Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

development of outdoor rec facility by HC120705025847

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 17

									Design and Development of an Outdoor Recreation Facility Land Use Planning &
Coordination Unit Policy, Research and Planning Sport and Recreation Services

About the Land Use Planning and Coordination Unit
The Land Use Planning and Coordination Unit was established in 2010 as one of the three components of the Policy, Research
and Planning Branch situated within Sport and Recreation Services in the Department of Communities. The strategic focus of
the Land Use Planning and Coordination Unit is to coordinate and support planning issues related specifically to the
sustainability and advancement of sport and active recreation policy outcomes.




Enquiries
Department of Communities Level 18 80 Albert Street Brisbane Qld 4000 Phone: 07 3237 1718 Fax: 07 3225 41351
http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/gateway/


Date of Publication: February 2012




Disclaimer

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this document was correct at the time of publication. However, the document is provided
on the condition that the department is not rendering legal, planning or professional advice. Local Authorities must take their own professional advice upon the
issues raised, and should not rely upon the information contained or omitted from this document.
Contents
Minister’s               Foreword                  ....................................................................................................................................2
Disclaimer                         ....................................................................................................................................................3
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................4 Planning
.......................................................................................................................................................5
    Starting a business ................................................................................................................................5 Is the
       project feasible? ........................................................................................................................5 Is the project
       sustainable? ..................................................................................................................6 What makes a site
       suitable? ...............................................................................................................7 Other site characteristics to
       consider..................................................................................................7 Outdoor recreation as a secondary
       use..............................................................................................8
  Design ..........................................................................................................................................................9 Steps in
       facility design ...........................................................................................................................9 Step 1: Decide the
     facility’s purpose...................................................................................................9 Step 2: Conduct a site inventory
                .......................................................................................................10 Step 3: Identify the area of land where
                                  development can take place ...............................................11 Step 4: Locate different functions
                  appropriately................................................................................11 Step 5: Walk the site with experienced
                                           designers.............................................................................13 Step 6: Develop a final plan
                  ..............................................................................................................13 Step 7: Discuss the plan with the
                               appropriate industry body ............................................................13 Trail classification and design
                                                                       ..............................................................................................................13
Applying for approval to develop a facility ............................................................................................14
       Sustainable Planning Act 2009 .........................................................................................................14 Preparing
       a     development             application................................................................................................14           The       Integrated
       Development Assessment System process .............................................................15 Further information about
       development applications ........................................................................15
Construction..............................................................................................................................................16
    Pre-Construction Phase.......................................................................................................................16
    Steps in the construction phase...........................................................................................................16 Step 1:
       Preparation of a construction plan........................................................................................17 Step 2: Preparation
       of an accurate cost estimate for development of the site..................................17 Step 3: Engagement of a
       professional to manage the project ..........................................................17 Step 4: Compliance with all relevant
       standards               ................................................................................17          Step            5:         Consideration                 of
       neighbours.................................................................................................17 Step 6: Undertaking construction in
       a responsible way ....................................................................17 Step 7: Monitoring construction and adjusting
       plans if required .......................................................18 Step 8: Inspecting the construction and completed
       works................................................................18            Step           9:         Obtaining            industry           registration            or
       licensing...........................................................................18
Further reading..........................................................................................................................................19
                              Minister’s Foreword
Queenslanders love their outdoor lifestyle and with such a diverse landscape available to us it’s not surprising that
we enjoy an extraordinary variety of outdoor recreation activities.
For some of us, getting outdoors is as relaxing as enjoying a stroll through the bush or a barbeque in a park, but for
many Queenslanders outdoor recreation is the challenge of scaling a peak, the thrill of a downhill ride on a mountain
bike, the pleasure of riding a horse along a trail, the exhilaration of sky-diving, the challenge of reading a map in the
wilderness, the camaraderie
of a camp fire, the surging power of white water or any one of numerous other recreation
experiences.
As Queensland’s population continues to grow, so too will its demand for outdoor recreation. In recognition of
this, the Queensland Government has set itself a goal to protect 50 per cent more land for public recreation by
2020.
In addition to state and local governments, private operators play an important role in helping Queensland to
achieve this goal, when they establish facilities that support outdoor recreation or create synergies between
outdoor recreation and local businesses such as tourism.
This document contains general information about the design and development of an outdoor recreation facility. It
is hoped that this will provide enterprising Queenslanders with a useful introduction to the issues that need to be
considered when planning a new recreational facility.
The Bligh Government is committed to helping Queenslanders become Australia’s healthiest people through Toward
Q2: Tomorrow’s Queensland targets, and recognises outdoor recreation plays a large role in this.



