�The Wise Old Woman� P by hvTMh48

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									                       “The Wise Old Woman” P. 2


Objectives
  1. Define plot.
  2. Define conflict
  3. Define climax.
  (all definitions are in the list of terms that starts on p. 859)


  Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read 2-13
  3. Use the plot chart from p. 3 and apply it to the story
  4. Find five (5) new words and define them.
  5. Make a pyramid and write a final copy of a paragraph in which
     you summarize the story and use at least three of the words.


Homework
Begin reading “The Landlady” that begins on p. 74.
“Broken Chain” P. 16
Obejctives
   Define external conflict.
   Define internal conflict.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Do the Quickwrite on p. 16. 4-6 sentences.
   3. Use each of the Vocabulary Development words in a contextually
      correct sentence.
   4. Read pp. 17-24 twice.
   5. Answer questions 2-6 on p. 26 completely in complete sentences.


Homework
None, if the work is completed and turned in within two class days.
                      Vocabulary Development P. 27
Objective
  1. List two ways Latin was spread in Europe.
  2. List the two things apostrophes are used for.


  Classwork
  1. Objective
  2. Read pp. 27-8.
  3. Do Practice and Grammar link from p. 28.
  4. Read pp. 29-30
  5. Answer Test Practice and Constructed Response from p. 31.
     Answer Constructed Response in complete sentences.


Homework
Finish Vocabulary Development.
                       Flowers for Algernon P. 32


Objectives
  1. Define subplot.
  2. Define parallel episodes.
  3. Define context clues.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Do the Quickwrite from p. 32 (4-6 sentences) and explain why you
     feel the way you do.
  3. Define the first Vocabulary Development words and use each in a
     sentence.
  4. Read pp. 33-41.


Homework
Finish Flowers-1.
                       Flowers for Algernon-2 P. 41


Objectives
None


Classwork
  1. Define the remaining Vocabulary Development words and use
       each in a sentence.
  2. Read pp. 41-50.
  3. Answer items 1-4 from p. 50 in complete sentences.
  4. Write a pyramid and 4-6 sentence paragraph response to item 5
       from p. 50
                             Flowers-3 P. 51
Objectives
  1. Define resolution.
  2. Define point of view.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 51-63
  3. Choose any five of the footnoted words, define them, and use each
     in grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
  4. Answer questions 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7 from p. 64 completely in
     complete sentences.
  5. Do the Writing topic from p. 64. Use 4-6 thematically developed
     sentences.
                          “After You Read” P. 65
Objectives
   1. Define etymology.
   2. Define fact.
   3. Define opinion.


Classwork
   1. Objectives.
   2. Read pp. 65-6 aloud.
   3. Choose four words from the Word Bank on p. 66. Get a
      dictionary and look up its etymology. Be sure to make the word
      map as drawn for each of the four words.
   4. Read p. 68. Do all of the exercises on p. 69. Be sure to answer the
      Constructed Response questions in complete sentences.


Homework
Finish this assignment before the next class.
                          “The Landlady” P. 71


Objectives
   1. Define foreshadowing.
   2. List the four elements of plot (p. 869)


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Read “Before You Read on p. 71.
   3. Choose five of the footnoted words, define them, and use each in a
      grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
   4. Read “The Landlady.”
   5. Fill out the Reading Check from p. 81.
   6. Answer questions 2-5 from p. 81 in complete sentences.
   7. Make a pyramid and write a final copy of a 4-6 sentence
      paragraph in response to “Extending the Story” from p. 81


Homework
None, but students must finish by the end of the second class day.
                      Vocabulary Development P. 65


Objective
  1. Define etymology.
  2. Define fact.
  3. Define opinion.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 65-6.
  3. Get a partner and dictionary and do the Practice from p. 66. Use
     three of the vocab words from Flowers.
  4. Read pp. 67-8.
  5. Do Test Practice from p. 69.
  6. Answer items 1-5 of Constructed Response on p. 69 in complete
     sentences.
  7. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in response
     to item number 6.


Homework
Finish Vocabulary Development.
                         “The Monkey’s Paw” P. 84


Objectives
  1. Define fate.
  2. Define free will.
  3. Define motif.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read “Before You Read” on p. 84.
  3. Read “The Monkey’s Paw” (pp. 85-98) twice.
  4. Define footnoted words 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18. Use each in a
     grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
  5. Answer Margin Questions 2, 4, 5, 7, 10, 14, 15, and 21 in complete
     sentences.
                        “The Third Wish” P. 100
Objectives
None


Classwork
  1. Fill out a blank Reading Check chart like the one on p. 100.
  2. Read the story on pp. 101-7.
  3. Choose four of the footnoted words, define them, and use each in
       a complete sentence.
  4. Answer questions 1-5 on p. 108 in complete sentences.
  5. Fill in the Comparing Stories chart on p. 108. Be sure to include
       information from both “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Third
       Wish.”


Homework
Be prepared to take the Comparing Stories chart and write a
compare/contrast essay.
                       Compare/Contrast Essay


Review the chart from p. 108.
Type a thesis sentence across the top of your paper. Example:


Thesis: The two stories we read are proof that sometimes a person
doesn’t really want what he or she asks for.


Based on your chart and thesis, write a 4 paragraph compare/contrast
essay. There is further guidance on pp. 516-21 in your book.


For turn-in:
Double spaced final copy
Pre-writing including thesis
Rough draft with revisions.
                      “The Open Window” P. 110
Objectives
  1. Define romance-highly imaginative short fiction.
  2. State what you believe Framton Nuttel’s illness was.


