Nahum Outline by F4Eh05kX

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									                  NAHUM

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        C Harvestime International Institute
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 For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line…
                                  (Isaiah 28:10, KJV)

           ...His word burns in my heart like a fire. It's like a fire in my bones!...
                                  (Jeremiah 20:9, NLT)
                       TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                      Page Number


Introduction To The Book Of Nahum           2

Outline Of The Book Of Nahum
       Nahum 1                              3
       Nahum 2                              6
       Nahum 3                              8

Supplemental Studies                        13
    INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF NAHUM

AUTHOR: Nahum.

TO WHOM: More than 100 years after Jonah preached to Ninevah and the entire city repented,
God sent Nahum to pronounce its doom because of their return to sin.

PURPOSE: To warn of judgment on Ninevah, capitol of the Assyrian empire which took God's
people into captivity.

KEY VERSE: God is jealous, and the Lord revengeth; the Lord revengeth, and is furious; the
Lord will take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth wrath for his enemies. (Nahum
l:2)

LIFE AND MINISTRY PRINCIPLE: God avenges evil and restores His people.

MAIN CHARACTER: Nahum. His name means comforter.

A BRIEF OUTLINE:
I.   Judgment of Ninevah decreed: 1
II.  Judgment of Ninevah described: 2
III. Judgment of Ninevah deserved: 3

STUDY QUESTIONS ON THE INTRODUCTION:
1.  Who was the author of the book?
2.  To whom was the book written?
3.  State the purpose for the book.
4.  Write the key verse.
5.  State the life and ministry principle of the book.
6.  Who is the main character?
7.  Give a brief outline of the book.




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           OUTLINE OF THE BOOK OF NAHUM
                                         Nahum 1

1 The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite.
2 God is jealous, and the Lord revengeth; the Lord revengeth, and is furious; the Lord will
take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth wrath for his enemies.
3 The Lord is slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit the wicked: the
Lord hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his
feet.
4 He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth,
and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth.
5 The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence,
yea, the world, and all that dwell therein.
6 Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger?
his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him.
7 The Lord is good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in
him.
8 But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and
darkness shall pursue his enemies.
9 What do ye imagine against the Lord? he will make an utter end: affliction shall not rise
up the second time.
10 For while they be folden together as thorns, and while they are drunken as drunkards,
they shall be devoured as stubble fully dry.
11 There is one come out of thee, that imagineth evil against the Lord, a wicked counsellor.
12 Thus saith the Lord: Though they be quiet, and likewise many, yet thus shall they be cut
down, when he shall pass through. Though I have afflicted thee, I will afflict thee no more.
13 For now will I break his yoke from off thee, and will burst thy bonds in sunder.
14 And the Lord hath given a commandment concerning thee, that no more of thy name be
sown: out of the house of thy gods will I cut off the graven image and the molten image: I
will make thy grave; for thou art vile.
15 Behold upon the mountains the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth
peace! O Judah, keep thy solemn feasts, perform thy vows: for the wicked shall no more
pass through thee; he is utterly cut off.

Outline 1:
I.    Introduction. (1)
      A.     The burden (a message and declaration concerning) the city of Nineveh.
      B.     The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite. (He was probably from the town
             of Elcos in Galilee. A burden is felt. A vision is seen.)




