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					                                             College of Education

                                       Learn. Lead. Inspire. Transform.


                             LAE 4414 Literature in Childhood Education

Contact Person: Dr. Thomas Crisp tcrisp@sar.usf.edu

                                            COURSE OVERVIEW

Course Description and Goals:

Welcome to LAE 4414 – Literature in Childhood Education. This course focuses on literary
understanding and genres in reading and teaching children's literature. We will discuss critical and
theoretical perspectives in evaluating children's literature and will concentrate on the literary, social, and
pedagogical issues encountered in the study of children's literature. Our course readings, activities, and
projects are designed to help you explore and learn about the following key ideas:

   Evaluating and selecting materials -- looking at, evaluating, and talking about children’s literature
   Taking a literary stance -- The differences between literary and curricular uses of children’s literature
   Appreciating genre elements – Picture Books, Folklore, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Contemporary
    Realistic Fiction, Nonfiction, Historical Fiction, Biography, and Poetry
   Use technology to communicate and collaborate with peers in order to nurture learning about
    children’s literature

This course was planned to encourage dialogue and an exchange of views. This sharing process will
require you to read a variety of books that you will use to demonstrate and support your developing
knowledge. You are required to purchase or have access to the course literature.

TaskStream account is required.

Course Objectives:

    1. To develop knowledge about children’s literature by exploring a variety of literary
       genres, authors/illustrators, and different cultural perspectives.
    2. To demonstrate an understanding of the importance of children’s literature to child
       development by studying research findings in these areas.
    3. To become familiar with notable authors and illustrators by studying their
       contributions throughout the history of children’s literature.
    4. To develop knowledge about how to evaluate and select books to meet children’s
       needs by applying literary criteria for different genres.


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   5. To acquire knowledge of quality children’s literature by developing personal resource
      materials to meet students’ different interests, and cultural backgrounds and various
      needs in today’s diverse classroom.
   6. To become aware of common literary techniques, writing styles, and developmental
      consideration in children’s literature.
   7. To develop an understanding of how literature is used to teach multiple subjects
      across curriculum.




                                          COURSE TEXTS

Feed – M.T. Anderson
Voices in the Park – Anthony Browne
Skeleton Creek – Patrick Carman
Al Capone Does My Shirts – Gennifer Choldenko
Rosa – Nikki Giovanni and Brian Collier
Tropical Secrets: Holocaust Refugees in Cuba – Margarita Engle
Becoming Naomi Leon – Pam Munoz Ryan
Where the Wild Things Are – Maurice Sendak
Rapunzel – Paul Zelinsky

Additional readings will be posted in PDF format on the course website. It is the student’s
responsibility to access and read these materials.


                                      COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

General Expectations:

Assignments are designed to build competency (through the process of completing the assignment)
and show competency (through products). Grading will be based on quality of work and the
demonstrated level of competence in meeting course objectives.

A Note on Scholarly Conventions:

The written work that you produce should be quality work, both in its content and form. The
content of your written work should always reflect your careful and thoughtful consideration of the
ideas we are exploring in the various readings and activities—and you should refer to these where
this serves to support your ideas. This does not mean you need to write pages and pages for these
assignments (in fact, points are deducted for assignments that are outside page limitations [when
set]), but it does mean you should carefully craft what you write—be clear, succinct, and support
what you say. Your work should be presented in an edited format (you have checked it for spelling
and grammar, it has been proof-read, etc.). Point deductions will be taken for excessive grammatical
or spelling errors. All assignments must be double spaced and submitted in “.doc,” “.docx,” or “.rtf”
format. Assignments submitted in other formats will not be accepted and my receive a score of “0.”



                                                                                                    2
TaskStream: TaskStream is a web-based electronic portfolio required of all students in the College of
Education (COE) programs. It provides a way to submit documents, called Critical Tasks to instructors for
feedback and assessment. The COE uses these assessments to evaluate candidate progress toward
meeting standards set by the Florida Department of Education, the faculty and professional
organizations. Further, the COE analyzes data from the assessments and uses the data for program
planning in order to ensure continuous improvement. Assignments designated as Critical Tasks must be
uploaded to your electronic portfolio on TaskStream and be rated with a mean score of 3 or higher in
order for you to pass the course. Remember, failure to upload the Critical Task may result in a failing
grade.

In this course the critical tasks are: Genre Analysis.

Essential Assignments: These are assignments that have been aligned with one or more FLDOE
curriculum requirements, i.e., ESOL standards, Reading Competencies, or Florida Teacher
Competencies/Skills.

