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The Role of SME in Higher Education by linxiaoqin

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									 TRANSFORMING

M 21       ANUFACTURING
          EDUCATION
          FOR THE

                      CENTURY
                                  ST




The Role Of SME
In Higher Education
A Report of the Role of SME in Higher Education Task Force


February 26, 2009




 CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This report is confidential and contains privileged material
 for SME business and is not to be distributed further. Any review, retransmission,
 dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information by
 persons or entities other than the intended recipients is prohibited. If you received this in
 error, please contact the sender and delete the material from any computer.
The Role Of SME In Higher Education




Contents
Task Force Members..............................................................................................................................
The Role of SME in Higher Education Task Force Mission ................................................................
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................ 1
Discussion .......................................................................................................................................... 5
Appendix A – Skills Shortage – A Pipeline Issue ........................................................................... 21
       Table A – Programs that Attract Students to Engineering/Manufacturing .......................... 23
Appendix B – Current SME Roles in Education ............................................................................. 25
       Table B1 – Educational Level Post Secondary: SME Efforts Today .................................. 26
Appendix C – Proposed Strategies and Tactics for Filling the Pipeline ........................................... 33
       Table C1 – Proposed Strategies and Tactics for Filling the Pipeline ................................... 34
Role of SME in Higher Education Task Force Members
Chair
 LaRoux K. Gillespie, Dr.Eng., FSME, PE, CMfgE (2008 SME Director)
 (Retired)
 Honeywell
 Kansas City, Missouri

Members
 Winston F. Erevelles (2008 SME Accreditation Committee member, SME Education Foundation Director
 and designated by SME Education Foundation to Task Force)
 Professor of Engineering and Dean
 School of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science
 Robert Morris University
 Moon Township, Pennsylvania

 Hulas H. King (2008 Chair of SME Accreditation Committee)
 Director
 GO PLM & Global Community Relations
 Siemens PLM Software
 Maryland Heights, Missouri

 Thomas R. Kurfess, PhD, FSME, PE (2007-08 President of NAMRI/SME)
 Professor and BMW Chair of Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical Engineering
 Director, Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Graduate Engineering Center
 International Center for Automotive Research
 Clemson University
 Clemson, South Carolina

 Robert L. Mott (2008 Chair of SME Manufacturing Education & Research Community Credentialing Tech
 Group)
 Professor Emeritus of Engineering Technology
 University of Dayton
 Senior Staff Member
 National Center for Manufacturing Education
 Dayton, Ohio

 Venkitaswamy Raju (2008 SME Accreditation Committee member)
 Professor and Director
 School of Engineering
 SUNY Lupton
 State University of New York Farmingdale
 Farmingdale, New York

 Rathel R. (Dick) Smith
 Assistant Professor
 Industrial Management
 Missouri State University
 Springfield, Missouri

Staff Liaison
  Mark J. Stratton
  Member & Industry Relations Manager
  Society of Manufacturing Engineers
  Dearborn, Michigan
The Role of SME in Higher Education
In March 2008, SME President Neil
Duffie established a task force to define            Recommend strategies and roles for
roles that SME should fill in higher
education.
                                                     SME in manufacturing, engineering
                                                     and technology higher education that
The Mission of the Role of SME in                    positively impact the need to fill the
Higher Education Task Force was to:
                                                     manufacturing talent pipeline from K-
“Understand the state of manufacturing,              12 to student member and “bridge” to
engineering and technology higher
education and provide strategic                      senior member.
recommendations as to the role SME
should undertake with higher education as a key workforce development point for feeding the
manufacturing talent pipeline. Additionally, this group will make recommendations for the coordination
of higher education activities currently undertaken by SME.”

Specifically, the four issues to address included:

    1) Identify major issues, trends and developments and recommend strategies in manufacturing,
       engineering and technology education to update and address competency gaps of new graduates
       as perceived by industry.
    2) Recommend strategies and roles for SME in manufacturing, engineering and technology higher
       education that positively impact the need to fill the manufacturing talent pipeline from K-12 to
       student member and “bridge” to senior member. Consider the role of the Member Council in
       building and maintaining this pipeline,
       particularly with respect to student
       members, and assist the Member                  Provide strategic
       Council in examining this role.                 recommendations for SME’s role
       Consider the role of the SME
       Education Foundation in building and            in ABET accreditation, as well as
       maintaining this pipeline and assist            strategic direction to SME’s
       the SME Education Foundation in
       examining and enhancing its role.
                                                       Accreditation Committee for its
       Consider how SME's strategies and               2009 annual agenda.
       roles in higher education can enhance
       the development of future SME leadership and volunteer champions and catalysts for the Society.
    3) Recommend ways in which SME may better prioritize and coordinate the higher education
       activities in which the Society is currently engaged.
    4) Provide strategic recommendations for SME’s role in ABET accreditation, as well as strategic
       direction to SME’s Accreditation Committee for its 2009 annual agenda.
Executive Summary

This report summarizes 30 current SME efforts and highlights six strategies and 31 recommended tactics
for achieving the goals given to this task force.

Issues, Trends and Developments Documented

The trends in sustaining an adequate pipeline of trained and competent manufacturing practitioners and
professionals and the impact of not doing so have been documented in literally hundreds of articles and
papers over the past two years. A brief summary white paper, entitled “Skills Shortage – A Pipeline
Issue,” describing the issues was prepared as a starting point for this task force. (See Appendix A.)
Similarly, at two national forums sponsored in 2008 by the SME Manufacturing Education & Research
Community (MER) and at a conference on manufacturing engineering education sponsored by the
International Academy for Production Engineering (CIRP) in Nantes, France, in late 2008, developments
in education and research were addressed and documented. A number of SME’s education leaders
attended these events.

In addition, the National Center for Manufacturing Education (NCME) has a grant from the National
Science Foundation to research trends in manufacturing education, specifically recruiting methodologies,
program trends, best practices, enrollment trends, program content and accreditation type. The research is
being done in conjunction with SME; the SME Education Foundation; the SME Manufacturing Education
& Research Community; the Manufacturing Division of the American Society for Engineering Education
(ASEE); ABET, Inc. (formerly the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology); and the
National Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT). This multiyear grant will result in at least two
reports a year through 2012 on these trends.

Recommended Strategies to Update Competency Gaps

Strategy 1. Determine manufacturing, engineering and technology education needs and recommend
    solutions. The first strategy, that of addressing competency gaps, has been implemented by holding a
    series of workshops addressing education needs at the collegiate level. This was done in parallel to
    task force efforts by the SME Manufacturing Education & Research Community. The MER
    Community initiated discussions at two national forums to define needed changes in manufacturing
    engineering and technology education. The culmination of this effort to define education needs at the
    collegiate level will be a June 2009 MER Community Manufacturing Education Transformation
    Summit.

    The primary issues identified in the above review of educational needs of graduates include:

       pipeline, image and marketing issues in manufacturing education,
       the need for a collective plan for recruitment and attraction of new entrants to the manufacturing
        industry as students, skilled workers and re-trainees,
       the need for a set of strategies and policies to be used to further manufacturing education by
        summit participants and other stakeholders,
       clear goals on emerging technologies, techniques and pedagogy and how to integrate them into
        manufacturing education so that educators can redesign and update their curricula.

    Results from the first two MER forums are too extensive and detailed to list here, but briefly they
    include specific educational needs and desires by industry as well as by educators, and numerous
    solutions to address the needs. The discussion encompasses both two and four-year programs as well
    as engineering and technology programs.

                                                     1
    A manufacturing education “wiki” site (www.merconline.net/wiki) contains the documentation from
    the two forums and an update on Curriculum 2015 along with information on the 2009 Summit.

    Companies have identified a need for practitioners coming out of community colleges and technical
    schools to receive training on expected work practices, in addition to their technical skills, prior to
    applying for jobs. Work practices include arriving at work on time, dressing appropriately, workplace
    behavior, computer literacy, problem solving and decision making, teamwork, applied math and
    manufacturing principles such as blueprint reading, mechanics and precision measurement. An
    example of how this is being implemented can be found on Metropolitan Community College Kansas
    City’s “Making It In KC” page (http://mcckc.edu/mccbtc/MakingIt.asp).

Recommended Strategies for Filling the Pipeline

Five strategies involving many roles for SME are identified for filling the pipeline and bridging students
to regular SME members.

Strategy 2. Use metrics for SME efforts to define progress on all student-related issues. The task
    force recommends defining metrics for all student-related efforts so that the reasons for success or
    lack of success can be directly identified. The task force identified all of the SME efforts and
    practices that directly affect students and higher education and assessed their relative impact where
    some metrics existed. In many instances, SME has efforts under way without measures to determine
    whether they are or will be successful. The efforts under way in 2008 are identified in Appendix B.

Strategy 3. Continue supporting SME Education Foundation efforts for attracting students to
    engineering and manufacturing. This would include developing, promulgating and facilitating ways
    for individual members and local chapters to participate in SME Education Foundation recruitment
    activities. The SME Education Foundation efforts affecting K-12 students and teachers seem
    exceptional in their impact on filling a pipeline of students into college for engineering and technical
    careers. Several of the efforts directly involve the students in manufacturing exercises so they have
    insight into manufacturing in a manner that interests them. SME needs to continue supporting this
    SME Education Foundation strategy of attracting young students and involving them in real design
    and manufacturing issues. In 10 years, this will lead to tens of thousands of students exposed to
    manufacturing and entering engineering and scientific fields. It also provides direct-access avenues
    for manufacturing professionals to relate to students. While the Foundation efforts expose students to
    manufacturing, SME also needs to develop a mechanism that allows students to see why
    manufacturing engineering and technology can be a fulfilling and important discipline for them.

Strategy 4. Enhance the SME student member program. The fourth strategy is to develop a
    meaningful student member program that assures successful transition to senior chapters. Many
    tactics necessary to achieve this are described in the body of this report. Some of the tactics
    individually help reach this objective and others combine several elements to keep the pipeline full
    and provide large numbers of transitioning students. One of the first elements of this strategy, already
    mentioned above, is to identify metrics for involvement and transition. In 2008, SME has no
    definitive goals or compelling drivers for transition of student members.

Strategy 5. Improve support for collegiate faculty through more recognition and attention to
    faculty needs. The fifth strategy involves increased support for faculty who teach manufacturing. The
    report describes a number of suggested ways to enhance this strategy. This ranges from those who
    teach in the grade schools and high schools to those who teach in post-secondary capacities. Student
    faculty advisors at colleges and universities influence every one of our student members, and they
    serve without much or tangible reward. SME does have examples of recognition at the secondary

                                                     2
    school level – specifically, the Building the Future Awards recognizing educators who teach in the
    Project Lead the Way program and an Outstanding Partner Award sponsored by the SME-EF and the
    3M Foundation. SME needs to continue to address increasing appropriate recognition at all levels for
    educators who influence our students.

Strategy 6. Develop a program that communicates directly with department heads to improve the
    infrastructure in engineering and technology programs. The sixth strategy involves infrastructure
    within higher education and between secondary and post-secondary schools. The goal is to help keep
    coordinators and leaders of manufacturing programs abreast of changes that may impact their
    programs, and provide a regular pulse-taking of the health of individual programs with prescriptions
    and support to get healthier. It would also help create and sustain a bridge between interest in high
    school and successful entry into college and encourage mentoring of SME scholarship winners when
    they enter college. If they are among the best in the field, they would make excellent leaders within
    higher education and in student chapters and, subsequently, senior chapters. Strong manufacturing
    programs will assure robust student involvement and retention in the field. Several suggestions are
    made in Appendix C that would enhance this area.

Coordination of SME Higher Education Activities

The third portion of the task force assignment was to recommend ways in which SME may better
prioritize and coordinate the higher education activities in which the Society is currently engaged.

