Preparing Your Search Email by yurtgc548

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 60

									Go Over Chapter 1 and 2
   Track 1-09
       At the moment, some people who use the Internet are
        linked to it using a dial-up connection. Here’s what you
        need to join them: a computer, a modem, and account,
        and a telephone line.
       What is a modem? In a word, a modem works as a
        translator between the computer and the telephone lines.
        The language used by the computer, cannot be
        transmitted through the telephone lines. Therefore, the
        modem’s job is translating the computer language, into
        signals that can be sent through the telephone lines.
   There are two basic types of modems: Internal,
    which are placed in a slot, inside your computer’s
    case, and external, which are small boxes that
    live outside your computer, and connect to your
    computer through a cable.
   Modems are rated by their speed, using a
    measurement called “bits per second” or “b..p..s”
    Your Internet experience is much more satisfying
    if you use a faster modem
Questions- chapter one
   1. What is a modem?

   2. What are the two basic types of modems?

   3. How are the modems rated?

   4. What does “bps” means?

   5. What are the four items that you need to
    connect to the Internet using a dial-up connection?
Chapter Two
  Track 1-10
Questions:
1. A web page includes:
2. A website is:
3. A webmaster is:
4. URL stands for
5. A URL is made from three parts:
    1.   The _________________ access type.
    2.   The _______________ name.
    3.   The ________________ to the file
6. What is the best way to find information on the
   web?
7. Search engines are organized by __________
   and _______________ to help you find
   information.
8. What can you find inside online libraries?
9. What does Mina tell Kevin about the cost of one
   of the Internet libraries?
10. What can you find inside white page?
 Preparing Your
Search / Email
Types of Search Tools
   Search Engines: Google, Wwwcrawler

   Metasearches: CNET’s
    http://www.search.com

   Directories: Yahoo!! MSN!
   Real language – Ask Jeeves
    http://www.askjeeves.com
Preparing Your Search
   1. State What You Want to Find
     ex: I want to find information on methods of losing weight
   2. Identify Keywords
     ex: I want to find information on methods of losing weight
   3. Word Forms (synonyms, alternate spellings..)
     ex: methods: method, ways, way, techniques
   4. Combine Synonyms, Keywords, Variant Word
    Forms
      ex: (popular or common or favorite) ; (method* or way* or
    technique*) ;
   5. Check Your Spelling
Search Tips
   Correct spell of key words
   Refine your keywords and search terms
   Try other search engines
   Type in multiple words, results are vary
       Keywords: Internet English and “Internet English”
        (Internet + English)
Using “real language” search sites
   Enter the question in the search entry box
   “Real language “ search pages allow the
    browser to ask a question
   All you need it Ask Jeeves and he will see
    what he can do for you.
       e.g. “Where can I find a picture of Sydney Opera
        House?”
       Tip: ask jeeves has an excellent partner site
        called ask jeeves kids http://www.ajkids.com
Hands On
   Ask Jeeves http://www.askjeeves.com
   Who is the president of Taiwan?
   How can I make chocolate cake?
   What time is it in Taiwan?
   Why is the sky blue?
Boolean Operator
   Boolean AND(+), OR, and AND NOT(-)
     Internet AND English (retrieve web containing all the keywords)
     Internet OR English (containing any and all keywords)
     Internet AND NOT English (containing one keyword but not the
    other)
     +Internet -English
   These three search words can be “nested”.
   Phrase Searching “ “
“Internet English”   (containing those words appear side-by-side”)
  Search Operators
Search Operators Example Keywords           Search Results:
                                            Web pages with

 (space) -     Internet -English            Internet not English

 “”            “Internet”            the phrase Internet English

 allintitle:   allintitle:Internet   Internet in the Web pages title

 allinurl:     allinurl:Internet     Internet in the Web pages URLs
Show Web Pages With
   All of these words
   At least one of these words
   The exact phrase
   None of these words
    (a) Not(-) (b) “”      (c) AND(+)   (d) OR

   Boolean Online exercise:
    http://www2.nkfust.edu.tw/~emchen/CALL/CALL_
    Exercises/CALL3-2.htm
Advanced Search -
Advanced Search – Google Advanced
Search in English
Advanced Search
you can search only for pages:
 All the search terms you type in
 The exact phrases you type in
 At least one of the words you type in
 Written in a certain language
 Created in a certain file format
 Selected time
 Numbers within a certain range
 Within a certain domain, or website
 Safe search (filter)
Search Results
   Server Busy
       Not a problem. You can try again in a minute.