Overview of Assignments:

Assignments will vary across the fifteen weeks of our course and will include readings (both
literature and scholarship), postings, online discussions and discussion boards, and individual
and small group activities. In addition, students will be required to complete several types of
written assignments. While not inclusive of every written assignment, the following list is intended
to prepare you for the types of experiences in which students will be engaged (additional
information on these assignments will be provided in class):

 Reflection Papers - Essential Assignment: To successfully complete these papers, students will
need to exhibit learning that occurred through their engagement in experiences across that week
(through synthesis and extension of content/ideas), as well as demonstrate how their thinking
about children’s literature has been impacted by the work completed across the semester.

Library/Bookstore Assignment - Essential Assignment : For this assignment, students are
required to visit a bookstore and a public library and spend some time observing in the children’s
section at each location. While at each location, students are expected to take notes (following the
note-taking format demonstrated in class), draw a sketch diagram of the children’s section at each
location, and write a 1-2 page piece in which they discuss what assumptions about books, children,
and reading are reflected by their observations.

In this course, we’ll be focusing on how to read and respond to children’s literature; honing skill in
choosing the highest quality literature for children. But where do we find such literature? This
assignment asks you to investigate how books are made accessible to children and the adults in
their lives through bookstores and libraries.

The goal of this assignment is for you to focus on how books are presented for “consumption.” By
looking closely at the places where readers go to find children’s books, we learn something about
assumptions about books, children, reading…and more. Here are the key requirements for
completing this assignment. Obviously, you may choose to do this at any time from now until it is
due.


                                                                                                         3
      Visit a bookstore and a public library. Spend some time observing in the children’s section
       at each location.
      While you’re at each location, make notes on a 3-column chart like the one below.

   What?                   Where?               Why?
   What is displayed       Where are specific   Propose reasons for things displayed/shelved as
   and shelved?            things displayed     they are. Notice any patterns? What are the
                           and shelved?         implications for buyers or borrowers? Think like
   *What evidence of                            kids, parents, teachers.
   diverse literature is   In the back corner
   there?                  of the library (or   Give children places to sit and read comfortably –
                           store)               suggests that this is a place where you should sit
   As one example:                              down and read a book (stay awhile). Suggests
   Piles of pillows                             that reading is for pleasure.




      Draw a sketch diagram of the children’s section at each location. Label furniture, displays,
       etc. You might include people in this diagram (e.g., Is there a clerk in this section? Are there
       adults with children?) Although you will not be evaluated on your “artistic” ability, your
       diagram should be easy to read and neat (i.e. no pencil sketches on a half sheet of lined
       paper!)
      Be sure to write down the location (specific bookstore or library – i.e. name and address) on
       each chart and diagram.
      What evidence is there of “diverse” literature? What do you notice about these books and
       their presence (or absence)? How are they shelved/displayed?
      After looking at your diagrams and your charts, write a 1-2 page piece in which you discuss
       what assumptions about books, children, and reading are reflected by your observations.
       Note similarities and differences between the 2 locations, and suggest possible reasons for
       any differences. What is promoted or emphasized in each location? Are there things
       missing? This component is critical. I want you thinking about why things are the way they
       are. What are the reasons behind the placement of objects, displays of certain texts,
       size/amount of seating, etc. The emphasis of your analysis should be on the possible
       meanings behind the organization of the environment. Interpret what you’ve seen.


Genre Analysis - Critical Task: The purpose of this course is for students to survey and analyze
the genres of children’s literature and apply this new understanding by demonstrating an ability to
select quality children’s literature. For this assignment, students will select children’s or young
adult literature they believe are exemplars for each of the genres we discuss in class (picturebook,
folklore, fantasy and science fiction, contemporary realistic fiction, historical fiction, biography,
nonfiction, and poetry). Again, each selection must be quality children’s or young adult literature
according to the genre criteria discussed in class (i.e., the folklore text should contain some of the
conventions and motifs that are traditional in the genre). This collection must include a total of 8
texts – one from each of the genres we discuss in class and must include at least one novel. Students
are encouraged to be both thoughtful and careful in their selection – What is happening in this
book? What will using this book “get” or “achieve” as opposed to any other? How does this book
meet the criteria for exemplary pieces of literature in this genre? Students should also be sure to


                                                                                                      4
evaluate these texts critically and to fully incorporate “diverse” literature (according to the
definition and criteria shared in class).