Classwork
  1. Read the story twice. Remember what “romance” means in the
     context of this story.
  2. Define each of the footnoted words and use each in a sentence.
  3. Create pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph about what
     you think Nuttel’s “illness” is and whether or not he was cured.
                           Skills Check, p. 122
Read selections aloud. Do pp. 125, 127, 128, 129. ( items)
                         Characterization P. 134
Objectives (You may use the Handbook of Literary Terms that starts on
p. 859).
   1. Define characterization.
   2. Define direct characterization.
   3. Define indirect characterization.
   4. Define motive.
   5. Define motivation.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Read pp. 134-5 closely.
   3. List the six forms of characterization.
   4. Do the Practice from the bottom of p. 135


Homework
If finished, read “Thanksgiving” that begins on p. 136.
                         “Thanksgiving” P. 136
Objectives
  1. Define comparisons
  2. Define contrasts.
  3. List three signal words that compare and three signal words that
     contrast.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 136-40 closely. Make an H map like the one on p. 141.
  3. Create a pyramid and then write a final copy of a paragraph in
     which you write on the topic from Practice 3 on p. 141. Use the H
     map to create your pyramid, and then use your pyramid to write
     a UCW paragraph (unified, cohesive, and well-written).
                          “Harriet Tubman” P. 142
  Objectives
  1. Define moral dilemma.
  2. Define inferences.
  3. Define irony.


Classwork
  1. Quickwrite from p. 142. List two examples of each.
  2. Define all the Vocabulary Development words and use each in a
     grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
  3. Read pp. 143-52.
  4. Reading Check from p. 154. List three facts instead of five for
     both (a) and (b).
  5. Answer questions 1, 2, 3, and 4 from p. 154 in complete sentences.
  6. Create a pyramid and write a final draft of a paragraph in which
     you answer Extending Interpretations from p. 154. Include and
     underline at least three of the Vocabulary Development words
     and/or footnoted terms from the reading.
                       “After You Read” P. 155


Objectives
  1. List three languages that have directly influenced English.
  2. Define text structures.
  3. List four types of text structures.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 155-58
  3. Make word trees with the words from p. 155
  4. Do the Test Practice from p. 159
  5. Answer each “Constructed Response” question in a complete
     sentence.


Homework
Finish “After You Read.”
                    “Too Soon a Woman” P. 169
Objectives
  1. Define motivation.
  2. Define summary.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Define each of the Vocabulary Development words and use each
     in a grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
  3. Read pp. 169-74.
  4. Do the Reading Check from p. 175.
  5. Answer all 4 items from question 4 in complete sentences.
  6. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph that
     answers the Writing topic. Use at least four of the Vocab
     Development or footnoted words and underline them.
                         “Home Sweet Soddie” P. 177
  Objectives
  1. Define biased.
  2. Define objective.


Classwork
  1. Objectives.
  2. Do Practice from p. 177.
  3. Read “Informational Text” on p. 178
  4. Read pp. 179-82.
  5. Do “Test Practice” on p. 183 including the Constructed Response.
     Answer in complete sentences.
  6. Do “After You Read” on p. 184.


Homework
Finish “Home Sweet Soddie.”
                          The Pigman


1. Read “A Personal Note” on pp. 187-93.
2. Read “Paul Zindel” on p. 221-2
3. If time allows, read “My First Love” on pp. 214-19
                            The Pigman-1 P. 1
Objectives
  1. Define plot.
  2. List the four basic elements of plot.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 1-31
  3. Define the vocabulary words and use at least four
  of them in a unified, coherent, and well-written paragraph.
  4. Chooses two of the following topics and answer each in 4-6
     sentence unified, cohesive, and well-written paragraphs.
  Vocabulary
  antagonistic      graft(the one dealing with corruption)   delicacies
     muttered       avocation




Topics
  1. John often commits pranks. Based on what you have read on pp.
     1-31, speculate about why you think this is true.
  2. Lorraine is apparently not as attractive as John. If their
     relationship is not about looks, speculate about what you think
     they have in common.
  3. John, Lorraine, and their friends prank call strangers and
     attempt to keep them on the phone as long as possible. Why do
     you think they might do that?
4. Lorraine says on p. 28 “I think you can tell the real *truth with
   that kind of lying.” What kind of lying does she mean? Do you
   agree or disagree?
5. John and Lorraine alternate chapters in the book. Do you find
   this more or less effective as a way to tell a story? Explain your
   answer.
                            The Pigman-2 P. 31-64


Objectives
  1. Define conflict.
  2. Define internal conflict.
  3. Define external conflict.
Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 31-64.
  3. Chooses two of the following topics and answer each in 4-6
        sentence unified, cohesive, and well-written paragraphs.
  4. Define all of the vocabulary words and use at least four of them in
        a UCW paragraph.


