Academic Program Plan

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					                                        Annual Academic Program Plan―2010–2011

                  Department                 Psychology
                  Discipline or Program on   Addiction Studies Program
                  which this plan focuses
                  Date                       December 27, 2010                   Version number                 1




I.   Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)
         OVERVIEW
         The Addiction Studies Program is responsive to the enhanced accreditation standards of the California Association of Alcohol and
     Drug Educators. CAADE follows and incorporates guidelines of SAMHSA - Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
     Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources.

           The Addiction Studies Program (ASP) courses include, but are not limited to, training and education standards specifically
     identified in SAMHSA’s Technical Assistance Publication Series, TAP 21 – “Addiction Counseling Competencies: The Knowledge,
     Skills, and Attitudes of Professional Practice”; plus SAMHSA’s Treatment Improvement Protocol, TIP 52 – “Clinical Supervision and
     Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor”; and TAP 21-A – “Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment
     Clinical Supervisors”.

           TIP 42 – “Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders”, and TIP 35 – “Enhancing Motivation for
     Change in Substance Abuse”, are publications, among others also drawn up by eminent and experienced educators, researchers and
     clinicians, that reflect major changes or ‘shifts in emphasis’ in the addictions field:

          The ‘Integrated Model of Treatment’ wherein co-occurring disorders and substance abuse/addiction are integrated, the one with
     the other; not treated separately, sequentially or in parallel. The ‘Integrated Model’ requires staff and counselors well-trained and
     educated in co-occurring disorders, not only in addiction. Treatment facilities and recovery communities are ill-equipped to provide
     adequate teaching about co-occurring disorders ‘on the ground’ for new, or even experienced addiction counselors. They want
     counselors who come out of college ready!

         Motivational counselor interviewing, ‘harm reduction,’ managed care and changes in health care, recognition of multiple
     substance abuses, and a ‘shift’ in treatment goals – each has implications for the Addiction Studies Program.

          HISTORY
          The ASP arose independently out of the community of treatment programs and circles of recovery in January, 1976 at the
     National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence – San Fernando Valley. It was formed out of necessity given the paucity of
I.   Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)
     trained and educated persons to work in the field of addiction as counselors to help alleviate the wide-spread suffering concomitant to
     addiction.

             In 1982 the ASP was invited by Mission College to bring the NCA&DD-SFV curriculum of seven addiction studies courses (each
     course was 54 hours per the Carnegie formula) that had been developed to meet curriculum and course requirements for CAADAC
     certification, (a process which CAADAC had just begun) to fledgling L.A. Mission College where the courses were accredited.
            Accreditation plus the magnificent opportunity to start a new department of Addiction Studies, the first of its kind in the L.A.
     Community Colleges District, was the extent of what Mission had to offer our fledgling Addiction Studies Program.
           Mission had no campus, buildings or classrooms, and no budget for teaching supplies, materials, or audiovisual equipment; so,
     from that time to this the Addiction Studies Program, with steady direction and support from its Advisory Board and other supporters
     including those who provide essential assistance in the realm of student-teaching presentations on specialty issues, continues to
     underwrite all necessary teaching supplies, materials including a few tables and folding chairs; and audio-visual equipment – television
     set and VHS player mounted on a high cart; computer access; availability of a web site for down-loading course-content material
     posted there for student study; over-head projector; DVD projector; approximately two hundred VHS and DVDs; two audio systems;
     copier, and other equipment, supplies, materials, or technology as needed.

          From 1982 through 1998 the ASP, originating at NCA&DD-SFV, held classes in a number of settings – NCA&DD-SFV, treatment
     centers, hospitals, even store-front out-patient programs – yet, principally at in-patient hospitals where I was Program Director, Clinical
     Supervisor and Nursing Director. When there was finally a L.A. Mission College campus with buildings and classrooms Mission invited
     the Addiction Studies Program to hold its classes on campus.

