Sleep by dffhrtcv3

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									    Sleep
  Margie Clark-Kevan

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ….
    Why do we need sleep?




http://web.ask.com/fr?q=fitness&desturi=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fitness2000.ca%2F&fm=i&ftURI
              Myth #1:
     Sleep = body and brain rest.
• Reality
   – Body systems do not
     shut down.
   – Some brain activity
     increases (Delta waves).
   – Some hormone
     secretions increase
     (growth and prolactin).


                                http://www.zoologie-skript.de/neuca/neuron2l.jpg
       Class Research Activity
                                    Research Topics
• The class will break into
                                      – Circadian clock
  six groups.
                                      – Growth hormones and sleep
• Each group will:                    – Serotonin and sleep
   – research one of the adjacent     – Nightly sleep brain events
     topics
                                      – Physiological differences
   – prepare a 5 minute oral            during NREM and REM
     presentation                       sleep
   – explain the topic and            – Melatonin and sleep
     explore its effect on teens      –   Melatonin
     and sleep                        –   DANA.org- brainweb and brain information-
                                          sleep
   – Include a written                –   Sleep disorders
     bibliography of 4+               –   Sleep and the brain (Gray Matters)
                                      –   Glossary of sleep-related terms
     acceptable sources.              –    Hot Topics in Current Research
                                      –   The processes underlying sleep regulation
             Myth #2:
 I need less sleep than my 8 year
            old sibling.
• Reality
   – Because of rapid
     growth, teens tend to
     need the same amount
     of sleep as pre-school
     children.
   – Nine+ hours of sleep
     per night!



                        JFK - Early Years http://homepages.uni-tuebingen.de/fred.yaniga/LPS-
                        JFK/jfk_and_siblings.jpg
              Myth #3:
   It’s not a big deal if I get an
    hour less of sleep at night.
• Reality
   – Each time segment of
     lost sleep accumulates
     as sleep debt.                      Quic kTime™ and a
                              TIFF ( Uncompress ed) decompr essor
                                 ar e neede d to s ee this picture.
   – Focus, performance,
     speed of thought and
     mood are affected.
                              http://www.worldwebmall.com/TSI/atomic_alarm_clock.jpg
              Myth #4:
       I can change my sleep
    requirements and schedule.
• Reality
   – The body’s biological
     clock times and
     controls a person’s                    QuickTime™ and a
     normal sleep/wake            TIFF (Uncompressed) decompress or
                                     are needed to see this picture.

     schedule.
   – Light exposure, eating
     and exercise patterns
     can affect the
     biological clock.
                              http://www.heroinhelp.net/images/teenager%2010.jpg
?                ?




    Why Sleep?


?                ?
    Can’t I get more done without it?
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                                                                                                                                                                      QuickTime™ and a
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                            QuickTime™ and a
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                                                                                       QuickTime™ and a
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                                                                                                                                                           QuickTime™ an d a
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          QuickTime™ and a
TIFF (Uncompressed) decompress or
   are needed to see this picture.
                                                                                                                      QuickTime™ and a
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                                                                                                               are needed to see this picture.
                                                                   QuickTime™ and a
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In life, quality wins out.
      Be your best!




http://www.kent.edu/photoessays/Sept2004/images/010HECMLKdanceI.jpg
              Sleep is a natural behavior.
                         QuickTime™ and a
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                  are needed to see this picture.                                    TIFF (Un compressed) decompressor
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 http://www.mythsdreamssymbols.com/images/sleepimage.jpg




                                                                                                                      QuickTime™ and a
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                     TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor
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http://extremeplusmarketing.net/pd/images/2puppies_thumb.jpg
                                                               http://www.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/D.Jefferies/jpgpics/koala-sleeping-001128.jpg
  1/3 of life is spent sleeping
because it’s essential to health!


           Sleep
  Sleep is required for survival
• Rats deprived of sleep die within 2-3 weeks
  of continued sleep deprivation.
• Rats with sleep debt live about five months
  compared to the normal 2-3 years.
• Humans deprived of sleep can become
  paranoid and hallucinogenic.
• 100,000 auto deaths per year are attributed
  to sleepiness- especially among teens.
            QuickTime™ and a
   TIFF (Uncompressed) decompre ssor
      are neede d to see this picture.




                                                                  QuickTime™ an d a
                                                         TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor
                                                            are need ed to see this picture.
    www.fadeeva.com/a60.html




              QuickTime™ and a
    TIFF (Un compressed) decompressor
       are neede d to se e this picture.