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II.    The source of destruction: God Himself. (2-3)
       A.     He is jealous (requiring exclusive devotion–not sinful jealousy as we know it.)
       B.     He revenges (avenges) evil.
       C.     He is furious.
       D.     He will take vengeance on His adversaries.
       E.     He reserves wrath for His enemies.
       F.     He will not acquit the wicked.
III.   The greatness of God. (3-6)
       A.     He is slow to anger.
       B.     He is great in power.
       C.     He has His way in nature:
              1.       In the whirlwind.
              2.       In the storm.
              3.       The clouds are the dust of His feet (as the dust from the feet of marching
                       soldiers).
              4.       He rebukes the sea and makes it dry.
              5.       He dries up the rivers causing Bashan (known for its rich pastures);
                       Carmel (known for its vineyards); and the flower of Lebanon (known for
                       its forests--all fertile areas--to dry up.)
              6.       The mountains quake at Him and the hills melt (earthquakes, volcanic
                       eruptions).
              7.       The earth is burned at His presence, the world and all that dwell therein.
              8.       The rocks are thrown down by Him.
IV.    Who can stand before God? (6) (If the elements can't stand before God, no man can do
       so.)
       A.     Who can stand before His indignation?
       B.     Who can abide in the fierceness of His anger?
       C.     His fury is poured out like fire.
V.     The Lord: (7)
       A.     Is good (despite being a God of judgment).
       B.     Is a strong-hold in the day of trouble.
       C.     Knows (takes note of) them that trust in Him.
VI.    The overrunning flood of God’s judgment on Ninevah. (8-10)
       A.     He will make an utter end of the place.
       B.     Darkness shall pursue His enemies.
       C.     Affliction shall not rise up the second time.
       D.     While they are folded together as thorns and drunk as drunkards, they shall be
              devoured as dry stubble. (While they are carousing, judgment will come and they
              will be consumed as quickly as dry stubble burns. They are as fuel for the fire of
              God's judgment. They will never rise again to afflict God's people.)




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VII.    There is one come out of you that imagines evil against the Lord, a wicked counsellor.
        (11) (This may refer to Sennacherib and his spokesman Rabshakeh. They framed an evil
        letter and an evil speech saying God was like the gods of the heathen and unable to
        protect His followers. They tried to dissuade people from putting confidence in Him,
        urging them rather to put themselves under the protection of the king of Assyria. See 2
        Kings 18:17; 19:23; 2 Chronicles 32;and Isaiah 36:15-20.)
VIII.   The word from the Lord. (12-14)
        A.      To Judah:
                1.      Though they be quiet and likewise many (completely confident in their
                        strength), yet they shall be cut down when he shall pass through.
                2.      Though I have afflicted you, I will afflict you no more.
                3.      Now will I break his (the enemy’s) yoke from off you and will burst your
                        bonds in sunder.
        B.      To the king of Ninevah: He has given a commandment concerning you.
                1.      That no more of your name be sown. (There would be no descendants,
                        hence his name would not continue.)
                2.      That out of the house of your gods will I cut off the graven image and the
                        molten image.
                3.      I will make (the temple of your gods) your grave, for you are vile.
                        (See also 2 Kings 19:37 and Isaiah 37:38.)
IX.     The messenger of the Lord. (15)
        A.      Behold upon the mountains the feet of him that brings good tidings (of
                restoration), that publishes peace. (See Isaiah 52:7 and Romans 10:13-15)
        B.      Admonition and promise to Judah. (15)
                1.      Oh Judah, keep your solemn feasts, perform your vows.
                2.      The wicked shall no more pass through you because he is utterly cut off.

Study questions on chapter 1:
1.    Whose vision does the book of Nahum describe? (1)
2.    What do you learn about Nahum in verse 1?
3.    Who is the source of the destruction that is coming upon Ninevah? (2-3)
4.    What do you learn about God’s judgment in verse 2?
5.    What do you learn about God’s grace in verse 3?
6.    How is creation affected by God's judgment as described in verses 3-6?
7.    What are the questions asked in verse 6 and how would you answer them?
8.    What do you learn about God in verse 7 and what promise is given to those who trust
      Him?
9.    What do verses 8-10 teach about God’s judgment?
10.   Explain verse 11.
11.   Summarize the word from the Lord given to Ninevah and Judah in verses 12-13.
12.   What is the commandment given by the Lord in verse 14?
13.   What is said about the messenger of the Lord who preaches restoration in verse 15?
14.   What admonition is given to Judah in verse 15?
15.   What did you learn in this chapter to apply to your life and ministry?