         For a bevy of reasons the ASP Advisory Committee working through proper channels and their respective Presidents, moved
     Addiction Studies from Mission College all faculty and the TOP code – to Pierce College in fall, 2001.


          CURRENT STATUS
          The mission of Addiction Studies mission is to have as many as possible capable students complete the ASP, then write the
     CAADE exam and continue accruing 2,080 hours supervised and signed-off, qualifying for CAADE’s certificate, Certified Addiction
     Treatment Counselor (CATC).
          The CATC credential will qualify our students to be grand--parented into one of the tiers being formulated by the Alcohol and
     Drug Programs of the state of California.

        Senior higher-numbered ‘optional’ courses provide 54 hours of ‘officially approved’ continuing education to MFT’s, LCSW’s, RN’s,
     CATC’s, CADC’s I & II, and MAC’s.



        I serve on the Question Development Committee of CAADE. The questions are psychometrically analyzed by a prestigious firm,
     Comira, to ensure question validity and reliability. While I willingly abide strict confidentiality with respect to the CAADE exam,
I.   Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)
     involvement in the committee acts to focus my attention upon an ever-widening sphere of knowledge that, upon careful consideration,
     needs to be incorporated into courses of Addiction Studies: CODs, trauma and PTSD, domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, nicotine
     addiction, family interventions, prevention, counseling techniques, and other subjects reinforcing the realization that we must continue
     to be alert to shifts and changes in the field of addiction to remain current and clinically relevant.

         Our mandate is to provide our students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (TAP 21) of the many competencies requisite of a
     ‘competent and professional’ (certified or licensed) addiction counselor, who must also have effective knowledge of related behavioral
     or mental health disorders.

          We are hopeful to have Addiction Studies 25 – “Addiction and Co-Occurring Disorders” curriculum-approved during spring, 2011
     semester so to be ready for scheduling in fall, 2011.This will be a major addition to our curriculum placing us well in the forefront of
     college alcohol and drug education and training programs demonstrating our responsive adherence to CAADE accreditation standards
     as well as conforming, in appropriate time, to federal (SAMHSA) guidelines as provided, apropos of AS 25, in TAP 42 – “Substance
     Abuse Treatment For Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders.”

           Clinical supervision takes its proper and long-necessary place in the education and training of addiction studies students and is
     being implemented in leading treatment centers.
     Clinical Supervision has two fundamental purposes: One, to ensure client safety and two, to facilitate professional growth and
     development of counselors.

         Clinical Supervision will be a major subject and practice in the proposed Addiction Studies 25 course,” – “ Addiction and Co-
     Occurring Disorders.”

         We now have three of our faculty who are ‘Certified’ Clinical Supervisors – Judy Davis, MFT, Marty Farash, MFT, and James
     Crossen, MFT.

         Each completed over forty hours of education and training given by a recognized Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS); verified
     hundreds of hours providing clinical supervision to others - students, clients in their private practices, and counselors and case
     managers (and middle managers/ administrators) in various counseling/therapy-services facilities; and each was required to verify that
     they themselves had been clinically supervised by another qualified clinical supervisor for an extensive number of hours.

          Clinical supervision, its greater emphasis in clinical treatment and recovery settings (addiction and CODs treated separately or in
     integrated programs), and with it becoming fieldwork and academically necessary to be included as an integral part of addiction
     studies programs, is representative of a number of other expansions, shifts in emphasis, innovations, or frank changes in philosophy,
     policy, or theory and practice in addiction prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery approaches.


          These contemporary movements act together to advance the status and job title of a person who works in the ‘field’ of addiction
     treatment and recovery as a ‘counselor’ plying their ‘vocation’ (for some, pursued as an ‘avocation’) to that of a person who is a fully-
I.   Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)
     trained, educated, and formally acknowledged (certified or licensed) as an addiction counselor working in the ‘profession’ of addiction
     who is recognized to be competent in the knowledge, skills and attitudes of a ‘professional’ addiction counselor engaged in
     professional practice.