                                                http://www.luna7.com/images/Other%20Art/ragdolls%20hallucinate.jpg




http://www.sizemore.co.uk/may03/carwreck1.jpg
                 The Delicate Balance:
   Teen sleep needs versus teen sleep behaviors…


                                                    Small shifts in
                                                    behaviors or
                                                    motivations can have
                                                    significant biological
                                                    repercussions.




http://rock-on-rock-on.com/gallery-more-four.html
Teens face a biological conflict


Opposing forces
are at work.                                                     QuickTime™ and a
                                                        TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor
                                                           are neede d to see this picture.




                  http://www.photo.net/philg/digiphotos/200109-nikon-d1x/tug-of-war-from-raw.half.jpg
           Teen body at war!


• Night-time                • Greater teen sleep
  competition of              requirements
                   Versus
  the body’s                • Morning teamwork of
  physiological               the body’s
  functions                   physiological
                              functions
       Night-time competition
• Melatonin secretion is delayed causing a
  natural urge to stay up later.
Teens need 8.5-10 hours of sleep
           per night!

  9.25 hours is optimal for most teens!
                 Caution!!!
• Be careful about choosing to delay your sleep
  cycle!
• A later bed-time urge ≠ less sleep requirements!
• Once a later sleep cycle is established, it is
  difficult to reverse!
• Exposure to light has a direct effect on your
  circadian clock!
• Arousing activities (telephone, computer use,
  video games, TV, etc.) make it easy to ignore
  feelings of sleepiness!
   In the morning, the opposite
   biological effect is dominant!
• The later sleep cycle + increased sleep
  needs win over in the morning.
• The natural urge pushes teens to sleep in
  later in the day.
     If one does not sleep in….
• Sleep debt will accumulate.
• A feeling of jet lag occurs.
                   Question
• How much sleep debt
  accumulates after one
  week if a person who     • Seven hours of sleep
  needs 9 hours of sleep     debt occurs in just
  per night gets eight       one week!
  hours of sleep per
  night?
Are you in debt?




http://www.uweb.ucsb.edu/~kjmoore/Horton-Yawn--02-17-2001.jpg
               Class Activity


• Each member of the
  class will record their                            QuickTime™ and a
                                           TIFF (Uncompressed) decompress or
  personal sleep data in                      are needed to see this picture.

  a sleep diary.
• interactive sleep diary
• sleepiness diary
                            http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih3/sleep/images/guide/diary_fig0-1.jpg
                 Question
                         • Yes and no…
• Does sleeping in on
                         • Making up for lost sleep on
  the weekend help you     weekends unfortunately just
  “catch up on sleep?      continues the cycle.
                         • Just as the body adjusts to the
                           earlier retiring/rising schedule
                           by the end of the week, the
                           body is then subjected to a late
                           night/sleeping in situation on
                           the weekend.
    Early bed-times are possible!
• Even with delayed
  melatonin levels, you can
  resist the biological urge
  to stay up late
   – Keep your circadian clock
     maintained.
       • Be consistent with your
         sleep patterns.
   – Avoid bright lights before
     retiring.
       • The absence of light
         signals melatonin release.
   – Engage in calming activities
     before retiring.
                                      http://pictures.ask.com/pictures?q=calm+night&qsrc=31&o=0
  Evidences of Sleep Deprivation
• Irritability
    – Can cause increased anger.
    – Can cause increased
      impatience.
    – Can increase moodiness.
    – Can lead to relationship
      difficulties

                                   http://www.nyahnyah.net/fb/sum/25akitomiffed.jpg
• Difficulty in focusing
    – Decreased performance
        • In school
        • In athletics
        • In driving ability



                                       http://www.nyahnyah.net/fb/sum/25akitomiffed.jpg
                        Effects of Sleep Debt
                                                                          • Increased death and injury
                                                                            caused by accidents-
                                                                            especially car accidents.
                                                                          • Poor grades and school
                                                                            performance.
                                                                          • Increased anger, fear and
                                                                            sadness.
                                                                          • Decreased ability in
                                                                            controlling emotions and
                                                                            behavior.
                                                                          • Decreased ability to focus,
                                                                            sit still, and complete
                                                                            work.
                                                                          • Increased use of
http://www.franklinparklibrary.org/programs/images/may2001art/angry.jpg     stimulants- especially
                                                                            caffeine and nicotine.
Sleep debt can mimic ADHD
                                     • Symptoms are similar
                                        –   Memory problems
                                        –   Mood changes
                                        –   Focus problems
                                        –   Restlessness
                                        –   Poor performance
                                        –  Adolescent ADHD: Sleep,
                                          Symptoms and Medication
                                        – Renew - Sleep and Stress:
                                          Children’s Sleep Patterns Related
                                          to Behavior-Study
                                        – Neurocognitive Consequences of
                                          Sleep Deprivation
                                        – Sleep Patterns and Sleep
                                          Disruptions in School-Age
                                          Children
http://www.youthchg.com/swivel.gif
       Sleep debt can cause weight gain
                                                                    • Sleep loss decreases leptin
                                                                      levels
                                                                       – an appetite depressor
                                                                         hormone
                                                                    • Sleep loss increases
                                                                      ghrelin levels
                                                                       – an appetite stimulator
                                                                         hormone
                                                                       –    Is obesity associated with poor sleep quality
                                                                           in adolescents?
                                                                       –   Gene expression profiles in gastric mucosa of
                                                                           sleep deprivation rats
                                                                       –   Sleep loss may equal weight gain
                                                                       –    Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats:
                                                                           effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted
                                                                           feeding, and sleep deprivation

