SIRXICT003A Operate retail information technology systems by 2ca6u9z

VIEWS: 25 PAGES: 38

									                             Certificate III
                                   in
                                Retail

  Learning and Assessment Material




                          SIRXICT003A
   OPERATE RETAIL INFORMATION
      TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS


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Contents
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………….3
Computers in the workplace …………………………………………………….3
Types of computers and their operation ……………………………………….3
Mini computers and mainframes ……………………………………………….4
Computer operation ……………………………………………………………..5
Software …………………………………………………………………………11
Occupational health and Safety ……………………………………………….18
Gathering data …………………………………………………………………..20
Starting a computer …………………………………………………………….21
Security controls…………………………………………………………………22
Opening and closing applications …………………………………………….23
Opening and closing files ………………………………………………………24
Summary…………………………………………………………………………29
TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS ………..30
Assessment task ………………………………………………………………..31
ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning ………………………………..32
ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist …………………….33
Participant survey of materials ………………………………………………..37
Suggested Answers ……………………………………………………………38



                                 Hinson Institute of Training




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SIRXICT003A              OPERATE RETAIL INFORMATION
                         TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS


Element of competency:
1. Use store information technology system
2. Edit and update information
3. Solve problems



Introduction


Computers have become part of our everyday lives. They are also very useful
in the workplace. Originally computers took up whole rooms but now we can
get computers that fit into the palm of our hand. Not only have they become
smaller, but computers are now more user-friendly.

This unit will help you to develop basic computer skills and understand how
they can help in your industry.



Computers in the workplace


There are many different types of computers in the workplace. In this section
we will look at different types of computers, their functions and how they work.



Types of computers and their operation


You can place computers into 3 broad categories according to their price,
size, speed of operation and volume of instructions they can handle. These
categories are:

      Micro computers
      Mini computers
      Mainframes

You might see or hear other terms used to describe the types of computers,
but they are often marketing labels or trade names.




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Micro computers

These are the type of computers you are probably most familiar with. They
have become known as personal computers or PC’s. PC’s use silicon chips
called microprocessors to do the work. The use of silicon chips greatly
reduces the cost of making computers.

These computers are ‘friendly’ to operate and weigh between 20 - 30 kgs.
Only person is required to operate a micro computer.

Microcomputers are widely used in business, schools and the home. This type
of computer includes the original standard desktop models, which you will
probably be working on in this unit, as well as laptop and notebook computers.

Laptops are portable. They usually weigh less than 4 kgs. And have a similar
or slightly slower processing speed to a standard desktop computer. They are
smaller than a PC due to the advancement in chip technology and have a
compacted keyboard. Laptops often come with a rechargeable battery so you
can use them even without access to a power outlet. You will often see people
on Trains, Planes or on building sites using these computers.

Notebook computers are smaller again. They weigh about 1 kg. and are
battery powered. These computers can do the same type of processing as
other PC’s but the size of the keys and screen make keying in of large
quantities of data difficult.


Mini computers and mainframes


Mini computers and mainframes are similar systems. Both share their
processing, storage and output facilities between many users. What is
different about the 2 types of computers is the number of users they can
accommodate.

Minicomputers usually have from 10 to 300 connected workstations,
depending on the type of processing required.

A mainframe system can accommodate several thousand users because it
can process and store more data. With the trend for computers to become
smaller but more powerful, what we would have called a mainframe 10 years
ago is probably now known as a minicomputer.

Desktop computers are usually connected by cabling to a mini or mainframe
computer. This computer is sometimes called a server. Together these
computers form a network. The diagram on the next page shows one type of
network system. In this network there are 2 different types of computer and a
printer.




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                                       Network system.




Computer operation


All computers work as a processor for information. Processing is the method
that takes basic information (text or numbers) and then sorts, collates,
compares or performs a mathematical function to produce meaningful results.
All processing has 3 phases which are always done in the same order:

       Input
       Process
       Output
Input
Input is the process of entering your information into the computer. This
information may include text, images, sound and other data that you wish to
store or process into the computer.

Process
The sorting, calculating, comparing and editing of that information is called the
processing.

Output

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Output is the result of the information you have input, after processing. Output
might appear on the screen, be printed or be a sound produced by the
computer.
Any computer is made up of 2 major parts:

      Hardware
      Software

Hardware
The physical equipment of the computer is known as hardware. Any item you
can actually touch is hardware. There are 4 major hardware components of a
computer:

      Central processing unit (CPU)
      Storage unit
      Input devices
      Output devices

The following diagram shows the different parts of hardware a computer can
have:




Central processing unit (CPU)

The central processing unit or CPU is the brain of the computer system. It
receives and carries out instructions from the software. The number of these
instructions a computer can perform depends on the size of the central
processing unit.



