INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM _IEP'S_ by hcj

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									THE PLANS
         IEP’s
         IHP’s
         504’s
         EAP’s

      Pat Glass, R.N.
  Jessamine Co. Schools
   District School Nurse
Health Services Coordinator
  INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION
        PROGRAM (IEP)
• An IEP is developed for every student that
  is identified as special needs (special
  education).
• The rules surrounding the development
  and implementation of an IEP was
  established by IDEA ( Individuals with
  Disabilities Education Act), which is a
  federal law.
                     IEP’S
• An IEP is developed thru the joint collaboration
  of a multidisciplinary educational team (school
  psychologist, counselor, spec. ed teachers,
  regular ed teachers, speech therapist, OT, PT,
  and school nurse) along with the parents.
• Special needs students can have multiple
  handicaps which impact learning, which include
  developmental, physical, and medical.
                   OHI
• OHI – means “Other Health Impaired”
• The student has a health condition that
  impacts his/her ability to learn in the
  classroom setting.
               “ADHD”
               “MVA”
               “OCD”
               “Diabetes”
                    ARC
• An ARC (Annual Review Committee) is where
  the IEP is developed. The ARC group is
  comprised of the multidisciplinary educational
  team.
• Once an IEP is developed, an ARC is held every
  12 months to review and update the IEP. For
  every student that has a medical condition, it
  is imperative that the school nurse
  participate in this meeting. The nurse will
  interpret, assess, and evaluate all info and
  services relating to the health condition.
                  The Law
• Whatever is stated in the IEP is the law!
• In other words, if it is part of the plan for
  that student, the school system is
  obligated to follow the IEP to the “letter”!
• As the school nurse, it is your
  responsibility to insure that all nursing
  services that are set forth by the IEP are
  being provided.
                   IEP’S
• For Medicaid billing, the nursing services
  that is billed for must be stated in the IEP.
• Stephanie Aldridge, from KSBA, will
  discuss more of this tomorrow.
 INDIVIDUALIZED HEALTHCARE
            PLANS
            (IHP’s)

• All IHP’s must be:
           a. Comprehensive
           b. Coordinated
           c. Communicated
               IHP’s (cont.)
• The school nurse uses her professional
  judgement to determine the need for an IHP.
• Once the need has been established, the school
  nurse must investigate all pertinent medical
  information regarding the health condition. This
  requires communication with the parents and all
  health care providers along with thorough
  medical documentation.
             IHP’s (cont.)
• Once the nurse has a clear picture of the
  health care needs of the student, a plan is
  developed.
• Communicate the plan to the parents and
  the doctor/doctors. Ask for input before
  you set the final plan into “concrete”.
• Once plan approved, coordinate the
  services.
             IHP’s (cont.)
• Communicate the plan to school staff in
  written and verbal communications.
• Train and review with staff members.
• Supervise! Supervise!        Supervise!
• Supervision is an excellent way to assess
  and evaluate the effectiveness of the plan.
 IHP’s, IEP’s, EAP’s, and 504’s
• The IHP can be used in multiple situations.
• You can use with:

          IEP
          EAP (Emergency Action Plan)
          504
OR – the IHP can simply stand alone.
                  504
• 504 is in reference to the Section 504 of
  the Rehabilitation Act 1973, which is a
  federal mandate.
• Many students with health conditions
  qualify under the 504 law.
• The key phrase in this law is “reasonable
  accomodations”.
             504’s (cont.)
• Each school building has a 504
  coordinator (usually the counselor).
• When a parent or the school determines
  the need for a 504 plan for a student, the
  504 committee meets. The parent is
  invited, and the school nurse should
  always be part of this committee.
               504’s (cont.)
• The 504 committee develops the 504 plan,
  taking into consideration “reasonable
  accomodations” and puts the plan in writing.
• The school nurse is the “go to” person in
  deciphering the medical information that is in
  front of the committee.
• The parent receives a copy of the finalized plan.
• The school nurse works with the building
  personnel in implementing, coordinating, and
  communicating the plan.
MAIN PROBLEMS WITH 504’s
• NO FUNDING FOR 504’s!!!!!!!!!
• A parent comes in with the 504 already
  written!!!!!

• ALWAYS REMEMBER – WHATEVER
  YOU AGREE TO IN A 504 – YOU MUST
  PROVIDE!
EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS
       (EAP’s)

• Many times in the development of a IHP,
  the school nurse makes the determination
  that the health condition has the potential
  to progress into a medical emergency or
  crisis. When this situation exists, the
  student needs an EAP.
            EAP’s (cont.)
• Some examples:
    peanut allergies
    asthma
    epilepsy
    insulin dependent diabetes
    panic attacks
    mental illness “melt downs”
           EAP’s (cont.)
• Chapter 9 in “School Nursing: A
  Comprehensive Text” good examples of
  EAP’s pages 186 – 191



REMEMBER – In order to have an EAP, the
 school nurse has to start with an IHP
 (Individualized Health Plan).
           EAP’s (cont.)
• Use same process in the development of
  the IHP
• Must have the 3 main components:
          Comprehensive
          Coordinate
          Communicate
   Training and Communication
• Plan must be written
• Communicate written plan to all personnel that are
  involved. Plan thoroughly. Don’t leave anyone out.
• Example: Teacher
               Classroom asst.
               Bus Driver and Monitor
               Coaches (extracurricular activities)
               ESS or ESY personnel
               Counselor
               PE teacher
               Administration
  Training and Communication
• Training – thorough!!!!!!!!!!
     Always have “return demonstrations!”
  REVIEW OFTEN!! (Annually would be
  the least amount of time for a review).

Unfortunately, the ability to supervise during
 the crisis (if one occurs) is not always
 available.
        DOCUMENTATION
• Important for evaluation and assessment
  to review documentation after the crisis
  occurs to see if EAP needs any changes.
• Also, excellent opportunity to review plan
  with staff (and see if any additions needed
  for personnel).
• BE SUPPORTIVE AND ENCOURAGING
  WITH STAFF!
             RESOURCES
• School Nursing: A Comprehensive Text
• Overview of School Health Services (NASN)
• The School Nurse’s Source Book of
  Individualized Healthcare Plans – Arnold and
  Silkworth
• Clinical Guidelines for School Nurses – School
  Health Alert
• Clinical Manual of Pediatric Nursing – Wong and
  Whaley’s, Fourth Edition

								
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