The first recommendation is to establish an Education Council or Center for Education
   communication effort. The committee recommends that the Manufacturing Education & Research
   (MER) Community establish a quasi-formal Education Council or Center for Education that would
   consist of all SME education-related entities. Specifically, accreditation, certification, licensing,
   NAMRI/SME, the SME Education Foundation, student Member Council leaders and leaders involved
   with academic institutions would participate with the MER Community in proposed twice-a-year
   conference calls to discuss education issues and assure that SME provides a single voice on education
   issues. The MER Community is primarily the group responsible for defining and distributing the
   manufacturing education body of knowledge from which institutions teach manufacturing-related
   engineering and technology. It also is the single group with the charge for mapping the future of
   manufacturing education. The recommended action is not for any structural or authority change
   within SME, rather to assure via a council that everyone is aware of the education issues being
   pursued and the impact of changes on the many SME education efforts. The education council would
   not be a policy-making entity, merely a communication tool. It is possible that when appropriately
   chosen the MER Community steering committee could be that education council.

The second recommendation is to provide an SME web site specifically focused on academic
   education issues and functions. While a drop down menu for University/higher education has been
   proposed, most of the committee believe that a single landing page will be the better approach. It is
   important that the site be identified in some manner as formal higher education as opposed to the
   many other forms of non-degree granting SME educational activities.




                                                     3
Recommended SME Role in Accreditation

The last portion of the Task Force assignment was to provide strategic recommendations for SME’s role
in ABET accreditation, as well as strategic direction to SME’s Accreditation Committee for their 2009
annual agenda.

Strategy 1. Pick leaders who will drive growth. SME must provide strong support of ABET efforts to
    maintain professional acceptance of manufacturing degrees. It is both a practical support issue as well
    as a strategic effort to assure continued viability of the degrees. In that vein it will always be critical
    to select the leaders of ABET efforts who are true leaders who can and will influence others. If it
    becomes just a committee SME will lose credibility and face the loss of programs.

Strategy 2. Grow manufacturing programs. There is a wide divergence of opinion on how to best
    accomplish this. In the United States engineering programs are reluctant to invest in the many costly
    resources required for a new manufacturing degree program. Funding for research is their main
    driver and less funding is being directed
    to manufacturing. Growing programs
    that have manufacturing in their title has     To grow manufacturing related
    been more prevalent at the engineering         programs SME needs to include in
    technology level.
                                                     its focus programs not now
    To grow manufacturing related                    accredited as a manufacturing
    programs SME needs to include in its             program or option, but with some
    focus programs not now accredited as a
    manufacturing program or option, but             little effort can step up and be
    with some little effort can step up and          accredited.
    be accredited. ABET provides the
    standards, but some programs are not aware of them. This requires careful study of programs not now
    in ABET and support for them. One possibility is to review the schools which report through the
    ABET Applied Science Accreditation Commission. Another is to review schools with options that are
    manufacturing. Another is to promote accreditation of graduate level manufacturing programs which
    are easier and more flexible to accredit than undergraduate programs.

    A second tactic for growth is to build on the interests by international schools in manufacturing. SME
    leaders are serving on ABET evaluation teams for programs at schools in the Mideast and on the
    Asian continent. International growth may be easier to accomplish than within domestic arenas. That
    also requires some dedicated effort to identify schools considering new programs, identifying schools
    that have programs but are not accredited, and meeting the faculty who would lead such efforts. Since
    ABET now provides a service like that when schools request accreditation of their programs through
    ABET, SME could provide the awakening or pump priming to move such interest along. Using this
    information to foster membership of students and faculty is an integral opportunity and natural
    extension of this activity.

    The 2009 SME Manufacturing Education Transformation Summit will present additional suggestions.

Strategy 3. Assist existing ABET programs to assure their health. As part of the infrastructure issues
    expressed in a paragraph above (Section 3 Strategy 6) SME should be in such close communication
    with accredited schools that we know the issues they face as soon as they are expressed and can help
    address solutions where possible. Solutions would include getting local industry support rather than
    just SME funding, initiating a national blitz similar to that done and being done as a result of the
    nursing shortage. We need to build a reputation for helping the named programs and drawing interest
    from programs considering providing more manufacturing education.

                                                       4
Discussion

Filling the Engineering and Manufacturing Pipeline with Students
The shortage of engineers has been a national concern for decades because of the retirement each year of
literally tens of thousands of engineers more than the number of engineers graduating. Despite moving
hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs offshore, we have the same shortage of skilled
manufacturing workers as well as engineers even in a depression.

The shortage is, in part, the result of a lack of appreciation of both engineering and manufacturing work.
This is not an issue limited to just the United States. Today, the same shortage of these workers is critical
in Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Korea, China and other countries. To assure that there is a
steady stream of these critical skills, SME and most engineering societies have initiated programs to focus
the attention of students from grades K-12 on the excitement, challenge and reward of working as
engineers or skilled personnel. There are at least 50 national programs in existence focused on growing
the pool of interested students.

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) began a national effort in 2005 to draw attention to
the great jobs for skilled workers in manufacturing. Through local community groups, NAM has funded
several efforts to increase the pipeline of students into post high school programs for engineering,
technology and skill-based programs. These have been successful but are not attracting enough students
yet nor are they assuring the supply of the most-needed skills. The public still has no positive image of
manufacturing. For example, Delaware County Community College recently changed its program name
from “Manufacturing Technology” to “Applied Engineering Technology” and now is “getting interest and
enrollment.”

The year 2008 was good for growth in the mechanical engineering collegiate programs. Mechanical
engineering classrooms are bursting in many colleges, apparently partly in response to the efforts just
mentioned. This is not the case for manufacturing engineering or technology programs. Many companies
that are searching for manufacturing engineers ask for mechanical engineering graduates rather than
manufacturing engineering students. SME needs to help call attention to the differences and encourage
companies to ask for what they truly want without alienating mechanical engineering, industrial
engineering, electrical engineering and related programs that fill the gap today.

Of all the efforts most impacting the supply of manufacturing-oriented skills, the FIRST Robotics
Competition and Project Lead The Way® appear to be the most successful in attracting students1. The
SME Education Foundation is a major leader in Project Lead The Way (PLTW), which alone is impacting
tens of thousands of students each year in a manner that allows them to better appreciate manufacturing
through hands-on experiences designing, building and testing. PLTW is a four-year high school curricula2,
with grade schools beginning to implement a reduced but similar effort to funnel more students to its
program. Unlike all other efforts, PLTW tracks students into college, providing a clear measure of success
in filling the pipeline.

This task force believes that the SME Education Foundation’s continued support for Project Lead The
Way is one of the most promising means for filling the pipeline of students into post-secondary programs.
Several other suggestions are presented later in this document for assuring an adequate supply out of
college programs into industry. In addition, SME can do more for providing a supply of hands-on skills
by focusing members on the potential they have in their own communities for building the pipeline. SME


1
    A list of all known programs is included at the end of Appendix A.
2
    For details about Project Lead The Way, see www.pltw.org.
                                                      5
as an organization can also improve the situation by becoming a recognized leader in providing or guiding
instructional needs in this area.

One of the shortages that will occur soon, if the supply of students increases, is that the colleges will not
be able to handle increased enrollments. Some colleges are already being forced to limit enrollments in
mechanical engineering programs because there is simply not enough funding coming from state
governments to support instructors, space and equipment. Most of the colleges are emphasizing graduate-
level research rather than increasing the undergraduate supply.

This situation is not a problem for manufacturing programs at present, but staffing with qualified
professionals is a multiyear issue that cannot accommodate sudden increases in student numbers. A media
blitz as mentioned earlier would help increase the numbers of students in manufacturing programs and
help assure that students trying to get into engineering have that opportunity.

Individuals wishing to understand the realities of implementing improvements in local areas will benefit
from reading the Intel workforce development article cited in the “Skills Shortage – A Pipeline Issue”
white paper in Appendix A.

Recommended Strategies to Update Competency Gaps
The various entities that constitute the education pipeline for engineering and manufacturing, as well as
most other occupations, are portrayed in Figure 1. In the U.S., skill development can begin in some high
schools, but most occurs after graduation from the 12th grade. In this instance, the pipeline is shown as a
vertical series of education levels. The thrust of this report concentrates on the higher education that
occurs in community colleges and four-year university programs. Apprenticeship programs in some
instances are provided in partnership with community colleges, and in other instances they are totally
company-sponsored. Haas Automation, for example, has 725 partnerships with schools, colleges and
universities throughout the U.S. providing training for both apprentices and technologists.


                                                          Ongoing, On-the-Job Education
                                  Task Force Thrust




                                                         College and University Education
 Workforce Development Sequence
          (Time Scale)




                                                               Community College




                                                             Technical/Trade School




                                                                       K-12
                                                      Science, Technology, Engineering, Math



Figure 1. Pipeline Education Levels


                                                                     6
Strategy 1. Determine manufacturing, engineering and technology education needs and recommend
solutions.

The first strategy, that of addressing competency gaps, was implemented through a series of
manufacturing education forums addressing education needs at the collegiate level. This was done in
2008 by the SME Manufacturing Education & Research Community in parallel to this task force’s efforts.
These groups initiated discussions and two national forums to define needed changes in manufacturing
engineering education. The culmination of this effort to define education needs at the collegiate level will
be a June 2009 Manufacturing Education Transformation Summit.

A manufacturing education “wiki” site (www.merconline.net/wiki) contains the documentation from the
two forums and an update on Curriculum 2015 along with information on the 2009 Summit.

Initial issues identified in the above review of educational needs of graduates included:

       pipeline, image and marketing issues in manufacturing education,
       the need for a collective plan for recruitment and attraction of new entrants to our industry as
        students, skilled workers and re-trainees,
       the need for a set of strategies and policies to be used to further manufacturing education by
        summit participants and other stakeholders,
       clear goals on emerging technologies, techniques and pedagogy and how to integrate them into
        manufacturing education so that educators can redesign and update their curricula.

The November 2008 SME Education Summit, as well as the earlier one, provided covered issues and
suggested solutions.

Companies have identified a need for practitioners coming out of community colleges and technical
schools to receive training on expected work practices, in addition to their technical skills, prior to
applying for jobs. Work practices include arriving at work on time, dressing appropriately, workplace
behavior, computer literacy, problem solving and decision making, teamwork, applied math and
manufacturing principles such as blueprint reading, mechanics and precision measurement. An example
of how this is being implemented can be found on Metropolitan Community College Kansas City’s
“Making It In KC” page (http://mcckc.edu/mccbtc/MakingIt.asp).

One issue left unaddressed is a need by local industries for individuals with highly qualified skills to run
complex manufacturing equipment (post-apprentice level, for example). While new programs provide
more starting skills, they do not address the bigger need for a more highly trained workforce than is being
provided by community programs.

A second issue unaddressed to date, but reinforced at the most recent SME Education Forum, is that many
companies are unaware that named manufacturing engineering programs provide the knowledge, skills
and abilities (KSAs) they cite as absent in the graduates they hire or would like to hire. A dual thrust is
required of making named manufacturing programs more visible while increasing the manufacturing
content in allied degrees.