http://www.obesityonline.org/slides/slideimgs/talk034__s010_f.gif      –   Sleep the Fat Off
                                                                       –   Brief communication: Sleep curtailment in
                                                                           healthy young men is associated with
                                                                           decreased leptin levels, elevated ghrelin levels,
Try a new phenomenal weight
         loss plan!




    http://www.poster.net/van-gogh-vincent/van-gogh-vincent-bedroom-at-arles-2802134.jpg




                          Go to bed!
Sleep debt decreases performance
                                                    • Teen driving
                                                      performance is lowered.

                                                       – Concentration is required
                                                         for safe driving.
                                                       – Morning crashes occur as
                                                         well as evening ones.
                                                       – Teens hold the majority of
                                                         sleep related car accidents.
                                                       – Ask Mr. Traffic - sleep and
                                                         driving
http://www.edmunds.com/media/ownership/driving/dr
ivers.ed.online/teen.driving.2.500.jpg
                                                       – Drowsy Driving: Detection
                                                         and Prevention
Sleep debt decreases performance
                                                     • Teen athletic performance is
                                                       lowered.
                                                        – Concentration and focus are
                                                          required for optimal physical
                                                          exertion.
                                                        – Athletes require quick reaction
                                                          times.
                                                        – A rested recovered body will
                                                          perform best.
                                                        – Good athletic performance
                                                          requires good attitudes.
                                                        – Peak performance requires
                                                          rehearsals.
                                                        – Peak performance requires
http://www.roadcycling.com/artman/uploads/armstron        energy!
g_004.jpg
Sleep debt decreases performance
                                       • Teen academic performance
                                         is lowered.
                                          – Memory and learning require
                                            sleep.
                                          – Concentration and focus are
                                            required for optimal mental
                                            exertion.
                                          – A rested mind will perform at
                                            its best.
                                          – Good academic performance
                                            requires good attitudes.
                                          – Peak performance requires
                                            rehearsals.
                                          – Peak performance requires
http://www.psy.ohio-                        energy!
state.edu/psy312/images/cogbrain.gif
      Create an experiment!
                                                              • Design a simple method to
                                                                test some aspect of sleep
                                                                related performance.
                                                              • You can choose reaction
                                                                rate, memory,
                                                                coordination, etc.
                                                              • Test students.
                                                              • Create an Excel graph
                                                                which compares
                                                                performance data with
                                                                sleep diary data for each
                                                                student tested.
http://www.joe-ks.com/images/EarlyTransportationStudies.gif
Nine easy ways to keep your
    sleep cycle intact…




     http://www.healthylivingintl.com/images/sleepguyhay.jpg
                                  #1
Maintain consistent bed-times and rising times.




             http://plenoptic.cureless.net/wakingsleeping.jpg
                   #2
Be aware of your
personal
circadian rhythm



                        http://www.effinchamp.org/clock.jpg
                    #3
Limit caffeine
and nicotine
intake after 2:00
p.m.

                         http://www.carl.n1.pl/1/coffee.jpg
                       #4
Limit arousal
activities 1-2 hours
before bedtime.

(Avoid TV, video
games, exercise,
phone, IM, etc.
before bed.)                Zack Schildhorn '07/University Photography
                     #5

Limit light intake
an hour before
retiring.



                      http://www.rockefeller.edu/images/clock2.gif
                      #6

Keep your sleeping
area for sleep- not
rousing activity!

                      http://stuff.mit.edu/people/ec_mok/www/henry/jordan's%20bed%20008.jpg
                        #7

An hour before
retiring, engage in
calming or
relaxation activities


                             http://store.chopra.com/uploads/1%20wi%20yoga.jpg
                     #8

Avoid jobs that
require late hours




                     http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/immigration/gfx/worker_1868093.jpg
                      #9

Expose yourself to
bright light in the
morning stimulate
waking.