Storage devices


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There are several devices a computer can use to store data. These are:

      Memory
      Secondary storage unit
      Floppy disc drive
      CD ROM drive.

The main storage, or memory, is where instructions and some data are kept
until they are needed for processing. There are 2 types of memory in a CPU:

      Read only memory (ROM)
      Random access memory (RAM)

The read only memory (ROM) contains the basic instructions that a computer
needs to get started (starting up a computer is called ‘booting’). When the
power is first turned on, the boot program checks whether the chips are
functioning. It then looks for the operating system programs. It finally checks
the computers storage systems. This routine is stored in the ROM. It cannot
be altered or reprogrammed.

The Random access memory (RAM) is where the computer places a copy of
the application program, the operating system and some data so it can have
instant access to them. By holding this information in the RAM the computer
can operate much faster than if it had to access it from storage every time it
needed an instruction.

The secondary storage unit is different to the ROM and the RAM. This storage
unit is often called the hard disk drive. The hard disk holds all of the
application and system software and some data. The hard disk can be kept
inside the computer or in a unit connected to the computer.




                                         Floppy disk




There are 2 other common drives; one is called a floppy disk drive. A floppy
disk is a separate disk not connected to the computer, which is much smaller
than the hard disk. Floppy disks are mostly used to hold information or data


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files. The floppy disk is inserted into the floppy disk drive so that the computer
can read the files stored on it.




The second of these drives is the Compact Disc Drive. This is commonly
referred to as the CD ROM drive. There are 2 main differences between a
floppy disk and the Compact Disc. Currently the floppy disk can be used to
store your own information on and can be used to transport information from
one computer to another. The information can also be changed or written
over.

The CD ROM used to be only for the retrieval of data; however, it is now
widely used for the storage of data as well. The arrival of DVD ROM and
writing software that is readily available for both CD ROM and DVD ROM is
steadily making floppy disks obsolete. Software manufacturers use CD and
DVD ROM as their preferred method of supplying programs as they can hold
much larger amounts of data. The floppy disk holds up to 1.44 Mb of
information whereas the CD ROM holds a minimum of 650 Mb and the DVD
ROM holds around 4 Gb of information.

Input devices
We use input devices to communicate with the computer. They put
information and data into a form which the computer understands. There are
several types of input devices. The input devices you are most likely to use
are:

      Keyboard
      Mouse

The following diagrams show typical examples of these devices:




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The most commonly used input device is the keyboard. Keys for letters and
numbers are arranged in the same way as a typewriter. Extra keys for
entering functions and commands are also provided. The keyboard is used for
entering text in applications like word processing, spreadsheets and data
bases.

The mouse usually has a rubber ball built into its base, although today optical
technology is taking over from the rubber ball. Sometimes the mouse is built
into the computer and operated with a touch pad. It controls the cursor, which
is a moveable point on the screen where information is entered. The mouse
also controls other functions on your screen. As you move or roll the mouse
around on a flat, smooth surface, sensors detect movement and the cursor
moves. There are 3 main ways of using the mouse. You can use it by
pointing, clicking or dragging. You may also come across other types of input
devices.




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Output devices
An output device converts the information in the computer into a form that we can
understand. Without output devices, much of the information processing a
computer performs would be of no use to us. There are 2 common forms of
output devices that you will be using in your workplace. They are:

       Printers
       Screen or Visual Display Unit (VDU)




                                                Printer




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                                               Screen



   Software

You have probably heard the term computer program before, but you may not
know what software is. Software can be described as a set of computer
programs. These programs tell a computer what to do. The tasks a computer
performs are often called functions. These functions might be data processing,
word processing, playing chess or displaying the time on screen. The software
controls any task a computer carries out. There are 3 types of software:

       System software
       Utility software
       Application software


System Software
The operating system of a computer is like a police officer directing traffic. The
system software makes sure the computer operates smoothly with as little delay
in processing time as possible. The operating system manages the storage and
retrieval of files.

Utility software
The utilities are used to sort and search the names of files stored on the system.
They create directories which act as the computers ‘filing system’ to organise the
stored files. The utilities also move and delete files from storage and make copies
of files called ‘backups’. Sometimes the utilities and the system software come
packaged together.




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Application software
An application program processes information. For example: Word processing,
spreadsheets, data bases and desktop publishing are all applications. Computer
drawing or graphics packages are also applications. Applications like word
processing, spread sheets and data bases are used on a daily basis in the
workplace to help manage the administration of businesses. This is the type of
software that you will probably have most contact with in your workplace. You can
use software for many administrative functions, including:

       Creating invoices
       Writing letters to customers
       Writing tenders
       Drawing up contracts
       Controlling stock
       Keeping financial records


Word processing
 Word processing is the use of computers to type, edit and print letters, reports,
articles and other documents. It has replaced typewriting for many tasks at home,
school and in the office.