Recommended Strategies for Filling the Pipeline
The SME Education Foundation’s current thrust for increasing the number of students leaving high
school with a strong understanding of engineering, design and manufacturing represents the single-most
effective approach for filling the pipeline. The task force members strongly endorse the continuation of




                                                     7
this effort to assure adequate numbers of persons with
appropriate skills entering industry3. While the Foundation’s         The SME Education
efforts are having significant impact, there is a need for a          Foundation efforts
mechanism that allows students to see why manufacturing
engineering and technology can be a fulfilling and important          affecting K-12 students
discipline for them. This is one step beyond explaining what          and teachers seem
manufacturing engineering and technology is.
                                                                      exceptional in their
Appendix table C1 provides numerous examples of individual            impact on filling a
efforts that SME can and should undertake to increase the             pipeline of students
number of individuals moving from high school into industry.
The table provides a detailed look at all of the interfaces with      into college for
higher education that impact the pipeline. The                        engineering and
recommendations impact SME staff and volunteers and should
involve manufacturing companies. In some instances,                   technical careers.
companies need to share in costs. In other instances, companies need to open their doors in formal efforts
to show what real manufacturing consists of and what their employees do. Internship opportunities
partnered with education facilities are another good means of filling the pipeline with known abilities.

While the recommendations indicate what should be done, it should not be inferred that SME funds alone
are needed. Rather, in many instances, SME leadership is needed and effective partnering with companies
or agencies will result in more impact for all. Getting broad support and leadership nationwide from SME
members to help fund and populate Web sites that provide manufacturing career information, as well as
direct involvement in manufacturing education programs, are other approaches that can provide lasting
benefit for filling the pipeline.

To simplify discussions of the five recommendations in this section of the report, the recommendations
are grouped under “students,” “faculty” and “infrastructure.” Some of the recommendations are more
effective when paired with recommendations from one of the other groups.

Strategy 2. Use metrics for SME efforts to define progress on all student-related issues.

In many instances, SME has efforts under way without any measures that determine whether they are or
will be successful. The higher education efforts under way in 2008 are identified in Appendix B. Where
SME metrics exist, a color-coded chart indicates the measure of success as judged by the task force. In
some instances, the task force provides proposed metrics. Green indicates that progress is good, yellow
indicates that progress is marginal and red indicates that progress or effectiveness is sorely lacking. Rows
without color indicate that no metric exists.

The task force recommends that metrics be defined or reviewed for all of the student-related efforts so
that the reasons for success or lack of success can be directly identified.

Strategy 3. Continue supporting SME Education Foundation efforts for attracting students to
engineering and manufacturing.

This would include developing, promulgating and facilitating methods for individual members and local
chapters to participate in SME Education Foundation recruitment activities. The SME Education
Foundation efforts affecting K-12 students and teachers seem exceptional in their impact on filling a
pipeline of students into college for engineering and technical careers. Several of the efforts directly

3
  The SME Education Foundation 2011-2012 action plan describes the many SME-EF efforts under way and is
recommended reading for anyone wishing to see K-12 efforts for filling the pipeline.
                                                     8
involve the students in manufacturing exercises so they have insight into manufacturing in a manner that
interests them. SME needs to continue supporting this SME-EF strategy of attracting young students and
involving them in real design and manufacturing issues. In 10 years, this will lead to tens of thousands of
students exposed to manufacturing and entering engineering and scientific fields. It also provides direct-
access avenues for manufacturing professionals to relate to students.

Some of the detailed recommendations in Appendix C tie some of these efforts directly to higher
education efforts, in addition to just assuring numbers of students enter higher education.

Strategy 4. Enhance the SME student member program.

The fourth strategy is to develop a meaningful student member program that assures successful transition
to senior chapters. Many tactics necessary to achieve this are described in the following paragraphs, and
all are presented in Appendix C. Some of the tactics individually help reach this objective, and others
combine several elements to keep the pipeline full and provide large numbers of transitioning students.
One of the first elements of this strategy, already mentioned above, is to identify metrics for involvement
and transition. Definitive goals and compelling drivers for transition of student members are crucial steps.

SME needs to develop a viable value proposition for collegiate student membership in SME that attracts,
engages and retains them.

Surprisingly, SME does a noteworthy job of attracting student members, but only about 15% retain that
membership upon graduation. Simply by retaining 50% of our students upon graduation, SME would
bolster its membership by 10,000-15,000 in 10 years. This would represent more than 10,000 young
members who could be effective chapter leaders. While some data exist implying that 15% of the students
come back to SME in later years, even that number is a low quantity, and it means years of lost
opportunity for both membership and leadership.

To provide that value proposition, the elements of such a strategy should include:

    1.   An engagement strategy for students entering college programs
    2.   Clear and compelling reasons to join and be active in SME
    3.   Competitions that engage students and build brand loyalty
    4.   Social networking opportunities that include or emulate Facebook, MySpace and YouTube. My
         Engineering Space could be an new approach (e.g., utilize the career awareness Web site being
         developed with SME-EF funding to develop, promote and host this activity)
    5.   Graduation or exit strategies that make SME an attractive organization in which to continue
         membership—e.g., more emphasis on SME as the source of great job or intern information.
         Continue a graduated dues structure from student member to full member and actively promote it.
         Establish regular communication with individual student members from SME headquarters with a
         succession of messages informing them of the community network structure and opportunities for
         obtaining manufacturing-related information. Anticipate the graduation date of student members
         and invite them to convert to the graduated path to full membership immediately upon graduation.
    6.   A means to track students when they leave school
    7.   Engage SME members with SME scholarship recipients to mentor, support and develop a desire
         to maintain SME involvement
    8.   Survey both member and nonmember manufacturing students to assess what would/does attract
         them

Comment: SME has nothing in place to keep students engaged or even tracked, yet the SME Education
Foundation, through Project Lead The Way, has a means to track students from high school to college.


                                                     9
SME should seek advice from PLTW on how students are tracked and adapt that or other systems to suit
SME’s needs in regard to retaining student members.

With the exception of SME student chapter faculty advisors, who receive little reward for their efforts, we
have no engagement strategy for students entering
college or for those leaving. Student membership
provides an opportunity for senior chapter               SME should match students
members to mentor, network and teach not just            with practicing manufacturing
one-on-one but one-on-many.
                                                             engineers…and senior
    1. SME should match students with                        chapters engage students in
       practicing manufacturing engineers who
       are SME senior members for mentoring                  their programs…
       and jobs.
    2. Senior chapters need to engage students in their programs regularly, perhaps as part of another
       event, tour, speaker, social event, etc. Matching students with mentors would be one noteworthy
       feature of such an event. We should engage local company HR personnel along with SME senior
       chapters and involve the local member consultant. SME senior chapters may need help
       understanding how to incorporate new graduates into meaningful participation while making their
       own chapter more compelling.

Of all the individual suggestions for improving the pipeline from college into industry and later SME
involvement, initiating a national competition(s) for college students is deemed to have the most impact.
Competitions provide brand recognition and loyalty and encourage true engagement. Competitions
generate excitement as well as recognition individually and for the schools involved. Other engineering
and technology groups provide one or more national competitions and provide monetary rewards and
scholarships as well as national recognition. Some innovative opportunities are emerging that integrate
the use of a Web-based platform such as YouTube for student competitors to showcase their contest
entries for judging. Dassault Systemes SolidWorks Corporation software company has partnered on
competitions that emphasize creating more visibility for manufacturing careers and technology. SME’s
efforts do not have to necessarily involve developing new competitions, but the efforts need to be able to
gain brand recognition from what is sponsored.

There are many choices of existing competitions. BotsIQ has been a popular part of some local chapter
activities in cooperation with regional manufacturing associations. For example, the Dayton (OH) Tooling
and Manufacturing Association conducts several Bots events each year, the largest of which takes place at
the annual regional manufacturing industry show. While the current program focuses on high school
students, it could be adapted to include college students in competition on a national level. This effort is
currently looking for a national sponsor. FIRST is another. The SME Education Foundation is aware of
other competitions. FIRST, BotsIQ and others utilize companies as well as organizations to sponsor and
mentor students. This provides further engagement for senior and student members. Developing a “green
manufacturing” competition might be appropriate to capture the attention of those students already
focused on a green environment. Student paper competitions are another common venue for attracting
students and providing both a competitive atmosphere and an opportunity to exhibit and enhance
communication skills. This effort needs to be a long-term commitment that builds excitement, is
rewarding to participants and is clearly an SME function.

Scholarship recipients are often awarded a scholarship and then the awarding organization (including
SME) ignores them for their four years in school. These are persons of excellence that we need to engage,
have an interest in and admire for their abilities. They have great potential to be future leaders. Similarly,
it appears that SME or SME-EF awards scholarships to students who do not pursue manufacturing


                                                      10
curricula or enter the manufacturing mainstream.
While that only involves a few recipients, it               The distinction of an
appears counterproductive for filling the pipeline          engineering workforce from a
into manufacturing.
                                                            technical or skilled-trades
The idea of addressing “career and technical                workforce may need to be
education”—often viewed as “vocational”
education—should be considered in the context of            clarified, with SME’s roles
SME linking with organizations who seek to add              defined or combined.
to the pool. People want options. Workforce
development is rising in visibility as an issue that affects manufacturing. The University of Southern
Indiana has a program called “Advanced Manufacturing Science” that is a four-year degree program.
Similar efforts might be appropriate for those who will not be calculus-literate but still have the skills to
be leaders in manufacturing. Some industrial technology programs may already be at that level, but a
more exciting program title may be needed to attract them. A title such as “Manufacturing CSI” would
perhaps elicit considerably more interest than “Industrial Technology.”

The distinction of an engineering workforce from a technical or skilled-trades workforce may need to be
clarified, with SME’s roles defined or combined. The role of SME should be to highlight the post-
secondary education options to improve a person’s skills and knowledge and enhance their performance,
mobility and career advancement opportunities. This message is complementary to the traditional
“workforce development” message that focuses on skilled trades, production operations and maintenance
positions that typically require industry-based training and/or apprenticeships. Many young people (and
their parents) want to know what options are available to them in the future even if they choose a skilled-
trades job in the near term.

Strategy 5. Improve support for collegiate faculty through more recognition and attention to
faculty needs.

The fifth strategy involves increased support for faculty who teach manufacturing. This ranges from those
who teach in the grade schools and high schools to those who teach in post-secondary capacities. There
are no tangible rewards for the many post-secondary instructors and faculty advisors who influence every
one of the student members. An example cited earlier as a model is the recognition by the SME-EF and
the 3M Foundation of middle school and secondary school educators for their outstanding efforts
inspiring students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math who have worked with
curriculum developed by Project Lead The Way. These educators have helped young people become
exposed to engineering and manufacturing through hands-on activities, field trips and group projects.
There is a need for increasing recognition of faculty teaching manufacturing in engineering and
technology programs at community colleges and universities possibly with small amounts of funding or
support that would make a difference. Logo gifts or other simple items are also ways to show our
appreciation for their work. The following paragraphs and Appendix C describe a number of suggested
ways to enhance this strategy.

SME should assess and improve the value proposition of SME membership for members of college faculty
(educators) so that it attracts and retains them.

This assessment and value needs to be directed toward:

    1. Educators in named manufacturing programs.
    2. Educators in programs other than manufacturing that teach manufacturing through options or
       courses in other discipline areas and in courses across the curricula for all students.
    3. Educators in international programs as well as those in the U.S.

                                                      11
    4. Educators in engineering, engineering technology, industrial technology and business schools that
       address topics such as lean manufacturing or industrial management.
    5. Promoting the SME brand such that all students and faculty members in manufacturing-related
       curricula clearly identify SME as the organization that is preeminent in the field.
    6. Rewarding excellent teachers—K-12 and college, promoting their accomplishments and its
       impact.

