Docstoc

Paradigm Shift

Document Sample
Paradigm Shift Powered By Docstoc
					Effective Collaboration For Serious
Violent Offender Reentry

                 David Osher, Ph.D.
          Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice
Technical Assistance Partnership for Child & Family Mental Health
                 American Institutes for Research
                         www.air.org/cecp
                    www.air.org/tapartnership
    OJJDP Conference on Serious Violent Offender Reentry
                         Washington, DC
                          October 1, 2002
Why Collaborate?
   Youth Have Multiple Needs
       Mental health
       Physical Health
       Substance Abuse Prevention & Treatment
       Education
       Employment
       Housing
       Recreation
       Spiritual
       Family
Why Collaborate?
   Stakeholders have Multiple Concerns About
    Short and Long-Term Educational,
    Vocational, Civic, and Safety Outcomes
       Families
       Schools
       Taxpayers
Why Collaborate?
   Eliminate Fragmentation
   Eliminate Duplication
   Eliminate Distrust
   Use Scarce Resources Wisely
   Address Multiple Risk Factors Across
    Multiple Domains
   Improve the Effectiveness of Interventions
   Build Capacity—No Agency Can Do It Alone
   Enhance Staff & Community Safety
Collaboration is Not a Good in Itself


   Can Collaborate to Do Bad Things
       (or because the “Boss told you to”)
   Can Collaborate to Do Good Things, but Do
    them Badly
Cultural Barriers to Collaboration

      Knowledge
      Professional Socialization
      Language
      Missions, Values, Beliefs, Rituals
      Communities of Knowledge and
       Communities of Practice
      Constituencies and their expectations
Structural Barriers to Collaboration

      Mandates & Accountability
      Funding Streams
      Organization of Resources
            Jobs
            Money
            Time
      The burden of routine
            What is on the desk when one gets back from a
             planning meeting
Other Barriers to Collaboration

      Self-interest
      Turf
      Management of Change
      Agency Driven approaches to planning and
       evaluation
Who is Collaborating (Different
Dynamics)
   Agency Collaboration
   Inter Agency Collaboration
   Family Agency Collaboration
   Family Interagency Collaboration
   Agency Community Collaboration
   Faith Based and Community Collaboration
   Inter Agency Community Collaboration
   Interagency Family Community Collaboration
We can Distinguish Between Two Approaches
             to Service Delivery
                 PROVIDER DRIVEN             CHILD & FAMILY
                                                 DRIVEN

SOURCE OF       professional               family and their support
SOLUTIONS                                  team
RELATIONSHIP    dependent client           partner/collaborator
ORIENTATION     isolating and “fixing” a   ecological approach
                problem viewed as          enabling the child and
                residing in the child or   family to do better
                family
ASSESSMENT      deficit oriented         strengths based
PLANNING        resource based           individualized for each
                                         child and family
PROGRAM         limited by agency’s menu comprehensive and
SERVICE         and professional         provided when and where
AVAILABILITY    convenience              the child and family
                                         require
EXPECTIATIONS   low                      high
OUTCOMES        based on symptoms        based on quality of life and
                                         desires of child and family
Provider-driven Systems
•Professionals and agencies are viewed as the key force in
solving problems.
•Providers “fix” their “clients” who are compliant and
passive.
Family members often share this orientation because:
•they are socialized to it as a sign of respect;
•they are fulfilling the expectations of the system in order to
insure they get services;
•they have been blamed, labeled dysfunctional, judged
inadequate or otherwise deemed unfit to make decisions.
Family-driven Systems
   • Responsibility for decision making is held
   collectively and equally by all members of the team.
   The Family is:
      •deemed to have expert knowledge regarding
      their child; and
      •expected to contribute to defining and resolving
      the issues.
Family-driven Practice in ACTION
Example
    Back End:
        Rhode Island Parent Support Network Led Transition
         Planning at the RITS
    Characteristics of Effective Community-Wide
    Collaborations
   Shared Ownership and Accountability
   Consumer-Driven
   Consumer-centered Goals and Orientation
   Multi-disciplinary across multiple domains
   Strategic & Data Driven
   Individual & Collective Accountability
   Culturally Competent
   Problem-Solving Approach
   Clear, Consistent, & Simple Interventions & Expectations
Characteristics of Effective Collaborations

   Sustained
   Supportive Infrastructure
   Institutionalized through
     Policy

     Leadership

     Management

     Protocols & Procedures,

     Practices

     Monitoring

     CQI

     Evaluation
Impact of Collaboration
   Agency staff have come to know their counterparts in other
    agencies and are friendlier with one another; allowing them
    to work with one another in a more respectful way.
   Agencies work together to change or adapt to a situation
    rather than place blame.
   Shifting the focus of service delivery from the individual
    service provider to the system as a whole.
Impact of Collaboration
   Less service fragmentation.
   Better response to specialized through more appropriate
    service options.
   Enhanced access to services
   Improved ability to consider the needs of the “whole child
    and the whole family” within the context of their community.
Collaborative Outcomes: The Bottom
Line
   KEEP IT SIMPLE
   KEEP IT REAL
   KEEP THE FOCUS ON
       THE CHILD
       THE FAMILY
       COMMUNITY CAPACITY & SAFETY
   LINK IT TO A THEORY OF CHANGE
Towards Effective Collaboration

     Talking the Talk

     Walking the Talk


     Walking the Walk
Collaboration as a Developmental Process

           Stage I: Individual Action

             Stage II: One-on-One

      Stage III: New Service Development

      Stage IV: Professional Collaboration

          Stage V: True Collaboration
                             Promising Practices in Children’s Mental Health: Volume VI
Resources www.air.org/cecp
   Video: Making Collaboration Work for Children,
    Youth, Families, Schools, & Communities
    (CEC)
   Video: Promising Practices for Safe and
    Effective Schools (OJJDP)
   Promising Practices in Children’s Mental Health
    (CECP, 1999, 2000, 2001) 13 Volumes
   Improving Prevention, Providing More Efficient
    Services, and Reducing Recidivism For Youth
    With Disabilities (CECP/EDJJ)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:7/2/2012
language:
pages:22