         Thus, we move from ‘field’ to ‘profession,’ from ‘vocation’ to ‘professional counselor,’ from ‘social model’ and virtual ‘peer
     counseling’ to clinical practices pertaining to screening, comprehensive assessment, treatment plans and efficient and effective case
     management in treatment and recovery counseling.

          The Addiction Studies Program is first in that calling. Our need is to increase the number of classes available to an ever-
     increasing number of students. To properly teach advanced and new knowledge about addiction and all that it entails, ex. The
     Scientific Approach to Addiction Treatment and Recovery – ASP needs to schedule 15 classes in coming semesters. We have the
     faculty to teach 15 different classes as we last did so in fall, 2008, or to teach sections added to some of the classes scheduled for
     spring, 2011.

          TAP 21-A (SAMHSA) “Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment Clinical Supervisors,” and TIP 52 (A treatment
     Improvement Protocol) – “Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor” (both, free from
     SAMHSA) are to be foundational textbooks for yet-to-be-approved AS 25.

            The excellent Ms. Jana Albright has joined our faculty as an adjunct. She will teach AS 1 – “Understanding Addiction and
     Counseling.” Addiction Studies may count itself fortunate to have Ms. Albright on faculty, albeit part-time. She has the qualities of
     person and character- not to mention experience – that will translate into AS 1 instruction of the best kind, we have every confidence.



     Comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII
     PROGRAM DATA SETS for 2011-12 AAPP Data – Revised 11-29-2010:

          Our need is to increase the number of classes available to an ever-increasing number of students in each class.

           Dramatic increase in the number of students per class is the result not only of a drastic reduction in class offerings in fall, 2010
     semester and upcoming spring, 2011 – eleven classes only, compared to previous semesters presenting 14 or 15 classes - but is also
     a result of a swelling wave of enthusiastic persons who wish to become certified addiction counselors (while pursuing their Associate
     of Arts degree) desiring to be of love and service to others.




          New and expanded practices banded with evidence-based technology and techniques are creating changes to long-established,
     more traditional approaches that have lacked scientific, systematic, evidence-based best practices in treating addicts.
I.   Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)

          ASP is unable to acquit itself of the responsibility of teaching and conveying these pertinent changes to students so that they
     enter the ranks of addiction counselors as professionals informed of ‘new’ or revitalized clinical practices and theories validated by
     empirical data, with only eleven courses which low number comes perilously close to reducing addiction studies to a partial,
     inadequate and incomplete program.

          In view of the above complaint, might it be possible to add one or two sections to select courses in the spring, 2011 semester?

           ASP has a faculty of knowledgeable and clinically experienced instructors full-ready and capable of teaching 15 classes. We last
     did so in fall, 2008, doing our students ‘great service’, the need of which is now in our request for more classes or sections.

          The considerable body of empirically gathered data, partially described above, and breakthroughs about the nature of addiction
     driven by scientific research, braver uses of technology, innovation of newer techniques in counseling, interventions and treatment,
     have been found to be effective evidence-based best practices by recognized expert clinicians associated with SAMHSA, who
     disseminate their views and conclusions through TAP and TIP publications, each of which is more than fit to be used as a textbook in
     an addiction studies class.

           However, to reiterate, regardless of burgeoning changes, wrought by advances in scientific knowledge (ex. “Addiction is a
     chronic relapsing brain disease.”); technology ( ex. SPECT images); set-upon-set of entirely new or revised resources available
     through SAMHSA such as whole courses some with power points, most with instructor class outlines, and some with In-Service
     Instructor Manuals – TAP 21, TAP 21-A, TIP 35, TIP 42 TIP 52, TIP 27 – “Case management;” draconian budget cuts (Prop 36 funds
     – gone); and resourceful ways of funding and providing services; the Addiction Studies Program – which after all, does address with
     trained professionals stark realities of drug addiction and substance abuse – continues to try to fulfill its teaching responsibilities by
     keeping up with shifts and changes in the field of addiction, but is faced with understandable but self-defeating measures such as
     reducing ASP to eleven classes, thus hampering and limiting its effectiveness and value to students and communities relevant to
     Pierce College, Woodland Hills.