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                                           Nahum 2

1 He that dasheth in pieces is come up before thy face: keep the munition, watch the way,
make thy loins strong, fortify thy power mightily.
2 For the Lord hath turned away the excellency of Jacob, as the excellency of Israel: for the
emptiers have emptied them out, and marred their vine branches.
3 The shield of his mighty men is made red, the valiant men are in scarlet: the chariots shall
be with flaming torches in the day of his preparation, and the fir trees shall be terribly
shaken.
4 The chariots shall rage in the streets, they shall jostle one against another in the broad
ways: they shall seem like torches, they shall run like the lightnings.
5 He shall recount his worthies: they shall stumble in their walk; they shall make haste to
the wall thereof, and the defence shall be prepared.
6 The gates of the rivers shall be opened, and the palace shall be dissolved.
7 And Huzzab shall be led away captive, she shall be brought up, and her maids shall lead
her as with the voice of doves, tabering upon their breasts.
8 But Nineveh is of old like a pool of water: yet they shall flee away. Stand, stand, shall they
cry; but none shall look back.
9 Take ye the spoil of silver, take the spoil of gold: for there is none end of the store and
glory out of all the pleasant furniture.
10 She is empty, and void, and waste: and the heart melteth, and the knees smite together,
and much pain is in all loins, and the faces of them all gather blackness.
11 Where is the dwelling of the lions, and the feeding place of the young lions, where the
lion, even the old lion, walked, and the lion's whelp, and none made them afraid?
12 The lion did tear in pieces enough for his whelps, and strangled for his lionesses, and
filled his holes with prey, and his dens with ravin.
13 Behold, I am against thee, saith the Lord of hosts, and I will burn her chariots in the
smoke, and the sword shall devour thy young lions: and I will cut off thy prey from the
earth, and the voice of thy messengers shall no more be heard.

Outline 2:
I.    Warning: He that dashes in pieces (the enemy) is come up before your face. (1)
II.   Futile preparations for battle. (1)
      A.      Keep the munition (arsenal).
      B.      Watch the way (the enemy may approach).
      C.      Make your loins strong. (The loins were believed to be the source of human
              strength.)
      D.      Fortify your power mightily. (This was a taunting proverb: Preparations
              for battle would actually do no good.)
III.  What the Lord has done. (2)
      A.      He has turned away (restored) the excellency of Jacob, as the excellency of
              Israel. (God has completed their judgment and intends to restore them.)


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      B.     The emptiers (the enemies of God’s people) have emptied them out.
      C.     Their vine branches have been marred (Psalm 80:8-16).
IV.   The results. (3-7)
      A.     The shield of his mighty men is made (dyed) red, the valiant men are in
             scarlet. (Some say their preference for red was to hide the blood from their
             wounds to make themselves appear invincible.)
      B.     The chariots (of war) shall be with flaming torches in the day of his
             preparation.
      C.     The fir trees shall be terribly shaken.
      D.     The chariots shall rage in the streets:
             1.       They shall jostle against one another in the broad ways.
             2.       They shall seem like torches.
             3.       They shall run like the lightnings.
      E.     He shall recount (gather together and count) his worthies (the brave military
             men)
             1.       They shall stumble in their walk.
             2.       They shall make haste to the wall thereof.
             3.       They shall prepare their defense.
      F.     The gates of the rivers shall be opened. (History records that the Tigres
             River flooded out a portion of the city wall, allowing the enemy to enter.)
      G.     The palace shall be dissolved.
      H.     Huzzab (the word means “it is decreed" that Ninevah) shall be led away
             captive:
             1.       She shall be brought up.
             2.       Her maids shall lead her as with the voice of doves, tabering
                      (beating) upon their breasts.
V.    Ninevah’s condition. (8-10)
      A.     She is of old like a pool of water: yet they shall flee away.
      B.     Stand, stand, shall they cry; but none shall look back.
      C.     Take the spoil of silver, take the spoil of gold: for there is no end of the store
             and glory out of all the pleasant furniture (the city will be stripped of its
             wealth).
      D.     She is empty, void, and waste.
      E.     The heart (of the people) melts, the knees smite together (because of fear),
             much pain is in all loins (considered the source of natural strength), and the
             faces of them all gather blackness (sadness, depression).
VI.   Parable of the lions. (11-12)
      A.     Where is the dwelling of the lions, and the feeding place of the young lions,
             where the lion--even the old lion--walked and the lion's whelp, and none
             made them afraid?
      B.     The lion tore in pieces enough for his whelps, strangled for his lionesses,
             and filled his holes with prey and his dens with ravin. (Lions were frequent