   DNS Error; ERROR 404 Not Found
       The site is not there anymore
       DNS (The Internet Domain Name System) was
        developed as a database to allow the allocation
        of host names amongst multiple naming
        authorities.
DNS Error—
    Check to see if you are connected
   Double click my My computer icon
   Double click the Dial-up Networking icon
   Use the right mouse button and click Online Gateway
    icon. Left mouse click properties from the list.
   Click the Server Types
   Click the TCP/IP Settings button
   Make sure that Server assigned IP Address is dotted.
   Make sure that Server Assigned Name Server
    Address is dotted.
   Press OK to the next two windows.
Matasearch
   Matasearch engine searches other search
    engines.
   E.g. http://www.search.com
   Who pays for All this wonderful search
    systems?
       Advertising supports all of them..
How to Cite Internet Sources?
   Giving credit is the ethical thing to do…
   WWW Resources
     Author’s name (last, first)
     Title of website in italics
     Date website was posted or last updated.
     URL (http://...) in bracket [ ]
     Title of publication underlined
     Date you accessed the website
    Example:
      Smith, Joe. Celine Dion Official Web Site. 5/6/00.
      [http://www.celinedion.com] Biography. 9/15/01
How to Cite Internet Sources?
   Online newspaper, magazine, or encyclopedia:
     Author’s name (last, first)
     Title of website in quotation marks.

     Date website was posted or last updated. (8/15/01)

     URL (http://...) in bracket [ ]

     Title of publication in italics.

     Date you accessed the website. (9/21/01)

    Example:
      Smith, Joe. “Cable News Network.” (8/15/01).
      [http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/] Israeli Troops Kill
      Palestinian Children. 9/21/01.
Go over Chapter 4
   Track 1-11
    1. What does Kevin want to search for on the
    Internet?
    2. What type of words should be used to search
    the Net?
    3. Why is spelling important?
    4. What is the second problem they encounter
    with their search?
    5. How do they narrow the search?
Chapter Five

       Email & Chatting Online
    Email :
   Email: Electronic mail, or email, may be the most heavily used features of the
    Internet.
   How to get free Web-based e-mails:
        Go to the service’s webpage
        sign up for get free account
        http://www.learnthenet.com/english/animate/email.html

        http://gateway.lib.ohio-state.edu/tutor/les9/

   Header: are the beginning of any email message.
        Subject       : Describes message (recommend)
        To            : Lists recipient of the message (at least one required)
        CC            : List carbon copy recipient(s)_ (Optional)
        Bcc           : Lists blind carbon copy recipient(s) name(s) will not be
         listed with the message (optional)
        From          : Address of message author (required; provide automatically)
        Reply         : Address to send your reply
Sending your email message
   TO box, type the name of the recipient. It should take this
    form: recipient@domain.com.
   You can send a message to more than one person by
    entering multiple addresses. Just put a semicolon (;)
    between each address
   Type the subject of the e-mail. (make it short and descriptive)
   Inbox icon – mail you have received
   Sent item– make you have sent
   Outbox – to see if there are any items waiting to be sent but
    not yet sent.

   http://www.learnthenet.com/english/html/92email.htm
Understanding E-Mail Addresses
   yanling@cmsu.edu.tw
        Yanling- username
        @- an axon sign, means “at”
        Csmu – server host name “the name of school server”
        Edu- for educational instituations
        Tw to taiwan

   yanling@yahoo.com
        Yanling- usernaem
        @
        Yahoo- name of the company that provides your email address; usually your ISP, or a free
         web-based email service. (domain name)
        Com – type of organization you have your email with.