Comment: Faculty needs vary between the types of schools that support manufacturing. For example,
SME attracts faculty from:

       Hands-on, skill-based schools (post high school)
       Apprenticeship programs
       Community colleges
       Four-year universities
       Graduate programs

The faculty serve in:
    Manufacturing engineering and manufacturing engineering technology programs (which are later
       referred to as “named manufacturing programs,” i.e., they have ‘manufacturing’ in the name of
       the program)
    Industrial technology programs
    Operations-oriented business programs (e.g., industrial management)
    Mechanical engineering and mechanical engineering technology programs
    Industrial engineering and industrial engineering technology programs
    Emerging offshore international programs
    Others

The education level required, reward system used and type of education offered vary widely among these
entities. For example, a typical professor in mechanical engineering is rewarded for the quantity of
research funds and journal (peer-reviewed) articles, while technology programs reward for teaching
excellence and numbers of students in class. Business schools that emphasize supply chains may seem out
of the ordinary for SME affiliation, but SME’s strength in lean manufacturing and supply chain
knowledge makes these programs prime candidates for faculty that SME should reach out to. The needs
of each of these entities vary widely. In contrast, the needs of most students can be largely lumped
together as one entity.

It is not clear how strong the brand loyalty to SME is among educators. Task force members believe a
very high percentage of faculty members with a major teaching effort in manufacturing topics are
members of SME, but there is no data to confirm that. SME has approximately 1,700 members who have
an interest in education, but we do not know what percentage of educators at large belong to SME or how
strong their brand loyalty is. If they are active in SME and promote the SME brand, they will influence
many students, which in turn will attract more students to the field of manufacturing.

SME offers little in the way of national recognition for excellence in teaching4. More promotion of
excellence in the people that K-12 and college students see every day will help build the brand image of
SME and impact the people who are making a difference in getting students into manufacturing programs
and positions. The Task Force suggests additional secondary school faculty recognition:

4
  The SME-EF is partnering with PLTW and business to provide a recognition program for outstanding PLTW and
Gateway Academy instructors. This type of activity will make an impact on faculty and the pipeline numbers. While
SME offers little in the way of acknowledging teaching excellence, a large portion of SME international awards go
to educators for their research, impact on technology and curriculum development.
                                                       12
    1. Identify which teachers specialize in the manufacturing component of Project Lead The Way.
       Recognize ALL of them and seek information about which ones are doing exemplary work with
       students.
    2. Apply the process in (1) also to teachers in manufacturing-related programs in technical high
       schools, career centers, Ford PAS and tech prep programs.
    3. Provide all such teachers with information about resources from SME, the SME library, the SME
       Technical Communities and the Manufacturing Education Resource Center (MERC) operated by
       the National Center for Manufacturing Education (MERC).

SME should seek additional members and collaborators from non-U.S. colleges and universities to
enhance the global outreach of SME and to ensure that manufacturing education is cognizant of
manufacturing developments on a global scale.

Appendix C presents additional recommendations that would increase the focus of educators on SME and
in so doing would help assure more students entering the manufacturing workforce. One such example is
providing a peer-reviewed publication (electronic or paper) that accommodates the needs of faculty who
are teachers rather than researchers. This would impact all technology teachers and many engineering
professors as well.

The task force did not address the issue of apprenticeship programs because these are not considered
higher education in the traditional sense. These programs are clearly a major tool to increasing the flow of
skilled graduates into industry. The SME Education Foundation has indicated it will address this topic as
part of its goals.

The SME Jobs Connection service is an avenue to explore for graduating students and those looking for
internships in job areas they are most interested in. This service’s effectiveness and appeal to students are
not known, but a survey of student use of this tool could lead to additional avenues for flowing students
into industry through a recognized brand name, especially for industries seeking graduates of
manufacturing programs.

Strategy 6. Develop a program that communicates directly with department heads to improve the
infrastructure and number of students in engineering and technology programs.

The sixth strategy involves the infrastructure within higher education and between secondary and post-
secondary schools. As an example, there is not currently a group for manufacturing department heads that
would keep them abreast of changes that might impact their programs and provide a regular pulse-taking
of the health of individual programs with prescriptions and support to get healthier. There is no bridge
between interest in high school and successful entry into college. There is no mentoring of SME
scholarship winners when they enter college. If they are among the best in the field, they would make
excellent leaders within higher education and in student chapters and eventually in senior chapters.

Professor Bob Wolff at the University of Dayton adds this to the latter concept:

                         The word “education” in English is one word
          The word “education” in Asia is built from two words: ‘education’ + ‘nurturing’

While the word “infrastructure” is used to define this area, both curricula and infrastructure are included.
Several suggestions are made below and in Appendix C that would enhance this area.
Some of the approaches that will help assure that manufacturing programs continue to exist and that
faculty members are drawn to them include:


                                                     13
    1. Provide a coordination program that touches all collegiate
       manufacturing curricula and individuals teaching                 SME’s efforts have
       manufacturing in nonmanufacturing programs (e.g.,                been perceived as
       mechanical, industrial, electronic) in a manner that helps
       communication and identifies convenient educational              largely relegated to
       resources. Specifically address how SME can enhance the          ABET-accredited
       growth and image of named manufacturing degree
       programs and options while also engaging programs in             programs. SME,
       other disciplines and programs across the curricula that         however, has a stake
       will never carry a manufacturing name.
    2. Develop a dialog with manufacturing-related educators            in all manufacturing
       that results in having adequate faculty and resources in         education.
       place when the expected waves of new students start
       entering manufacturing programs.

Comment: One proposed approach in this area is to have SME promote the Manufacturing Education
Resource Center (MERC), which houses teaching resources. SME and the SME Education Foundation
provide support, but many faculty still are unaware of the existence of this federally funded center
designed to make teaching easier and more effective (it is dedicated to faculty to help meet curricula
needs). There is a continuing need to identify and promote the NSF-funded MERC and NCME as useful
resources for manufacturing education and to emphasize that SME has been a valuable and active partner
in this activity since its inception in 1993. Perhaps an SME award can be created that recognizes the
“Manufacturing Education Resource of the Year” submitted to MERC for inclusion in the database.
Publicity surrounding the award would honor the submitter and promote the NCME and MERC as
valuable resources.

SME’s efforts have been perceived as largely relegated to ABET-accredited programs. SME, however,
has a stake in all manufacturing education. Broadening SME’s role in assisting teachers in programs not
named as “manufacturing” by providing or pointing to teaching tools for manufacturing concepts and
topics increases SME’s impact and brand recognition. In addition to mechanical and electronics
technologies, SME should consider how it can fit in maintenance, industrial technology, business,
management and related educational curricula.

The quality of engineering, technology and technical education programs is measured in part by
accreditation processes conducted collaboratively by organizations that engage industry and academic
stakeholders in developing standards and conducting program evaluations. SME and other organizations
are the conduits for members to participate in helping improve the academic programs. The criteria for
evaluating manufacturing criteria need to be reviewed on a continual basis for improvements that reflect
industry needs. There is an increasing number of manufacturing programs internationally that are seeking
accreditation, giving SME the opportunity to play a larger leadership role and increase its visibility
globally.

Raising the profile of ABET-accredited manufacturing programs will enhance the brand recognition and
stature of the programs and SME and will increase the quantity of students entering these programs. This
is a part of the needed coordination and communication effort described above.

None of today’s manufacturing programs are found in the most highly rated engineering schools. The
notion of a strategy for increasing manufacturing programs by supporting the development of
manufacturing departments/degree programs at the “tier one” universities is one solution that, if
successful, would raise the visibility of manufacturing programs.
Membership in SME has continued to decline through 2007, while membership in the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Manufacturing Engineering Division is reported to be

                                                   14
continuing to grow, now exceeding 16,0005. So the question is, “How do you successfully
market the manufacturing engineering degree program?” One answer lies in getting the major
colleges of engineering to develop manufacturing engineering BS-degree programs. This will
require a collective effort on the part of SME and industry to develop “named” manufacturing
engineering degree programs, departments and faculty. High school students interested in
engineering will then see manufacturing engineering as a viable option to mechanical or
industrial engineering.

Clearly, developing graduate-level manufacturing
engineering or manufacturing systems engineering programs
was not the answer. This did not really change the                    There is a national lack
manufacturing engineering landscape as we still have only             of awareness of what
about 20 manufacturing engineering programs, and most are
small. One view of the issue is that it will only be when such
                                                                      manufacturing
institutions as Ohio State, the University of Michigan, Penn          engineers do and their
State, the University of Wisconsin, Georgia Tech, MIT or              impact.
the University of Illinois produce significant numbers of
graduates who call themselves “manufacturing engineers”
because that is what is on their degree that we will see a change in the national status of the
manufacturing engineer.
It would help if our manufacturing graduates start calling themselves “manufacturing engineers” instead
of “ME’s,” which most of us consider is the abbreviation for mechanical engineering. Even SME’s
Manufacturing Engineering magazine abbreviates itself as ME (see http://www.sme.org/cgi-bin/find-
articles.pl?&08jam002&ME&20080113&&SME&#article).

There is a national lack of awareness of what manufacturing engineers do and their impact. The lack of
awareness permeates the K-college levels for students, and it also is consistent with a lack of familiarity
in society in general and parents, teachers and guidance counselors in particular. This is an infrastructure
issue as well as a K-12 issue. It can be ameliorated by:

    1. Helping develop and connect members to career information that clearly tells a story (many
       stories) of why manufacturing is fun, worthy and provides strong earning potential.
    2. Directing career information to K-12, to parents and to educators in a manner that actually gets to
       them (SME has provided such information but it is not clear that it has had much impact).
    3. Directing career information to nontraditional students, such as those needing retraining for new
       careers.
    4. Providing career information conveniently and prominently on the Internet and coordinated with
       existing sources and materials.
    5. Developing/identifying/recruiting a nationally recognized spokesperson (at least one, recognized
       by the public) to speak for manufacturing and manufacturing engineering. This is a key effort for
       success.
    6. The existence of structured intern programs at all schools having a manufacturing program would
       accelerate discussions about manufacturing as a rewarding opportunity.

Comment: SME should encourage and support its members to utilize existing resources such as the
ManufacturingIsCool.com Web site that targets students. The Advanced Manufacturing Career
Collaborative (AMC2) Web site at amcsquared.com is a manufacturing career Web site developed by
southwest Pennsylvania, the SME Education Foundation and others that is dedicated to students and the
general population and portrays the great job opportunities in manufacturing. The National Center for

5
  We are indebted to input from Dr. J T. Black as well as others who have participated in the recent education
forums for some of the commentary in this section.
                                                         15
Manufacturing Education (NCME) in Dayton, Ohio, is developing a template for regional manufacturing
career Web sites with the support of the SME Education Foundation, the Dayton Tooling and
Manufacturing Association (DTMA) and local colleges and universities offering manufacturing-related
education. More of this kind of collaboration will be needed in early 2009 when the site is rolled out
nationally. Furthermore, there will be a need for continued funding to coordinate the rollout and assist
other regions in developing their own parts of the site.

We make many of our decisions based on the stories we hear. Stories are both a teaching tool and a
motivational device. They tell about ordinary people who become heroes for something they do. We have
no heroes in manufacturing that the public can see. We do not publicize our research heroes, student
heroes, teaching heroes and recent-graduate heroes—our legends. SME does not have a storehouse of
such stories that evoke interest in manufacturing, no program to distribute such stories. Active members
(students/practicing engineers) may help provide the interest-generating stories of manufacturing. The
SME Fellows would be a great source for collecting truly attention-getting stories. Similarly, our
Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer award winners, emerging leaders in all our communities,
young engineers and veteran manufacturing engineers each have stories to tell that provide manufacturing
excitement and brand recognition.

Some of the research performed by faculty has exciting aspects that, if told engagingly, would draw
interest from students and society, further providing a drawing card to our professions. Providing insight
into such activities goes beyond publishing brief news clips in our magazine. The participants need to
become part of the story-telling effort.

