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PRIMARY SOURCES by hbaKk15

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 3

									Bibliography
PRIMARY SOURCES
1. National Park Service. U.S. Department of the Interior. Photograph. Online. Internet.
[http://www.nps.gov/grca/grandcanyon/images/ql-weaver.GIF]. February 4,
2005.
This picture was used on our first slide to give an illustration of the Navajo culture and came
from a general source that discussed the Navajo culture.


2. GCS Distributing. Online. Internet.
[http://www.clermontyellow.accountsupport.com/flash/UntilThen.swf]. January 22nd,
2005.
This music was used in our project to emphasize the importance of the Navajo Code Talkers
and is a general source. We used it at the end of our project because of the important text
stated there.


3. Begay, Evelyn M. “From Revolution to Reconstruction” Photograph. Online. Internet.
[http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/images/2003/Navajo_Delegation_1874.jpg]. February 12,
2005.
We used this general source in the first slide to give an example of the Navajo people who
showed up in the military agencies to defend their country.


4. TeacherLINK. Photograph. Online. Internet.
[http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/tlresources/units/MonsonUnits/KriAda/indian.gif].
January 30th, 2005.
This picture is a general source used on the first slide of our project to represent the Navajo
people and how they were captured and sold into slavery.


5. National Park Service. U.S. Department of the Interior. Photograph. Online. Internet.
[http://www.nps.gov/amme/wwii_museum/d-day_saipan/doughertys_squad.html].
February 12, 2005.
We used this picture to give an example of the Navajo code in our project and is a general
source. It was used with other examples.



6. U.S. Navy Office of the Information. Photograph. Online. Internet.
[http://www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/ships/submarines/seawolf/seawolf2.jpg]. February
4th, 2005.
This submarine was used in our project to give another example of the code and is a general
source. It was used with other examples.


7. Index of //www.ctrl-c.liu.se/images/aviation/military/warbirds/. Photograph. Online.
Internet. [http://www.ctrl-c.liu.se/ftp/images/aviation/military/warbirds/f4u-corsair-1.gif].
February 4th, 2005.
We used this photograph of a warplane to give another example of the Navajo code and is a
general source. It was used with other examples.


8. Nichols, Judy. “Reweaving a historic bond.” Map. Online. Internet.
[http://www.turtletrack.org/Art/Maps/NavajoRez.gif]. February 12th, 2005.
This map of the Navajo Reservation was used in our project to show the audience how the
reservation stretches into four states. It is a general source.



SECONDARY SOURCES
1. McClain, Sally. Navajo Weapon: The Navajo Code Talkers. Tucson,
Arizona: Rio Nuevo Publishers. 2002. In this book Sally McClain described the Navajo
Code Talker history. We used it because it helped give us more information on the subject.
This source is commonly used by the public when researching our topic. We used it by getting
necessary information on the Navajo Code Talkers and accounts from actual Code
Talkers. We used the picture of Technical Sergeant Philip Johnston from it. From studying
this source we gained more understanding in the field of our research and found out a lot
about how the code was begun. This source was not biased because it gave several different
opinions on each thing.


2. Paul, Doris A. The Navajo Code Talkers. 25th Anniversary Edition.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Dorrance Publishing Company. 1998. This book by Doris A.
Paul described in vivid detail the Navajo Code Talkers. We used it because it gave us
information that we could not find anywhere else. This is also a source generally used in the
public. We used this source by applying the information within its cover to help us further
understand our topic and thesis statement. We understood the code more by reading this
book because it explained it better than other sources. This source is not biased because it
only gives factual information and not opinions.


3. Silliphant, Allen (dir.) Navajo Code Talkers: The Epic Story. 1994. This source is
available to the public. We used this video to learn more about the culture and language to get
background information on our topic. Though we did not use any quotes or graphics it helped
us understand our topic more deeply. It did give us information on the culture that we did not
get from our other sources. This source did not conflict with any information we received but
may have been biased because it was done by only a selected amount of people.

								
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