   yanling@ms18.hinet.net
        Yanling – username
        @
        Ms18- server host name or
        Hinet,- domain name; the computer through which I send and receive email
        Net – a network service
Understanding E-Mail Addresses
   Read the article at
    http://www.learnthenet.com/english/html/22
    email.htm
   Domain suffix – the dot followed by letter at
    the end of an email
   Internet domain suffixes are divided into
    several different “areas”. (p. 103)
       .com; .net; .org; .edu; .biz; .gov; .mil;
Abbreviations and Acronyms
 AFAIK – As far as I know
 BAK – Back at keyboard
 BTW – By the way
 OIC – Oh, I see
 TIA – Thanks in advance
 WB – Welcome back
Questions:
<TOY>, <IMHO>, <G>, <OTOH>, <HTH>
Emoticons
   Emoticons = emotion + icons
 Called “smileys”
 Substitute for the tone of the voice
 A hint about writers’ feelings or actions
 You should not use them in a formal message
 Look like faces
    :)    = :-)
    :(    = :-(
    ;)    = ;-)
    :D    =:-D
Activity:
http://www.learnthenet.com/english/html/25smile.htm
http://gateway.lib.ohio-state.edu/tutor/les9/les9activity.html
Who is the father of smileys?
http://www.newbie.net/SmileyFAQ/index.html
   Why did you get a very angry message
    from someone you wrote to?
       Ambiguous thoughts or misunderstood document
       Unknown sender
       Capital LETTERS
       Enormously long signature
Netiquette

