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The American Cancer Society and The Commission on Cancer

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The American Cancer Society and The Commission on Cancer Powered By Docstoc
					The American Cancer Society and
The Commission on Cancer:
Working Together to Improve Cancer Outcomes



                          The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health
                          organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing
                          cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research,
                          education, advocacy, and service.

   American Cancer Society Objectives
     •	   Support	better	decisions	by	making	available	high-quality,	timely,	understandable	information,	
          especially	to	newly	diagnosed	cancer	patients	and	their	caregivers.

     •	   Leverage	the	Society’s	scientific	credibility	and	unique	position	to	support	innovative,	high-impact	
          research	–	both	through	direct	funding	and	the	ability	to	influence	the	amount	and	direction	of	
          research	funding	from	other	sources.

     •	   Improve	cancer	patients’	quality	of	life	by	assisting	primarily	with	service	referral,	community	
          mobilization,	collaboration,	advocacy,	and,	where	appropriate,	directly	providing	services.

     •	   Increase	prevention	and	early	detection	of	cancer.


                                       The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) is
                                       a consortium of professional organizations dedicated to improving
                                       survival and quality of life for cancer patients through standard-setting,
                                       prevention, research, education, and the monitoring of comprehensive
                                       quality care.


   Commission on Cancer Objectives
     •	   Establish	standards	to	ensure	quality	multidisciplinary	and	comprehensive	care	delivery	in	health	
          care	settings.

     •	   Conduct	surveys	in	health	care	settings	to	assess	compliance	with	those	standards.

     •	   Collect	standardized,	high-quality	data	from	CoC-accredited	health	care	settings	to	measure	
          cancer	care	quality.

     •	   Use	data	to	monitor	treatment	patterns	and	outcomes	and	enhance	cancer	control	and	clinical	
          surveillance	activities.

     •	   Develop	effective	educational	interventions	to	improve	cancer	prevention,	early	detection,	cancer	
          care	delivery,	and	outcomes	in	health	care	settings.
            Why should the American Cancer Society work with
                        CoC-accredited facilities?

Looking at impact, history, investment, and access can best sum up the importance of the
collaboration between the Society and the CoC.

Access
The	shared	goals	of	the	partnership	between	the	American	Cancer	Society	and	the	CoC	are	to	prevent	
cancer	and	to	provide	the	best	care	and	support	to	those	affected	by	this	disease.	CoC-accredited	
facilities	provide	the	Society	with	access	to	newly	diagnosed	cancer	patients	nationwide.	



                      5%                                                                                0%


                75%                                                                         80%
                                           Hospital with approval                                                                   Treated elsewhere
                                           Hospital without approval                                                                Diagnosed and treated
                                                                                                                                    in approved programs


•	   Approximately	25	percent	of	the	5,000	hospitals	in	the	United	States	and	Puerto	Rico	have	cancer	
     programs	approved	by	the	CoC.

•	   CoC-accredited	facilities	diagnose	and	treat	approximately	80	percent	of	the	1.4	million	new	cancer	
     cases	each	year.
     Source: National Cancer Data Base (NCDB)



                            Distribution of 1,400+ CoC-Accredited Programs
            3               As of January 2008


                                                                                                                                                       11
                                                       4                7
                                  40
                                                                                       19                                                     5
                                                                                                                                                  9
                                                                        6                          33                                    72       46
                             25                7                                                          39                                      24
                                                           0                                                                                                   10
                                                                                        14                                          77             53
                                                                        12
                                                                                                    84              94
                                                                                                         48
                                       3                                                                                                               7
                                                                                                                          11
                                                   6           22
                                                                             14                                                     42
                                                                                             33                                                            36
                                                                                                               30
                            109
                                                                                                                                                           8
                                                                                                                                    42
                                                                                                          32
                                                                                  17          6
                                               6           7                                                                   19


                                                                                                    13    21         46


                                                                            73                31

                                                                                                                               79

                                           7




                                                                    
                                              History


The two organizations have a long-standing history together and have shared major milestones
in more than 90 years of working together: 	

  191	–	 The	American	Cancer	Society	and	the	American	College	of	Surgeons	(ACoS)	are	founded	by	
          overlapping	group	of	physicians.