          It may be said perhaps, that addiction and substance abuse is equivalent to a raging epidemic deeply damaging families,
     communities, values and principles of life; or as ub a dimestic war our society has been defeated, is suffering stringencies of
     occupation by the contagion of addiction contaminating virtually every sphere of human activity.

          Addiction Studies plays a crucial role in alleviating some of the suffering inflicted by addiction. ASP, providing the most current
     practices in prevention, intervention and treatment through education and training of ‘professionals’ equipped to fairly engage the
     struggle, is the epitome of ‘harm reduction,’ a renewed and revised treatment alternative to total abstinence.



           Addiction Studies is the first line of defense providing first-education and training to would-be addiction counselors who would
     treat addiction and help reduce damage incurred by its scourge.
  I.    Program Overview (Please include comments on the enrollment and outcomes data provided for Section XIII.)

            Addiction Studies is as well, the first line of offence, effectively reducing problems of addiction in the catchment area of Pierce
        College and surrounding communities, evidenced by county sponsored surveys and statistical analysis.

             The value of the Addiction Studies Program to our greater community, and the merits of sending out thoroughly prepared certified
        and competent addiction counselors far and away throughout California, other states and even now in other countries, is plain.

             While all disciplines are deserving, justly so, perhaps the Addiction Studies Program, dealing as it does with virulent and
        pervasive addiction is especially so and asks for additional support in maintaining its academic and fieldwork standards, support for
        the which we offer our special thanks.

              We need more courses or additional class sections, starting with spring, 2011 semester, thank you.

              James Lynn Crossen, Director, Addiction Studies Program.




  II.   Assessment of 2009-2010 Annual Goals
            Goal                                                                                                     Achieved Continuing Discarded
        A.    Create an AS budget to pay for two Student Workers                                                                                   No
        B.    Hire two Program Assistants to work with students in AS 9 and 91 fieldwork classes                                                   No
        C.    Hire one more adjunct faculty.                                                                         Achieved
        D.    Establish as a prerequisite minimum proficiency in English reading and writing.                                                      No
                                                                                                                          (Press tab for additional rows.)

III.    2010-2011 Annual Goals Based on the Pierce College Strategic Plan (Distinguish between goals and the resources required to achieve
        these goals.)
        Provide an action plan for achieving each goal. Press Ctrl + Click to identify the specific Pierce Strategic Plan Objective addressed → Strat. Plan

        A.      Schedule AS 25 – “Addiction and Co-Occurring Disorders” for fall, 2011 based on TIP 52, TIP 21-A, and TIP                 1,2,3,5,6
                42.
        B.      Increase the use of the internet in all courses. Implement web sites for each instructor. Weebly.com                      1, 2
        C.      Continue to be thoroughly engaged in all issues relevant to the ASP – federal and state legislation,                      1,2,3,5,6
                certification and licensing processes, and severe budget cuts and their implications for treatment and recovery
III.   2010-2011 Annual Goals Based on the Pierce College Strategic Plan (Distinguish between goals and the resources required to achieve
       these goals.)
       Provide an action plan for achieving each goal. Press Ctrl + Click to identify the specific Pierce Strategic Plan Objective addressed → Strat. Plan

               facilities.
       D.      Make Spanish 1 a requirement of the ASP for non-Spanish speakers                                                                    1,2

               E. Improve the quality of teaching by the use of computers for research and writing papers, power points,        1,2,3,4,8
               quizzes and exams, video taping, practice teaching sessions by students, and feedback in classroom training.
                                                                                                                (Press tab for additional rows.)