                      http://homepage2.nifty.com/kenkitagawa/Hopper-morning-sun.jpg
            Final Thoughts…
• Experience life more                                       Reward!
  fully- without the fog
  of a sleepy brain.
• Experience peak
  performance skills and
  learning abilities.
• Experience mental and
  physical challenges
  with a positive          www.zednotzee.ca/ peakperf.html

  attitude.
NSTA Standards for Science
Standard 1: Content
      Teachers of science understand and can articulate the knowledge and practices of contemporary science. They can interrelate and interpret important
     concepts, ideas, and applications in their fields of licensure; and can conduct scientific investigations. To show that they are prepared in content, teachers of
     science must demonstrate that they: a. Understand and can successfully convey to students the major concepts, principles, theories, laws, and
     interrelationships of their fields of licensure and supporting fields as recommended by the National Science Teachers Association. b. Understand and can
     successfully convey to students the unifying concepts of science delineated by the National Science Education Standards. c. Understand and can successfully
     convey to students important personal and technological applications of science in their fields of licensure. d. Understand research and can successfully
     design, conduct, report and evaluate investigations in science. e. Understand and can successfully use mathematics to process and report data, and solve

      problems, in their field(s) of licensure.
C.2.a. Core Competencies. All teachers of biology should be prepared to lead students to understand the unifying concepts required of all teachers of science, and
       should in addition be prepared to lead students to understand:
       9. Behavior of organisms and their relationships to social systems.
       10. Regulation of biological systems including homeostatic mechanisms.


      12. Applications of biology in environmental quality and in personal and community health.
      14. Biochemical interactions of organisms with their environments.
      20. How to design, conduct, and report research in biology.
      21. Applications of biology and biotechnology in society, business, industry, and health fields.
Standard 3: Inquiry
      Teachers of science engage students both in studies of various methods of scientific inquiry and in active learning through scientific inquiry. They encourage students,
      individually and collaboratively, to observe, ask questions, design inquiries, and collect and interpret data in order to develop concepts and relationships from empirical
      experiences. To show that they are prepared to teach through inquiry, teachers of science must demonstrate that they:
       a. Understand the processes, tenets, and assumptions of multiple methods of inquiry leading to scientific knowledge.
       b. Engage students successfully in developmentally appropriate inquiries that require them to develop concepts and relationships from their observations, data, and inferences in

      a scientific manner.
Standard 4: Issues Teachers of science recognize that informed citizens must be prepared to make decisions and take action on contemporary science- and
      technology-related issues of interest to the general society. They require students to conduct inquiries into the factual basis of such issues and to assess
      possible actions and outcomes based upon their goals and values. To show that they are prepared to engage students in studies of issues related to science,
      teachers of science must demonstrate that they:
       a. Understand socially important issues related to science and technology in their field of licensure, as well as processes used to analyze and make decisions
      on such issues.
      b. Engage students successfully in the analysis of problems, including considerations of risks, costs, and benefits of alternative solutions; relating these to the

      knowledge, goals and values of the students.
Standard 5: General Skills of Teaching Teachers of science create a community of diverse learners who construct meaning from their science experiences and
      possess a disposition for further exploration and learning. They use, and can justify, a variety of classroom arrangements, groupings, actions, strategies, and
      methodologies. To show that they are prepared to create a community of diverse learners, teachers of science must demonstrate that they:
http://www.nsta.org/professionalinfo
http://www.unizh.ch/phar/sleep/sleepreg.htm
http://www.unizh.ch/phar/sleep/glossary.htm
http://www.dana.org/brainweb/
http://www.brains.org/hottopics.htm
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/education/doe/organization/curriculum/CurriculumFrameworks/ScienceFrameworks.htm
http://familydoctor.org/258.xml
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=15583226&dopt=Citation
http://cms.psychologytoday.com/articles/pto-20050203-000001.html
http://ajpregu.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/287/5/R1071
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2004-12-06-sleep-weight-gain_x.htm
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/99019036/ABSTRACT
http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/165/5/562
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http://search2.google.cit.nih.gov/search?site=NIH_Master&client=NIH_frontend&proxystylesheet=NIH_frontend&output=xml_no_dtd&filter=0&getfie
http://sleepfoundation.org/quiz/sleepdiary2.html
http://www.dana.org/books/press/brainnews/bitn_0105a.cfm#4
http://www.thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_03/i_03_m/i_03_m_par/i_03_m_par_alcool.html
http://www.dana.org/brainweb/brainweb.cfm?CategoryID=17
http://www.athleticinsight.com/
http://www.neuroguide.com/index.html
http://www.sciencenews.org/pages/sn_arc97/5_24_97/fob2.htm
http://www.dana.org/grants/health/clinicalneuroresearch.cfm
http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih2/addiction/guide/guide_lessons_toc.htm
http://arbl.cvmbs.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/endocrine/hypopit/gh.html
http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1914.htm
file:///Users/e119users/Desktop/margie-%20/Why%20Sleep%20Is%20Important.html
http://www.aasmnet.org/
http://apu.sfn.org/Template.cfm?Section=PublicResources&Template=PublicResources/SubCategory.cfm&cat_id=1

								
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