Word processing programs enable you to type words into a computer to write
letters, reports, invoices and other documents. Word processing software greatly
simplifies the work of editing a document. Some of the things you can use the
program for include:

       Inserting text
       Deleting text
       Checking spelling
       Correcting errors
       Checking grammar and punctuation
       The software can perform some of these functions automatically, if
        instructed to. The document can then be stored, printed or deleted as
        required.

Most word processing packages have a number of templates or basic pre-set
forms. When you use these forms you only need to fill in the details. In your
workplace these could include:

       Standard letters to clients
       Formats for tender writing
       Order forms
       Blank invoice documents


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Spreadsheets
A spreadsheet is a computer program used to organise numbers and other data
in rows and columns. It then performs calculations involving the rows and
columns of numbers. It can be used for both financial and scientific work.
Information created by a spreadsheet program can also be called a spreadsheet.

Most financial software uses spreadsheets. The basic structure of the
spreadsheet is a series of vertical columns and horizontal lines. The rectangular
areas created by the intersection of the columns and lines are called cells. Each
cell represents a specific kind of business information, such as the cost of a
product or the number of units sold. You enter the number or other data into the
cells.

Mathematical equations link certain cells so that a change in one cell
automatically changes related cells. For example, if you entered the amount $10
in a cell representing an amount paid for materials, the computer would
automatically add $10 to the cell representing the total expenditure. Business and
financial professionals can create large spreadsheets with thousands or tens of
thousands of cells. Here is an example of a spreadsheet:




                                         Spreadsheet

This is a basic budget spreadsheet. Spreadsheets are structured in the same way
as a financial ledger sheet, with columns down the page and rows across. The
rows are numbered from ‘1’ and the columns are labelled with letters beginning
with ‘A’.

In the spreadsheet above the cell C10 refers to column C, row 10. The entry in
this cell is 410. As you can see from the spreadsheet above, the information you
enter in the cells can be numbers or letters. What you can’t see is the formulas.
This is because the spreadsheet automatically calculates the formulas and places


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the answer in the cell. The cells that have formulas in them have been shaded.
When you enter details above these cells the amount is automatically calculated.

This type of program could also be used for controlling stock. Amounts of stock
could be recorded and monitored so that ordering can be managed. The following
diagram is an example of this:




                                       Stock control sheet

Databases
A database is a body of information made up of individual pieces of information
that are organised so they can be reviewed in a variety ways. Many databases
are stored on computers and are reviewed by means of programs called
database management systems. These systems include client lists.

These pieces of information have been organised in a filing system so it’s easier
to find. You would already be familiar with a number of databases. Telephone
directories, library catalogues and card files are all types of databases. A
database is useful because it stores information and sorts it in many different
ways. Databases you might use in your workplace include:

       Customer lists
       Suppliers
       Contractor details

Since a database is a structured way of storing information each piece of
information needs a specific label or heading. These labels are called fields.



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Here is an example of a database record:




                                         Database record

The bold headings on the left are the fields. Once you have set the fields in the
database it acts like a template. So all you need to do to add a record is fill in the
blanks.

Depending on the software application you will be using, the terms used to
describe the parts or formats of the database are given different names. Here are
some you may need to know:


       Tables are like records, which store the data
       Queries gather particular data from the database, which you have
        requested
       Forms display the data from tables or queries so you can view, edit or
        enter data
       Reports summarise and report data from tables and queries so you can
        print it or analyse it.




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   The easiest way to view information in a database is by using the form format.
   Forms usually look something like the diagram below:




                                               Form

Computer aided design and drafting
In manufacturing, there are also other applications, which may be used. The
computer software could include computer-aided design and drafting (CADD).
CADD software can be a quick and efficient alternative to conventional drawing.

A drafter using a CADD system selects commands from graphics software and
other programs. The drawing appears on the monitor and is stored in the
computers memory. Drafters use a laser printer or a small inkjet printer to print
most drawings. For large drawings, they may use a pen plotter, which inks a roll
of paper with a number of precisely controlled pens, or an electrostatic plotter,
which works like a large inkjet printer. The drawing can also be printed on
photographic film.

CADD systems are used to link designs to computer aided machinery which will
produce the finished product. For example, most fitted cabinets are produced by

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overhead routers which are controlled by computer. This means the drafter can
send his designs and dimensions from his CADD system directly to the tool
producing it.