A nationally recognized spokesman such as Charlton Heston who spoke for the National Rifle
Association brought lots of attention to his interests. In a similar manner, we need someone to speak for
manufacturing and manufacturing engineering. This would be a person who is an excellent speaker,
nationally recognized for some aspect, able to delve into many aspects. It would be a person that the
public as well as government and other organizations would recognize. The message would not be
directed to just students but rather to the general public—a national spokesperson bringing attention to
manufacturing. Some television/movie personalities would bring that recognition when over the course of
several months/years they appear with the message. Some manufacturing professionals could do the same
if they were effective speakers. Name recognition is important. Government support for this effort would
be important.

The issue of internships should be coordinated as a national effort. While the discussion here is in the
context of higher education, the same applies at the secondary school level and is an issue that SME-EF is
addressing.

Recommended Coordination of SME Higher Education Activities
The third portion of the task force assignment was to recommend ways in which SME may better
prioritize and coordinate the higher education activities in which the Society is currently engaged.

The first recommendation is to establish an Education Council or Center for Education
communication effort.

The committee recommends that the Manufacturing Education & Research (MER) Community establish
a quasi-formal Education Council or Center for Education that would consist of all SME education-
related entities. Specifically, accreditation, certification, licensing, NAMRI/SME, K-12, the SME
Education Foundation, student Member Council leaders and leaders involved with academic institutions
would participate with the MER Community in proposed twice-a-year conference calls to discuss
education issues and assure SME provides a single voice on education issues. The MER Community is
primarily the group responsible for defining and distributing the manufacturing education body of
                                                     16
knowledge from which institutions teach manufacturing-related engineering and technology. It also is the
single group with the charge for mapping the future of manufacturing education. The recommended
action is not for any structural or authority change within SME, rather to assure via a council that
everyone is aware of the education issues being pursued and the impact of changes on the many SME
education efforts. The education council would not be a policy-making entity, merely a communication
tool. It is possible that when appropriately chosen the MER Community steering committee could be that
education council. In some respects, the proposed entity parallels the ASME Center for Education.

The second recommendation is to provide an SME Web site specifically focused on academic
education issues and functions.

While a drop-down menu for university/higher education has been proposed, most of the committee
believe that a single landing page may be the better approach. It is important that the site be identified in
some manner as formal higher education as opposed to the many other forms of SME educational
activities. The IEEE “Education” Web site is one of the best examples to emulate.

The MER Community is generating considerable interest and engagement in manufacturing education
under its current leadership through its Manufacturing Education Leadership Forums and involvement in
the MERC and NCME. To lead the strategies discussed in this report and as a center for all SME
education efforts, it is essential that this group be filled with many more strong leaders.

Much of this community’s effort involves ongoing work to keep SME’s brand well respected for
providing quality to education, timely changes, and leadership in academia and related issues that
indirectly affect the pipeline and infrastructure of talent to industry. Without its work, however, there
would be no pipeline to be filled. As an example, SME accreditation and certification efforts provide
strong brand recognition for those already in the pipeline, but by themselves they do not directly fill the
pipeline. These efforts have a broad charter that involves thousands of our members in diverse ways. In
addition to the pipelines strategies described above, this group needs to:

    1. Establish SME as the primary center of manufacturing engineering and technology education and
       information.
    2. Collaborate with others as appropriate to make a positive impact on manufacturing education
       (academic, industry, associations and government).
    3. Expand the dialog on manufacturing education beyond SME to include other professional
       societies and associations who have major stakes in manufacturing, such as ASME, IEEE, IIE,
       ASQ, APICS and others.
    4. Develop a clear communication approach with other SME communities such that the MER
       broadcasts SME successes in education, provides strategies, draws leaders, recognizes excellence,
       identifies changes in the definition of the manufacturing engineering field and drives
       improvements in education.




                                                      17
Recommended SME Role in Accreditation
The last portion of the task force assignment was to provide strategic recommendations for SME’s role in
ABET accreditation, as well as strategic direction to SME’s Accreditation Committee. The Accreditation
Committee’s 2009 annual agenda includes the following items:

    1. Review accreditation criteria for manufacturing programs to ensure they remain relevant to
       contemporary manufacturing environments and engineering practices and are forward-looking.

    2. Create, review and guide an effective online presence linking SME leaders, faculty, industry and
       students to accreditation information and how to become engaged in manufacturing education
       accreditation activities.

    3. Define steps that will increase the impact of accredited Manufacturing Engineering/Technology
       and Industrial Technology programs.

    4. Promote the benefits of accreditation and encourage accreditation globally of manufacturing
       education programs within academia and encourage employers’ support.

    5. Actively identify, recruit and train the best manufacturing education and industry leaders to
       support and become engaged in accreditation activities.

    6. Align and promote the benefits of certification with the assessment of manufacturing programs
       and students.

    7. Formally recognize people, institutions and companies for excellence in their support and
       engagement in manufacturing accreditation.

The task force conversations drew together the following strategic recommendations.

Strategy 1. Pick leaders who will drive growth.

SME must provide strong support of ABET efforts in order to maintain professional acceptance of
manufacturing degrees. It is both a practical support issue as well as a strategic effort to assure continued
viability of the degrees. In that vein, it will always be critical to select the leaders of SME activities in
ABET efforts who are true leaders who can and will influence others. If it becomes just a committee,
SME will lose credibility and face the loss of programs.

Strategy 2. Grow manufacturing programs.

There is a wide divergence of strong opinions on how to best accomplish this. In the United States,
engineering programs seem to be reluctant to invest in the many costly resources required for traditional
manufacturing because funding for research is the main driver and little funding is directed to
manufacturing. Growing U.S. programs that have manufacturing in their title has been easier at the
engineering technology level. To grow manufacturing-related programs, SME needs to consider focusing
on discussions with programs not now accredited as a manufacturing program, but that with a little effort
could step up and be accredited. ABET provides the standards, but some programs are not aware of them.
This requires careful study of programs not now in ABET and giving support to them. One possibility is
to review the schools that report through the ABET Applied Science Accreditation Commission. Another
is to review schools with options that are manufacturing. Another is to promote graduate program
accreditation, which is much easier than for undergraduate programs.



                                                      18
A second tactic for growth is to build on the interest in manufacturing among international schools. SME
leaders are serving on evaluation teams for programs at schools in the Mideast and on the Asian continent.
International growth may be easier to accomplish than within domestic arenas. That also requires some
dedicated effort to identify schools considering new programs, identifying schools that have programs but
are not accredited and meeting the faculty who would lead such efforts. Because ABET now provides a
service like that when schools request accreditation of their programs through ABET, SME could provide
the awakening or pump-priming to move such interest along. Using this information to foster membership
of students and faculty is an integral opportunity and natural extension of this activity.

Strategy 3. Assist existing programs to assure their health.

As part of the infrastructure issues expressed above, SME should be in such close communication with
accredited schools that we know the issues they face as soon as they are expressed and can help address
solutions where possible. Solutions would include getting local industry support rather than SME funding.
We need to build a reputation for helping the named programs and drawing interest from programs
considering providing more manufacturing education.

The SME Manufacturing_Education_Transformation_Summit_2009 will present additional suggestions.

References
Manufacturing Education Plan: Phase I Report (1997). Dearborn, MI: Society of Manufacturing
   Engineers.
Rogers, Dick; Stratton, Mark J.; King, Robert E. (1999). Manufacturing Education Plan: 1999 Critical
   Competency Gaps. Dearborn, MI: Society of Manufacturing Engineers.
Manufacturing Education Plan: Phase III: 2001-2002 Critical Competency Gaps (2002). Dearborn,
   MI: Society of Manufacturing Engineers.




                                                   19
20
Appendix A
Skills Shortage – A Pipeline Issue
While the U.S. has shipped hundreds of thousands of jobs overseas in an effort to be more competitive,
there simply are not enough skilled workers in the U.S. workforce pipeline to meet either today’s needs or
tomorrow’s. Eighty percent of our manufacturing companies complain about a shortage of skilled help. It
is not limited to any one industry, nor even to just the U.S. It is not a new issue, but it is an issue for
which no short-term solution is evident. It is an issue of both insufficient numbers of skilled applicants
and a lack of skills in those who do apply. To further compound the issue, the number of U.S. high school
graduates will peak in 2009 and continue to fall through 2030.

Industry Week6 notes that, “Over the past twenty years the number of students graduating from STEM
{science, technology, engineering and mathematics} programs at US universities has remained essentially
unchanged. During this same period, demand for science and engineering workers has grown at more than
four times the rate of the overall US workforce. The pipeline of science and engineering talent is decreasing,
while demand is increasing. Employment in science and technology occupations has grown faster than
students graduating with engineering degrees can fill the vacancies.”

A survey of Connecticut manufacturing companies, supported by surveys from several other states, found
that almost 50% had difficulty filling engineering positions and at least 20% of the companies there have
the same problem for CNC programmers, CMM programmers, machinists and related skills7. Every large
city across the country faces the same shortages for these manufacturing-related positions. Eighty-three
percent of respondents to a National Association of Manufacturers survey8 indicated that these shortages
are currently impacting their ability to serve customers. Skill deficiencies are causing difficulties
maintaining production levels consistent with customer demand, achieving productivity targets, and
achieving or maintaining target levels of customer service and satisfaction.

Employers are looking for highly trained manufacturing practitioners. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
predicts that each year through 2012 employers will be seeking:
       17,000 industrial and manufacturing engineers
       14,000 mechanical engineers
       14,000 engineering technicians
       273,000 metal and plastic production workers
For manufacturing, it is a pipeline issue—not enough students taking the required technical courses
throughout their education to enter these technological positions.

Not enough students graduate from engineering colleges to fill the engineering and technical needs in
manufacturing because, in part, not enough students enter engineering and technical colleges. Not enough
students graduate from high schools with strong STEM abilities that allow them to be successful in
technical colleges. Students lack clear career goals and perceptions of what engineers and technicians do.
Students at all levels (and their parents, teachers and public at large) lack an understanding of the
challenges and reward of manufacturing careers. Manufacturing unfortunately is still viewed as a dull,
monotonous, less rewarding industry than CSI-like police positions.



6
  Industry Week, Jonathan Katz April 25, 2008.
7
  “Connecticut manufacturers can't fill job openings,” Manufacturing Engineering, 01/04/06.
8
  2005 Skills Gap Report – A Survey of the American Manufacturing Workforce by Deloitte, NAM and
the Manufacturing Institute.

                                                     21
The lack of skilled workers is partly attributed to a lack of understanding of the viability, the breadth and
nature of manufacturing jobs and its pay levels, under appreciation of the challenge and interesting types
of work and a desire to enter jobs requiring less demanding studies. Lack of interest among youth to enter
into a career in manufacturing is and has been a key issue for years, but the many recent public notices
that “manufacturing is dead in the U.S.” leads many to ignore our industry because “it obviously has no
future.”

Student expectations for their jobs often do not match the flexibility that companies offer, and many of
today’s students are not prepared academically nor do they have the expected “soft skills.” As an example,
one young high school student, when asked if she was going to get a summer job, said, “Oh, I had one
already, but I quit after the first day. They expected me to work the hours they wanted.” The teacher had
to explain that you do not get to pick the hours you want to work for most jobs.

To prepare some students for potential work, community colleges provide six-week training programs
that explain what companies expect in workers. Topics such as “You have to show up to work every day
of the week, not just when you feel like it,” and “You must not swear at your supervisor; you must wear
appropriate clothing” and similar levels of “work etiquette” are key parts of the curricula. Only after you
pass this course of study is your name forwarded to companies searching for workers.