Vocabulary
Hovel         excruciatingly     compulsive         incongruous
        philanthropy
  Topics
  1. John apparently chooses to be in conflict with nearly everything.
        Choose one conflict, state its type, and discuss how you believe it
        will be resolved.
  2. Mr. Pignati has an excellent memory. Based on what you know
        about him so far, discuss whether this is a good or bad thing.
  3. The Pigman has a huge collection of pigs. What do they represent
        and why does he have so many of them?
  4. Based on the other adults in the book, why do you think John and
        Lorraine would want to hang out with Mr. Pignati?
5. The Pigman’s favorite animal at the zoo is Bobo the baboon.
  Using the zoo as a metaphor, discuss what you think their
  connection is.
                              The Pigman-3
Objectives
  1. Define setting.
  2. List the setting of this book.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 65-97
  3. Chooses three of the following topics and answer each in 4-6
     sentence unified, cohesive, and well-written paragraphs.
  4. Define each of the Vocabulary words and use at least four of them
     in a UCW paragraph.
  Vocabulary
  Floundering     dismember           nocturnal subliminally
     fixated
  Topics
  1. John likes to hang out at the cemetery. On p. 68 he says he would
     prefer seeing ghosts. Why does he say this, and how do you feel
     about it?
  2. John wants to be an actor, but his father wants him to take over
     the family business. In which profession do you think John would
     be happier? Why?
  3. Mrs. Pignati is not really in California. Why does Mr. Pignati say
     she is?
  4. Lorraine buys nylon stockings for her mother. Why would she do
     this?
5. On p. 94 Lorraine talks about the three monkeys holding each
   other. Why do they do it, and what do you think this symbolizes?
                             The Pigman-4 P. 98
  Objectives
  1. Define point of view.
  2. List the point of view of this book.
Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 99-134
  3. Chooses two of the following topics and answer each in 4-6
     sentence unified, cohesive, and well-written paragraphs.
  4. Define the Vocabulary words and use at least four of them in a
     UCW paragraph.
  Vocabulary
  Prevaricates    bellowed     compassion         disheartened
     subconscious       mortified    ingrate
Topics
  1. Write a paragraph about what has happened so far from the
     point of view of John or Lorraine’s parents.
  2. Lorraine’s mother is disappointed in men. Why does she try to
     pass this on to Lorraine rather than let Lorraine discover for
     herself whether or not her mom is right?
  3. Even though Mr. Pignati says John and Lorraine don’t have to
     bring anything, they start to anyway. What might this mean, and
     give examples from the reading to support your argument.
  4. On p. 112 Lorraine says “Maybe there are some lies you should
     never admit to.” Do you agree or disagree? Use examples and/or
     logic to support your answer.
5. John and Lorraine claim to be Mr. Pignati’s children so they can
  see him in the hospital. Is there more truth to this than they might
  admit? Explain your answer.
                           The Pigman-5 P. 135


  Objectives
  1. Define theme.
  2. List the major theme of this book.
  3. Define protagonist.
  Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 135-82
  3. Choose three of the following topics and answer each in 4-6
     sentence unified, cohesive, and well-written paragraphs.
Topics
  1. John writes both the first and last chapters of the book. Is he the
     main character or is Lorraine? Explain your answer
  2. John does many things because he can get away with them. Is this
     right, or will something happen to break him of this habit?
     Explain your answer.
  3. Norton destroys the pig collection. Explain what it means
     symbolically and discuss whether it foreshadows anything, and if
     so, what. Give examples.
  4. The protagonist is sometimes described as the person who is most
     changed at the end of the story. Based on this idea, discuss
     whether John, Lorraine, or the Pigman is the protagonist. Be sure
     to explain your answer.
  5. A zookeeper tells Mr. Pignati that Bobo was ill-tempered, but he
     behaves
  when Mr. Pignati is there, and he dies when Mr. Pignati is in the
  hospital. Discuss what you think this means.
6. On p. 181 John says, “There was no one else to blame
  anymore…and there was no place to hide.” Discuss what you
  believe he means by this.
                         “Mrs. Flowers”-1 P. 185
Objective
  1. Define main idea.


Classwork
  1. Objective
  2. Read “Before You Read” on p. 185.
  3. Do the Class Survey.
  4. Use all Vocabulary Development words in a complete sentence.
  5. Read pp. 186-190 twice.
  6. Choose two of the topics below and write a 4-6 sentence
     paragraph response. For extra credit, include and underline at
     least two of the footnoted words in each paragraph.
  Topics
  1. State the main idea of the selection and support your ideas with
     examples from the reading.
  2. Mrs. Flowers told Marguerite that she should be “intolerant of
     ignorance but understanding of illiteracy.” It might be helpful to
     define ignorance and illiteracy first. Then explain what this
     means and agree or disagree. Be sure to explain your answer.
  3. Mrs. Flowers says, “[L]anguage is man’s way of communicating
     with his fellow man and it is language alone that separates him
     from the lower animals.” Do you agree or disagree, and if not,
     explain what you think does separate humans from animals. In
     either case, explain your answer.
              “Meet the Writer”—Maya Angelou p. 190


Objectives
None
Classwork
1. Read “Meet the Writer” on p. 190
2. Answer questions 1, 2, 3, and 5 on p. 191 in complete sentences. If
   a longer answer is necessary, feel free to write it.
3. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph response to
   “Writing” from p. 191
4. Do “After you Read” (1-4) on p. 192.
                              TP-CASTT


TP-CASTT is a method for analyzing poetry and most songs. It stands
for Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude, Shift, Title, and Theme.
Title—Think about the title before reading the poem
Paraphrase—Put the poem/song into your own words
Connotation—think about what the words mean beyond the literal
Attitude—Determine the poet/speaker’s tone (ironic, angry, sad, etc.)
Shift—Look for changes in the poet’s attitude
Title-Review the title again and see if its meaning has changed for you
Theme-Determine what the poet is saying in relation to an attitude
about life


Copperhead Road
 By Steve Earle

...my name's John Lee Pettimore.....
(D)
Same as my daddy and his daddy before
(D)
You hardly ever saw Grandaddy down here
(D)
He only come to town about twice a year
(D)
He'd buy a hundred pounds of yeast and some copper line
(D)
Everybody knew that he made moonshine
Now the revenue man wanted Grandaddy bad.
(D)
He headed up the holler with everything he had.
(G)              (C)     (G)
It's before my time but I've been told.
 .
(D)-(No Chord)
He never come back from Copperhead Road.


(2nd Verse)
(D)
Now Daddy ran the whiskey in a big block dodge
(D)
Bought it at an auction at the Mason's Lodge
(D)
Johnson County Sheriff painted on the side
(D)
Just shot a coat of primer and they looked inside
(D)
Well him and my uncle tore that engine down
(D)
I still remember that rumblin' sound
        (G)              (C)       (G)
Well the sheriff came around in the middle of the night.
(D)
Heard Mama cryin' knew somethin wasn't right.
      (G)                    (C) (G)
He was headed down to Knoxville with the weekly load.
         (D - Let Ring)
You could smell the whiskey burnin' down Copperhead Road.