Netiquette:
The set of rules about behaviors that is
 acceptable when writing an email or talking
 to people in a chat room.
 --from Cambridge Advanced Learner
 Dictionary
  Email Netiquette
 Clearly summarize the contents of your message in the
subject line.
 Don't use CC (Carbon Copy) to copy your message to
everyone.
 Use BCCs (Blind Carbon Copies) when addressing a
message that will go to a large group of people who don't
necessarily know each other.
 Keep your messages short and focused.
 Avoid using all capital letters. (Yelling)
 Don't write anything you wouldn't' say in public. (flaming)
Email Precautions
   Check your inbox / avoid forge letter
   People adopt imaginary roles
   Use Bcc field when you are sending mailing
    to a long list of address
   Don’t pass on chain letters.
   Email is not very private and confidential
       Read your email is easy; unless encrypt it.
Email Etiquette
   Here are a few pointers to help you
    communicate more effectively
       http://www.learnthenet.com/english/html/65mailet
        .htm
Mailing List
  A list of e-mail addresses of people interested in the
   same topic
 You can access a world of mailing lists, organized
   around a specific topic, through the Internet.
 When you subscribe to a mailing list, you receive all mail
   sent to that list.
http://www.learnthenet.com/english/html/24mlists.htm
http://gateway.lib.ohio-state.edu/tutor/les10/pg1.html
Generally, there are two types of mailing lists:
 Announcement-type lists, where you receive
  messages, but can't post to the list yourself.
 Discussion-type lists, where everyone on the list
  can participate. When a list subscriber sends a
  message, it goes to everyone on the list. You can
  reply to messages you receive, send new
  messages, or just read the messages without
  participating.
Mailing List
How to “get on” a mailing list?
1. send a message to the list administrator (this is usually not a
    person, just an automated process) and your e-mail address is
    added to the list.
2. Subscribing to a mailing list is usually free. After you subscribe, you
    will receive a reply giving you details about the list and how to
    participate. Soon, you'll begin receiving mail from other list
    members.
3.Subscribing to mailing lists is free- just send an email message to the
    “subscription address.” Leave the subject line of your message
    blank. In the message box type:
 Subscribe <LISTNAME><Firstname Lastname>
 Ex: Subscribe ENGL-SL Yanling Hwang
Mailing List
How to “get off” a mailing list?
 If you want to remove yourself from the list, you
  will need to unsubscribe. The process varies from
  list to list; but generally, you’ll need to send a
  message with the word” unsubscribe” followed by
  the name of the lit and your email address to
  administrative address, not to the list address. .
 Ex: Unsubscribe ENGL-SL Nicole Huang
Mailing List
How to “get off” a mailing list?
 If you want to remove yourself from the list, you
  will need to unsubscribe. The process varies from
  list to list; but generally, you’ll need to send a
  message with the word” unsubscribe” followed by
  the name of the lit and your email address to
  administrative address, not to the list address. .
 Ex: Unsubscribe ENGL-SL Yanling Hwang
Advantages of listservs
   an enormous archive or past discussion
    and teacher resource files around various
    subjects built up over the years.
   A medium for teaching
   Disadvantage of listservs
       There are always some articles you just don’t
        want to read.
Listening to Track 1-13
Question one:
 What are Mina and Kevin talking about?
    a. How to send e-mail.
    b. How to get a free e-mail
    c. How to log into a yahoo e-mail
       account
    d. How to log into a hotmail account
Listening to Track 1-13
Question two:
 How many e-mail accounts does Mina have?
     a. She has none right now, but she
        wants to get one as soon as possible.
     b. She just got one yesterday
     c. She doesn’t need e-mail accounts
     d. She just got her second account
       yesterday
Listening to Track 1-14
Question three:
 After you have filled out the form, you need
 to click on?
     a. password lookup
     b. Mail.yahoo.com
     c. Sign up now
     d. Submit this form
Listening to Track 1-14
Question four:
 What will happen if you lose your password?
     a. You will lose your account
     b. You have to call the company and
       ask them for a new password
     c. You can look it up online
     d. You have to go to the main office and show
       them your ID.
Listening to Track 1-15
Question five:
 Mina suggests that Kevin pay attention to:
    a. his spelling and signing out
    b. making a good impression
    c. maintaining his identity
    d. clicking on check mail
Listening to Track 1-15
Question six:
 Which part of Kevin’s e-mail address tells
 us the server:
    a. Kevin
    b. Rs5
    c. ocit
    d. edu
Listening to Track 1-15
Question seven:
 What does an e-mail address reveal:
    a. The user name
    b. The country where the server is
       located
    c. The server name and the type of
       institution
    d. All of the above
Mailing List
You can access a world of mailing lists, organized around a
  specific topic, through the Internet.

How Do mailing lists work?
   Each mailing list has two email addresses. One
    address is to subscribe (get on the list) and
    unsubscribe (get off the list). The other address is for
    communicating to the other members of the discussion
    group. When you send email to this second address, it
    gets distributed to everyone else on the list.
Mailing List
How to “get on” a mailing list?
  Subscribing to mailing lists is free-just send
  an email message to the “subscription
  address.” Leave the subject line of your
  message blank. In the message box type:
 Subscribe <LISTNAME><Firstname
  Lastname>
 Ex: Subscribe ENGL-SL YanLing Hwang
Mailing List
How to “get off” a mailing list?
 If you want to remove yourself from the list, you
  will need to unsubscribe. The process varies from
  list to list; but generally, you’ll need to send a
  message with the word” unsubscribe” followed by
  the name of the list and your email address to
  administrative address, not to the list address. .
 Ex: Unsubscribe ENGL-SL Nicole Huang
                   Mailing Lists
Daily Brief: http://incinc.net/db.html
  Daily summary of U.S. and world news sent out by e-mail
  every weekday morning. To subscribe, fill out the form at
  http://www.incinc.net/db_subscribe.html

Word. A. D day
 Mails out an English vocabulary word and its definition
 each day. To subscribe, send email to
 wsmith@wordsmith.org, and on your Subject line, put
 subscribe<you full name>. For example, subscribe< Nicole
 Huang>
         Subscribe Mailing Lists