Phil Reeves MP
Minister for Child Safety and Minister for Sport
Disclaimer
While every effort has been made to ensure that           The State of Queensland, and the authors,
the information in this document was correct and          consultants and advisors who contributed and
accurate at the time of publication, the information      assisted in compiling this document, expressly
is advisory and general in nature, and should             disclaim all liability (including but not limited to
not be relied upon to meet individual or specific         liability for negligence) to the maximum extent
requirements—it is to be used as a guide only             permitted by law for errors or omissions of any
and is not binding on any person or organisation.         kind, or for any loss (including direct and indirect
                                                          losses), damage or other consequence that may
This guide will not cover every circumstance, nor
                                                          arise from reliance on the information contained
can it, when adhered to, entirely eliminate risk.
                                                          in or omitted from this document.
Prior to using the information in this document,
developers should consider the circumstances of           Material included in this document may be freely
their situation.                                          reproduced provided that it is accompanied by
                                                          an acknowledgment stating the full title of the
This document is provided on the condition that
                                                          document, the State of Queensland and the date
the State of Queensland, and the authors,
                                                          of release.
consultants and advisors who contributed and
assisted in compiling it are not rendering any legal      At the time of publication, the links to websites
or professional advice or service, and make no            referred to in this document were correct. The
warranties about the information in the document.         Department of Communities acknowledges that,
Developers are encouraged to seek their own               at times, organisations change internet addresses
independent professional advice, as necessary,            or remove information from the internet.
prior to relying on information in this document.
Photo:




This guide is intended for private land owners or         driving or ropes courses. These are examples
land managers who are interested in establishing          only and do not reflect the full range of outdoor
outdoor recreation facilities on their land.              recreation activities.
                                                          The guide has been prepared by the Department
Outdoor recreation is a broad term covering a
                                                          of Communities (Sport and Recreation Services),
wide range of recreational activities in natural,
                                                          to facilitate the provision of places that support
rural or urban open spaces. In general, outdoor
                                                          opportunities for community participation in
recreation is considered to include activities that
                                                          recreation and sport. The guide is aligned to a
do not require built facilities other than such
                                                          Queensland Government commitment in Toward
things as tracks, amenities blocks, camping
                                                          Q2: Tomorrow’s Queensland, to protect 50
areas and car parks. It often involves large areas
                                                          percent more land for nature conservation and
of land, water and/or air. Although outdoor
                                                          public recreation by 2020.
recreation is
sometimes defined in terms that exclude                   The guide provides basic advice about issues
organised                                                 to consider when planning and constructing an
competition, many outdoor recreation                      outdoor recreation facility and identifies relevant
activities have both recreational and sporting            sources of further information. The guide is not
forms.                                                    intended to be comprehensive and does not
                                                          replace the need for wider research and/or expert
Examples of outdoor recreation include activities
                                                          advice, but highlights a range of essential, generic
such as bushwalking, camping, canoeing and
                                                          issues to consider when planning and developing
kayaking, mountain bike riding, trail horse riding,
                                                          an outdoor recreation facility.
trail running, rock climbing, abseiling,
orienteering, off-road motorcycling, four-wheel
Photo:
                                                          and opportunities of running an outdoor
                                                          recreation business.
Starting a business
                                                          The Queensland and Australian Governments
It is critically important that before investing in the   both offer extensive on-line resources to inform
development of an outdoor recreation business,            individuals who are considering starting a
prospective business owners ensure they are well          business. These resources discuss matters such
informed regarding both the demands of running            as working hours and work-life balance, financial
a business and the specific demands                       viability and control, access to markets, taxation,
business structures, law and business planning.        •        • allowing 10 to 15 per cent of original cost
Details are available via the following links:         estimates to cover unexpected costs, inflation and
http://www.business.qld.gov.au/ (Queensland            project administration for the term of the project
                                                       •        initial start-up equipment costs
Government)
                                                       •        • future operating costs. A comprehensive
http://www.business.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx          feasibility study will also assess such factors as:
(Australian Government) In addition, the
                                                       •        the need for the facility, in relation to
SmartLicence web-site (Queensland Government)          market demand and local supply of comparable
provides information on State, Local and               facilities
Commonwealth government licensing
requirements your business may need to meet:           • identification of key user groups and the size
http://www.sd.qld.gov.au/dsdweb/htdocs/slol/               of the accessible market for the facility
Is the project feasible?                               • opportunities that may arise from synergies
                                                           with other businesses including, for example,
The relevant local government can help to
                                                           local tourism
determine if the project is feasible. Developers
                                                       •        the scope of planning processes,
should seek advice from the relevant local
                                                       approvals, cultural and heritage considerations
government regarding whether its planning              and environmental issues that will need to be
scheme will allow the proposed type of land use        addressed
on private property. It is advisable, at an early      •        likely cash flows during construction and
stage, to seek to establish a relationship with the
local government planning staff in order to gain a        operation
comprehensive mutual understanding of the
                                                       • overall financial costs and revenues associated
project and its requirements under regional and
                                                          with construction and operation of the facility.
local planning schemes.
                                                          Revenues could include income sources such
It is also helpful to seek advice from industry           as entrance fees, grants, sponsorship and
bodies relevant to the types of outdoor recreation        commercial contributions from on site
to be supported on the land.                              businesses
To help ensure the financial feasibility of the        • foreseeable difficulties and risks during
project, a business plan should include costs for          planning, construction and subsequent
some or all of the following:                              operation of the facility.
   •    contracting a project manager —                If the financial feasibility of the facility appears
   depending                                           likely to be initially weak, developers might
                                                       consider whether the facility can be developed
on the complexity of developing the project •
                                                       and opened in stages to allow early operating
obtaining planning approval                            revenues to support latter stages of development.
   •     design and construction (including            If employing this strategy, it is appropriate to
   contracting a qualified quantity surveyor to        assess the independent viability of each interim
   obtain reliable                                     stage of development to identify possible risks, if
   estimates)                                          any, that could arise if subsequent development is
•        site works such as grading and drainage,      delayed or cancelled.
sediment barriers/traps, permanent barriers for
environmental protection, security lighting and        It is recommended that developers consider
fencing, linking to existing utilities and signage     engaging the help of people experienced in
•        buildings such as a club house or office      operations and maintenance of similar facilities
block,                                                 to estimate the costs to establish and operate
   toilet/shower blocks, kiosks, storage facilities,   the site.
   or loading ramps
                                                       In addition, consultation with experienced
•        building approvals                            individuals who have already developed
•        landscaping — importing and grading soil,     similar facilities can provide valuable lessons
planting and irrigation of entrance and perimeter      regarding all phases of the project including
buffers, parking and events areas                      design, application for development approval,
•        sealing areas such as car parks,              construction, promotion and operation of the
maintenance and emergency [helipad] areas
                                                       facility.
•        utilities — sewerage, electricity,
installations for supply of drinking and irrigation    Is the project sustainable?
water (installation and running costs)                 When developing a site it is essential to ensure
•        • safety fencing, spectator areas, start
                                                       the development will be sustainable. Securing the
gates, race towers (if appropriate), night lighting
                                                       long-term rights to use the land for the intended
and a public address system
purposes is an important consideration.
To assess sustainability, prospective developers
should consider these questions:
•        Is the site close to interested populations?
•        Is it easy to access?
•        • Will the project be environmentally
friendly
•        – will activities harm native plant and
animal habitats or watercourses? The proposed
development will have to meet the requirements of
environmental legislation. Depending on the
proposal, relevant state government legislation is
likely to include the:
     • Environmental Protection Act 1994
     • Vegetation Management Act 1999, and
     • Water Act 2000. (See:
     http://www.derm.qld.
     gov.au/about/legislationpolicy/legislation/
     acts.html)
•        Is it well designed — have the land’s
natural features been incorporated; are the tracks
constructed to minimise erosion?
•        Is the project economically viable — will it
operate efficiently with sufficient income and cash
flows; will it be too costly to develop or

