BODY MASS INDEX by f6sTbu

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									                                   Body Mass Index
Authors of the measurement tool:
      Originator of the Quetelet index - Adolphe Quetelet (1832)
      Changed the name to the Body Mass Index - Ancel Keys (1972)1
      Adopted by the World Health Organization in 1995 as a tool to quickly and easily
      determine level of obesity.

Purpose of the tool:
      To quickly and easily determine a person’s level of obesity or deviation from
      normal growth.

Target population:
       Everyone

What it tests:
       The Body Mass Index is a chart derived from an equation where ‘the weight
       increases as the square of the height’ is considered average or normal.1

Reliability and Validity:
       Not available

Administration:
      You must have a device to measure height and a scale to measure weight. Taking
      these measurements and applying them to the chart will give you a score that has
      been divided into categories. BMI = weight in kg / height in meters squared

Table 1: The International Classification of adult underweight, overweight and obesity according to BMI


                 Classification                                BMI(kg/m�)
                                           Principal cut-off points   Additional cut-off points
         Underweight                               <18.50                      <18.50
           Severe thinness                         <16.00                      <16.00
           Moderate thinness                    16.00 - 16.99               16.00 - 16.99
           Mild thinness                        17.00 - 18.49               17.00 - 18.49
                                                                            18.50 - 22.99
         Normal range                            18.50 - 24.99
                                                                            23.00 - 24.99
         Overweight                                 ≥25.00                     ≥25.00
                                                                            25.00 - 27.49
            Pre-obese                            25.00 - 29.99
                                                                            27.50 - 29.99
            Obese                                   ≥30.00                     ≥30.00
                                                                            30.00 - 32.49
               Obese class I                     30.00 - 34-99
                                                                            32.50 - 34.99
                                                                            35.00 - 37.49
               Obese class II                    35.00 - 39.99
                                                                            37.50 - 39.99
               Obese class III                      ≥40.00                     ≥40.00
         Source: Adapted from WHO, 1995, WHO, 2000 and WHO 2004.
Time requirements:
       2-5 minutes. Minimal

Advantages:
      Simple, easy scoring and comparison to others.

Disadvantages:
      Assumes normal body types and does not take into account extremes in height,
      muscle, or bone density.

Acquisition:
       The chart can be purchased as a poster or is found in multiple locations on line for
       free.


   1. Eknoyan, G. Adolphe Quetelet (1796-1874) – the average man and indices of
      obesity. Nephrol. Dial. Transplant. 2008;23:47-51.




Appraised by: David Blaine Archibald                        Date appraised: 8/1/08

								
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