The rigor of science and engineering classes seems too demanding for many students who have the
mental abilities to succeed. Engineering is clearly demanding, and there is no effort to dilute that. Current
data indicate that only 50% of students enrolled in college STEM programs complete the degree
requirements in six years. Business classes are easier, as are communications, general studies and other
curricula even if they do not result in job opportunities. Graduation from college is a goal of many
students, but graduation from curricula that automatically moves them into a good paying, fulfilling job is
not in the vision of many students.

The government, industry associations, education centers, Chambers of Commerce and other entities have
banded together to produce a multitude of programs to entice more students in the STEM programs so
there will be a larger and more capable group to fill the many diverse needs in our society. Most leaders
in the field agree that the most pressing need is to get more students into the basic pipeline with the
needed key skills, then worry about how to get them from there into the individual areas of need. That is
different than having hundreds of specialties trying to attract students in that area from early ages.

The SME Education Foundation, for example, is devoting the major part of its efforts to getting students
into the STEM pipeline. By picking the right programs to support there, SME-EF also helps the teachers
and students better appreciate all engineering fields, and in some instances the programs also provide
some insight into manufacturing. Project Lead The Way, for example, is a four-year program in high
schools that teaches students how to solve problems in a project manner. It includes designing, building,
testing and reporting on devices such as size or color-sorting machines, projectile throwers and other
working “machines.” The students use AutoCAD’s Inventor program to draw. They use a variety of
computer programs to program their machines. FIRST Robotics is another tool to attract students, educate
them about manufacturing technology and provide learning skills in a truly memorable experience. The
competitive atmosphere adds yet another venue for learning and enjoying real-world challenges.

SME and SME-EF, in a variety of venues including partnering with others, support the pipeline of STEM
students. They have the challenge of finding the most effective ways of supporting the effort while
assuring that we do in fact get the needed skills and numbers of individuals into the manufacturing arena.

The SME Role in Higher Education Task Force is summarizing existing SME workforce pipeline support
activities and assessing the role SME should be playing in higher education.


                                                     22
Table A1. Programs that Attract Students to Engineering/Manufacturing
                                                               Grade            Middle    High
                           Activity                            School           School   School

  Engineering is Elementary (SME-EF)                              X

  Partner in ManufacturingIsCool (SME and SME-EF)                 X                  X     X

  Gateway Academies (SME-EF)                                                         X

  Building the Future faculty awards program (SME-EF)                                X     X

  Outstanding Partner Award program (SME-EF)                                         X     X

  Lego League (SME-EF)                                            X                  X

  SAE World in Motion (SME-EF)                                    X                  X

  Future Cities (SME-EF)                                                             X

  Project Lead The Way (SME-EF)                                                      X     X

  Ford PAS (SME-EF)                                                                  X     X

  Summer mfg. experiences (Internships) (SME-EF)                                     X     X

  FIRST Robotics (SME-EF)                                                                  X

  Skills USA (SME-EF)                                                                      X

  College scholarships (SME-EF)                                                            X

  Mentoring program (SME-EF)                                                         X     X

  Bold Visions video (SME-EF)                                                        X     X

  Industry-specific videos (SME-EF)*                                                       X

  YouTube sponsorship (SME-EF)                                                       X     X

  Google sponsorship (SME-EF)                                                        X     X

  Advanced Manufacturing Web Portal
  (SME-EF)                                                        X                  X     X

  What’s Up in Factories? (Channel 13 video)                                               X

  Zoom into Engineering (NSPE & WGBH)                                                X     X

  Design Squad (TV show)                                                                   X

  National Robotics Challenge (Ohio & SME)                                                 X

  JETS/TEAM                                                                                X

  Rube Goldberg Competition (SME chapters)                                           X     X
*Some of these are also designed for high school teachers, counselors and parents.


                                                         23
24
Appendix B – Current SME Roles in Education
The following matrix describes the activities that SME and the SME Education Foundation utilize today
to support higher education. As such, this is an “as is” matrix as opposed to “should be” or “will be.” The
majority of the SME-EF efforts today are directed to building a more effective pipeline to engineering and
science, which in turn will help increase the numbers of students who enter manufacturing via some
higher education means. At the present time, most of the SME-EF efforts are new ones for which no data
on effectiveness are available. It will be a few years before the true impact is visible, although their efforts
today anecdotally are making an impact. Most of the SME-EF efforts are included in Appendix Table A1.
There are no metrics defined yet for any of those SME-EF efforts, but the Foundation should develop
metrics for its efforts. The following table is dedicated solely to higher education programs. An “X” in
column 2-4 indicates that the effort is designed to impact the community identified by that column title.
No specific effort toward graduate programs is identified in this matrix.

One to three performance metrics are identified for each effort listed. Data for that metric are included
where it is available and the data are color coded, with green indicating a well-performing metric, yellow
indicating that better results would be expected, and red indicating that that effort is falling far short of the
results one would expect. The SME journal publications have undergone several changes designed to
increase their impact, but the results will not be seen for the next year or two. While that effort is shown
as red, the electronic publication and a new editor for one of them is designed to make them more
impactful and no new changes will be suggested for the journals.

There are no data for many of the efforts. That would imply that we have not been measuring
performance or different measures were used to judge them. Clearly, if we wish to make an impact with
each of these efforts, we need to drive to metrics.

The SME Task Force for Higher Education is not using this matrix to assess what SME should be doing.
A different matrix will describe what should be done. This is simply what SME is doing and how
effective it is judged to be. The task force believes that each of our efforts should be making a visible
impact. That matrix defines the gaps and the why it is important to SME.




                                                       25
Table B1
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 2



Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 1
                         Technical   Community                        Metric #1                Metric #2                Metric #3
Activity                 School      College     Universities
Student member program                                          # student members % students who are           % retention while still in
(SME )                                                                            members from named           school
                                                                3,461 student     Mfg curricula
                                                                members vs. total Data not currently           February 08 = data
                                                                SME membership of sorted this way              =105/376 =41%
                         X           X           X              24,268 =14%
Student Chapters (SME)                                          # chapters who meet   %(or #) chapter     %(or #) chapters/mfg
                                                                requirements          members who convert curricula
                                                                                      to regular member
                                                                only a limited number 5-23% (varies by
                         X           X           X              of chapters reporting month)
Student Chapter                                                 # chapters doing
Competitions (SME)                                              competitions/# student
                                                                chapters
                                                                (No data currently
                         X           X           X              available.
WESTEC Mfg Challenge                                            # student chapters       % student chapters in # publicity news items/year
Competition (SME)                                               competing                region who compete on competition
                                                                2008 = 12                (Need to define what
                                                                                         reasonable area to
                         X           X           X                                       draw from is.)




                                                                26
                               Technical   Community                        Metric #1                Metric #2               Metric #3
Activity                       School      College     Universities
Member Bridge Program                                                 %(#) of students who     # member sponsors     # sponsored students
(SME)                                                                 convert to regular
(Manual search required to                                            member                   14 current sponsors   14 currently
identify students and to                                              (Data not available)
match to membership
category over time)            X           X           X
Technical conferences                                                 %(#) of students who Impact of conference
attended by student                                                   attend                 on student
members (SME)                                                         ~ 15 estimated in 2007
(Data are not currently
captured.)                     X           X           X
Certification (Certification                                          % student members        % student chapters that # schools who offer
Comm.)                                                                certified                promote certification certification exam
                                                                      A list search is under   No data automatically Data are available and a
                                           X           X              way to get counts        collected               list is forthcoming
Discounted costs to                                                   %(#) of faculty who    % of faculty who are    Impact of conference on
educators (SME)                                                       attend                 SME members             faculty
(discounts not available                                              ~ 25 estimated in 2007 There are 1,191 SME     No data currently
for all events and are not                                                                   members affiliated      collected.
always visible on                                                                            with
marketing pieces –                                                                           colleges/university
educators have to request                                                                    and community
it on letterhead )                                                                           colleges = 4.9% of
                                                                                             SME Total
                               X           X           X




                                                                      27
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 3
                         Technical   Community                  Metric #1               Metric #2             Metric #3
Activity                 School      College     Universities
Faculty Advisor                                                 # Outstanding student   #student chapters who # student members who
complimentary                                                   chapters                meet requirements     convert to regular member
memberships (SME)                                               Only 32 SPAG forms      Can be based on
                                                                have been submitted     SPAG but only 32      5-23% (varies by month)
                         X           X           X              to analyze              submitted
International Award                                             # Educators recognized #Educators nominated Extent of recipient
Program for Mfg. (SME)                                          56% of 52 recent                            engagement
                                                                honor awards have
                                                                been awarded to
                                                 X              educators.
Fellows Member Program                                          # Educators recognized #Educators nominated Extent of recipient
(SME)                                                           6 year average = 43% (data not collected) engagement
                                                 X              are to educators.
Technical Paper                                                 # papers published by # citations for NAMRI
publishing (NAMRI/SME)                                          educators             papers
peer reviewed                                    X              70-105/ year          Not recorded by ISI




                                                                28
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 4
                                Technical   Community                  Metric #1                Metric #2             Metric #3
Activity                        School      College     Universities
Technical Paper                                                        # papers published by # citations for SME
publishing (SME) not                                                   educators             papers
peer reviewed                                                          FY2007 = 155 papers (data not collected)
(There are papers with                                                 with 180 educator
multiple authors so the                                                authors and 62
totals are different than the                                          industry-based
total number of papers. )                                              authors. (does not
                                                                       include 70 NAMRC
                                                                       papers)
Faculty Opportunity for                                                % engaged leaders that
Leadership Roles in SME                                                are educators
                                X           X           X              (Data not at hand)
Faculty efforts to                                                     # of leaders driving     # of college programs # Students/ year that would
incorporate Mfg into other                                             this thought             that are receptive to have stronger mfg
curricula (MER)                                                        (data not available      this                  background
                                                                       but will be as result of We have no data on
                                                                       education forum)         what mfg is being
                                                                                                taught in non mfg
                                            X           X                                       curricula
ABET Criteria                                                          Periodic review held Proposed changes          # programs accredited
development                                                            and changes proposed being implemented         Increasing/decreasing
(Accreditation Comm.)                                                  (yes/no)             (yes/no)
                                                                                                                      Decreasing
                                                                                                                      24 Engineering
                                            X           X                                                             35 Eng. Tech.