In many cases, CADD also makes it unnecessary to print mechanical drawings.
Workers who are going to produce a part can call up the drawings from computer
memory or a disc or tape and display them on their own monitors.

Designers can even use CADD software in the design process. They do this by
producing a 3 dimensional drawing of the object on the monitor. CADD also
allows you to change the dimensions of the object or move the model about to
provide various views of the object. The process of designing and creating
mechanical devices on a computer is known as computer aided design (CAD).

CAD provides additional advantages. For example, an architect can use CAD to
‘walk through’ a model of a building before construction begins.

Computer aided manufacture (CAM) technology is used in manufacturing to
operate machines like lathes, routers and saws.

Visualisation programs

Visualisation programs can be used in the retailing sector of industry.
Visualisation is a method, which can simulate the application of a finish to virtually
any surface to produce an image of what the item would look like. Visualisation
programs can also be used in new product design and other areas of
manufacturing.

Visualisation can be used in a number of situations, such as:

       Applying paints or wallpapers to walls
       Creating interior themes for whole rooms
       Simulating how a staircase may look in an area.


Email
Many large companies use electronic mail or email for contacting customers or
other people within the company. This saves time and can also be a way of
keeping in contact with overseas business, particularly in Australia, where we are
asleep when the other side of the world works. Email is increasingly being used
for:

       Sending tenders
       Ordering materials
       Receiving or sending plans and specifications

Now that you know a little more about computers and their applications, you can
start to see how they work in your workplace. Remember that there are many
different producers of hardware and software so the steps you follow to access
and operate your computer might not be exactly the same as in another
workplace. The concept and result, however, will be the same.

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Now that you have an understanding of the types of computers, the software and
the operations that are performed by them, let’s learn to use a computer.


   Occupational health and Safety


Before you use a computer there are some health and safety requirements you
need to remember.

The widespread use of computers has presented it’s own set of problems in the
area of Occupational Health and Safety. Listed below are some health and safety
issues you must consider when you work with computers:

       Lighting
       Noise
       Heat
       Cables
       Posture
       Occupational overuse syndrome


Lighting
Poor lighting can cause glare and reflections and make working on your computer
difficult or dangerous. The screen should be positioned so that the light coming
from windows and overhead lighting does not cause reflections on the screen.
The screen should be placed so you do not face directly into, or away from, a
window. Special filters can be placed over the screen to cut down on the glare.

Noise
Noise from information processing equipment, such as computers and printers,
can be a major source of irritation and can even cause headaches. Printers can
also be noisy. If you are using a computer in a small space, the printer should be
kept in another room or in a special hooded box.

Heat
This equipment can also produce considerable amounts of heat. Each piece of
hardware has a built-in an to cool the equipment. The fan takes the heat from the
equipment and spreads it into the surrounding area. A small, poorly ventilated
area can quickly become hot and stuffy.

Cables
Next time you sit down at a computer, look behind the equipment. You will see a
number of cables leading from the power source to the machine and other cables
connecting the input and output devices. These cables can be quite dangerous.


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They can become an obstacle if left in passage ways and the electricity
conducted by them can be a hazard.

To avoid dangers associated with these cables, you should:

       Always be aware of the location of cables and power points
       Never plug a loose cable into a socket while power is still supplied to the
        system
       Be careful you don’t trip over cables.


Posture

Poor posture is the major source of health problems associated with using
computers. To achieve an ideal sitting position follow these steps:

       Lower or raise the height of your chair so that both of your feet are flat on
        the floor. If the chair is still too high you will need a footrest
       Tilt the angle of the seat slightly forward
       Alter the height of the back rest so that your lower back is firmly supported
       Place you elbows at your sides, then bring your forearms up to a right
        angle position. This is the height your keyboard should be. Adjust the
        keyboard area of the desk as required.
       Look at the screen without bending or straining your neck.

The diagram below shows the correct posture when using a computer.




                        Correct posture for computer operation


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Occupational overuse syndrome
With any task, there is a risk of injury when parts of the body are used too often
and incorrectly. The risks involved might include sore or damaged eyes and
repetitive strain injury (RSI) which is damage caused by overuse of muscles and
body parts. To help prevent these problems, you could:

       Have regular breaks
       Plan your work to avoid long periods of computer use
       Exercise muscles or body parts affected.




   Gathering data


Now that you know more about the computers and applications used in your
workplace, you can start to use them. The first step will be to gather the data you
are going to use.

Before you begin to gather data to input into the computer you will need to be
clear about the difference between data and information. Data is a collection of
facts which can be added, subtracted, compared or sorted. A fact can be almost
anything; the number of items a customer has ordered or even daily average
temperatures etc. Information may include data or the results of processed data.
It also includes text or words, graphics, video images and voice input.