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             in Assyrian sculpture as the lion was the national symbol of Ninevah. The
             people of Ninevah viewed themselves as strong and invincible like lions.
             God declares that they were no better than beasts who filled their dens with
             “ravin”–various types of prey.)
VII.   A word from the Lord (the true Lion of Judah: Revelation 5:15). (13)
       A.    Behold, I am against you, says the Lord of hosts.
       B.    I will burn your chariots in the smoke. (Chariots were their primary
             defense.)
       C.    The sword shall devour your young lions (young warriors).
       D.    I will cut off your prey from the earth. (Without prey, Ninevah would not be
             sustained as a city.)
       E.    The voice of your messengers shall no more be heard.

Study questions on chapter 2:
1.    What warning is given in verse 1?
2.    Summarize the futile preparations for battle in verse 1.
3.    Explain what God did as recorded in verse 2.
4.    What were the results of God’s judgment in verses 3-7?
5.    How was Ninevah described in verses 8-10?
6.    Explain the parable of the lions in verses 11-12.
7.    Summarize the word from the Lord to Ninevah in verse 13.
8.    What did you learn in this chapter to apply to your life and ministry?

                                         Nahum 3

1 Woe to the bloody city! it is all full of lies and robbery; the prey departeth not;
2 The noise of a whip, and the noise of the rattling of the wheels, and of the pransing
horses, and of the jumping chariots.
3 The horseman lifteth up both the bright sword and the glittering spear: and there is
a multitude of slain, and a great number of carcases; and there is none end of their
corpses; they stumble upon their corpses:
4 Because of the multitude of the whoredoms of the well-favoured harlot, the mistress
of witchcrafts, that selleth nations through her whoredoms, and families through her
witchcrafts.
5 Behold, I am against thee, saith the Lord of hosts; and I will discover thy skirts
upon thy face, and I will shew the nations thy nakedness, and the kingdoms thy
shame.
6 And I will cast abominable filth upon thee, and make thee vile, and will set thee as a
gazingstock.
7 And it shall come to pass, that all they that look upon thee shall flee from thee, and
say, Nineveh is laid waste: who will bemoan her? whence shall I seek comforters for
thee?
8 Art thou better than populous No, that was situate among the rivers, that had the
waters round about it, whose rampart was the sea, and her wall was from the sea?

                                             8
9 Ethiopia and Egypt were her strength, and it was infinite; Put and Lubim were thy
helpers.
10 Yet was she carried away, she went into captivity: her young children also were
dashed in pieces at the top of all the streets: and they cast lots for her honourable
men, and all her great men were bound in chains.
11 Thou also shalt be drunken: thou shalt be hid, thou also shalt seek strength
because of the enemy.
12 All thy strong holds shall be like fig trees with the firstripe figs: if they be shaken,
they shall even fall into the mouth of the eater.
13 Behold, thy people in the midst of thee are women: the gates of thy land shall be set
wide open unto thine enemies: the fire shall devour thy bars.
14 Draw thee waters for the siege, fortify thy strong holds: go into clay, and tread the
morter, make strong the brick kiln.
15 There shall the fire devour thee; the sword shall cut thee off, it shall eat thee up
like the cankerworm: make thyself many as the cankerworm, make thyself many as
the locusts.
16 Thou hast multiplied thy merchants above the stars of heaven: the cankerworm
spoileth, and flieth away.
17 Thy crowned are as the locusts, and thy captains as the great grasshoppers, which
camp in the hedges in the cold day, but when the sun ariseth they flee away, and their
place is not known where they are.
18 Thy shepherds slumber, O king of Assyria: thy nobles shall dwell in the dust: thy
people is scattered upon the mountains, and no man gathereth them.
19 There is no healing of thy bruise; thy wound is grievous: all that hear the bruit of
thee shall clap the hands over thee: for upon whom hath not thy wickedness passed
continually?

