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Does the economy affect trends in suicide_

VIEWS: 23 PAGES: 10

									      Group 4
Shelly Matushevski
  Karen Pavlisko
  Bennett Cowie
  Matt Morrison

November 23, 2009
                   Introduction
 Can money buy happiness?              =
 Do times of economic hardship affect the rates of
 suicide in the United States?
   Weakening economy
       Rising unemployment rates
       Slow GDP growth
   Spill over onto an individual’s mental health
 Is there a direct relationship between the economy and
 suicide rates?
                       Theory
 One may speculate there is a relationship between an
  economy in recession and the depletion of a person’s
  mental health
 Spurred by rising unemployment rates, falling profits of
  businesses, and fear of bankruptcy for businesses and
  individuals
 Does worry (about economic issues) lead to stress, then
  lead to depression, and then maybe even onto suicide?
 One might wonder whether or not
  the suicide rate is in fact related to
  the business cycle
                    Method
 Use of economic research related to the economies
  affect on suicide rates
 Excel spreadsheets constructed with data from reliable
  sources to create a useable data set in SAS
 Importation of raw data into SAS
 Analysis of data in SAS to determine trends between
  suicides and recessions
              Research Findings
 Ethnic and Sex Differences in Suicide Rates Relative to
    Major Depression in the United States
   Antidepressants and Suicide Risk in the United States,
    1985-1999
   Does unemployment increase suicide rates? The OECD
    Panel Evidence
   Economic Theory of Suicide
   Happiness and Economic Performance
   The Economy and Suicide: a Time-Series Study of the
    U.S.A.
            Research Findings
 Economic data was compared to three socio-
 demographic factors that can cause depression
   Low income
   Unemployment
   Disrupted marriages
 Males from all ethnic groups have higher suicide rates
  than females
 Women were twice as likely to be suffering from
  depression due to the three socio-demographic factors
 Victims undergo major depression before time of
  death
                         Results
-the regression line
is shown graphing
the suicide rate
dependent upon
changes in GDP.
-p-value = .1350,
much larger than
accepted alpha of
.05
-R2 value= .0907
The R2-value
represents how well
the regression line is
able to approximate
the actual data.
-Very weak
relationship
                       Results
-regression line is
shown graphing
suicide rate
dependent upon the
unemployment rate
-p-value = .0007,
smaller than
accepted alpha of
.05
-R2 value also shows
the trend is much
more significant at
.3885
-Useful model
                        Results
-suicide rates as a
whole steadily
decline for a 15 year
period beginning
in 1986
-Appears to be a
period of lag.
Between 1983 and
1986,
unemployment
rates fell, suicide
rates actually rose
-Between 1990 to
1992 rates in suicide
decreased while the
unemployment rate
increased severely
                                       References
   Grunebaum, Michael, Steven Ellis, Shuhua Li, Maria Oquendo, and J. John Mann."Antidepressants and Suicide Risk in
            the United States, 1985-1999." Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. November 2004.
            http://excalibur.cpmc.columbia.edu/reprints/Grunebaum%20et%20al%20JCP%202003.pdf (accessed
            November 5, 2009).

   Hamermesh, Daniel, and Neal Soss. "An Economic Theory of Suicide." The Journal of Political Economy. February 1974.
           http://www.jstor.org/stable/1830901?seq=1 (accessed November 5, 2009).

   Noh, Yong-Hwan. "Does Unemployment Increase Suicide Rates? The OECD Panel Evidence.“ Journal of Economic
            Psychology. August 2009. http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Noh_Yong-
            Hwan.pdf?issn=01674870&issue=v30i0004&article=575_duisrtope (accessed November 5, 2009).

   Oquendo, Maria, Steven Ellis, Steven Greenwald, Kevin Malone, Myrna Weissman, and J. John Mann. Ethnic and Sex
            Differences in Suicide Rates Relative to Major Depression in the United States. October 2001.
            http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/158/10/1652#SEC2 (accessed November 5, 2009).

   Oswald, Andrew. "Happiness and Economic Performance." The Economic Journal. 1997.
             http://www.jstor.org/stable/2957911 (accessed November 5, 2009 ).

   Ruhm, Christopher. "Are Recessions good for your Health?" The Quarterly Journal of Economics. May 2000.
            http://www.jstor.org/stable/2587005?&Search=yes&term=recessions&term=suicide&list=hide&searchUri=%
            2Faction%2FdoAdvancedSearch%3Fq0%3Dsuicide%2Band%2Brecessions%26f0%3Dall%26c0%3DAND%26q
            1%3D%26f1%3Dall%26c1%3DAND%26q2%3D%26f2%3Dall%26c2%3DAND%26q3%3D%26f3% (accessed
            November 5, 2009).

   Yang, Bijou. “The economy and suicide: a time-series study of the U.S.A.” American Journal of Economics and
              Sociology, volume 51, no. 1 January 1992 (pp. 87-99)

								
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