  196	–		The	Society	encouraged	and	funded	ACoS’s	development	of	an	approvals	program	for	cancer	
          care	clinics.

  196	–		The	Society	established	and	funded	the	Cancer	Liaison	Program.

  1988	–		ACoS	initiated	and	piloted	the	Society-funded	National	Cancer	Data	Base	(NCDB).

  1995	–		Triads	were	formed	between	Commission	on	Cancer	(CoC)	state	chairs,	state	and	hospital	
          tumor	registrars,	and	Society	staff	members,	which	led	to	the	establishment	of	the	CoC’s	
          Facility	Information	Profile	System	(FIPS).

  1998	–	Triad	planning	collaborations	occurred	between	Society	Divisions,	the	CoC	and	the	states.
 -1999

  000	–	The	Society	and	the	CoC	worked	as	national	partners	to	plan	and	implement	the	
 -004 Comprehensive	Cancer	Control	Leadership	Institutes;	this	collaboration	provides	impetus	
         for	state	chair	involvement	in	the	development	and	implementation	of	state	cancer	plans.

  00	–		Society	Division	staff	members	began	annual	participation	in	national	CoC	state	chair	
          meetings	to	foster	partnership	and	collaborations.

  004	–		The	CoC	released	new	Cancer	Program	Standards	that	included	three	standards	focused	on	
          community	outreach.

  005	–		The	CoC	initiated	The ChrOniCle,	a	newsletter	for	Society	staff	members	that	provides	
          updates	on	CoC	activities	and	programs	and	assists	staff	members	in	efforts	to	collaborate	
          with	CoC-accredited	programs	and	physicians.

  005	–		The	role	of	the	Cancer	Liaison	Physician	(CLP)	was	refined	into	three	primary	areas:	to	act	as	
          (1)	champion		
          of	the	cancer	program,	(2)	liaison	to	the	CoC,	and	(3)	agent	of	change	in	the	community.

  006	–		The	Society	and	CoC	instituted	quarterly	conference	calls	with	Division	relationship	
          managers	to	monitor	CoC	collaborations,	share	best	practices,	and	address	challenges.

  007	–		The	Committee	on	Cancer	Liaison	outlined	five	focus	areas	for	the	CLP,	two	of	these	focusing	
          on	the	relationship	with	the	Society.

  008	–		Rollout	will	occur	of	national	training	focusing	on	Society	staff	members	working	with	CoC	
          relationships.




                                                   
                                                 Impact


Past	and	current	collaborations	between	the	American	Cancer	Society	and	the	Commission	on	Cancer	
have	made	a	tremendous	impact	on	the	support	available	to	newly	diagnosed	cancer	patients,	the	
education	of	the	public	about	cancer	prevention	and	early	detection,	and	physician	engagement	in	
cancer	control	activities	at	the	state	and	community	level.	Continued	success	of	this	relationship	can	
significantly	influence	the	reduction	of	cancer	incidence	and	mortality	and	increase	access	to	high-quality	
cancer	care	for	cancer	patients	nationwide.		

The following objectives are made possible through the Society’s partnership with the 1,400
CoC-accredited facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico:
  •	 Increase	the	number	of	newly	diagnosed	patients	served	with	timely,	accurate	information	and	
     resource	referral.
  •	   Increase	access	to	services	for	the	underserved.
  •	   Increase	referrals	to	American	Cancer	Society	programs	and	services.
  •	   Increase	provider	screening	referrals	and	screening	capacity.
  •	   Increase	physician	involvement	at	the	Division,	state,	and	local	level.