maintain?
•       Is there an adequate water supply?
•       Will it be fun, engaging, satisfying and safe
for participants and spectators?
• Will social, financial and environmental            expansion
   impacts of the intended activities at the site     •      have a suitable climate
   affect neighbours or other nearby land uses?       •      be within acceptable travelling distance of
   Can these impacts be managed at acceptable         a population/market
   levels?
                                                      •      allow tracks to be built where natural water
Proponents of new outdoor recreation projects         bodies such as drainage lines, creeks,
should, at an early stage of planning, identify       watercourses and coasts are not impacted
and assess the potential risks associated with        •      have soils and other track surfaces that
establishing, operating and maintaining the           minimise erosion during track construction and
proposed facility. Specific risks are discussed       use — for example, sites with acid
further in this document. However, risk
assessment in relation to project sustainability      sulphate soils need specific management
should be comprehensive, including risks                 to minimise the environmental impact of
associated with safety, legal, financial, social,     disturbing these soils
market and environmental considerations.              •       have vegetation that can be retained to
                                                      protect visual amenity, shade, separation between
What makes a site suitable?                           uses, but also be selectively cleared for safety
A combination of appropriate land ownership, land     •       preferably not be environmentally
use, local government planning provisions and         sensitive, avoiding locations with environmentally
physical characteristics is necessary for a site to
be suitable for an outdoor recreation facility.       significant habitat areas or native plant and
                                                      animal species.
Typically, sites with favourable land tenure and
land use characteristics for privately managed        Other site characteristics
outdoor recreation will:
                                                      to consider
•      provide the landowner or operator with
secure, long-term rights to use the land              Landscapes offer a range of values including
•      be compatible with the intent of the local     biodiversity, economic, scenic amenity, cultural
government’s planning scheme                          heritage and outdoor recreation values. Outdoor
•      have minimal potential to negatively impact    recreation facilities should be planned and
on neighbours                                         designed with the goal of optimising all values
•      for noisy activities, be sufficiently          offered by the relevant landscape.
separated
                                                      The proposed site may have culturally significant
   from sensitive land uses by distance or other      characteristics or features such as historic or
   buffers such as hills, trees and other natural     archaeological features, traditional Indigenous
   barriers that reduce the impact of noise and       sites or be the subject of native title claims. In
   dust. Sensitive land uses include hospitals,       general, however, native title should not be an
   houses and child care centres.                     issue on private freehold property. If the property
                                                      has recently been bought, the solicitors who
Sites with favourable physical characteristics        conducted searches on behalf of the buyer should
are likely to:                                        have identified any development restrictions
• have public roads to the property and internal      that apply to the land. Alternatively, the local
    access roads that can provide ready access        government will advise whether the property is
    during construction and can handle expected       affected and advise who should be consulted. If
    traffic volumes                                   the property is affected, developers should
•         have safe entry and exit points from the    investigate any restrictions on the proposed use
site, which allow easy access during operating        of the property and plan ways to preserve and
hours and speedy access by emergency vehicles         manage relevant locations to allow continued
•         be large enough for the proposed            access or use for cultural purposes.
activities, all associated facilities and future
Outdoor recreation as a                               Steps in facility design
secondary use                                         Before applying for development approval the
Outdoor recreation is often a secondary use for       facility needs to be designed. The following seven
land that is primarily dedicated to conservation,     steps will help with planning and design.
agricultural production or some other use. Where      Step 1. Decide the facility’s purpose — consider
a landholder considers introducing outdoor                    activities, participants, their ages, skills
recreation as a secondary use of their land, the              and equipment.
landholder will need to assess the potential
impacts of outdoor recreation on the primary land     Step 2. Conduct a site inventory.
use and the elevated management commitments           Step 3. Identify the area on the land where
required to balance multiple land uses.                        development will take place — the ‘site
Outdoor recreation activities may offer synergistic            development envelope’.
opportunities for existing businesses, such           Step 4. Locate different functions appropriately.
as facilitating tourism benefits. In some cases
participants in outdoor recreation can assist in      Step 5. Walk the site with experienced
land management. For example, an agreement                    designers.
with an outdoor recreation club might involve club    Step 6. Develop a final plan.
volunteers contributing to weed management,
track maintenance or other needs. A good              Step 7. Discuss the plan with the appropriate
relationship with outdoor recreation groups can               industry body.
also lead to recreationists providing relevant
                                                      Step 1: Decide the facility’s purpose
information to landholders through reporting
conditions or events sighted on the land (e.g.        Developers should consider:
erosion, plant disease, vandalism, unauthorised       •        the features of the property
trespassing etc).                                     •        the physical requirements of various
                                                      activities to be conducted on the site