       .         .         .

(3rd Verse)
(D)
I volunteered for the army on my birthday
(D)
They draft the white trash first, 'round here anyway
(D)
I done two tours of duty in Vietnam
(D)
And I came home with a brand new plan(D)
I take the seed from Columbia and Mexico
(D)
I plant it up the holler down Copperhead Road
(G)              (C)
Well the D.E.A.'s got a chopper in the air.
(D)
I wake up screamin' like I'm back over there.
(G)                   (C)
I learned a thing or two from Charlie don't you know.
(D)
You better stay away from Copperhead Road.
Dulce et Decorum Est
by Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime...
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.
With a partner, apply TP-CASTT to the entire poem. Write each
answer in at least one complete sentence. Feel free to use quotations
from the poem to support your argument. When finished, create a
pyramid and write a 5-6 sentence paragraph in which you create a topic
sentence about your reaction to the poem and use elements from TP-
CASTT to support your argument. It is not necessary to use them all.
                     “Drumbeats and Bullets” P. 194
Objectives
  1. Define genre.
  2. Define historical fiction.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read “Before You Read” on pp. 195-6
  3. Read pp. 197-200
  4. Fill out the Outline from the “Reading Check” on p. 202
  5. Write a rough draft and final copy of a paragraph in which you
     discuss whether you prefer to read historical fiction or history and
     why. Be sure to use 4-6 sentences and support your main idea.


Homework
Finish “Drumbeats and Bullets.”
                   “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh” P. 203


Objectives
  1. Define theme.
  2. Define implied theme-a theme that is not directly stated.


Classwork
  1. Objectives.
  2. Read pp. 203-11
  3. Write a grammatically and contextually correct sentence with five
     of the footnoted words.
  4. Do Items 1-7 from p. 212. Answer in complete sentences and
     explain your answers fully.
                          Test Practice P. 224
Objectives
None
Classwork
Read and do all Test Practice Items on pp. 224-31. When finished, you
should have 28 total answers.
If you finish, you may read about setting on pp. 236-7 and then read
“The Green Mamba on pp. 239-47.
                    Setting/”The Green Mamba” p. 236


   Objectives
   1. Define setting.
   2. Define inference.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Read “Setting” on pp. 236-7
   3. Do the Practice chart from p. 237.
   4. Do the Practice the Story chart from p. 249. Be sure to answer all
      four of the questions.


We will take two days to do this lesson.
                         “In Trouble” P. 250
Obejctives
  1. Define mood.
  2. Define visualize.


Classwork
  1. Read “Before You Read.”
  2. Use each of the Vocabulary Development words in a correct
     sentence.
  3. Read pp. 251-8.
  4. Answer all parts of the Reading Check from p. 259 in complete
     sentences.
  5. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph on the
     Writing topic from p. 259.
                     “There Will be Soft Rains” P. 265
Objectives
   1. Define allusion.
   2. Define chronological order.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Read Before You Read” on p. 265
   3. Write a correct sentence for each of the Vocabulary Development
      words.
   4. Read pp. 266-72.
   5. Answer questions 1-5 on p. 273 in complete sentences.
   6. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in response
      to item 6 on p. 273



                         There Will Come Soft Rains

                             By Sara Teasdale



There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground,
And swallows circling with their shimmering sound;

And frogs in the pool singing at night,
And wild plum trees in tremulous white;

Robins will wear their feathery fire,
Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire;

And not one will know of the war, not one
Will care at last when it is done.
Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree,
If mankind perished utterly;

And Spring herself when she woke at dawn
Would scarcely know that we were gone.
                   Vocabulary Development P. 260
Objectives
  1. Define homophones.
  2. Define homographs.
  3. Define compare and contrast.
Classwork
  1. Objectives.
  2. Vocabulary Development from p. 260 (11 items)
  3. Read pp. 261-2.
  4. Do the Test Practice from p. 263. Be sure to do the Constructed
     Response from the bottom of the page as well.
  5. The last 15 minutes of class, you may partner up and do the
     Vocabulary Development from p. 264. Be sure to do it completely
     for each of the five words.


Homework
None. But if you finish in class, Read the “Before You Read” from p.
265 and “Meet the Writer” from p. 272.
                          “Destination: Mars” P. 274
Objectives
  1. Define word analogy.
  2. Define subtitle.
  3. Define sidebar.
Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read p. 275 aloud.
  3. Discuss analogies.
  4. Do p. 274 (10).
  5. Read “Destination: Mars.”
  6. Read the sidebar.
  7. Do Test Practice from p. 279
  8. Answer all five Constructed response questions in complete
     sentences.


Homework
Finish “Destination: Mars.”
                         “The Circuit” P. 280
Objectives
  1. Define tone.
  2. Define cause and effect.
  3. Define inference.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Write a correct sentence with each of the Vocabulary
     Development words.
  3. Answer each of the inference questions in complete sentences (5).
  4. Read pp. 280-6.
  5. Items 2 and 4 from p. 287. Do two thought bubbles for item 2. Use
     two or three sentences to answer item 4.
  6. Do the Writing from the bottom of p. 287.
  7. Do all 10 Grammar Link activities from p. 288.
                          “Cesar Chavez” P. 289
Obejectives
  1. Define cause and effect.
  2. Define inferences.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 289-95
  3. Do Test Practice and Constructed Response from p. 292
  4. Do Test Practice and Constructed Response from p. 296
  5. Do After You Read on p. 297


Homework
Finish “Cesar Chavez”
             “Bradbury Interview/The Flying Machine” P. 298
Objectives
  1. Define generalizations.
  2. List the three key elements of Bradbury’s stories.