The following are the types of information required in workplaces like yours and
the data that is likely to be needed:

Data required for orders

       The name and address of the supplier
       An order number so the information can be easily traced
       The delivery details, such as delivery location
       The quantity and description of the materials
       Information that forms the basis of pricing the materials, such as an
        amount per quantity

Data required for invoices

       The name and address of the client
       The order number supplied by the client
       The delivery details
       The quantity and description of the product
       Information that forms the basis of pricing the product



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Data required for stock control

The details of raw materials, such as:

       The name of the materials
       The amount of the materials that is used each week/month
       How long it takes for the materials to be delivered from the date of order
       At what point the materials should be re-ordered
       What the minimum and maximum stock amount should be for each
        product

The details of finished goods, such as:

       The name of the products
       How long it takes to make each product
       The amount of the products that are sold each week/month
       At what point the product should be re-ordered
       What the minimum and maximum stock amount should be for each
        product

Date required for client lists

       The name and address of the client
       The delivery details of the client
       The quantity and description of the products previously purchased by the
        client
       Information on pricing structure for that client
       Personal information about the client

All of this data can form the basis of your orders, invoices, stock control plans and
client lists. In your workplace there may be other specific needs; this will depend
on the type and quantity of work your company produces.



   Starting a computer

Different brands of computers can have slightly different methods for starting up
the computer. The 2 most common brands have completely different ways of
starting the computer. Some computers are switched on at the box that contains
the hard disc and CPU. Others have a button on the keyboard to start the
computer.




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   Security controls


When you use a computer at home it will usually start up the operating program
by itself. At most workplaces this is likely to be slightly different. Most companies
have some sort of security control to restrict who can access their system and in
some cases the company can control the amount of access different people in
the workplace have. This control is commonly referred to as the system
administrator. The system administrator controls:

       Who can access the computer system
       How much information can be accessed by each user


Logging on
The security features that are most common require the current user to logon.
Logging on requires the user to enter a user name and password. The following
diagram shows an example of a screen which requires a username and
password.




                                           Login screen

Username
The username is set and controlled by the system administrator. Sometimes the
username is an abbreviation of the user’s name, for example, ‘johns’, ‘jsmith’, or
‘johnsmith’. Notice how no spaces or uppercase letters have been used. Most
security features are what is called case sensitive, this means you must use the
correct case or the system will not give you access.

Password
Sometimes a password is also required. This is probably the most important part
of logging on because it protects the computer from unauthorised use.



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The password can be several letters or numbers or a combination of both. This is
the responsibility of you, the user, and should only be known by you and not
shared with others. The first time you access the system you should change the
password. This should be a word or set of numbers that you can remember
without fail at any time. The password protects your company by allowing
computer access only to users with recognised passwords. This protects
information about:

       Clients
       Procedures
       Trade secrets

A password is also for your protection. Most security systems can monitor who
does what on the system so it is important not to share your password because if
it is your access that causes a problem in the companies system it will be you
that will be held responsible. Remember, passwords can also be case sensitive
so you must remember if you used upper or lower case.

You may be asked to change your password from time to time. This helps to
ensure security. It is good practice to change your password every few weeks.
You might even be asked to change it more often.


   Opening and closing applications


Almost all application programs are started with a single or double click of the
mouse button over an icon located on the screen. This is the easiest way to start
a program for word processing, spreadsheets and databases.

To close the application, you should refer to the horizontal list of options close to
the top of the screen in most applications. One of the options is ‘File’ When you
click on ‘File’ a drop down list of commands will appear. In this list there will be an
‘Exit’ button or word to click on.

These methods are far easier than the old Disc Operating System (DOS). You
might even have an old DOS computer in your workplace. This system required
you to firstly change the drive type. The drive, directory and filename then had to
be manually typewritten in, then the ‘Enter’ key pressed to open the application.
To close the application there was a ‘Close’ or ‘Exit’ word that had to also be
typewritten in. These older systems don’t have the luxuries of spell checking and
other features of today’s applications.




       SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 23 of 38
   Opening and closing files

Before you can open and close a file there are some basic principles you should
be aware of. They are:

           Disc directory
           Drives
           Files


   Disc directory

Directories are like chapters in a book. Just as a chapter contains sentences and
paragraphs, directories contain files. They act as an index to show where each
document is stored. For example, drawings may be stored in directory called
drawings or letters may be stored in a directory called letters. For example,
‘C:\Letters\harry.doc’ indicates that the document called ‘Harry’ is stored in the
‘letters’ directory on the ‘C:\’ drive.

The way directories are used in each workplace may vary. Your company may
have its own procedures for storing data into different directories.

