the question at a later time. We will deal with
       information sources in a bit.
   o Research Log – Include the question, what sources you looked at and
       maybe even page numbers or search terms – what information you found
       or did not find, the date. Condition of the source (typed and crossed out or
       maybe notes were made on the margins.) Is the source a primary or
       secondary source.
   o Sources
   Know what you are looking for – be very specific. Then determine you’re
   your sources to use.
   At http://www.pbs.org/kbyu/ancestors/
   One the left hand side click on free charts.
   Click on How to select a record to search
   Note that information is divided into three sections – Vital, biographical, and
   background. Below is a listing of the sources, which may be used to find the
   information.
   Glossary of record types – this is a definition of source information.
   o Learning Sources – it will take time to learn the sources. More then a
       90 minute class. I will make these suggestions.
       o Take a on-line course
           Ancestors – http://pbs.org/kbyu/ancestors
           Free - Created by PBS
           Family Search –
           http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Home/Welcome/welcome.asp
Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
        Free - Created by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.
        Under on Search for Ancestors click on Learn how to start your
        family history.
        RootsWeb.com
        Free - on the home page scroll down to Getting Started and then
        Roots Webguide to Tracing your Family Trees.
        National Genealogical Society
        http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/index.htm
        Cost – on-line course, which includes homework and tests. Allowed
        18 months to complete the program. On home page click on Learning
        Center and then homestudy.
     o When requesting help
        From a relative, a genealogy, a researcher, a librarian use the magic
        words – I am looking for …(specific question) …(can you help me?,
        Where would you suggest I start looking?, I have already looked at …
        Where else may I look?) Thank you. Do not be surprised if you are
        charage for information. (Postage, photocopy, time)
3. Other Websites
   o Cyndi’s List of Genealogy sites on the Internet
     http://www.cyndislist.com/
     This web site gathers information found on the internet on genealogy.
     Note:
     Are you new to Genealogy? Which will link you to
     Beginner Guide Hints & Tips – many articles and tutorials
     Research guides –
     Allow about 5 -8 minutes to explore on own.
   o MyFamily.com, Inc.
     http://www.myfamilyinc.com
     according to their press release - This company is in the business of
     “connecting family with their histories and one another” MyFamily.com,
     Inc. publishes Ancestry Magazine, computer software for tracking your
     family history and provides both free and paid subscription services.
     On this page is a description of their five website and links to each.
     o Ancestry.com – paid subscription (cost is unknown)
        There is a commercial that you may watch that gives you information
        about the site.
     o RootWeb.com – free online site – contains interactive guides and
        resources for tracing family history. – downside think lots of
        commercials
     o MyFamily.com – totted as the place for families to talk and share
        their history.
     o Ancestry.co.uk – research for those in the United Kingdom and
        territories.
Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
4. Local Libraries
   o Iron Range Resource Center
     http://www.ironrangeresearchcenter.org/
     If anyone comes into the Hibbing Public Library wanting to do genealogy
     research, I would refer them to the Iron Range Resource Center. Not to
     be rude, not dumping them on someone else, but genealogy is an area of
     specialization to the staff at the Iron Range Resource Center. They also
     have databases we do not have. It tends to be quieter there and they are
     air conditioned.
   o Hibbing Public Library
     http://www.hibbing.lib.mn.us
     o Local newspapers – have all issue of the Daily Tribune
     o City Directories – Hibbing City Directory back to
     o Pamphlet File – our pamphlet file concentrates on Hibbing
     o Heritage Quest online - Provides libraries with a large and growing
         collection of research materials for tracing family history and American
         culture. It is designed specifically for patrons in public libraries either
         just beginning their family research or are still uncovering their past.
         Access this by clicking on the Internet symbol.
         Go to Favorites
         Double-click on the folder “Library Databases”.
         Click on Heritage Quest Online.
         o Click on Search Census.
         o Type in surname: Mayo
         o Type in year: 1870
         o Because there are more than 500 (1234) documents they want you
             to refine your search.
         o Type in state: Minnesota
         o The report now lists the # of “Mayo’s” in each county. You
              may access by county or the entire state.
         o Click on Minnesota to view a list of all.
         o Click on John B. Mayo
         o Scan down to the census record. (Note that he was a physician)
         o Return to home page.
         o Note that you can also Search Places.
     o Digtial Sanborn Maps -This contains a full-image collection of maps
         of Minnesota towns and cities.
         o Go to Favorites file on the Internet.
         o Find the folder “Library Database:
         o Click on Sanborn Maps.
         o Click on Browse Maps.
         o Select a state: Minnesota
         o Select a city: Hibbing
Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA
        o Select a date: Sept 1913
        o Sections of the city appear.
        o Click on the different sheet numbers to see the different areas of
            town
   o Minnesota Historical Society Library
     http://www.mnhs.org/
     Unless you or family recently moved to Minnesota, at sometime you will
     need to go to the Minnesota Historical Society Research Library. Death
     records are available one line. If you have relative who fought in the civil
     war you might want to read the civil war letters to get a sense of what life
     was like. A photo collection is also available on-line.




Created by Enid Costley with contribution from Deborah Johnson for the Hibbing
Public Library with support from the IRRRA Do. I.T. Community Technology
Awareness Program, June 2003.
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share
Alike Licensed. To view a copy of this license, visit
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/1.0/ or send a letter to creative
commons, 559 North Abbott Way Stanford California 94305, USA

				
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