                                                                       29
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 5
                          Technical   Community                  Metric #1             Metric #2                Metric #3
Activity                  School      College     Universities
Mfg. Education                                                   # attendees each forum Results published and Forum led to impacts on
Leadership Forums (MER)                                                                 distributed outside   education
                                      X           X                                     attendees
Modeling Mfg. Curricula                                          Models or targets     Identification of new    Curricular changes being
(MER)                                                            proposed              curricula elements       proposed for
                                                                                       (yes/no)                 implementation
                                                                 -Curricula 2000 and
                                                                 2002 published: 2015 Yes
                                                                 to be published in                             Yes
                                                                 2008
                                                                 -Mfg Ed Leadership
                                      X           X              forum is leader
ABET Program Review                                              All programs requested Evaluators evaluated    All evaluators meet
(Accreditation Comm.)                                            reviewed as needed     for each trip           minimum requirements
                                                                 (100% is target)
                                      X           X              100%
ABET Governance                                                  SME plays an active SME actively
(Accreditation Comm.)                                            role in ABET           promoting significant
                                                                 Administrative boards/ improvements (yes/no)
                                      X           X              commissions (yes/no)




                                                                 30
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 6
                             Technical   Community                  Metric #1              Metric #2                Metric #3
Activity                     School      College     Universities
Assessments of knowledge                                            SME developing        # Assessments offered # Assessments being used
to national standards                                               assessment tools?                           by educators
(Certification Comm.)                                               Yes/no
                                                                    Yes
                                                                    Technician outcomes
                                                                    assessment &
                                                                    certification pending
                                                                    study. Developing
                                                                    outcomes assessment
                                                                    for 2/4 year Elect.
                                                                    Eng. Techn. Demand
                                                     X              needs to be clear
Networking center for                                               #Academic attendees    Rating of attendees as
academic research                                                    110/year              to benefit from
(NAMRI/SME)                                                                                attending (1 to 10
                                                                                           scale)
                                                     X                                     (data not available)
Professional institutional                                          Full recognition for
credit for faculty                                                  NAMRI involvement?
promotions                                                          Yes/No
(NAMRI/SME)                                          X              Yes




                                                                    31
Educational Level Post Secondary: SME
Efforts Today Page 7
                           Technical   Community                  Metric #1               Metric #2             Metric #3
Activity                   School      College     Universities
Recognition (Awards) for                                          Full recognition for    # Awards
faculty excellence                                                NAMRI Awards?
(NAMRI/SME)                                                       Yes/No
                                                   X              Yes                     4 Awards/year
Clear identification of                                           Yes/No
scholarly faculty                                                 YES
(NAMRI/SME)                                        X
Journal Publications for                                          # papers/year           # Citations to Journal Impact Factor
academic recognition
(SME)                                                                                     ~14/year
J. Mfg Systems                                                    -24/year                Not tracked           0.032
J. Mfg Processes                                   X              -12/year                                      Not tracked
Journal service to                                                Full recognition for
profession credit (SME)                                           Journal editorship
                                                                  Yes/No
                                                   X              Yes
Center for matching                                               # requests per year
student and faculty                                               5-10/year
surveys to practitioners               X           X
Google sponsorship                                                # hits/month
(SME-EF)                               X           X              3700
Siemens software grants                                           # students continuing   ??                    ??
(SME-EF)                                                          in mfg/eng programs




                                                                  32
Appendix C – Proposed Strategies and Tactics for Filling the Pipeline from
Kindergarten to SME Senior Chapters
The first row defines the variations in schools that SME is affiliated with. To read a row look at the first
three columns of information which define the type of program involved. The goals and remaining
portions of that row specifically apply to the programs defined to the left. When the first three columns
are blank look above to the previous row(s) to determine the programs involved.




                                                      33
Table C1
Target           Community               Specialty         Goal                  Why this goal?                  Gaps         Recommended
                                                                                                                              actions
- Pre-college    - Community             - Eng.
programs            colleges             - Eng Tech
- College        - Universities-         - Ind Tech
students         Graduate programs       - Operations/
- Faculty        - Non mfg eng/Tech        Bus. programs
- Faculty           programs
advisors         - International
- Dept              programs
chairs/Deans
- Named Mfg
programs/not
named
programs

College
students in
named mfg
eng/eng
tech./ind tech
programs
                    Community college    Eng.            90% are SME members   1) They are interested in the   1) We have   Develop data to
                    Four-year schools    Tech.                                 profession and SME will         no data      determine if
                    Graduate schools     Ind Tech.                             provide advantages to them                   SME is meeting
                    International                                               2) Provides recognition for                  goal
                     Programs                                                    ABET/other accreditation
                                                                                 3) Provides additional
                                                                                 education (informal)
                                                                                 4) Provides networking
                                                                                 5) Provides another group
                                                                                 for school to associate with
                                                                                 6) Access to SME
                                                                                 scholarships




                                                                       34
Target   Community               Specialty           Goal                         Why this goal?                 Gaps           Recommended
                                                                                                                                actions
          Graduate Schools       Same as above                                  1) Free technical reports      We have no
                                                                                                                 data
                                 Ind./Prod./Bus./o   N/A but students should be   1) SME will be major           There is no    Understand the
                                   perations Mgt     aware of SME                 source of information upon     program to     impact that SME
                                   Programs                                       graduation                     make these     can have in these
                                                                                  2) Benefits during school      students       programs and
                                                                                  same as above                  aware of       develop
                                                                                                                 SME            programs as
                                                                                                                                appropriate
            Community college    Eng.              100% renew while students    Ditto above                    We retain      SME needs to
            Four-year schools    Tech.                                                                         only 40% of    develop a
            Graduate schools     Ind Tech.                                                                     these based    program for
            International        Ind/Prod./Bus.                                                                on Feb 08      higher retention
             programs              Mgt Programs                                                                  data

                                  Eng.              70% upgrade to regular       Ditto 1) above                 We retain      SME needs to
                                  Tech.             member upon graduation       2) We have invested in         less than      develop a
                                  Ind. Tech.                                     them                           23% of these   program for
                                  Ind./Prod./Bus.                                3) Upgrade is start of life-   members        higher retention
                                   Mgt Programs                                   long learning and
                                                                                  development of professional
                                                                                  networking opportunities
                                                                                  4) Saves money over new
                                                                                  membership




                                                                    35
Target   Community             Specialty      Goal                         Why this goal?                 Gaps            Recommended
                                                                                                                          actions
          Community            Eng.         Recognition for individual   1)Recognition builds brand     SME student     Evaluate
           colleges             Tech.        excellence                   loyalty                        paper award     potential
          Four-year            Ind. Tech.                                2) Recognition when            exists and      recognition
           programs             Ind./Bus.                                 advertised well publicizes     scholarships    programs for
          Graduate programs     Programs                                  the brand                      but no other    student member
          Non mfg eng/tech                                                3) Recognition says            program         (individual)
           programs                                                        “thanks” for good work         exists          excellence

                                              Provide effective            1) Recognizes excellence       Local           Capture and
                                              Scholarships/Fellowship      2) Makes us competitive        chapters and    publicize what
                                              program                      with other fields              SME EF          chapter and other
                                                                                                          provide         mfg scholarships
                                                                                                          scholarships,   are being offered
                                                                                                          but there is    today. Evaluate
                                                                                                          no              means to
                                                                                                          coordination    publicize, grow
                                                                                                          (SME EF         new scholarships
                                                                                                          will manage     (partnering for
                                                                                                          scholarships    example)
                                                                                                          for chapters)
                                              Provide impactful job        1) Assure that students stay   No gap
                                              opportunity information      in the mfg field
                                                                           2) Helps build brand loyalty
                                                                           for students and from
                                                                           employers
                                              Provide impactful student    1) Competitions focus          There are no    Investigate/devel
                                              competitions                 students on mfg, build         national or     op opportunities
                                                                           excitement and increase        coordinated     for competitions
                                                                           knowledge                      competitions    as effective as
                                                                           2) Effective competition       other than      ASME paper
                                                                           provides newsworthy brand      WESTEC          competitions,
                                                                           association                                    college Battle
                                                                           3) Competitions provide                        Bots, or FIRST
                                                                           personal recognition




                                                             36
Target   Community   Specialty   Goal                          Why this goal?                 Gaps              Recommended
                                                                                                                actions
                                 Low cost/ no cost access to   1) Getting students involved   It is not clear   Enhance
                                 SME knowledge sources         with drawing knowledge         that we have      visibility so that
                                                               from SME builds brand          an effective      SME becomes
                                                               recognition and loyalty        approach that     first place to
                                                                                              draws             search for
                                                                                              students to       knowledge
                                                                                              our
                                                                                              knowledge.
                                                                                              We have no
                                                                                              data
                                 Provide direct involvement    1) to broaden student          Student           Have student
                                 with mfg engineers and        knowledge                      chapters          chapters and
                                 technologists                 2) to demonstrate the          provide this      senior chapters
                                                               excitement and enjoyment       opportunity       develop means to
                                                               of being a mfg eng/tech.       but do not        assure each
                                                               (build higher interest in      provide a one     student knows
                                                               student)                       on one            one mfg
                                                                                              opportunity       professional
                                 Schools should have student   1) Builds brand recognition    No
                                 chapters                      2) Chapter programs            significant
                                                               provide knowledge and          gap w/n
                                                               networking opportunities       named
                                                                                              programs.
                                                                                              Some
                                                                                              opportunity
                                                                                              may exist
                                                                                              with
                                                                                              programs not
                                                                                              names as
                                                                                              mfg.




                                                 37
Target            Community              Specialty      Goal                          Why this goal?                    Gaps           Recommended
                                                                                                                                       actions
College            Non mfg eng/tech     Eng            N/A but should be aware of    1) SME will be major              SME has no     SME analyze
students not in     programs             Tech           SME and invited to join       source of information upon        program to     potential benefits
named mfg                                Ind Tech                                     graduation                        offer to non   for addressing
eng programs                                                                          2) Benefits during school         mfg named      student
                                                                                      same as above                     programs       opportunities in
                                                                                      3) Joint sponsorship of tech                     non named
                                                                                      programs opens eyes to                           programs
                                                                                      SME and others
                                                                                      4) Provides awareness of
                                                                                      SME resources (books,
                                                                                      papers, videos)
Faculty            Four year programs   Eng programs   Provide peer reviewed         1) Merit/tenure/Promotion         No gap
(new/young)        Graduate programs                   Technical publishing outlet   is based on publications; if
                   Non mfg eng/tech                                                  no outlet provided they will
                    programs                                                          go elsewhere and we lose
                   International                                                     their allegiance
                    programs                                                          2) Journals provides
                                                                                      academic/research
                                                                                      credentials (luster/status) for
                                                                                      the society
                                                                                      3) Publication adds new
                                                                                      knowledge to our databases
                                                        Provide networking            1)Networking is critical for      No gap
                                                        opportunities with other      new faculty who have to
                                                        academics                     understand where funding is
                                                                                      and how to partner with
                                                                                      other academics for funding
                                                                                      2) Networking enhances
                                                                                      curricula development and
                                                                                      implementation,
                                                                                      accreditation and recruiting




                                                                        38
Target   Community              Specialty         Goal                            Why this goal?                Gaps            Recommended
                                                                                                                                actions
                                 Eng. Tech.      Provide peer reviewed           Faculty of some Industrial    There ere no    Develop peer
                                 Ind. Tech.      publication for non technical   Technology and Eng            SME             review program
                                  Ind./Bus.       articles                        Technology programs need      opportunities   for
                                  Programs                                        peer reviewed publications    and few         business/academi
                                                                                  for tenure, merit increases   outside SME     c/managerial/Lea
                                                                                  and promotion                                 n/soft skills (on-
                                                                                                                                line or paper)
         Community colleges      Eng. programs   Provide and facilitate grants   1) Any money named as         Some SME        Some SME
                                                  for conference travel and       “grants” counts for merit,    funding does    funding does not
                                                  curricula development           Tenure and promotion          not result in   result in
                                                                                  2) We need to help assure     recognition     recognition for
                                                                                  that these educators stay     for faculty     faculty when it
                                                                                  current in their fields and   when it         easily could by
                                                                                  their host institutions do    easily could    change in words
                                                                                  poorly at supporting such     by change in
                                                                                  efforts.                      words
         Community colleges      Eng. Tech.      Provide networking              1) These programs need to     Local           Local chapter
                                 Ind. Tech.      opportunities with industry     place their graduates and     chapters        needs to identify
                                 Ind./Bus.                                       need industry support to      provide that    faculty at local
                                  Programs                                        survive and grow              as do the       colleges and
                                                                                  2) Local SME units can        conferences.    encouraging
                                                                                  facilitate summer jobs in     No              involvement.
                                                                                  mfg for both students and     significant     Need to address
                                                                                  faculty                       gap where       how to get
                                                                                  3) Local SME units can        chapters are    networking when
                                                                                  provide student projects      active          chapter is not
                                                                                                                                active.
          Community             Eng.            Provide discounted costs to     1) Grants count for tenure,   Some SME        Some SME
           colleges              Eng. Tech.      educators in the form of        merit and promotions and      funding does    funding does not
          Four year programs    Ind. Tech.      grants                          even small amounts are        not result in   result in
          Graduate programs     Ind./Bus.                                       significant for technology    recognition     recognition for
          Non mfg eng/tech       Programs                                        program faculty               for faculty     faculty when it
           programs                                                               . 2)SME benefits from the     when it         easily could by
          International                                                          involvement of faculty and    easily could    change in words
           programs                                                               the added knowledge of        by change in
                                                                                  educators helps students      words