Drives
There are 3 main drives in computers today. They are:

       C Drive – The hard disc
       A Drive – The floppy disc drive
       CD/DVD ROM – The compact disc drive

You need to know these drives so that when you save data you know where to
look for it later.

Files
A file must be given a name before it can be stored on a disc. For instance, if a
file is saved as ‘C:\letter.doc, it indicates that the file is stored in the ‘C;\’ drive and
the name is ‘letter’. The 3 character extension ‘.doc’ shows that it is a document.
If the file had an extension of ‘.dwg’, it would indicate a drawing file. Files can
contain any sort of computer information. But they all have 3 character
extensions.

Opening files
To open a file you must first open the application that the extension refers to. For
example, ‘C:\letters.doc’ the .doc refers to a word processing application. Then, if
you use the command ‘File’ ‘Open’ you will see a box appear with options to
select a file from this box.




       SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 24 of 38
                                                           File/open box

This box will usually open to the area on your hard drive that holds the different
types of data you have saved. Sometimes you will need to open directories that
have been created to save files into. This happens when you have a lot of files
and they are sorted into directories to make them easier to find.

Another way to open a file is to open the file management or utility software to
help find the file you are looking for. When you find the file simply double click
with the mouse and the file will open.

Saving and checking files
Entering data is a very time consuming task. While you are entering data you
should periodically save your work. Depending on how fast you work, this should
be done every five to ten minutes. Most applications today have an automatic
save option which can be set to any time limit you require.

Before closing files you must save the work you have completed. The easiest
way to do this is by selecting the ‘File’, ‘Save’ command. If you haven’t previously
saved your work most applications will prompt you to ‘Save as’. This will give you
the opportunity to name the file and select a directory for the file to be stored in.




     SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems     January 2008   Version 1   Page 25 of 38
                                          Save screen

Retrieving files
Once the file has been saved it is a good idea to close the application, then re-
open the application and the file you were using to check that the file has been
saved properly and is now on the drive selected.

Closing files
Closing files uses a very similar process to opening. Select the ‘File’ command
option, when the options appear select the ‘Close’ button or word. If you haven’t
saved your work most applications will ask if you would like to save. You should
do so if required. Click the ‘OK’ button and your work will be saved and the
application will close.

Another way to close a file is to double click on the cross on the corner of the
screen, the same procedures will then follow, the application will ask you if you
would like to save your work. You should do so if required and then click on the
‘OK’ button to close the application.




                                         Close screen

     SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 26 of 38
Printing
When you have completed entering and adjusting your data, you might want to
print it for others to use or look at. Printing a piece of work can be done a number
of different ways. Here is a simple step-by-step process.

       Save your work – before performing any special tasks you should always
        save the work you have completed
       Click on ‘File’ – a drop down list of commands will appear
       Click on ‘Print’ – a new box of information will appear
       Select the number of copies, the section you want printed and the printer
        you wish to use
       Click on the ‘OK’ button in the smaller box.

These examples are shown in the following example.




                                          Printing screen

If all the details are correct your printer will start printing your information.


Logging out and shutting down

Once you have finished using the computer in your workplace you must logout or
shut down. This procedure must be carried out correctly so that your security
password is safely closed and no damage is done to the computer. Logging out
correctly will also allow you to re-enter your application quickly when necessary.




       SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 27 of 38
Each company may require you to perform this in a different way. You may need
to:

       Logout, making sure you exit your username and password
       Logout and shutdown, exiting username and password as well as correctly
        closing programs and operating system.

Logging out and shutting down may even be included in the one procedure. The
operating system may have a number of steps to close down. The steps may
include the following:

       Open the operating system menu bar – this could be clicking on a ‘Start’
        button or an icon
       Select the ‘Shut down’ option – a new box will appear
       Select the ‘Shut down’ option again
       Click on ‘OK’ – the system will then shut itself down




                                       Shut down screen

If you only want to logout and not actually shut down the same procedure is
followed, but when the new box appears you will select ‘Logout’ or ‘Logon as
different user’. This tells the computer just to logout the user and remain active for
another user.




       SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 28 of 38
   Summary

As you use computers in the future as part of your job, remember the following
points:

       A computer has input and output devices. Input devices include a mouse
        and keyboard. Output devices include screens and printers.

       Different software is available to both operate the computer and provide
        programs which help you to complete your work.

       Some of the software you could use to help you complete your work
        include spreadsheets, databases and computer aided design.

       You should set up your work area and computer to best suit your needs in
        terms of Occupational Health and Safety, including seat positioning,
        lighting and noise.

       You should not spend extended periods in front of the computer without
        breaks

       You will probably need to access your computer using a password for
        security

   Remember to save all important files before you close them.




       SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 29 of 38
SIRXICT003A                  OPERATE RETAIL INFORMATION
                             TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS

TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS

The Trainee will be required to demonstrate competence on the job, in
practical demonstration; observation, question/answer and role-play
situations, incorporating verbal questions and written work, including
completing workplace forms, either to the RTO Trainer or Supervisor, under
the guidance of the RTO Trainer.


Element of competency:
1. Use store information technology system
2. Edit and update information
3. Solve problems


1.        Name the 3 types of computers




2. What are the 3 phases of computer processing?




     SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 30 of 38
3.     What are the 3 types of computer software?




4.     What types of databases might you use in your workplace?




Assessment task

Demonstrate for your workplace assessor, your ability to effectively and
efficiently:

         Use store information technology system
         Edit and update information
         Solve problems

Provide samples and examples where appropriate.




     SIRXICT003A   Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 31 of 38
   ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning
Trainee name:
Name of Workplace:
RTO Trainer name:
Unit/s of competency:      SIRXICT003A
Unit Name:                 OPERATE RETAIL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS
Date of training/
assessment visit:

Instructions: In addition to written answers provided above, the trainee is required to
provide verbal answers to the following questions that will be asked by the RTO Trainer.
Read the questions prior to the Trainer’s visit, and be prepared to answer them, obtaining
help where necessary.
Did the trainee satisfactorily answer the following questions:                    Yes             No

1. Name the 3 types of computers.                                                                 
2. What are the 3 phases of computer processing?                                                  
3. What are the 3 types of computer software?                                                     
4. What types of databases might you use in your workplace?                                       
5. What are your computer start -up procedures?                                                   
6. What are your computer shut-down procedures?                                                   

The trainee’s underpinning knowledge was:
Satisfactory                                  Not Satisfactory 
Notes/comments :
Question 1:


Question 2:


Question 3:


Question 4:


Question 5:


Question 6:


RTO Trainer signature:
Trainee signature:
Date of assessment:




      SIRXICT003A       Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 32 of 38
ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist
Trainee name:
Name of workplace:
RTO Trainer name:
Unit/s of competency:      SIRXICT003A
Unit Name:                 OPERATE RETAIL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS
Date of training/
assessment visit:

During the demonstration of skills, did the trainee:                        Yes     No             N/A
Knowledge of store information technology system accurately                                       
demonstrated and conveyed to other staff members as required.
Hardware accurately identified and operated according to                                          
manufacturer's instructions and store procedures.
Software accurately identified and used according to manufacturer's                               
instructions and store procedures.
Application and uses of software available, accurately identified and                             
used according to store procedures.
Data transmitted according to Electronic Data Interchange procedures                              
as required.
Keyboard skills used accurately to enter information as required by                               
store policies.
Back up procedures regularly performed according to store procedures.                             
Information to be edited/updated correctly identified according to store                          
procedures.
Information on system accurately edited/updated according to store                                
procedures.
Price changes accurately identified and entered into store system as                              
required.
Matching of shelf data price and computer records ensured.                                        
Equipment/hardware/software faults identified and rectified where                                 
possible or expert assistance sought without delay.
Maintenance program for hardware and software systems monitored                                   
and implemented according to manufacturer's specifications and store
procedures.
Routine problems handled using appropriate problem solving                                        
techniques and referred to appropriate personnel as required.
Problems arising at point of sale evaluated and resolved according to                             
store procedures.
Assistance positively and actively provided to staff as problems arise.                           




   SIRXICT003A       Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1       Page 33 of 38
The trainee’s performance was:                   Not Satisfactory                  Satisfactory      
Feedback to trainee:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Trainee signature:


RTO Trainer signature:




I confirm competence for this unit SIRXICT003A                                     _________________
                                                                                    (Manager signature)

                                                                                   _________________
                                                                                         (Date)




   SIRXICT003A          Operate retail Infotechnology systems       January 2008      Version 1    Page 34 of 38
                                           COMPETENCY RECORD - SIRXICT003A
After assessment the assessor, the supervisor and participant should sign the competency record. If competency is not achieved at the first attempt, strategies to
address the performance gaps need to be identified and a time for re-assessment organized.