Approximately six points (6%) of your final grade can be earned each week, with the final ten
points (10%) being awarded for the successful completion of the genre analysis (more on this
assignment will be provided online). Further information, policies, and procedures on assignments
and the submission of written work will be provided during the first week of our online course.


Preparation and Participation (Codes of Conduct):

It is essential that you not only complete each activity and assignment (on time!), but that you are
also prepared to be an active participant. An important aspect of any classroom learning
community is the active engagement of students and teachers around worthwhile content. Your
contributions to discussions and activities are essential to your learning as well as to the health and
learning of our own online community. Additionally, you will be expected to raise relevant
questions, make contributions that promote discussion, be sensitive to eliciting the ideas of others
in the class, and actively engage in small group work. Your preparation and participation will
impact your final grade in this course—deductions may be taken at any time. You are responsible
for all material covered in class. Failure to complete an assignment by the due date may result in a
score of “0” on that assignment. More than three missing assignments may result in a failing grade
(0.0) for the course.

For some people sharing their thoughts in a public forum feels “risky.” However, part of developing
as future professionals involves sharing your ideas and engaging in the ideas of others. Think of
this online course as an environment in which to get your feet wet and begin taking such risks.



                                          COURSE POLICIES


General Policies for Conduct and Procedures

Contacting your instructor:
    Because I do not have an office or home telephone, the best way to get in touch with me is
       via email
    I do my best to respond to all emails within 48 hours – even if it is just to say, “Thanks, I got
       your email.”
    Do not assume that I have gotten your email – technology is not foolproof (and I am not
       perfect). If you do not hear back from me within 48 hours, please email me again.
    I ask that you provide me with as much advance notice as possible when you email me and I
       will do the same in my communications to you.
    I generally do not respond to emails on weekends (Saturday-Sunday).
    I should not be your “first resort”: before asking me questions about our schedule, the
       syllabus, course assignments, etc., you should refer to your course notes, the syllabus and
       assignment descriptions, and/or your peers (as applicable).

Meeting with your instructor:


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      My schedule is fairly flexible. I am generally available to meet with students by appointment
       throughout the week. Because this is an online course, I will meet with students via “Skype,”
       a free online program that allows for “face-to-face” meetings over the Internet. You can
       download Skype for free from: http://www.skype.com. There is no need to provide Skype
       with any financial or credit card information.
      Prior to any meeting with me, please email me with the details as to the purpose of the
       meeting, your goals in having the meeting, etc. In addition, please attach any relevant
       documentation to the email so that I may review it prior to the time of our meeting.
      If I am on campus, I am generally working. Therefore, if you see me in my office, please do
       not assume that I am available for impromptu meetings. Schedule all meetings with me in
       advance.

Assignments:
     It is my policy to not accept late papers. Please turn in your assignments when they are due.
       Forgetting to complete assignments hinders the work we can do in class. Because
       technology is often unpredictable, work diligently to submit assignments as expeditiously as
       possible.
     In the unlikely event that I decide to accept a late assignment, the score will be reduced by
       25% for each week it is late.
     I reserve the right to adjust due dates of papers and assignments as necessary.
     I do not give extra credit unless it is offered to the entire class, so make sure you complete
       all assignments carefully.

Things that are out of my control:
    Your bus/transportation schedule
    Your class schedule
    Your work schedule
    Your family schedule
    Your issues with technology

Web Portal Information

Every newly enrolled USF student receives an official USF e-mail account. Students receive official
USF correspondence and Blackboard course information via that address.


Detection of Plagiarism

 http://www.cte.usf.edu/plagiarism/plag.html The University of South Florida has an account with
an automated plagiarism detection service which allows instructors to submit student assignments
to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to 1) request that assignments be submitted to me
as electronic files and 2) electronically submit assignments to SafeAssignment. Assignments are
compared automatically with a huge database of journal articles, web articles, and previously
submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student's paper was
plagiarized. For more information, go to
http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0304/adadap.htm#plagiarism.