Classwork
  1. Read pp. 298-311.
  2. From the interview, choose one thing that Bradbury says and
     write a 4-6 sentence paragraph response.
  3. Answer the even numbered (2,4,6,8,10) margin questions in
     complete sentences.
  4. Create a pyramid and write a final 4-6 sentence paragraph in
     which you respond to one of the message topics from p. 311. For
     extra credit, use and underline the four footnoted words from the
     story.


Homework
None. We will work on this two days.
                         “The Fog Horn” P. 319
Objectives
  1. Define quest.
  2. Define symbol.
  3. List the five parts of SIFTT.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Discuss SIFTT
  3. Read pp. 319-28
  4. Jot down any symbols or metaphors you read in the story (3-4)
  5. Apply SIFTT to the story
  6. Once you have determined theme for the story, create a pyramid
     and write a final copy of a paragraph in which you discuss the
     story’s theme and whether or not you believe it was effectively
     communicated.


Homework
Finish “The Fog Horn.”
            “Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World” P. 331
Classwork
  1. Read pp. 331-7
  2. Do Skills Reviews on pp. 344-9 (25 questions total)
                     “The People Could Fly” p. 356
Objectives
  1. Define summary.
  2. Define theme.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read “Theme” on p. 356 and do the exercise.
  3. Read pp. 358-62
  4. Read about Virginia Hamilton on p. 362
  5. Do the Practice the Strategy chart.
  6. Answer each of the five practice questions.
  7. Determine the theme for the story and write a 4-6 sentence
     paragraph response about it.
                    “A Tragedy Revealed” P. 444
Objective
  1. Define KWL.


Classwork
  1. Objective
  2. Read pp. 444-59
  3. Construct a KWL chart that includes at least three items.
  4. With a partner, write five of the Vocabulary Development words
     m in terms of their parts (morphemes). You will need a
     dictionary. Example: im-mut-able im-not mut-change able-the
     ability to do something.
  5. Write a 4-6 sentence paragraph that summarizes the story and
     uses at least four of the Voc. Dev. Words.
                             Poetry-1 P. 616
Objectives
   1. Define rhythm.
   2. Define meter.
   3. Define free verse.


Classwork
   1. Finish terms.
   2. Obejctives.
   3. Read pp. 616-619 with a partner.
   4. Use objectives to analyze poems.
   5. Read “Introduction to Poetry” on p. 623.
   6. Write a one sentence summary of each stanza of each poem (7
      total).
   7. Apply TP-CASTT to the poems. Write a 4-6 sentence pargraph
      that summarizes one of the poems.
Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening-
Robert Frost
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

My son, My Executioner-Donald Hall

My son, my executioner
I take you in my arms
Quiet and small and just astir
and whom my body warms

Sweet death, small son,
our instrument of immortality,
your cries and hunger document
our bodily decay.

We twenty two and twenty five,
who seemed to live forever,
observe enduring life in you
and start to die together.
                                    Poetry-2
   Objectives
   1. List the elements of TP-CASTT.
   2. Define theme.
   3. Define allusion.
   4. Define figurative language.


   Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Listen to “Mission Temple Fireworks Stand” and “Perfectly Good
   Guitar,” and/or “Copperhead Road
   3. Apply TP-CASTT to each poem.
   Write a one sentence summary of each stanza.
   4. List the rhyme scheme and meter of the first 8 lines of each song.
   5. Find one example of an allusion, figurative language and the line it
   occurs on in each song.


                Mission Temple Fireworks Stand—Paul Thorn
I saw a black man with a bible and a sparkler in his hand.
He was holding a tent revival and running a firework stand.
He said the end of the world is coming, you better get on your knees.
Today bottle rockets are two for one, but salvation's free.

He said I quit my job at a big church where the milk and money flowed,
To sell cherry bombs for Jesus in a tent beside the road.
I ain't in it for the money, most cars they pass on by.
But I pay the rent on New Years and the fourth of July.
Here at the...

Chorus:
Holy Ghost (Holy Ghost)
Big Bang theory (Big Bang Theory)
Pentecostal (Pentacostal)
Fire and brimstone (Fire and Brimstone)
Mission Temple Fireworks Stand

Fireworks are dangerous, they can blow up in your face
So you better read the instructions, light the fuse and get away
These things are made in China so it's easy to see
How a man who worships Buddha ain't got no guarantees
This is the...

Chorus

Whoa-o-o-o-o

Bridge:
He said everything I'm selling is all going up in smoke
This world is like an atom bomb, it's ready to explode
When the trumpet sounds and The Lord comes back I promise you one
thing
I'll be a human bottle rocket and I'll go out with a bang
I'll leave this...

Chorus

                           Perfectly Good Guitar
                                John Hiatt


He threw one down from the top of the stairs
beautiful women were standing everywhere
they all went off when he smashed that thing
but off in the dark you could hear somebody sing

it breaks my heart to see those stars
smashing a perfectly good guitar
i dont know who they think they are
smashing a perfectly good guitar

it started back in 1963
his mama wouldnt buy him that new red harmony
he settled for a sunburst with a crack
but hes still trying to break his mamas back

oh it breaks my heart to see those stars
smashing a perfectly good guitar
i dont know who they think they are
smashing a perfectly good guitar

how he loved that guitar just like a girlfriend
but every good thing comes to an end
now he just sits in his room all day
whistling every note he ever played

well there outta be a law with no bail
smash a guitar and you go to jail
with no chance for early parole
you dont get out until you get some soul

oh it breaks my heart to see those stars
smashing a perfectly good guitar
i dont know who they think they are
smashing a perfectly good guitar

late at night the end of the road
he wishes he still had that old guitar to hold
he'd rock it like a baby in his arms
never let it come to any harm

oh it breaks my heart to see those stars
smashing a perfectly good guitar
i dont know who they think they are
smashing a perfectly good guitar