                                                         • the nature of the facility’s targeted clients —
                                                      their skills and abilities. Knowing this will assist
                                                      with decisions about which activities and
                                                      competitive disciplines (if any) the operation will
                                                      cater for.
                                                      Developers should then consult relevant
                                                      stakeholders to:
                                                         • identify the number of people who will
                                                         participate in the activities to be
                                                         accommodated. This will help to determine
                                                         if the number of potential users will justify
                                                         the development. Local clubs and relevant
                                                         industry (e.g. outdoor recreation clubs and
                                                         associations, equipment retailers) should
                                                         be consulted to seek their support and
                                                         suggestions.
                                                      Contact details for recognised state sport
                                                      and recreation bodies are available on the
                                                      department’s web-site at:
                                                      http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/sportrec/
                                                      industry-information/industry-contacts




Photo:
                                                          and built site features and values. Planning
•       invite experienced representatives to visit       documents the local government may have
the site from each activity it will cater for, and        produced should be reviewed to locate potential
obtain their views on whether the site is suitable        conflicts or trouble spots or opportunities such as
for these activities. This consultation can generate      the acquisition of additional neighbouring land.
valuable information for the design and
subsequent operation of the facility                      Physical characteristics: The physical
•       seek local government advice about which          characteristics of the site will be of major
state government departments or other agencies            importance when designing the facility. Obtaining
need to be consulted regarding the development.           aerial photographs and maps can help to ensure
To streamline the approval process, only speak            that all background physical characteristics of
with those authorities                                    the site are identified. Climate, topography, soils,
                                                          vegetation, plants, animals and other features all
    identified as relevant to the site                    need to be considered, as well as existing uses.
• promote the community benefits of establishing
                                                          Built or planned facilities: An inventory should
   the facility in the area. For example, benefits
                                                          be made of existing roads, tracks and other
   might include providing a safe place for
                                                          infrastructure such as buildings or fences, which
   participants, ensuring effective environmental
                                                          may be used in, or could be changed to suit, the
   management of the site, attracting visitors to
                                                          final site design. If buying the property, ensure
   the local area and stimulating other local
                                                          that comprehensive pest and building inspections
   businesses
                                                          are conducted, and check that all buildings have
•       make contact with neighbouring property           local government building approvals. Contact the
owners and public land managers to keep them              local government to identify planned uses for the
informed about important milestones. Providing            property and neighbouring sites, and utilities that
contact details to neighbouring land owners will          pass through the site, such as oil and natural gas
encourage open communication and better
                                                          pipe lines, water, stormwater and sewerage pipes
understanding of the proposed development. This
                                                          or power lines. The local government will identify
may be a valuable initiative to reduce the risk of
                                                          the relevant authorities with an interest in the site
local opposition during assessment of the
development proposal                                      and will advise if it is necessary to contact them.
•       speak with utility and infrastructure             Utilities: Checks should be made to ensure that
providers (if utilities are available) to determine       services required to establish and operate the
the requirements for installing electricity,              facility are available, or can be cost-effectively
sewerage and water access, where relevant.                provided on site. Developers should consider the
Otherwise, alternatives including solar power,            need for water, sewerage, power, waste
composting toilets, water tanks, dams, bores or
                                                          disposal, and telephone services both during
the need for users to provide their own water
                                                          construction and when the facility is in operation.
should be considered
•       negotiate the re-allocation of land such as       Culturally and environmentally sensitive areas:
road reserves or the relocation of existing site          Developers should contact the Department of
                                                          Environment and Resource Management to
    hazards or infrastructure, if these will affect the   identify any culturally or environmentally
    future operation of the facility.                     significant characteristics of the site and ensure
Developers should explore what business                   the facility design accommodates or preserves
opportunities the property might support and the          these. Plan to:
best location for these. For example, opportunities       •       maintain, protect and manage culturally
could include:                                            significant features
                                                          •       improve habitat linkages and potential
•       training/instruction in the activity              ecological corridors
•       food and drink sales                              •       protect sensitive or significant native plants
•       equipment maintenance and hire
•       camping and other recreation activities for          and animals to ensure their survival
    participants and supporters. Conducting                  • protect native vegetation and animals
additional activities may require additional                 from indirect impacts of the development
development approvals, permits or licences from
the local government — depending on the nature
of the service to be provided.
Step 2: Conduct a site inventory
The design of an outdoor recreation site should
be based on an inventory of the cultural, natural
                                                        standards.
•        buffer and restore degraded vegetation
where necessary                                         The map could also include:
•        control the spread of weeds                    •       the locations of soil types
•        identify fire risks. Provide access for fire   •       slopes
fighting vehicles and equipment where bushfire or       •       vegetation types
other fire risks are significant. Limit any             •       heritage values
                                                        •       watercourses. It is useful to make copies of
   permitted burning to a designated area and           this base map
   determine safe conditions for burning. Water
courses: Attention should be given to the               for use in the final site plan. Developers should
potential impacts of water on trails as well as to      ensure they can afford to build the facility or
the impacts of the activities at the site on water      operation designed, that risks are managed, and
quality. Erosion from water flows can impact the        that participant and spectator safety is optimised.
safety of participants in activities at the site and
can exacerbate maintenance costs. If not well           Consider the following features in your
managed, pollution from activities on the site may      site design.
impact the ecological health of waterways or            Compatibility with surrounding areas:
water quality in catchments, potentially bringing       Proposed site components should be located
the facility into conflict with environmental laws.     so they are compatible with adjacent and
Where possible, the creation of new water               surrounding land uses.
crossings should be avoided. If a new crossing          Built elements of the facility: Considerations
is needed, professional advice from a qualified         include whether the facility requires:
engineer will help to minimise impacts through          •         an administration building
appropriate design and construction of the              •         camping facilities
crossing.                                               •         sheltered meeting points at landmarks
                                                        along tracks or trails
Step 3: Identify the area of land where
                                                        •         water storage
development can take place                              •         access points
The area of land where development can take             •         • food preparation / sales facilities. If the
place, or the ‘site development envelope’ should:       facility is intended to host competitive activities,
•        allow for any buffers recommended by the       the site may require:
local government’s planning scheme provisions if        •       a clubhouse or administration building
the development will generate noise, dust or            •       grandstands or viewing areas
odours