                                             Investment

The	financial	and	staff/volunteer	investment	between	the	American	Cancer	Society	and	the	
Commission	on	Cancer	has	been	significant.	Each	year,	the	Society	awards	funds	to	the	CoC	to	support	
three	programs;	however,	a	dollar	amount	cannot	be	placed	on	the	value	of	the	human	resources	that	
are	contributed	to	the	partnership.					

Financial
The	following	CoC	programs	receive	funds	from	the	Society	each	year	and	directly	support	the	Society’s	
mission:	
  •	 Cancer	Liaison	Program	(CLP)	      	      	       	        	       $300,000+
  	 This	network	of	1,600	physician	volunteers	is	responsible	for	providing	leadership	within	the	
     facility	and	at	the	community	level.				

  •	Facility	Information	Profile	System	(FIPS)	 	      	       	         $80,000+
  	 This	data-sharing	activity	between	the	Society	and	the	CoC	provides	information	to	the	public	on	
    the	available	resources	and	services	in	CoC-accredited	facilities.		

  •	National	Cancer	Data	Base	(NCDB)	          	        	      	        $800,000
  	 This	database	includes	data	on	approximately	70	percent	of	cancer	diagnoses	nationwide	and	is	
    a	longitudinal	resource	used	to	analyze	patterns	of	diagnosis,	treatment,	and	outcomes	of	cancer	
    patients	in	the	US.

Human Resources
  •	   American	Cancer	Society/CoC	staff	time	             •	   Volunteer	physician	time


                                                      4
                      Potential to Impact Leadership Roles




                             American
                                                              Commission
                             Cancer
                                                              on Cancer
                             Society




                                    Collaborative Activities


The potential to impact all four American Cancer Society leadership roles exists through
current partnership activities and opportunities for growth.
   I.	 Information Delivery	–	Drive	patients	treated	in	CoC-accredited	facilities	to	the	Society	for	
       timely,	accurate	information	and	resource	referral.

   II.	 Research	–	Increase	the	number	of	patients	referred	to	clinical	trials;	translate	research	
        findings	into	practice.

   III.	 Quality of Life	–	Increase	the	number	of	patient	referrals	to	Society	patient	services.

   IV.	 Prevention and Early Detection	–	Increase	screening	rates	and	reduce	tobacco	consumption	
        through	education	and	advocacy.




                                                    5
           Strategies to Support the American Cancer Society
                            Leadership Roles

I. Information Delivery Collaborative Activities
Support	better	decisions	by	making	available	high-quality,	timely,	understandable	information,	
especially	to	newly	diagnosed	cancer	patients	and	their	caregivers.


   American Cancer Society
   CoC	Hospital	Locator                                     •   Jointly	promote	the	Cancer	Resource	
   1-800-ACS-2345                                               Network	(CRN)	including	cancer.org,		
   www.cancer.org                                               1-800-ACS-2345,	Society	programs	and	
   Cancer	Resource	Connection	(CRC)                             services,	and	the	Patient	Navigator	
                                                                Program	where	available.

                                                            •   Publish	and	provide	a	comprehensive	
                                                                directory	of	community	resources	for	
                                                                cancer	patients	and	their	caregivers.		
   Commission on Cancer
                                                            •   Ensure	facility	access	to	Society	books	
   Facility	Information	Profile	System	(FIPS)
                                                                and	publication.
     	 Level	I	–	resource	and	service	info
     	 Level	II	–	cancer	caseload




II. Research Collaborative Activities
Leverage	the	American	Cancer	Society’s	scientific	credibility	and	unique	position	to	support	innovative,	
high-impact	research	–	both	through	direct	funding	and	the	ability	to	influence	the	amount	and	
direction	of	research	funding	from	other	sources.



   American Cancer Society
   Clinical	Trials	Matching	Service                    •   Jointly	promote	referral	to	the	American	
                                                           Cancer	Society	Clinical	Trials	Matching	
                                                           Service.