                       Copperhead Road-Steve Earle
Well my names john lee pettimore
Same as my daddy and his daddy before
You hardly ever saw grandaddy down here
He only came to town about twice a year
Hed buy a hundred pounds of yeast and some copper line
Everybody knew that he made moonshine
Now the revenue man wanted grandaddy bad
He headed up the holler with everything he had
Its before my time but Ive been told
He never came back from copperhead road


Now daddy ran the whiskey in a big block dodge
Bought it at an auction at the masons lodge
Johnson county sheriff painted on the side
Just shot a coat of primer then he looked inside
Well him and my uncle tore that engine down
I still remember that rumblin sound
Well the sheriff came around in the middle of the night
Heard mama cryin, knew something wasnt right
He was headed down to knoxville with the weekly load
You could smell the whiskey burnin down copperhead road


I volunteered for the army on my birthday
They draft the white trash first,round here anyway
I done two tours of duty in vietnam
And I came home with a brand new plan
I take the seed from colombia and mexico
I plant it up the holler down copperhead road
Well the d.e.a.s got a chopper in the air
I wake up screaming like Im back over there
I learned a thing or two from ol charlie dont you know
You better stay away from copperhead road


Copperhead road
Copperhead road
Copperhead road
                               Poetry-3 P. 667
   Objectives
   1. Define lyric poem.
   2. Define elegy.
   3. Define extended metaphor.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Read “My Papa’ Waltz”
   3. Apply TP-CASTT to the poem.
   4. Read “O Captain! My Captain” and apply TP-CASTT to it.
   5. List what the extended metaphor for each poem is.
   6. Based on the theme you determine for the poems, create a
      pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence final copy of a paragraph in
      which you discuss the theme of one poem and your reaction to it.




My Papa's Waltz-Theodore Roethke

The whiskey on your breath
Could make a small boy dizzy;
But I hung on like death:
Such waltzing was not easy.

We romped until the pans
Slid from the kitchen shelf;
My mother's countenance
Could not unfrown itself.

The hand that held my wrist
Was battered on one knuckle; At every step you missed
My right ear scraped a buckle.
You beat time on my head
With a palm caked hard by dirt,
Then waltzed me off to bed
Still clinging to your shirt.




O Captain! My Captain!


O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.


O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills; 10
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You've fallen cold and dead.


My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won; 20
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.
Walt Whitman
                              Poetry Test
1-6 are matching. Write the correct letter.
1. rhythm
2. meter
3. free verse
4. theme
5. allusion
6. figurative language
Answers for 1-6
           a. a pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in poetry
           b. poetry without a regular meter or rhyme scheme.
           c. a reference to something from history, religion, politics, etc.
           d. a word or phrase that is not meant to be understood literally
           e. the general insight about life that a work reveals
           f. a musical quality produced by the repetition of stressed and
                unstressed syllable or other repeated sound patterns


7-12 are matching. Write the correct letter.
7. lyric poem
8. elegy
9. extended metaphor
10. symbol
11. metaphor
12. iamb
a. two consecutive syllables (a metrical foot) in which the first syllable is not
stressed, and the second is as in the word dis-sect.
b. a poem of mourning, usually about someone who died
c. a poem that expresses feelings or thoughts rather than express an emotion.
d. a metaphor that is developed over a few lines or even an entire creative
work
e. a comparison between two different things that does not use the words like
or as
f. an object that stands not only for itself but that also stands for something
else that is usually abstract. A wedding ring or the U.S. flag are examples.
For questions 13-23, use the excerpt from the poem below.


“April Inventory” W. D. Snodgrass
The green catalpa tree has turned
All white; the cherry blooms once more.
In one whole year I haven't learned
A blessed thing they pay you for.
The blossoms snow down in my hair;
The trees and I will soon be bare.      6

The trees have more than I to spare.
The sleek, expensive girls I teach,
Younger and pinker every year,
Bloom gradually out of reach.
The pear tree lets its petals drop
Like dandruff on a tabletop.               12

The girls have grown so young by now
I have to nudge myself to stare.
This year they smile and mind me how
My teeth are falling with my hair.
In thirty years I may not get
Younger, shrewder, or out of debt.                 18

Feel free to read the excerpt from the poem as many times as you need.
Using your study sheet and applying the elements of TP-CASTT, answer the
following questions:
13. What might the title of the poem suggest? Write a one sentence (not a
fragment) answer.
   14.What time of the year is it, and what does the season represent? (2
      answers).
   15.Paraphrase any one stanza of the poem in 1-2 complete sentences.
   16.List one example of figurative language (simile, metaphor,
      personification, hyperbole, etc.,) the line it occurs on, what you think
      it means. 1-2 sentence answer. (2 answers).

    17. Write an example of alliteration within the poem and include the line
it occurs on. (2 answers)

   18.List one example of a simile and list the line it occurs on. (2 answers).
   19.Choose the attitude of the poem:
   a. angry b. sarcastic c. reflective d. allusive

   20.List where a shift occurs in the poem and write a one sentence
      explanation of what it is and what it might mean. (2 answers)
   21.(T/F)The tone of the poem is related to the attitude of the poem.
   22. (46 points).Based on one of the potential themes, create a pyramid
      and then write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in which you discuss the
      theme. You may answer it terms of TP-CASTT, agree or disagree
      with the poet, or come up with another discussion topic of your own
      making. Use the possible themes below for question 7. Item 23 does
      not require an answer.
   23.Possible themes include:
   a. Spring is a time for taking stock of oneself.
   b. As we age, we yearn for our lost youth.
   c. We don’t recognize the value of youth until it is too late.
   d. Life’s hard, and then you die.
  24.Poetry-4 P. 636
Objectives
  1. Define tall tale.
  2. Define exaggerations.
  3. Define ballad.
  4. Define alliteration.

Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Do the Quickwrite and write three exaggerations.
   3. Read “Sonnet,” Sonnet 73, and “The Cremation of Sam McGee”
      twice. List the metaphor of each stanza of sonnet 73 and what it
      stands for.
   4. Do items 2, 3, and 4 from p. 645.
   5. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence final copy of a
      paragraph in which you respond to item 1 from p. 645.




That time of year thou mayst in me behold (Sonnet 73)
by William Shakespeare
That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

In me thou see'st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.

In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the deathbed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.

 This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong,
 To love that well which thou must leave ere long.


Sonnet - Billy Collins

All we need is fourteen lines, well, thirteen now,
and after this one just a dozen
to launch a little ship on love's storm-tossed seas,
then only ten more left like rows of beans.
How easily it goes unless you get Elizabethan
and insist the iambic bongos must be played
and rhymes positioned at the ends of lines,
one for every station of the cross.
But hang on here wile we make the turn
into the final six where all will be resolved,
where longing and heartache will find an end,
where Laura will tell Petrarch to put down his pen,
take off those crazy medieval tights,
blow out the lights, and come at last to bed.
                        Poetry Terms Application




Using your poetry terms sheet and textbook, find twelve examples of the
things you see listed on your sheet. Be specific when you state where you
found them. You may not use examples from the reading book glossary.
For example:
Alliteration: repetition of consonant sounds.
Example: “the talkative teacher testified” P. 645, line 31.
Each one done correctly is worth 5 points.
                                  Style p. 530
Objectives
  1. Define style.
  2. Define figure of speech.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 530-4
  3. Choose five of the terms in bold, define each, and write an
     example of your own of each.
  4. Do practice 1 and practice 2 from p. 535.


Homework
Finish “Style”
                     “The Tell-Tale Heart” P. 537
Objectives
  1. Define narrator.
  2. Define dramatic irony.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. With a partner, Read pp. 536-543
  3. Choose five of the Vocabulary Development words, write them
     syllabically, define them, and use each in a sentence.
  4. Answer the six Style questions in complete sentences.
  5. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in which
     you discuss whether or not the narrator is mentally ill and not
     reliable, or sane and reliable. Be sure to explain your thesis in the
     paragraph.


Homwork
Finish “The Tell-Tale Heart.”
                        “Raymond’s Run” P. 546
Objectives
  1. Define allusion.
  2. Define dialect.


Classwork
  1. Objectives.
  2. Read pp. 546-555/
  3. Answer all six of the Infer/Style questions in complete sentences.
  4. Explain what the allusions “Mercury,” “Dodge City,” and
     “throwing stones” mean and where they originated. Answer in
     complete sentences.
  5. Create a pyramid and write a paragraph response to either
     Extending Interpretations or Writing from p. 556.


Homework
Finish “Raymond’s Run.”
                   Vocabulary Development P. 557


Objectives
  1. Define metaphors.
  2. Define similes.
  3. Define analogy.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 557-560.
  3. Do page 557 and 561 in their entirety and answer in complete
     sentences.


Homework
Finish Vocabulary Development.
                   “My Mother Pieced Quilts” P. 563
Objectives
  1. Define symbol.
  2. List what element of figurative language is closest to symbol.
  3. Define personification.


Classork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read p. 563
  3. With a piece of paper, read the poem line by line. 40 gallons of sap
     metaphor.
  4. Write down three examples of figurative language you find
     appealing, tell what it means, and list the line it occurs on.
  5. Answer items 2 and 4 from p. 567 in complete sentences.
  6. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in which
     you choose the most or least effective use of figurative language in
     the poem and tell why. You may use an example of your own if
     you believe it is better.
  7. Or you may do the same thing to “Missed the Boat.”
                               Missed the Boat
                              By Modest Mouse
while we're on the subject, could we change the subject now?
i was knocking on your ear's door, but you were always out
looking towards the future, we were begging for the past
well we know we had the good things but those never seemed to last
oh please just last


everyone's unhappy, everyone's ashamed
well we all just got caught looking at somebody else's page
well nothing ever went quite exactly as we planned
our ideas held no water but we used them like a dam


oh and we carried it all so well
as if we got a new position
oh and i'll laugh all the way to hell
saying "yes this is a fine promotion"
oh and i'll laugh all the way to hell


of course everyone goes crazy over such and such and such
we made ourselves a pillar, we just used it as a crutch
we were certainly uncertain at least i'm pretty sure i am
well we didn't need the water, but we just built that good dam


oh and i know this of myself
i assume as much for other people
oh and i know this of myself
we've listened to more of life's end gong than the sound of life's sweet
bells
was it ever worth it was there all that much to gain
well we knew we'd missed the boat and we'd already missed the plane
we didn't read the invite we just danced at our own wake
all our favorites were playing so we could shake shake shake shake
shake


tiny curtains opened and we heard the tiny clap of little hands
a tiny man would tell a little joke and get a tiny laugh from all them
folks
and drifting around on bubbles and thinking it was us that carried them
when we finally got it figured out that we'd truly missed the boat


oh and we carried it off so well
as if we got a new position
oh and we own all the tools ourselves
without the skills to make a show with
oh what useless tools ourselves
              “Brer Rabbit/Ransom of Red Chief” P. 574
Objectives
  1. List what usually causes us to laugh.
  2. Define trickster tales.
  3. List five elements of humor.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 574-7.
  3. Answer questions 1-3 from p. 578 in complete sentences.
  4. When finished, begin “The Ransom of Red Chief that begins on p.
     579.
  5. Read pp. 580-94
  6. Find five non-footnoted words that are new to you, define them,
     and use each in a correct sentence.
  7. Answer questions 1-4 on p. 595 completely in complete sentences.
  8. Find an example of each of the five elements of humor in the story
     and list the page it occurs on.
                       Compare/Contrast Essay
Objectives
  1. Define comparison and contrast on p. 877.
  2. List the two ways comparison and contrast essays can be
     developed.
  Classwork
  1. Compare and contrast “Brer Rabbit” and “Ransom.”
  2. List three things from each you believe are noteworthy.
  3. Create a thesis for a compare/contrast essay.
  4. Pre-write a thesis web or outline.
  5. Write a 175-225 word rough draft of your essay.
  6. Revise your rough draft in which you include information from
     the stories to support your points
  7. Write a double-spaced final copy of your essay. You may type it
     on the computer if you have a current account.
                              Peer Editing

     Author:_______________                                    Peer
                    Editor:_______________



Please consider the following points as you read the rough draft; check
off and/or write comments to improve the assignment.