•        avoid site hazards such as excessively         •       warm-up, marshalling or training areas
steep areas, cliffs, waterways, areas prone to          •       staging areas
flash flooding, power poles and highly erosive or       •       storage facilities
                                                        •      areas for participants to base themselves
   acid sulphate soils
                                                        where they can prepare for their activities or
• account for specific features of the site             undertake maintenance on equipment.
   – for example, electricity companies may have
   conditions relating to the use of land close to      Entrances, exits and parking areas: Easy
   power poles.                                         access should be designed to provide for the
                                                        efficient arrival and departure of all site users
Step 4: Locate different functions
                                                        including emergency vehicles. If practical, locating
appropriately                                           entrances close to neighbouring retail and
An interim design for the site should be drafted        accommodation facilities can enhance
using a large scale contour map. The design             convenience for the facility’s users. Access is
should include:                                         likely to be less expensive if located on secondary
•      the location of existing infrastructure such     roads, rather than main roads where the costs of
as roads, tracks and power lines                        modifications would be high.
•      sensitive and protected areas
                                                        To minimise traffic impacts on residents, access
•      access points
                                                        by local roads through residential neighbourhoods
•      essential facilities, which will ensure an
economically feasible operation and meet venue          should be avoided.
The relevant local government will be able to          Good risk management starts with appropriate
advise which agency (the local government itself       planning prior to construction, that considers the
or Department of Transport and Main Roads)             risks facility operators, clients or others may face.
should be approached for assistance.                   Facility design should incorporate features that
                                                       reduce the frequency, severity and consequences
If an entrance station is required, it should be
                                                       of incidents. For example, this can be achieved
designed to deal with the volume of traffic arriving
                                                       through:
at peak times. This means, at peak times, the
entrance station must be able to meet demand               • warnings, filters, optional routes, graduation in
when performing its intended functions — such              the difficulty of activities, providing areas to
as collecting entrance fees, issuing permits,              build confidence and skills to negotiate more
assigning campsites, providing first aid, or               difficult sections and maintaining good sight
providing information about directions, activities,    lines
rules and regulations. Easy 24-hour access to              • managing areas where horse, bicycle or
camping areas should be provided.                          motorcycle riders could fall (if your facility
                                                       caters to these activities) by clearing hazards,
Car parking should meet demand in terms
                                                           reducing speed limits and reducing the
of numbers and size (keeping in mind that
                                                       distances riders might fall
for activities such as horse riding or off-road
motorcycling, many cars will be towing trailers).      •       signage which helps to locate and retrieve
                                                       injured participants
Water: Adequate drinking water must be                 •       consistently enforcing risk management
available. The site may also use water                 practices.
catchments, water tanks, dams, bores and
irrigation systems to irrigate the site, to provide     Risk management is an important
special features if appropriate and, for some           consideration for developers and operators of
activities, to control dust.                            outdoor recreation facilities. The department
                                                        recommends proponents refer to relevant
The local government will also be able to advise        Adventure Activity Standards, available at:
whether relevant planning provisions or                 http://www.communities.qld.gov.au/sportrec/
environmental approvals identify criteria for           recreation/queensland-adventure-activity
activities that potentially affect watercourses,
                                                       standards.
riparian areas or wetlands on or near the facility.
For example, if tracks are expected to cross           Tracks and trails: The design of tracks and trails
watercourses the facility may be required to use       will affect users’ enjoyment and safety,
specified erosion prevention measures.                 environmental impacts, erosion and the extent,
Site hazards: Locating tracks near hazards             and costs of ongoing maintenance. For example, if
should be avoided. An assessment will be needed        a site caters to relatively high speed activities such
of what selective clearing will be necessary to        as off-road motorcycling or mountain bike riding,
create safe tracks and optimise the site’s scenic      poorly designed intersections can heighten safety
potential and interest for participants.               risks. The width of a track and how it is cut into the
                                                       side of a slope will affect drainage and erosion.
The clearing of native vegetation in Queensland is
regulated by the Vegetation Management Act             The International Mountain Bicycling
1999. Vegetation management guidelines for             Association (IMBA) offers extensive advice
landholders are available at                           on trail design and construction, including
http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/vegetation. These           identification of commonly made errors. Although
explain when a permit is required and how the          the IMBA focuses on mountain bike riding, its
Department of Environment and Resource                 advice on trail design has wider relevance. See:
Management can help in the process. Although           http://www.imba.com/resources/trail-building.
permits for broadscale clearing are no longer          Trails SA has published Sustainable Recreational
issued in Queensland, native vegetation may still      Trails: Guidelines for the planning, design and
be cleared under a permit to build infrastructure.     maintenance of recreational trails in South
In addition, local governments                         Australia. This publication provides
may apply specific tree clearing restrictions.         comprehensive information on trails from
Risks: Managing risk is an essential component         planning and design through to operation and
of safe and sustainable facility design.               maintenance.
See: http://www.southaustraliantrails.com/               site.
resources.asp
Additional sources of information are listed in
                                                         Step 7: Discuss the plan with
‘Further reading’ at the end of this document.           the appropriate industry body
                                                         It can be beneficial to contact the relevant state
Step 5: Walk the site with experienced                   recreational or sporting association for your
designers                                                proposed activity at an early stage of planning.
Having drafted a preliminary design for tracks and       These organisations can provide valuable insights
other site features, walking over the site can help      into the interests of participants and other
identify where the planned locations of features         stakeholders in their activities.
require adjustment to improve safety, enjoyment          Additionally, if you wish to host competitive events
and interest — avoiding sensitive areas that may         with the endorsement of a relevant association, it
later need excessive maintenance – and to                may be useful to check whether that association
optimise the use of the site for all users.              has specific requirements that should be
If catering to competitive activities, this site check   considered during facility planning. For example,
can help ensure the design layout and associated         Motorcycling Queensland requires applicants
structures will meet necessary standards.                seeking to have their competitive facility licensed
                                                         or their recreational venue registered, to submit
Step 6: Develop a final plan                             their draft plans for evaluation before starting
The detailed contour map developed for the               construction.
interim design can be used to produce the final          Trail classification and design
plan for the site. Knowledge gained from walking
the site can be used to:                                 Information on trail classification and design is
                                                         included in the appendices of Management and
•       locate the different planned activities
                                                         maintenance of an off-road motorcycle facility;
sensitively and appropriately
                                                         available on the department’s website at http://
•       • protect the site’s environmental and
cultural features. Developers should also consider       www.communities.qld.gov.au/sportrec/recreation/
completing supplementary plans relevant to the           trail-bike-riding-in-queensland.
planned uses of the site, such as:                       Additional useful information is also in the draft
•       a preliminary engineering survey for             South East Queensland Active Trails
tracks, roads and drainage                               Implementation Guideline No. 1, published by the
•        a track design and landscape plan               Department of Local Government and Planning
                                                         and available at: http://www.dlgp.qld.gov.au/
•        development plans for any built facilities
                                                         regional-planning/active-trails-strategy.html.
•        a business plan for the operation of the
Photo:




Sustainable Planning Act 2009                            administrative terms used in planning schemes.
The Sustainable Planning Act 2009 establishes a          Development proponents should check the
process for making, assessing and deciding               terminology used in the relevant local government
development applications in Queensland. The              planning scheme. If the scheme was prepared
process used to obtain development approvals is          after the introduction of the QPP on 18 December
called the Integrated Development Assessment             2009, it should be compliant with the QPP. In that
System, or IDAS.                                         case, it will be necessary for development
                                                         proposals to reflect the definitions used in the
An introductory guide to the Sustainable Planning        QPP. Information on the QPP is available at:
Act 2009 is available on-line at: http://www.dlgp.
                                                         http://www.dlgp.qld.gov.au/statewide-planning/
qld.gov.au/about-planning/planning-reform.html.
                                                         queensland-planning-provisions.html.
Preparing a                                              Development proponents should note that:
developmentapplication                                   •        A number of development approvals may
                                                         be required to establish an outdoor recreation
The Queensland Planning Provisions (QPP)
                                                         facility
are the standard planning scheme provisions
                                                         •        A legal process exists for making,
made under the Sustainable Planning Act 2009             assessing and deciding development applications
that provide a consistent format and structure           •        A development application for an outdoor
for local government planning schemes across             recreation facility is likely to be complex to prepare
Queensland. In addition, the QPP provides                and assess, particularly if it involves noisy or
a range of definitions for land uses and                 environmentally impactful activities
•            Such activities may also incur conflict with   The provisions of the relevant local planning
                                                            scheme will identify the required levels of
   adjoining and nearby landowners, increasing              assessment (e.g. code assessable or impact
   the likelihood of opposition to the development          assessable) applicable to different types of
   proposal                                                 development within a local government area.
•       Fees will be required from local                    Various components of a facility’s development
government and possibly state agencies in order             may require different levels of development. The
to process the development application                      local government will be able to offer advice
•       Technical consultants will need to be               relating to your specific proposals.
engaged to prepare assessment studies to
support the application                                     In general, however, the development
                                                            assessment process follows the steps outlined
•       The application is likely to take more than         by the Department of Local Government and
six months and up to a year to assess by local              Planning at: http://www.dlgp.qld.gov.au/
government, depending on its complexity and the             development-applications/flow-charts.html.
issues that arise                                           Further information about
•       Council may require infrastructure
contributions as well as internal and external
                                                            development applications
works as part of the development approval                   The development approval process is outlined at -