                                                                                                      6
Grading Scale

The grading scale will be approximately as follows:

“A” (90-100 points): reflects exemplary work, knowledge, and skill in meeting the performance
objectives – participant went beyond requirements, is analytical, reflective and professional in
stance, and demonstrated a strong understanding of reading comprehension. 94-100 = “A”; 90-93 =
“A-”

“B” (80-89 points): reflects good, competent work, knowledge, and skill in meeting the
performance objectives. Participant demonstrates a good understanding of reading comprehension.
87-89 = “B+”; 84-86 = “B”; 80-83 = “B-”

“C” (70-79): reflects satisfactory/adequate work, knowledge, and skill in meeting the performance
objectives; minimal requirements have been met successfully. Participant demonstrates a minimal
understanding of comprehension. 77-79 = “C+”; 74-76 = “C”;
70-73 = “C-”

“D” (60-69): reflects inadequate work, knowledge, and skill in meeting the performance objectives;
minimal requirements have generally been met. Participant demonstrates a minimal understanding
of reading comprehension. 67-69 = “D+”; 64-66 = “D”; 60-63 = “D-”

Below 60: fails the course

Each assignment will be graded separately and the graded assignments will be combined to reach a
final grade for this section. At any point, any attendance deductions will be taken. Please note, a
grade of “A” is considered exceptional work, a grade of “B” is considered good work and a “C” is
considered to be adequate work.




                                        USFSM POLICIES

   A. Academic Dishonesty: The University considers any form of plagiarism or cheating on
      exams, projects, or papers to be unacceptable behavior. Please be sure to review the
      university’s policy in the catalog, USFSM Undergraduate Catalog or USFSM Graduate Catalog
      and the USF Student Code of Conduct.

   B. Academic Disruption: The University does not tolerate behavior that disrupts the learning
      process. The policy for addressing academic disruption is included with Academic
      Dishonesty in the catalog: USFSM Undergraduate Catalog or USFSM Graduate Catalog and
      the USF Student Code of Conduct.


                                                                                                  7
C. Contingency Plans: In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USFSM to
   suspend normal operations. During this time, USFSM may opt to continue delivery of
   instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate,
   Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the
   student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and
   the main USFSM and College websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general
   information. The USF hotline at 1 (800) 992-4231 is updated with pre-recorded information
   during an emergency. See the Safety Preparedness Website for further information.

D. Disabilities Accommodation: Students are responsible for registering with the Office of
   Students with Disabilities Services (SDS) in order to receive academic accommodations.
   Reasonable notice must be given to the SDS office (typically 5 working days) for
   accommodations to be arranged. It is the responsibility of the student to provide each
   instructor with a copy of the official Memo of Accommodation. Contact Information: Pat
   Lakey, Coordinator, 941-359-4714, plakey@sar.usf.edu,
   www.sarasota.usf.edu/Students/Disability/

E. Fire Alarm Instructions: At the beginning of each semester please note the emergency
   exit maps posted in each classroom. These signs are marked with the primary evacuation
   route (red) and secondary evacuation route (orange) in case the building needs to be
   evacuated. See Emergency Evacuation Procedures.

F. Religious Observances: USFSM recognizes the right of students and faculty to observe
   major religious holidays. Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class
   for a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in
   writing, by the second week of classes. Instructors canceling class for a religious
   observance should have this stated in the syllabus with an appropriate alternative
   assignment.




                                                                                                8
                                        COURSE SCHEDULE

                            (Subject to Change at Instructor Discretion)

Week One: Course Overview and Introduction
   Introduction to the course and the technology
   Reading of syllabus
   Overview of assignments and expectation
   Getting to know the instructor and one another

Week Two: The Value and Impossibility of Children’s Literature
   Defining children’s literature
   Categories of literature/overviews of genres
   Introduction to critical reading of children’s literature;
   Ideology and children’s literature
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Three: Visual Elements in Children’s Literature/Genre: Picturebooks (Part I)
   Interplays between art and text in children’s literature
   Talking about art in children’s literature
   Reading Where the Wild Things Are (Sendak)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Four: Visual Elements in Children’s Literature/Genre: Picturebooks (Part II)
   Styles of art in children’s literature
   Critically reading art and illustration
   Reading Voices in the Park (Browne)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Five: Traditional Literature and Literary Lore/Genre: Folklore
   Generic elements of folklore
   Influence of folklore on contemporary literature
   Reading Rapunzel (Zelinsky)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Six: Imagining Possibility/Genres: Fantasy and Science Fiction
   Logic and consistency
   Extensions and suspensions of constructions of “reality”
   Reading Feed (Anderson)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Seven: Realism and Issues of Censorship/Genre: Contemporary Realistic Fiction
      Creating “realism” in children’s literature
      Cultural construction of childhood (cont.)
      Literary prizing and/as censorship
      Reading Becoming Naomi Leon (Ryan)
      Essential Assignment: Reflection paper