_____ Thesis statement: Clear? Does the author take a position?
Introduction creates interest?


_____ Specific details to support position: Can the editor cite three
specific details to support the author's position?


_____ Logical organization: Easy flow of ideas from one point to the
next? Paragraphs arranged in a logical manor?


_____ Sentences varied as to form and length?


_____ Language/vocabulary appropriate?


_____ Spelling, punctuation, grammar used accurately?


_____ Conclusion: Summary/point of emphasis relating back to the
thesis statement? No new arguments presented in the conclusion?


_____ Title: Appropriate, needs improvement?


What did you like about this piece of writing?
What did you dislike about this piece?



What improvements can you suggest, especially to add to increased
reader interest?



Other constructive comments?



Thank you for your careful consideration of your classmate's writing.
                             “Ribbons” P. 711
Objectives
   1. Define speaker.
   2. List the type conflict in the story.


Classwork
   1. Objectives
   2. Quickwrite from p. 711 (4-5 sentences).
   3. Read pp. 711-721.
   4. Answer questions 1-3 from p. 722 in complete sentences.
   5. Answer all five bullet points from question 4 on p. 722.
   6. Create a pyramid and write a final copy of a paragraph that
      correctly uses at least four of the Vocabulary Development words.
      You may base it on either the Quickwrite or Writing on p. 722.


Homework
None. We will take two days on this lesson.
                Beowulf and “Casey at the Bat” P. 647
Objectives
  1. Define epic.
  2. Define mock heroic.


Classwork
  1. Objectives.
  2. Quickwrite from p. 647
  3. Read Beowulf and “Casey at the Bat.”
  4. Do exercises 2-5 on p. 653 completely.
  5. Using your Quickwrite as your pyramid, write a 4-6 sentence
     paragraph that answers question 1 from p. 653




Write a mock epic—3 stanzas—12-18 lines.
                       “Camp Harmony” P. 468
Objectives
  1. Define themes.
  2. Define generalization.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read “Before You Read” on p. 468.
  3. Do a 4-6 sentence Quickwrite.
  4. Read pp.469-73.
  5. Read “In Response….” On p. 475.
  6. List the irony of the story’s title in a complete sentence.
  7. Answer questions 3-5 on p. 477 in complete sentences.
  8. Using at least four of the Vocabulary Development words, write a
     4-6 sentence paragraph response to question 6 on p. 477.
            “Gettysburg Address/I Have a Dream” P. 479
Objective
  1. Define refrain.
  2. Define allusion.


Classwork
  1. Objective
  2. Read the Gettysburg Address twice and make the columns and fill
     them out as described on p. 479.
  3. Read pp. 483-485.
  4. Answer questions 2-6 on p. 486 in complete sentences.
  5. Create a pyramid and do Writing from Another Point of View on
     p. 486. Use at least three of the Vocabulary Development words
     correctly in your final product.
                  “The Power of Nonviolence” p. 487
Objective
Define word analogy.
Classwork
  1. Objective
  2. Do After You Read from p. 487. Do both sections.
  3. Read pp. 488-90
  4. Create an outline based on the one on p. 488 apply an informal
     one to the story.
  5. Test Practice from p. 491
  6. Answer all Constructed Response questions except number 7 in
     complete sentences.
             “New Colossus/Refugee/First Americans” P. 492
Objectives
   1. Write one sentence about what you think the American Dream is.
   2. Define lyric poem.
   3. Define stereotype.


Classwork
   1. Read pp. 492-501.
   2. Apply TP-CASTT to “The New Colossus.”
   3. Create a chart like the one on p. 495 and fill it in.
   4. List three stereotypes you can think of.
   5. Create a pyramid and write a 4-6 sentence paragraph in which
      you list a stereotype and discuss how you feel about it.


When finished, turn in your work and read “Coming to America” that
begins on p. 506.
                     “Coming to America” P. 506
Objectives
None
Classwork
1. Read pp. 506-15
2. Do Skills Review on pp. 522-5.
                  “Reading Skills, Out, Out” P. 706
Objectives
  1. Define inferences.
  2. Define biographical approach.


Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Read pp. 706-9 with a partner
  3. Do the “It Says, I Say” chart on p. 710.
  4. When finished, begin reading “The Treasure of Lemon Brown”
     on p. 730
                  “The Treasure of Lemon Brown” P. 729
  Objectives
  1. Define climax.
  2. Define resolution.


  Classwork
  1. Objectives
  2. Do the analogies below. The answers are the Vocabulary
     Development words.
  3. Read pp. 729-39
  4. Do the Quickwrite on p. 729—4 sentences
  5. Answer all seven of the Retell questions in complete sentences.
  6. Create a pyramid and write a final copy of a paragraph in which
     you answer Question 1 from p. 740. Use at least four of the
     Vocabulary Development Words.


Analogies
Mushy:oatmeal::eggshells:
Funny:comedy::horror film:
Definitely:yes::maybe:
Uncertain:certain::planned:
Concretely:abstractly::casually:

								
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