IV.    Long-Range Educational Goals (3–6 Years)               Press Ctrl + Click to identify the specific Pierce Strategic Plan Objective addressed →   Strat. Plan
       A.     Establish on campus, in proximity of the classroom(s) a room or building for interviews. Not treatment but                            1,2,3,4,8
              providing education, information and referral services for students, individuals from off-campus, and families.
              In conjunction establish a once-a-month talk by a major person associated with addiction or CODs, or
              trauma/PTSD.
       B.     Require (how?) all addiction studies students to complete an AA (plan B) before ‘graduating’ from the ASP.                            1,2,3,4,8
       C.     Locate a grant-writer (or student?) to discover block grants or some source of federal money to support an                            1,2
              educational/treatment/ program suitable for the ASP.
       D.     Create a ‘management course’ for addiction treatment administrators, hiring from without the department an
              experienced manager and instructor to teach the course.



                                                                                                                                 (Press tab for additional rows.)

  V.    Curriculum
             List any new programs and/or certificates OR changed programs and/or certificates
             approved by the Curriculum Committee during 2009 (spring and fall). Check whether they                                                       Approval
        A.                                                                                                                    New          Changed
             are New or Changed, and provide the date they were approved by the Curriculum                                                                 Date
             Committee.
             1
              2
              3
                                                                                                                                    (Press tab for additional rows.)
           List any new, updated, or changed courses approved by the                               Check All That Apply.
      B.   Curriculum Committee during 2009 (spring and fall). Provide the                                           Distance        Approval
                                                                                   New        Updated    Honors
           course number and the course title.                                                                      Education         Date
           1
           2
           3
           4
           5
           6
                                                                                                                 (Press tab for additional rows.)
      C.   Course Outlines of Record
           1   Number of courses in discipline or program 18 courses
           2   Number of courses that have been updated since 2004 (CORs must be updated every 6 years) 15 CORS

VI.   Progress in the Student Learning Outcomes Cycle
      A. Course-Level Student Learning Outcomes
           Number of courses in discipline or program
           Number of courses with Student Learning Outcomes defined
           Total number of courses that have been assessed to date (at least once)
           Total number of courses in which assessment findings have been implemented or utilized
           Program-Level Student Learning Outcomes Developed (Relate outcomes to the Mission Statement
                                                                                                                        Mission         ILO
      B.   and the Institutional Learning Outcomes)              Press Ctrl + Click for Mission Statement or ILOs →
           1
           2
           3
           4
           5
           6
        C.   Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Activity
             In the space provided below, provide a narrative describing the student learning outcomes assessment activity conducted during
             the 2009-2010 academic year.


        D.   Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Findings and Actions Taken
             In the space provided below, provide a narrative describing the student learning outcomes assessment findings and actions
             taken or planned as a result of the 2009-2010 assessments.




VII.    External Influences (Environmental Scans)
        A.   Articulation status (from ASSIST or articulation officer)
             How many of your courses are transferable to CSU or UC?
             Of these courses, how many are articulated with CSU or UC?
        B.   Labor market data supporting demand for the program (if applicable)


        C.   Advisory Committee input (if applicable) (Include date of last meeting.)


        D.   Other pertinent data (such as discussions with four-year institutions, concepts derived from professional conferences and
             journals, outcomes from district discipline committee meetings, input from adjunct faculty, agreements with high schools or
             regional occupational programs, etc.)




VIII.   Additional Human Resources Needed to Implement Program Goals―Faculty, Staff, Student Workers, and Others
        Specific human resource required (provide comprehensive justification based on program goals and student
        learning outcomes)                                                                                                      Annual Cost
        A.
        B.
        C.
        D.
VIII.   Additional Human Resources Needed to Implement Program Goals―Faculty, Staff, Student Workers, and Others
        Specific human resource required (provide comprehensive justification based on program goals and student
        learning outcomes)                                                                                                        Annual Cost
        E.
H




