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IRRIGATION, RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND AGICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT by Z5HN4T6E

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 16

									    IRRIGATION, RURAL LIVELIHOODS AND
    AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT



       MONITORING AND EVALUATION: GOOD
                  PRACTICES

      REGIONAL IMPLEMENTATION WORKSHOP FOR IFAD-
    SUPPORTED PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES IN EASTERN AND
                     SOUTHEN AFRICA

                       Maputo,

                    15-18 November
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        BACKGROUND
     This is a WB & IFAD supported project which started
      in May 2006
     The total estimated cost is US$52.5 million out of
      which
       US$40.0 million grant from IDA
       US$8.0 million loan from IFAD
       US$2.8 million GOM
       US$1.7 million beneficiaries


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    PROJECT DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES
         The main objectives of the project are two-fold

    (i)   To raise agricultural productivity and net incomes of
          poor rural households in 11 target districts of Malawi in
          a sustainable manner

    (ii) To strengthen recipient institutional capacity for long-term
         irrigation development.




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               Project Implementation
     Project implementation is coordinated by technical
      departments of the Ministries of Agriculture and Ministry of
      Irrigation and water
     On the ground implementation is through technical specialist
      in the districts. This is to embrace decentralization structure
      established in Malawi in 2004
     Communities are the final implementers and beneficiaries of
      the project




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               Project Implementation


    Technical
    Departments                     MASAF




    Outreach                            Outreach
    Offices                             Offices (4)

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         Aims of the IRLADP M+E system
     To establish a system that will capture project performance and
      impact indicators
     Develop capacity at all levels to track down performance indicators
     Develop a system that will coordinate performance tracking of the
      various project components both technical and financial
     Develop a system that will effectively report performance and help
      the PMU, the government and the donor follow performance




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     PROJECT COMPONENTS
The project has four main components:

i)   Irrigation Rehabilitation and Development;

ii) Farmer Services and Livelihoods Fund (FSLF);

iii) Institution Development and Community Mobilisation; and;

iv) Project Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation



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        Monitoring and Evaluation
     The design of IRLADP incorporated M&E as an integral part of the
      project during project design

     This is reflected by the inclusion of the M&E Specialist at PCU and 3
      Regional M&E Experts

     The RM&E experts trains and guide district staff on all issues related to
      M&E (coordinate PME; Review meetings; compilation of reports)
     The PAD also included the M&E framework; with all indicators
       (impact; outcome; output and activity) including safeguard indicators




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         Monitoring and Evaluation
 The establishment of the M&E system started with reviewing the M&E
     framework to include indicators that were missed out during design stage

 A workshop with stakeholders was organized to agree on the proposed
     indicators and how they will be collected

 This was followed by the collection of baseline information
 Caveat: always strive to ensure that methods of collecting data are the same as those used
     by the sectors concerned (Harmonization of indicators).




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     Monitoring and Evaluation
      A simple reporting format was developed and shared
       with implementing agencies
        Where implementing staff are able to record outputs and few explanations
         on outputs departing from targets
        Analysis of the information is done at district/regional level

      Process is on-going especially on demand driven
       activities, indicators are agreed and baseline collected =
       moving targets for some indicators




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                       Main Lessons for
              implementing an effective M&E system
 The need to identify one or two knowledgeable officers (graduates) who
    will be responsible for managing the system
   This should be followed by the preparation of reporting formats to enable
    districts to report on the same parameters with proper instructions on how
    the parameters should be collected ( no formats = Chaos)
   This will also make it easier for aggregation of main achievements at
    national level
   The reporting format should be as simple as possible because field staff do
    not have time to compile and analyze the information
   Reporting frequency should be agreed in advance (in our case its quarterly and
    monthly for civil works)


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              Main Lessons for implementing an
                    effective M&E system
 All implementer should from the beginning understand where they are
  starting from and where they are going and what are the benchmarks for
  reporting progress
 Introduction of good filing systems at the beginning of project
  implementation should be encourage to avoid loss of information/reports
    ◦ (where possible, the reports should also be stored electronically)

 Training of the selected officers on basic M&E principals is a must
    ◦ In projects you are dealing with specialist that know their work but may not be fully familiar
      with measuring progress and reporting their work. You remove commonly used words such as “a
      lot” “good” “many” “happy” with proper quantification and description that help to measure
      progress and impact.
 Review meetings should be conducted where possible – helps to receive
1   reports from districts and provides instant feedback on emerging issues
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        Main Lessons for implementing an
              effective M&E system
      Participatory M&E is also key to sustainability of projects
       (beneficiaries should be trained & empowered to monitor own
       activities).
       ◦ How do communities know that they are making progress and that their
         livelihoods are changing?
     Ensure that there is a mechanism for providing feedback so that
      reports are not moving one way
     Sector Ministry’s M&E officers should actively participate in
      project monitoring –scheduled monitoring visits with clear objectives
      and checklist of what is to be monitored (visits should add value to M&E
      systems not just tours)



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                                               Issues
 Non-submission of reports; where they are submitted they are usually late – review
        meetings will resolve the problem
       Inaccuracy of the data being generated – find means for data triangulation
       High staff turnover/transfers and this necessitates continuous training – little done by
        project since these are sector employees
       M&E functions are not allocated enough resources – Vs advocacy for participatory
        M&E – Lobby for more resources and new projects to allocate enough funds for this
        activity
       District M&E officers are not actively participating in monitoring projects at district
        level
       Poor filing hence difficult to retrieve reports – electronic systems might help
       Measurement of some indicators is usually difficult/costly e.g. income hence sales is
        an ideal indicator


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     END OF PRESENTATION

    Thank You for Your Attention

               And

         God Bless You All



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