                                                                  39
Target          Community              Specialty      Goal                          Why this goal?                 Gaps            Recommended
                                                                                                                                   actions
Faculty          Four year programs   Eng programs   Provide Fellows program       1) Provides high prestige to   No gap
(established)    Graduate programs                                                 those faculty who have
                 Non mfg eng/tech                                                  distinguished themselves
                  programs                                                          and that encourages their
                 International                                                     further involvement with
                  programs                                                          SME
                                                                                    2) Provides SME with cadre
                                                                                    of distinguished members
                                                                                    which labels SME as a
                                                                                    leader in research and
                                                                                    academic issues
                                                      Provide International award   1) It provides luster to       No gap          Recognition as
                                                      recognition                   individual                                     being among the
                                                                                    2) It provides luster to SME                   top 10% of Mfg
                                                                                                                                   Educators would
                                                                                                                                   draw more
                                                                                                                                   support and Best
                                                                                                                                   Papers awards
                                                                                                                                   would also.
                 Community             Eng.         Provide discounted costs to   1) Helps keep educators        No gap, but     Some SME
                  colleges              Eng. Tech.   educators for activities      aware of industry needs        little usage.   funding does not
                 Four year programs    Ind. Tech.                                 2) Gives another good          Providing       result in
                 Graduate programs     Ind./Bus.                                  reason to belong               these as        recognition for
                 Non mfg eng/tech       Programs                                   3) Universities are poor       grants would    faculty when it
                  programs                                                          financial supporters for       grow interest   easily could by
                 International                                                     these activities               and loyalty     change in words
                  programs                                                          4) Good addition to the
                                                                                    overall professional
                                                                                    development of the faculty
                                                                                    member
                                                                                    5) faculty then bring new
                                                                                    knowledge back and more
                                                                                    enthusiasm which students
                                                                                    see




                                                                     40
Target          Community              Specialty      Goal                            Why this goal?                 Gaps            Recommended
                                                                                                                                     actions
Faculty (all)    Community             Eng.         Provide non-peer reviewed       1) Provides wider              No gaps
                  colleges              Eng. Tech.   publication opportunities       distribution of research
                 Four year programs    Ind. Tech.                                   work which attracts more
                 Graduate programs     Ind./Bus.                                    funding, and more
                 Non mfg eng/tech       Programs                                     awareness of completed
                  programs                                                            work
                 International                                                       2) Provides more ways to
                  Programs                                                            get knowledge in front of
                                                                                      readers
                                                                                      3) Provides outlet for
                                                                                      graduate student research
                                                      Provide leadership              1) We need more engaged        No gaps
                                                      opportunities for all faculty   members
                                                                                      2) Faculty need more
                                                                                      awareness of industry issues
                                                                                      and provides leadership
                                                                                      opportunities not available
                                                                                      in schools
                                                                                      3) Counts as service for
                                                                                      merit, tenure, promotions
Faculty          Community             Eng.         Provide discounted costs to     1) Acknowledges the            This requires   Some SME
Advisors          colleges              Eng. Tech.   faculty advisors in form of     amount of work required        renaming to     funding does not
                 Four year programs    Ind. Tech.   grants                          2) Provides merit, tenure,     obtain          result in
                 Graduate programs                                                   and promotion credit           maximum         recognition for
                 Non mfg eng/tech                                                                                   benefit         faculty when it
                  programs                                                                                                           easily could by
                 International                                                                                                      change in words
                  programs
                                                      Provide complimentary           1) Acknowledges the            No gap, but     Need to improve
                                                      memberships to faculty          amount of work required        faculty needs   clarity of needs
                                                      advisors                        2) Provides merit, tenure,     to reply to
                                                                                      and promotion credit           application




                                                                       41
Target          Community              Specialty      Goal                            Why this goal?                 Gaps          Recommended
                                                                                                                                   actions
                                                      Provide formal recognition to   1) Will better motivate FA     No program    Develop program
                                                      advisors of top student         2) Provides merit, tenure,     exists to     to recognize the
                                                      chapters                        and promotion credit if        reward        FA for success
                                                                                      significant award              leaders of    with his/her
                                                                                      3) Increases visibility of     very          chapter
                                                                                      SME presence and what          successful
                                                                                      successful chapter can be      chapters
                                                                                      like (provided we publicize
                                                                                      that well)
                                                                                      4) Recognition increases
                                                                                      resources that FA gets from
                                                                                      industry and other faculty

Institutional    Community             Eng.         Provide Assessment              1) National assessment is      No gap, but
Programs          colleges              Tech.        programs for students           accepted for accreditation     more
(Dept Chairs)    Four year programs    Ind. Tech.                                   purposes (certification exam   advocacy
                 International         Ind./Bus.                                    for example)                   would help
                  Programs               Programs                                     2) Makes assessment
                                                                                      program consistent with
                                                                                      what SME says is the mfg
                                                                                      field.




                                                                     42
Target   Community   Specialty   Goal                        Why this goal?                  Gaps             Recommended
                                                                                                              actions
                                 Provide regular formal      1) Chair/Dean wants to          No program       Provide a regular
                                 communication with          improve program and this        exists to fill   communication
                                 program heads on issues     provides ideas and contacts     this need        mechanism that
                                 facing mfg programs and     2) Helps identify more                           provides two
                                 means by which SME can      resources for faculty to call                    way interaction
                                 help (i.e. more directed    upon                                             for issues,
                                 support when programs are   3) Programs need more                            changes, and
                                 threatened)                 continuous curricula                             ways to meet
                                                             guidance than getting now,                       individual
                                                             4) Many programs need                            program needs.
                                                             support (contacts, ideas,                        A list server may
                                                             examples) just for survival                      be warranted as a
                                                             5) Identifies what other                         simple
                                                             schools are doing and what                       conveyance, but
                                                             they are looking ahead                           a leader and
                                                             toward                                           topic design is
                                                             6) provides faster                               needed.
                                                             implementation because of                        Understand the
                                                             earlier identification of                        difference
                                                             possibilities/needs                              between ABET
                                                                                                              accredited
                                                                                                              programs and
                                                                                                              student chapters
                                                                                                              whose program
                                                                                                              is not ABET
                                                                                                              accredited.
                                 Provide grant money for     1) We truly need                No SME           Provide training
                                 unique curricula            excellence, originality,        related grant    for effective
                                 enhancement development     impact replication of           funds/           grant proposals
                                                             success in development and      support          and approaches
                                                             that often has not been         exists           and links to get
                                                             provided and responses                           funding.
                                                             from grant recipients have
                                                             not met expectations but
                                                             funding is needed for
                                                             excellence when it is
                                                             identified



                                               43
Target   Community   Specialty   Goal                           Why this goal?                  Gaps            Recommended
                                                                                                                actions
                                 Develop a unique spokesman     1) Having an inspiring,         1) There is     Identify and
                                 for mfg education (i.e.        educational presentation        no              engage 2 or 3
                                 Eugene Merchant or Richard     would help draw student         spokesman       national level
                                 Feynman look alike for         and parent interest in mfg      for mfg who     individuals with
                                 education) – develop NASA      careers                         garners         compelling
                                 quality PowerPoint             2) Such a spokesman would       national        messages and
                                 presentations                  increase the image of mfg       recognition     provide outlets
                                                                                                as a dynamic,   for these
                                                                                                exciting,       presentations/me
                                                                                                inspiring       ssages.
                                                                                                speaker that
                                                                                                will change
                                                                                                the image of
                                                                                                mfg
                                 Provide certification          1) It documents nationally
                                 programs for students          the capabilities of its
                                                                students (assures school is
                                                                providing quality graduates)
                                                                and it assures employers
                                                                that individual students
                                                                have necessary knowledge
                                 Provide opportunity for all    1) ABET and ASEE
                                 Mfg educators to meet          represents only part of the
                                 periodically on their issues   educators
                                                                2) ASEE does not
                                                                necessarily represent the
                                                                programs
                                                                3) SME is complementary
                                                                to ASEE and provides the
                                                                role of defining body of
                                                                knowledge and model
                                                                curricula
                                                                4) Provides pedagogy
                                                                discussions for mfg and
                                                                discussion for application of
                                                                soft skill needs not held in
                                                                other venues




                                                 44
Target   Community   Specialty   Goal                         Why this goal?                 Gaps   Recommended
                                                                                                    actions
                                 Support Mfg Eng/Tech         1) Mfg eng as a profession
                                 within ABET                  is important to SME
                                                              2) We are the lead society
                                                              for these programs
                                                              3) ABET recognition is
                                                              critical to acceptance as a
                                                              field
                                                              4) Without SME support
                                                              many mfg programs and
                                                              program models would
                                                              disappear
                                 Support Ind. Tech within     1) SME can provide more
                                 NAIT                         detail in what should be
                                                              involved in what mfg
                                                              content should be in
                                                              curricula and that would
                                                              enhance the industrial
                                                              technology programs
                                                              2) NAIT is both an
                                                              accrediting body and
                                                              individual member org
                                 Take an active role within   1) Make sure mfg is
                                 ABET                         adequately being covered
                                 (Governance/Leadership)      by other academic
                                                              disciplines
                                                              2) increases mfg industry
                                                              perspective into all realms
                                                              of its activities
                                                              3) Mfg industry would be
                                                              less well served without our
                                                              contribution




                                                 45
Target   Community   Specialty   Goal                           Why this goal?                  Gaps   Recommended
                                                                                                       actions
                                 Support centers of mfg         1) Provides easy to access/
                                 eng/tech education             no cost info for mfg
                                 knowledge used by faculty      educators and enhances
                                 (i.e. NCME/MERC)               contacts
                                                                2) They are intertwined with
                                                                SME EF already
                                                                3) Increases the quality of
                                                                education
                                                                4) NCME allows NSF
                                                                funding to be leveraged on
                                                                behalf of SME interests –
                                                                i.e. our support helps garner
                                                                other funding
                                 Enhance pipeline of students   1) There is a need for many
                                 into higher education mfg      more professionals with
                                 programs                       good solid mfg knowledge
                                                                2) Number of students in
                                                                both mfg and non mfg
                                                                programs need to be
                                                                enhanced
                                 Be a member advocate and       We need many diverse
                                 mobilize SME members to        approaches to carry the
                                 help grow and maintain         message
                                 interest in mfg                2) We need individuals who
                                                                can convey a positive image
                                                                of mfg as a field/ profession
                                                                and SME members can
                                                                provide that




                                                46
Target            Community                Specialty             Goal                             Why this goal?                 Gaps   Recommended
                                                                                                                                        actions
Pre College                                                      Prepare audio visual projects
programs                                                         that attract K-12 students to
                                                                 Mfg programs
                                                                 Prepare audio visual projects
                                                                 that stimulate parents and the
                                                                 public to Mfg as a good
                                                                 profession
                                                                 Prepare audio visual projects
                                                                 that attract nontraditional
                                                                 students to Mfg as a
                                                                 profession
                                                                 Provide easy to access
                                                                 multiple views into Mfg
                                                                 technology and operations
                                                                 Provide projects that entice 2   It will combat the declining
                                                                 and 3 year graduates into        number of students
                                                                 completing four year degrees     available to move into
                                                                 (Upward mobility)                higher paying Mfg jobs
                                                                 Provide program to match
                                                                 students to mfg practitioners
                                                                 (1 on 1)
If there is no student chapter, benefits of student membership are minimal.




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