        Provide the following information regarding full-time faculty and adjunct faculty.
             1.    Full-time faculty, Fall 2009
                   a.   Full-time equivalent faculty:                                  Chair reassigned time:
                   b.   FTEF reassigned temporarily:                                   FTEF reassigned permanently:
                   c.   Number of new hires and/or transfers in                        2007:              2008:                2009:
                   d.   Name of most recent hire or transfer in and year hired:

                   e.   Number of retirees or full-time positions lost                 2007:              2008:                2009:
                   f.   Names and year left since 2001:

              2.   Adjunct faculty
                   a.   Number of adjunct faculty teaching in program (head count)
                        Fall 2007:                      Fall 2008:                  Fall 2009:                    Fall 2010:
                   b.   FTEF adjunct faculty teaching in program
                        Fall 2007:                      Fall 2008:                  Fall 2009:                    Fall 2010:
             3.    Comparison of full-time faculty hours to adjunct faculty hours
                   a.   Number of total program hours taught by full-time faculty
                        Fall 2007:                      Fall 2008:                  Fall 2009:                    Fall 2010:
                   b.   Number of total program hours taught by adjunct faculty
                        Fall 2007:                      Fall 2008:                  Fall 2009:                    Fall 2010:
                   c.   Percent of total program hours taught by full-time faculty
                        Fall 2007:                      Fall 2008:                  Fall 2009:                    Fall 2010:
             Comments
             Supplemental data:
     IX.    Additional Equipment and Software Needed to Implement Program Goals
            Replace the zeroes in the following charts with equipment and software funding amounts received or budgeted from the sources
            listed.
                              Program 100         Program 100          Program 100          IELM         Perkins IV             Other               Total
                               GL 642300           GL 640100            GL 652000        (Block Grant)    (VTEA)
                            Purchases< $5,000   Purchases > $5,000    Equipment Leases
            2009-2010
            Allocations            0                    0                    0                0              0                   0                    0
            Received

            Briefly describe equipment and software purchases made in 2009-2010:

                              Program 100         Program 100          Program 100          IELM         Perkins IV             Other               Total
                               GL 642300           GL 640100            GL 652000        (Block Grant)    (VTEA)
                            Purchases< $5,000   Purchases > $10,000   Equipment Leases
            2010-2011
            Allocations            0                    0                    0                0              0                   0                    0
            Budgeted

ge




       List additional/replacement equipment needed.
       Place all items in priority order. Provide a comprehensive justification based on program goals
       and student learning outcomes for each item. Check possible sources.                                             Possible Funding Sources ()
                                                                                                                                        Program      IT/Tech
                                            Item and Justification                                       Cost         Perkins   IELM
                                                                                                                                          100        Refresh
       1.
       2.
       3.
       4.
                                                                                                                                (Press tab for additional rows.)
       List additional/updated software needed—OTHER THAN MICROSOFT OFFICE.
       Place all items in priority order. Provide a comprehensive justification based on program goals
       and student learning outcomes for each item. Check possible sources.                                             Possible Funding Sources ()
                                                                                                                                        Program      IT/Tech
                          Item, Number of Licenses, New or Renewal—Justification                         Cost         Perkins   IELM
                                                                                                                                          100        Refresh
       1.
  2.
  3.
  4.
                                                                                                                                                                      (Press tab for additional rows.)
       Complete the following information ONLY if you seek IELM (formerly Block Grant) funding for the 2010-2011 academic year. This
       section is your IELM request, and it will be copied and given to the IELM committee for determination of recommended funding.
                                                           Explain the instructional use of the item. Explain how the




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Total approximate cost
                                                                                                                                                                          Can the program function

                                                                                                                                                                          this item? "Yes" or "No."
        Item Priority Number




                                                                                                                            issue? "Yes" or "No."
                                                           item will either maintain or expand the program. Explain




                                                                                                                            Will the item address




                                                                                                                                                                          with a partial funding of




                                                                                                                                                                                                      than one piece; put the
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Approx. cost: if the line
                                                                                                                                                    ("Replace") or new?
                                                                                                                            any health or safety