•       The costs associated with consultant fees,          http://www.dlgp.qld.gov.au/development-
planning studies, development assessment fees               applications/development-application-process.html
and any internal or external works required as a
condition of approval, can be substantial. For              Assistance in preparing and lodging a
example, if the proposed development is likely to           development application can be obtained by:
generate additional                                         •       privately commissioning a town planning
                                                            consultant to prepare the application
         traffic and require emergency access along a       •       contacting the section of the relevant local
         minor road, substantial costs may be required      government dealing with development
         to upgrade the road accordingly.                   assessment matters
                                                            •       consulting the Department of Local
The Integrated                                              Government and Planning
DevelopmentAssessment                                       •       contacting the Planning Institute of
                                                            Australia.
System process
Photo:




Pre-Construction Phase
After obtaining the necessary IDAS approvals, and before starting construction, developers should:
•       determine how the site will be managed once it is operational
•       develop a business plan for the facility managers or a club development plan for any

                                        not-for-profit organisation running the facility
•            determine what funds are available for capital development and estimate the likely income stream from the
site
•            estimate all costs associated with construction, starting up early operations and ongoing

   maintenance costs to confirm that sufficient
   resources will be available following construction, to run the facility
• produce construction documents and ensure they comply with relevant established venue standards
• obtain all local government building approvals and permits required
•       if external contractors will be needed for construction, use the design documents to call for tenders, assess
the tenders received and award the tender to complete the construction.