                                                                                     9
Week Eight: Blending and Balancing History and Fiction/Genre: Historical Fiction
   Modern models in children’s fiction
   Writing history in children’s literature
   Accuracy and representation in historical fiction
   Reading Al Capone Does My Shirts (Choldenko)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Nine: Constructing History and Historical Figures/Genres: Biography and Nonfiction
   Cultural construction of historical icons and “heroes”
   Problematizing fact and fiction
   Exemplary informational text
   Reading Rosa (Giovanni)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Ten: Spring Break
   No class this week

Week Eleven: Essence, Language, and (Multiple) Voice(s)/Genre: Poetry
   Appreciating elements of poetry
   Reading and exploring children’s poetry
   Reading Tropical Secrets: Holocaust Survivors in Cuba (Engle)
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper

Week Twelve: The Politics of Children’s Literature
   Essential Assignment: Creation, Production, and Consumption of Children’s
      Literature Discussion with Technology Component
   Politics of publishing
   Reading Skeleton Creek (Carman)
   Essential Assignment: Final Position Paper

Weeks Thirteen and Fourteen: Genre Analysis
   Beginning/Continuing work on the genre analysis assignment

Week Fifteen: Genre Analysis/Course Wrap-Up and Closing Conversations
   Course evaluation
   Submitting the Critical Task: Genre Analysis
   Essential Assignment: Reflection paper




                                                                                          10
                                          GENRE ANALYSIS RUBRIC

 This checklist provides further detail about the specific criteria for the genre analysis. This checklist will
          also be used by your instructor as a rubric for assessing your completed assignment.



                CRITERIA                                                                       SUCCESSFULLY
                                                                                               COMPLETED?

The CONTENTS of the genre analysis are clearly described in an essay
placed before the genre analysis begins. The essay should be
500-1000 words in length and describe the process of selecting books
and putting together the genre analysis. The relevance and meaning
of each book (for the author of the analysis) should be clear
and detailed.                                                                                  _______

The analysis contains exactly EIGHT pieces of quality
literature (one for each of the following genres: picture book,
fantasy and science fiction, contemporary realistic fiction, historical
fiction, folklore, biography, nonfiction, and poetry).
It also contains at least one novel.                                                           _______

The annotations for each piece of literature include the
bibliographic information (in APA format), a balanced summary
of the text as well as a brief description of how the book
uniquely meets the criteria for the genre it has been chosen to
represent.                                                                                     _______

The author addresses any problematic aspects of the book and
incorporates scholarly criticism where applicable.                                             _______

The genre analysis should contain multiple books depicting “authentic”
and “accurate” representations of populations that have been traditionally
under-represented in literature and media (“diverse” literature)                               _______

Adheres to scholarly conventions (i.e., APA format, typed, double
spaced) as described in class and in the syllabus                                              _______




                                                                                                             11
                                  LAE 4414 Teaching Literature Genre Analysis
                                             Links to Standards: “Diversity” and “Critical Thinking”
                                  Links to new Standards: “The Learning Environment” and “Critical Thinking”
                                              University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee



The purpose of this course is for students to survey and analyze the genres of children’s literature and apply this new understanding by
demonstrating an ability to select quality children’s literature. For this assignment, students will select children’s or young adult literature they
believe are exemplars for each of the genres we discuss in class (picturebook, folklore, fantasy and science fiction, contemporary realistic fiction,
historical fiction, biography, nonfiction, and poetry). Again, each selection must be quality children’s or young adult literature according to the
genre criteria discussed in class (i.e., the folklore text should contain some of the conventions and motifs that are traditional in the genre). This
collection must include a total of 8 texts – one from each of the genres we discuss in class and must include at least one novel. Students are
encouraged to be both thoughtful and careful in their selection – What is happening in this book? What will using this book “get” or “achieve” as
opposed to any other? How does this book meet the criteria for exemplary pieces of literature in this genre? Students should also be sure to
evaluate these texts critically and to fully incorporate “diverse” literature (according to the definition and criteria shared in class).




                                                                                                                                                        12
Semester:                           Student U-Number:                                       Assessor:


                                                       Level 1      Level 2     Level 3          Level 4     Level 5
        Assessment Criteria – Diversity                                                                                  Score
                                                     Unacceptable   Marginal   Proficient       Advanced   Exceptional

The genre analysis should contain multiple books
depicting “authentic” and “accurate”
representations of populations that have been
traditionally under-represented in literature and
media (“diverse” literature), respecting students’
cultural, linguistic, and family background.




   Assessment Criteria – Critical Thinking             Level 1      Level 2     Level 3          Level 4     Level 5     Score


Evaluate the texts critically, addressing any
problematic aspects of the book and incorporating
scholarly criticism where applicable.




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