                                                                                                                                                                                                      cost of a single piece.
                                                                                                                                                                                                      item consists of more
                                                           alternate sources of funding (such as Perkins IV) that you
                                                           will apply for, or have applied for, and the current status of




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  of the line item.
                                                                                                                                                    Replacement?
                               Equipment, materials, or
                                                           those requests. If it is software, explain whether it is
                               software item description
                                                           unique to your program and whether it is an augmentation to




                                                                                                                                                    ("New").
                                                           the number of licenses or new software. (Note: To replace
                                                           stolen instructional equipment, apply to the PCC Budget
                                                           Committee.
          1
          2
          3
          4
                                                                                                                                                             (Press tab for additional rows.)


X.     Supplies Budget Needed to Implement Program Goals
       2009-2010 Amount Allocated                                                                 2010-2011 Amount Requested
       General justification for 2010-2011 amount requested:




XI.    Facilities
       A.                      New facilities or additional classrooms required to implement program goals (provide comprehensive justification based on
                               program goals and student learning outcomes).
XI.    Facilities
       B.    Alterations and improvements required for existing facilities to implement program goals. Include any technological upgrades
             required. (Provide a comprehensive justification based on program goals and student learning outcomes.)




XII.   Other Resources Needed to Implement Program Goals
       Resource and General justification                                     2009-2010 Amount Allocated 2010-2011 Amount Requested


                                                                                                              (Press tab for additional rows.)


Additional Comments or Information:

Insert additional comments or information here:
Department:                                                      Psychology
Discipline or Program on which plan focuses:                   Addiction Studies

XIII. PROGRAM DATA SETS

A. Total enrollments, WSCH (weekly student contact hours), FTES (full-time equivalent students), and WSCH/FTEF
                                                       Fall 2004         Fall 2005       Fall 2006   Fall 2007 Fall 2008   Fall 2009   Fall 2010
Total enrollments:                                        393               356             394         453       504        529          452
WSCH:                                                    1548              1400            1520        1721      1866       2118.7      1882.68
FTES:                                                     48.6               44            47.8        54.1      58.6       66.59        59.17
WSCH/FTEF:                                                 n/a             552.7          518.2       549.3     595.5       723.1        689.6

B. Number of classes offered (combined classes counted as a single class), average class size, total number of hours taught
                                                      Fall 2004         Fall 2005       Fall 2006     Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009    Fall 2010
No. of classes:                                          11                 11             13            14        14        12           11
Avg. class size:                                         36                 32             30           32.4       36       44.1         41.1
Hours taught:                                            n/a                38             44            47        47        44         41.001

C. Student success and retention rates - program and college averages
                                                        Fall 2004          Fall 2005   Fall 2006   Fall 2007   Fall 2008   Fall 2009   Fall 2010
Program Success:                                          82%                81%         82%         79%         84%         86%         83%
College Success:                                          70%                68%         67%         67%         67%         69%         70%
Program Retention:                                        88%                90%         92%         89%         93%         93%         90%
College Retention:                                        86%                86%         86%         86%         86%         88%         87%

D. Number of degrees and certificates awarded (if applicable)
                                                         2003-04           2004-05      2005-06     2006-07    2007-08     2008-09     2009-10
Degrees                                                      3                1            4           5          6          12           5
Certificates                                                 7               11            9           4          7          10           5

E. Comparison of full-time faculty hours to adjunct faculty hours
                                                          Fall 2004        Fall 2005   Fall 2006   Fall 2006   Fall 2008   Fall 2009   Fall 2010
Number of total program hours taught by full-time
faculty                                                      n/a              15          15           15         15          15          15
Number of total program hours taught by adjunct faculty      n/a              23          29           32         32          29        26.001
Percent of total program hours taught by full-time
faculty                                                      n/a            39.5%        34.1%       31.9%      31.9%       34.1%       36.6%

				
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