Steps in the construction phase
Effective management of the construction
process includes:
          Step 1: Preparation of a construction plan.
Step 2: Preparation of an accurate cost estimate for developing the site.
Step 3: Engagement of a professional to manage the project.
Step 4: Compliance with all relevant standards.
Step 5: Consideration of neighbours.
Step 6: Undertaking construction in a responsible way.
Step 7: Monitoring construction and adjusting plans if required.
Step 8: Inspecting the construction and completed site works.
Step 9: Obtaining industry registration or licensing.
                                                         1. This section has drawn upon a framework environmental management plan for off-road
Step 1: Preparation of a construction                     motorcycling facilities, developed by Ison Environmental Planners on behalf of the Gold
                                                                                          Coast City Council in 2002.
plan                                                     Step 6: Undertaking construction
A construction plan that covers all aspects and          in a responsible way
stages of the construction should be prepared.
                                                         Construction of facilities should not damage the
Step 2: Preparation of an accurate cost                  environment or unnecessarily disadvantage
estimate for development of the site                     nearby property owners. Environmental standards
                                                         that must be met during construction vary among
Engaging a qualified quantity surveyor can assist
                                                         Queensland local governments. Contact the
in gaining a more reliable estimate of the costs of
                                                         relevant local government to check its standards.
constructing the facility as designed. The Australian
Institute of Quantity Surveyors website                  Preparing an environmental management plan
www.aiqs.com.au or the Yellow Pages can be used to       can provide a useful guide for contractors and
                                                                                                                       1
identify the names of Queensland-based                   volunteers overseeing construction. Such a plan
professionals.                                           should address the appropriate range of
                                                         environmental issues for the site, to ensure all
Step 3: Engagement of a professional to                  stages of construction occur in a socially and
manage the project                                       ecologically sustainable way. This would include
It is desirable that a professional project manager be   ways to manage any undesirable impacts of
contracted to manage complex projects. The relevant      construction, including:
local government may keep a register of local            •        minimising impacts on nearby property
professionals. The Yellow Pages also lists project       owners and other stakeholders
managers.                                                •        controlling erosion and minimising the
                                                         effects of eroded sediments
Step 4: Compliance with all relevant                     •        controlling and managing declared plants
standards                                                and other weeds during construction
The venue operator must ensure the site complies         •        minimising pollution from construction
with all standards, regulations and statutory permits,   activities and on-site facilities required by the
including environmental, town planning and safety        workforce. Pollution has adverse environmental
standards; and local and state government                impacts and may impose heavily on existing
                                                         infrastructure
regulations or statutory permits. These include
                                                         •        sourcing and road transport of materials. It
erosion and sediment control standards and
                                                         is important to ensure the safe transport and use
construction standards for new buildings.                of equipment and materials, and that extraction
The operator must also ensure that all venues are        and use of sand, gravel and other construction
constructed and maintained according to these            materials are in accordance with licence
standards and meet health building codes and any         provisions and road maintenance and repair
local government by-laws for sporting facilities and     standards
public parks.                                            •        managing acid sulphate soils if
                                                         excavations are required close to mangrove and
Step 5: Consideration of neighbours                      salt marsh lowlands
The interests of neighbours should be considered
                                                            • operating all vehicles in a safe manner
before construction commences. In most
                                                            with consideration for others.
cases it is both courteous and beneficial from
a practical perspective to develop relationships with    For complicated, multi-facility projects, the
all nearby property owners, businesses and               environmental management process may operate
community groups. Informing the local community of       as explained below. For simpler projects, the
relevant aspects of the construction process and,        landowner/manager may take responsibility for
ensuring that construction activities do not adversely   both environmental and project management.
affect neighbours will reduce the risks
of conflicts arising during construction.
Supervision, reporting and site management are           and completed works
required before and during construction:
                                                         Construction should be managed to ensure that
• Before work starts on the site, the local              ongoing inspections and review of each stage
   government appoints an environmental                  can determine if adjustments are required to
   officer responsible for auditing and reporting        environmental management procedures, the site
   performance and compliance with the                   design, cost estimates or contract documents.
   Environmental Management Plan. This officer           Developers should:
   is not responsible for construction
                                                            • engage people who are experienced in final
•       The landowner/manager should appoint a              inspections to help make a detailed inventory
project manager and an environmental site                   of the completed site works and buildings, and
representative. One person could assume both                to ensure that contracted works have been
responsibilities. The project manager will have             satisfactorily completed before obtaining final
overall responsibility for the project including
                                                            local government approval
Environmental Management Plan obligations,
while the environmental site representative might           • check for and rectify any discrepancies
be the main contractor                                      between the contracted works, the final result
•       During construction, the environmental site          and any relevant industry venue standards.
representative should hold all appropriate
                                                         Where a development involves building work,
documents on site and prepare monthly
                                                         building certification will be required. Building
environmental summary reports, which are kept
on site available for inspection by authorised           certification is the independent checking and
people until construction is complete. Following         approval of building work by a building certifier
construction, the Environmental Management               (also known as a building surveyor) to ensure the
Plan Framework also provides a means of                  work complies with safety, health, amenity and
ensuring that ongoing site management is                 sustainability standards specified in legislation
environmentally sound.                                   and building codes.
                                                         Local governments depend on building certifiers
Step 7: Monitoring construction and                      to check that building work complies with building
adjusting plans if required                              codes and laws. The certifier may be a local
It is important that all aspects of the construction     government employee or a private certifier that
process are monitored regularly to ensure the            the local government contracts to work on its
local government’s environmental standards are           behalf.
adhered to and that appropriate reporting is
completed. Developers should also ensure that
                                                         Step 9: Obtaining industry registration
necessary design and management adjustments              or licensing
can be made in a timely way to accommodate               For some outdoor recreation activities developers
unexpected changes, such as cost increases.              may wish to gain industry support through
When costs exceed available funds, it will be            registration or licensing with a relevant recreation
necessary to consider whether to reduce the              organisation. For example, to conduct off-road
planned size or scope of the project, obtain more        motorcycling events sanctioned by Motorcycling
funds or complete the project in phases.                 Queensland, a facility operator must have venue
Step 8: Inspecting the construction                      registration and a track licence with that body.
Photo:

American Trails: American Trails is a non-profit organisation that identifies its goal as being to support America’s
trails by finding common
ground and promoting cooperation among all interested parties. Their website includes a range of relevant
resources. See http://www. americantrails.org/resources/index.html.
International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA): The IMBA’s mission is to create, enhance and preserve great
trail experiences for mountain bikers worldwide. In addition, IMBA states that it actively promotes responsible
mountain biking, supports volunteer trail work, assists land managers with trail management issues, and improves
relations among trail user groups. IMBA’s trail-building manuals and other resources can be accessed through
www.imba.com. Also see reference to Trail Solutions: IMBA’s Guide to Building Sweet Singletrack, below.
Natural Surface Trails by Design: Physical and Human Design Essentials of Sustainable, Enjoyable Trails:
(by Troy Scott Parker)
This book discusses natural surface trail design for any trail use, including trails for hiking, horse riding, mountain
biking, wheelchairs, all terrain vehicles and off-road motorcycles.
Content discusses:
•       human perception of nature and sites
•      physical forces of compaction and displacement caused by trail use
•      erosion
•      soils and tread materials (including crushed stone)
•      the complex interaction of slope, grade, runoff, weather and climate, tread width, trail use, trail drainage,
sustainability of drainage.

This resource is available from the Queensland Outdoor Recreation Federation at
www.outdoorsqueensland.com.au/01_cms/ details.asp?ID=880.
Professional Trailbuilders Association (PTA):
PTA is a North American advocate for private trail contractors. PTA’s web-site includes links to a variety of
organisations with relevant information. See www.trailbuilders.org/resources/weblinks.html.
Sustainable Recreational Trails: Guidelines for the planning, design and maintenance of
recreational trails in South Australia: This publication provides comprehensive information on trails from
planning and design through to operation and maintenance. See: http://www.
southaustraliantrails.com/resources.asp
The Western Australian Department of Sport and Recreation provides a range of generic information kits, focus
papers and case studies that can assist in planning and managing recreation facilities. View these resources at
http://www.dsr.wa.gov.au/facilityresources.

								
To top