Outline 3:
I.    The woe: Woe to the bloody city! (1)
      A.     It is all full of lies and robbery.
      B.     The prey departs not.
             (Ninevah was sustained by violence, continually preying on others.)
II.   The attack against Ninevah. (2-3)
      A.     The noise of a whip (urging the horses on).
      B.     The noise of the rattling of the wheels.
      C.     The prancing horses and the jumping chariots are heard.
      D.     The horseman lifts up both the bright sword and the glittering spear.
      E.     There is a multitude of slain:
             1.        A great number of carcases.
             2.        No end of their corpses.
             3.        They stumble upon their corpses (there are so many, and no time for
                       burial).
III.  The reason for the destruction. Because of the multitude of the whoredoms of the
      well-favoured harlot, the mistress of witchcrafts, that sells nations through her

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       whoredoms, and families through her witchcrafts. (4)
IV.    What God declares. (5-6).
       A.     I am against you, says the Lord of hosts.
       B.     I will discover (lift up) your skirts upon (over) your face.
       C.     I will show the nations your nakedness and the kingdoms your shame.
       D.     I will cast abominable filth upon you and make you vile.
       E.     I will set you as a gazing stock.
              (There will be a total revelation of their sin.)
V.     The response of observers. (7)
       A.     And it shall come to pass that all they that look upon you shall flee from
              you.
       B.     They will say:
              1.       Nineveh is laid waste.
              2.       Who will bemoan her (mourn her)?
              3.       Where shall I seek comforters for you?
                       (Their allies will totally abandon them.)
VI.    Comparison to the city of No. (8-10) (Read the story of No-amon in Jeremiah 46:25
       and Ezekiel 30:14 to which this passage refers.)
       A.     Are you better than populous No, that was situated among the rivers, that
              had the waters round about it, whose rampart was the sea, and her wall was
              from the sea? (No’s source of life was the rivers from the Nile which
              formed a fork around her for protection and she was also protected by the
              sea. Like Ninevah, she was thought to be impregnable.)
       B.     Ethiopia and Egypt were her strength, and it was infinite. (The best defense
              is to return to God, not look to others for help.)
       C.     Put and Lubim were their helpers.
              (Ethiopia, Egypt, Put, and Lubim were all strong allies of No.)
       D.     Yet was she carried away, she went into captivity.
              1.       Her young children were dashed in pieces at the top of all the streets.
              2.       They cast lots for her honorable men.
              3.       All her great men were bound in chains.
                       (Although No was fortified by her geographic location and her
                       strong allies, God judged her and brought her down.)
VII.   Ninevah--like No–will experience similar judgment. (11-13 )
       A.     You will also be drunken. (They will be made to drink of God’s wrath:
              Isaiah 51:17,21; Jeremiah 25:15.)
       B.     You shall be hid (vanished out of sight).
       C.     You also shall seek strength because of the enemy. (Ninevah, like No, would
              seek help from their allies in vain.)
       D.     All your strong holds shall be like fig trees with the first ripe figs: if they are
              shaken, they fall into the mouth of the eater. (The conquest would be as
              easy as shaking ripe figs off of a tree.)