                                                       •   Utilize	National	Cancer	Data	Base	(NCDB)	
                                                           data	to	monitor	patterns	of	care	and	
   Commission on Cancer                                                                                	
                                                           improve	quality	of	care	for	cancer	patients.	
   Standard	5.1	–	Ensures	that	clinical	
                                                       •   Maximize	opportunities	for	the	health	care	
   trial	information	is	available	to	
   patients                                                facility	to	obtain	information	about	how	to	
                                                           access	the	Society’s	research	dollars.
   Standard	5.2	–	Requires	a	certain	
   percentage	of	cases	accrued	to	
   clinical	trials	based	on	size	of	facility
   National	Cancer	Data	Base




                                                   6
           Strategies to Support the American Cancer Society
                            Leadership Roles

III. Quality-of -Life Collaborative Activities
Improve	cancer	patients’	quality	of	life	by	assisting	primarily	with	service	referral,	community	
mobilization,	collaboration,	advocacy,	and,	where	appropriate,	directly	providing	services.



   American Cancer Society                               •   Jointly	promote	the	Cancer	Resource	
   Patient	services	(e.g.	Reach	to	                          Network	(CRN),	including	cancer.org,		
   Recovery®,	Road	to	Recovery®)                             1-800-ACS-2345,	Society	programs	and	
   Hospital-based	patient	navigation                         services,	and	the	Patient	Navigator		
                                                             Program	where	available.

                                                         •   Expand	utilization	of	Society	patient	
                                                             services	and	programs	in	CoC-
                                                             accredited	facilities.		
   Commission on Cancer                                  •   Establish	a	referral	process	for	Society	
   Standard	6.1	–	Ensures	that	                              programs	and	services.
   CoC-accredited	facilities	offer	
   patient	services	on-site	or	by	                       •   Recruit	facility	volunteers	to	deliver	
   referral                                                  and/or	coordinate	Society	programs.




IV. Prevention and Early Detection Collaborative Activities
Increase	prevention	and	early	detection	of	cancer.



   American Cancer Society
   Public	awareness	campaigns
   Tools	and	resources	for	physicians	
   Patients	education	materials                               •   Engage	physicians	and	health	care	
                                                                  providers	in	professional	education,	
                                                                  community	outreach,	advocacy,	and	
                                                                  referral	of	patients,	according	to	
                                                                  American	Cancer	Society	prevention	
   Commission on Cancer                                           and	early	detection	guidelines.		
   Standard	6.2	–	Ensures	that	
   CoC-accredited	facilities	offer	
   two	prevention	or	early	detection	
   programs	annually




                                                     7
           Strategies to Support the American Cancer Society
                           Pillars and Beyond

Advocacy – Inform facility health care professionals of ongoing legislative issues and
advocacy efforts impacting cancer care.
Partnership Strategies:
  •   Educate	facility	health	care	professionals	about	ongoing	national,	state	and	community-based	
      legislative	and	policy	issues	that	impact	cancer	research,	prevention,	early	detection,	treatment,	
      and	survivorship.

  •   Encourage	interested	facility	health	care	professionals	to	become	active	members	of	the	American	
      Cancer	Society	Cancer	Action	NetworkSM	(ACS	CAN).

Disparities – Engage facility health care professionals in addressing issues of cancer
disparities.
Partnership Strategies:
  •   Jointly	promote	the	Cancer	Resource	Network	to	facility	health	professionals,	using	language,	
      literacy,	and	religious-	and	culturally	specific	resources	to	reach	the	underserved.



Engagement	of	Commission	on	Cancer-accredited	facilities	extends	beyond	the	American	Cancer	
Society’s	leadership	roles.

Mission Support
Partnership Strategies:
  •   Provide	opportunities	for	CoC-accredited	facilities	to	engage	in	mission	support	activities,	such	as	
      Relay	for	Life®	or	galas.

  •   Develop	a	formal	process	for	measuring	CoC	participation	in	mission	support	activities.