     Assessment Strategies                                Assessor Comments
     C U R R E N T
     C O M P E T E N C I E S

     Oral/written questions                                              _____________________________________________
     Activities
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Workplace project
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Supervisor/3rd party report
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Self-Assessment                                                     _____________________________________________
     Other                                                               _____________________________________________

                                                                             Valid            Sufficient            Authentic             Current
     The evidence supplied is:
                                                                                                                                        
                                                               The participant is competent has shown competence in all of the
                                                               following elements:


                                                                Use store information technology system
                                                                Edit and update information
                                                                Solve problems



     Trainee Signature:                                   _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


     Supervisor Signature:                                _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


     Trainer Signature
                                                          _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

     The Trainee is
     NOT YET COMPETENT:                                                         D A T E     F O R     R E A S S E S S M E N T :         _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


     Strategies to address gaps in
     trainee performance:




                  SIRXICT003A          Operate retail Infotechnology systems           January 2008         Version 1      Page 35 of 38
                                                                 Off-the-Job Training Log

Trainee Name: ____________________________________                                    Supervisor signature: _________________________________

Company: __________________________________________________________________                                                      Date: ______/______/200____

Certificate:     II             III    IV             in
 Business (Office Admin/Admin)                   Civil Construction                         Extractive Industries                       Food Processing
 Hospitality                                     Process Manufacturing                      Retail Operations                           TDT (Road Transport)
 TDT (Warehousing)                               Telecommunications (Call Centres)                                                       _________________
List below the times allocated to “Off-the-Job” training for:                                     SIRXICT003A – Operate retail Infotechnology systems

               Activity                               Activity                                        Activity                                Activity
  Date          code       Duration       Date         code           Duration             Date        code       Duration         Date        code      Duration




Activity Code
   1.    Read self-paced guides                                                            2. Developed knowledge of use and safety requirements
   3.    Met with Workplace Coach                                                          4. Worked on assessment tasks
   5.    Discussion on phone                                                               6. Discussed assessment tasks
   7.    Researched store policy and procedures                                            8. Researched legislative requirements
   9.    Researched workplace policies and procedures                                      10. Researched industry codes of practice
   11.   Observed other staff member/s operating Infotechnology systems                    12. Performance appraisal
   13.   Other research                                                                    14. Read relevant industry publications
   15.   Staff training                                                                    16. Talking to the supervisor
   17.   Complete appropriate paperwork relevant to task                                   18. Other: (specify) __________________________________________




                                   SIRXICT003A     Operate retail Infotechnology systems     January 2008   Version 1   Page 36 of 38
                                      Participant survey of materials


Unit code: SIRXICT003A                                  Unit name: Operate retail Infotechnology systems

Date……..……………


                                                      Instructions:
Please complete the questionnaire by circling the one number that best describes your answer to each
question. Please read each question carefully. For mailed surveys, place the completed questionnaire in
the enclosed reply paid envelope and post it back within seven days




Q1.      Thinking in general about the material you were given for this unit, how would you
         rate it overall?

                       Circle only one answer
Poor ………………………………………………………………………….…... 1
Fair ……………………………………………………………………………….. 2
Good …………………………………………………………………………..…. 3
Very Good ……………………………………………………………………….. 4
Excellent ...……………………………………………………………………….. 5
Don’t know ……………………………………………………...…………...….. 6

Q2.   How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the unit
material?
                                  Circle one answer only for each statement



                                                                                                                            Don’t know
                                                                                            Agree nor
                                                                      Disagree


                                                                                 Disagree




                                                                                            Disagree
                                                                      Strongly




                                                                                                                 Strongly
                                                                                             Neither




                                                                                                        Agree



                                                                                                                  Agree



                                                                                                                               / NA
 a. The layout of the reading material made it easy to use/read         1         2            3        4          5           6
 b. The layout of the assessment material made it easy to use/read      1         2            3        4          5           6
 c. The font size of the material was large enough                      1         2            3        4          5           6
 d. The reading material assisted me to complete the assessment         1         2            3        4          5           6
 e. The material was easy to understand                                 1         2            3        4          5           6
 f. The graphics/pictures were useful                                   1         2            3        4          5           6
 g. The graphics/pictures were sufficient in number                     1         2            3        4          5           6
 h. The graphics/pictures were legible                                  1         2            3        4          5           6
 i. The materials was free from typing errors                           1         2            3        4          5           6
 j. The material was relevant to my job/workplace                       1         2            3        4          5           6

Comments: Please expand on the above points if you rated any of them less than 3
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________



           SIRXICT003A        Operate retail Infotechnology systems     January 2008        Version 1   Page 37 of 38
                                      Suggested Answers

          SIRXICT003A                       Operate retail Infotechnology systems


1. Name the 3 types of computers


       Micro computers
       Mini computers
       Mainframes



2. What are the 3 phases of computer processing?


       Input
       Process
       Output



3. What are the 3 types of computer software?


   System software
   Utility software
   Application software



4. What types of databases might you use in your workplace?


   Customer lists
   Suppliers
   Contractor details




         SIRXICT003A     Operate retail Infotechnology systems   January 2008   Version 1   Page 38 of 38

								
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