                                              10
        E.      Behold, your people (troops) in the midst of you are women. (Women were
                considered the weaker sex.)
        F.      The gates of your land shall be set wide open unto your enemies (invasion).
        G.      The fire shall devour your bars (defenses).
VIII.   Futile preparations for the siege of the city (14-16)
        A.      Draw waters for the siege.
        B.      Fortify your strong-holds.
        C.      Go into clay, tread the mortar, make strong the brick kiln (for protecting the
                bulwark).
        D.      There (in the midst of these preparations) shall the fire devour you.
IX.     The cankerworm, locust, and grasshopper analogies. (16-17)
        A.      The sword shall cut you off:
                1.      It shall eat you up like the cankerworm.
                2.      Make yourself many as the cankerworm.
                3.      Make yourself many as the locusts.
        B.      You have multiplied your merchants (hired soldiers) above (more than) the
                stars of heaven.
        C.      The cankerworm spoils and flies away.
        D.      Your crowned (leaders) are as the locusts.
        E.      Your captains are as the great grasshoppers:
                1.      They camp in the hedges in the cold day.
                2.      When the sun arises they flee away.
                3.      No one knows where they are.
                        (Even though they were as numerous as a horde of grasshoppers or
                        locust, they could not escape. The captains were as grasshoppers
                        who sleep until the heat comes and then fly away.)
X.      A message to the king. (18-19)
        A.      Your shepherds slumber.
        B.      Your nobles shall dwell in the dust (they will die).
        C.      Your people are scattered upon the mountains and no man gathers them.
        D.      There is no healing of your bruise.
        E.      Your wound is grievous.
XI.     Universal joy over the fall of Ninevah. (19)
        A.      All that hear the bruit (the report) of you shall clap their hands over you.
        B.      For upon whom has not your wickedness passed continually?
                (The book ends with the statement of truth that God eventually punishes
                cruel, brutal, inhumane nations.)

Study questions on chapter 3:
1.    What to you learn about Ninevah in verse 1?
2.    Describe the battle that was to occur in Ninevah. (2-3)
3.    According to verse 4, what was the reason for the destruction?
4.    What does God declare in verses 5-6?
5.    What would be the response of observers of Ninevah’s judgment? (7)

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6.    Summarize the comparison of No and Ninevah. (8-10)
7.    Summarize the judgment of Ninevah as described in verses 11-13.
8.    Explain the fig tree analogy in verse 12.
9.    Describe the siege of the city of Ninevah. (14-16)
10.   Explain the cankerworm, locust, and grasshopper analogies in verses 16-17.
11.   What was the message to the king of Ninevah as detailed in verse 18?
12.   Describe the shepherd/sheep analogy in verse 18.
13    How would people respond to Nineveh’s destruction? (19)
14.   What did you learn in this chapter to apply to your life and ministry?




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           SUPPLEMENTAL STUDIES
1.   Jonah was a prophet of Israel sent to preach to Ninevah. The city responded, and
     there was a great revival. Unfortunately, the people eventually returned to sin.
     Years later, Nahum, a prophet of Judah, was sent with a prophetic message of
     doom.

     Ninevah was the capital of Assyria. During Nahum’s ministry it was at the peak of
     its wealth, power, and fame. The city was considered to be impregnable, yet their
     fall was prophesied. Ninevah was conquered and destroyed by the Babylonians,
     Medes, and Scythians. The city has remained in ruins since that time.

     For more about Ninevah see Isaiah 10:12-19; 14:24-25; 30:31-33; 31:8-9;
     Ezekiel 32:22-23; Zephaniah 2:13-15; and Zechariah 10:11.

2.   Here are some of the reasons for the judgment that came upon Ninevah:
            -Bloodshed: 3:1
            -Lies: 3:1
            -Robbery: 3:l
            -Killing of the innocent: 3:3-4
            -Whoredom: 3:4
            -Witchcraft: 3:4
            -Immorality: 3:5
            -Hidden violence: 3:6
            -Merchants (hired soldiers) who destroy: 3:16
            -A wound so bad it could not be healed: 3:19
            -Continual wickedness: 2:2-3,8-9,11,13,15; 3:19

3.   Compare these verses:
          Isaiah 8:8; l0:23       Nahum l:8-9
          Isaiah 24:l             Nahum 2:l0
          Isaiah 2l:3             Nahum 2:l0
          Isaiah 52:7             Nahum l:l5

4.   The book of Nahum ends in a question. The only other Old Testament book that
     ends in a question is Jonah, which was the other message to Ninevah.




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