Volunteerism/Physician Engagement
Since 1913, 15 of the Society’s national presidents have been members or held leadership positions
within the CoC.

Partnership Strategies:
  •   Develop	a	plan	to	further	engage	physicians	at	CoC-accredited	facilities	in	Society	activities.

  •   Develop	opportunities	at	the	national,	Division,	and	local	levels,	including,	but	not	limited	
      to,	engagement	of	CoC	physicians	in	Society	advocacy	initiatives,	and	as	volunteers,	media	
      spokespersons,	and	participants	in	comprehensive	cancer	control	efforts.




                                                     8
          Guidelines for Working with CoC-Accredited Facilities


The	following	section	outlines	the	process	for	which	you	can	prioritize	work	with	the	CoC	facilities	in	your	
area.	Invest	the	most	resources	into	those	facilities	where	you	have	the	greatest	potential	for	impact.			

Prioritizing Your Constituents
The	following	pyramid	represents	a	model	for	setting	parameters	for	the	level	of	engagement	with	CoC-
accredited	facilities.		Actual	caseloads	may	vary	by	Division;	therefore,	each	Division	should	determine	
its	own	criteria	for	tier	prioritization	and	assess	staff	capacity	to	determine	the	appropriate	number	of	
facilities	in	each	tier.




                         Tier	1:
                                                     1              1,000+	cancer	cases
                  Formal	Collaboration




                Tier	2:
         Active	Engagement                                                    500-1,000	cancer	cases




     Tier	3:
  Information
                                                                                         <	500	cancer	cases




Criteria for consideration may include:
  •	   Patient	caseload	and	population	(i.e.	underserved	populations)

  •	   Location	of	the	facility

  •	   Cancer	program	category

  •	   Past	and	current	relationships	with	the	Society

  •	   Scope	of	resources	available	from	the	Society	and	the	community




                                                      9
                                Tier 1: Formal Collaboration


CoC-accredited facilities in Tier 1 have the greatest potential for impacting each of the Society’s
leadership roles.
In	addition	to	the	strategies	listed	for	Tier	2	and	Tier	3,	the	following	strategies	are	recommended	for	
Tier	1	facilities:
  •     Dedicated	account	manager	and	account	team
  •     Hospital-based	patient	navigator	(as	strategically	negotiated)
  •     Active	community	resource	development	to	address	gaps	in	service	or	identify	unmet	needs
  •     Minimum	of	quarterly	meetings	with	Cancer	Liaison	Physician	annually
  •     Tier	2	strategies
  •     Tier	3	strategies


                                  Tier 2: Active Engagement

CoC-accredited facilities in Tier  have high potential to impact the Society’s leadership roles.
In	addition	to	the	strategies	listed	for	Tier	3,	the	following	strategies	are	recommended	for	Tier	2	facilities:
  •     Relationship	managers	identified	to	work	with	the	facility	with	or	without	formal	account	team
  •     Society	patient	service	programs	offered
  •     Community	outreach	collaboration	as	appropriate
  •     Approved	collaborative	action	plan
  •     Minimum	of	two	meetings	with	the	Cancer	Liaison	Physician	annually
  •		   Presence	at	cancer	committee	meetings	as	membership	allows
  •     Tier	3	strategies


                                        Tier 3: Information

CoC-accredited facilities in Tier  have some potential to impact the leadership roles, but are
limited by size, resources, and total cancer caseload.
The	strategies	listed	below	are	recommended	as	a	minimum	level	of	engagement	at	all	CoC-accredited	
facilities:

  •     Society	contact	person	identified	to	work	with	the	facility
  •     Society	publications	on-site
  •     Promotion	of	the	Cancer	Resource	Network
  •     Patient	referral	process	recommended
  •     Formal	communications	with	the	Cancer	Liaison	Physician
  •     Minimum	of	annual	meeting	with	the	Cancer	Liaison	Physician
  •     Introduction/in-service	in	Society	programs	and	services

                                                      10

				
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