1.ESOL :Discussion for ESOL/bilingual graduate
        students. Mail the command info esol to
         majordomo@lists.umbc.edu
2.Slang of the Day
3.EZTalk 每日一字電子報
4.華視英語電子報
5. 1390英文電子報
Conversation – Mailing List
(track 1-19)
   K: You know how I love movies? Well, I’ve decided to join a
    mailing list. I can talk to others about movies and also find out
    all the latest information.
   M: That’s a great idea! How did you join?
   K: Well, first of all, I went to www.liszt, com and subscribed.
    You need to give your name and the list that you want to
    subscribe to. Once your subscription has been received they
    will send you some basic information about the discussion
    group and how you can participate. The list I subscribed to is
    quite good; I get about two e-mails a week from them. But my
    friend subscribed to one and they are always sending him
    stuff, he says it is a real pain because his mailbox is always
    full and he often can’t receive mail from any of his friend.
   M: Wow! That’s too bad. What’s he going to do?
   K: Unsubscribe.
Questions
    1. If you want to join a mailing list first you
     must….
    a.   Unsubscribe
    b.   Login
    c.   Register
    d.   subscribe
    2. What is the advantage of mailing lists?
    a.   Puts you in touch with the people that don’t
         have the same interests as you do.
    b.   Helps you fill out your mailbox so you can look
         important among your friends.
    c.   Let you share the latest information with others.
    d.   They are just a waste time.
How to get off a mailing list?
   M: So, how do you get off a mailing list?
   K: It depends on the list. Basically you need ot send a
    message with the word “unsubscribe,” followed by the name
    of the list and your e-mail address.
   M: who do you send the message to ?
   K: Send it to the administrative address, not to the list
    address; if you use the list address, everyone on the list sees
    your request except for the person who needs to act on it.
   M: so you must have the administrative address.
   K: Right.
Question
    1. To unsubscribe from a mailing list….
    a.   Send your request to the mailing list
    b.   Click on the unsubscribe button
    c.   Delete all messages that come form the list
    d.   Send your request to the administrative
         address
    Hands-on Practice
   A. Practice your new web search skills (please
    document your search engine, the keywords you tried in the search box and then
    write down the answer of each question)
   1. What U. S. President was born in a town named Caldwell?
   2. From what place did the Ebola virus get its name?
   3. What is the address of the Empire State Building?
   4. Who invented the paper clip?
   5. What country had the largest recorded earthquake?


   B. Please join two mailing lists from Appendix F (p.
    202)
            Send your mail to phuang@nhit.edu.tw
            Subject as        p2, Name, No.
Heavenly Pies Restaurant
   Waiter: Hi. 1. _______________to Heavenly Pies. May I take your 2. ________?
   Woman: Uh . . . yes. I'd like the chicken fried 3. ___________.
   Waiter: Okay. Would you like 4. ___________, bread, or rice with your meal?
   Woman: Umm. I'll take the rice?
   Waiter: Would you 5.______________ for anything to drink?
   Woman: Yeah. I'll 6. __________ a medium Sprite.
   Waiter: I'm sorry. We only have large or small.
   Woman: Well, in that case, uh, I'll have a 7. ___________ Sprite.
   Waiter: Okay. A small Sprite. And what kind of 8. _____________ would you like with your salad. It
    comes with the fried steak.
   Woman: What dressings do you have?
   Waiter: We have 9. _____________, Italian, blue cheese, and ranch.
   Woman: Oh! Ranch, please.
   Waiter: Would you like anything else?
   Woman: Well, I'd like to see you 10. _______ menu. That's the main reason why I like to 11.
    _________ here.
   Waiter: Oh, I'm so sorry, but we aren't 12. ____________ any pies today.
   Woman: Huh?
   Waiter: Well, you see, Dave, our 13. _________, slipped on a banana peel back in our kitchen two days
    ago, and14. _____________ his back. [Oh] He'll be out for at least two weeks. In the meantime, we're
    serving ice cream sundaes15. ______________. Sorry.
   Woman: Wow. I'm sorry to hear that. I hope he gets better soon.

								
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