2010 CIRP UI Summary

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					    Institutional Research and Assessment Report

    March 22, 2011


                                    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
                             CIRP FRESHMAN SURVEY RESULTS
                                            FALL 2010
Each fall since 1992, the University of Idaho has administered the UCLA-HERI Cooperative
Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman Survey, in order to better understand our
incoming class of students. The survey yields information on student demographics, study
patterns and social activities in the senior year of high school, academic self-assessment, career
goals, ways of financing college education, and objectives of college study. In addition, we are
able to compare how University of Idaho students differ from students nationwide and from
previous classes of University of Idaho students. As in the past several years, the survey was
administered in the Core Discovery courses, a required course for all freshmen; 1,576 first-time
full-time freshmen responded, yielding a seventy-five percent (75%) response rate of students
enrolled in the first-year course, up one percent (1%) from last year.

Eighty-one percent (81%, no change from the past two years) of respondents described the racial
composition of the last high school they attended as “mostly” or “completely white” compared
with sixty-four percent (64%) of their peers. Additionally, eighty-seven percent (87%, up 2%)
described the neighborhood where they grew up as “mostly” or “completely white” compared
with seventy-five percent (75%) of their peers. Also consistent with previous years, ninety-two
percent (92%, no change) are White/Caucasian.

Interestingly, University of Idaho students spend less time “partying” than in any previous year,
with over one-half (56%, up 1%) reporting they spent “less than one hour” or “none” per week,
which is the lowest rate since our initial participation in the survey in 1992. However, students
from public universities in general spent even less time “partying”, with fewer than one-half
(48%) reporting an hour a week or less.

Twenty-five percent (25%) of respondents reported that they think there is a chance they will
“seek personal counseling” this year. Along with a decline in self-confidence, self-understanding
and emotional health, this follows the national trend. This suggests that our students will be
coming to us requiring added assistance with transition issues.

Consistent with previous years, University of Idaho women’s responses about their activities
during their last year in high school were slightly different from those of the men, as were those
at public institutions. Women were likely to report they spent more time studying, working,
volunteering, in student clubs or groups, talking with teachers, in online social networks, and
reading for pleasure than were men, but less time exercising, partying, playing video games,
socializing with friends, or watching TV.

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                           1
                          CIRP FRESHMAN SURVEY RESULTS
                                    FALL 2010

INTRODUCTION
Each fall since 1992, the University of Idaho has administered the UCLA-HERI Cooperative
Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman Survey, in order to better understand our
incoming class of students. The survey generates information on student demographics, study
patterns and social activities in the senior year of high school, academic self-assessment, career
goals, ways of financing college education, and objectives of college study. In addition, we are
able to compare how University of Idaho students differ from students nationwide and from
previous classes of University of Idaho freshmen. These data are used to plan and improve
academic programs and student services.

As in the past several years, the survey was administered in the Core Discovery courses, a
required course for all freshmen; 1,576 first-time full-time freshmen responded, yielding a
seventy-five percent (75%) response rate of students enrolled in the first-year course, up one
percent (1%) from last year. Response rates are dependent on the cooperation of faculty in the
CORE Discovery courses, and the University of Idaho is grateful for their time and commitment
to this project.

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS
Consistent with previous years, ninety-two percent (92%) of first-time full-time freshmen
graduated from public high schools, charter schools or magnet schools (6% more than other
public universities); seven percent (7%) from private schools, and one percent (1%) were home-
schooled. Ninety-six percent (96%, no change from last year) reported that they had graduated
from high school in 2010 (compared to 99% of their peers at all public universities). Ninety-
eight percent (98%, up 1% from 2009) reported they are 19 years of age or younger. Freshman
women have consistently reported being slightly younger than men, with sixty-four percent
(64%, up 1%) of women reporting they were 18 or younger on December 31, 2009 compared
with fifty-seven percent (57%, up 3%) of men. Fewer than one percent of respondents (0.4%)
currently have veteran status with the US Armed Forces, military reserve or National Guard.
This is very slightly more than last year.

Fewer respondents reported they had an average grade in high school of A-, A or A+ than those
in 2009 (46%, down 3%), with forty-seven percent (47%, up 1%) reporting a grade point average
of B-, B or B+. Consistent with previous years, women reported higher GPAs than men, with
thirteen percent (13%, down 3%) more women reporting they received a GPA of A-, A or A+
during high school. SAT and ACT scores were lower for University of Idaho students than for
their peers at public universities. Eighty-one percent (81%, no change from the past two years)
of respondents described the racial composition of the last high school they attended as “mostly”
or “completely white” compared with sixty-four percent (64%) of their peers. Additionally,
eighty-seven percent (87%, up 2%) described the neighborhood where they grew up as “mostly”
or “completely white” compared with seventy-five percent (75%) of their peers.

Also consistent with previous years, ninety-two percent (92%, no change) are White/Caucasian,
and over seven out of ten reported their permanent home is more than 100 miles away from the

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                           2
Moscow campus. Seventeen percent (17%, up 1%) report they are first generation in college.
(Note: this is below the nearly 30% frequently reported as “first-generation” students at UI. The
difference is primarily due to the CIRP defining “first-generation” as students whose parents
have no postsecondary education while the UI admissions form asks whether either parent has
obtained a bachelor’s degree. This is the correct question to determine eligibility for TRIO
programs, but obviously results in a higher proportion of students classified as “first-
generation.”) Ninety-two percent (92%, up 7% [likely due to the new residency rule]) planned to
live in on-campus housing during their fall term at the University of Idaho, with nearly one-third
(30%, up 1%) reporting they will live in a fraternity or sorority house compared to just over three
percent (3%) of their peers at public universities. Nearly all respondents are U.S. citizens (99%)
while ninety-six percent (96%) reported English as their native language.

Seventy-one percent (71%, up 3%) of respondents estimate their parents make less than
$100,000 per year, with the median in the range of $60,000 to $74,999, consistent with last year.
Over one-half of students reported their fathers (53%, down 2%) and mothers (52%, no change)
had a college or graduate degree; both are less than their peers at public universities (who
reported 59% for both their fathers and mothers). Seventy-three percent (73%, no change) of
freshmen reported their parents are “both alive and living with each other” compared to seventy-
two (72%) of their peers at public universities. While twenty-three percent (23%, down 3%)
percent of respondents reported their fathers have no religious preference and sixteen percent
(16%, down 4%) reported their mothers have none, thirty-two percent (32%, no change) of
freshmen reported they themselves have no religious preference. Twenty-one percent (21%,
down 4%) consider themselves “Born-Again Christian”, and eleven percent (11%) consider
themselves “Evangelical.” In contrast, sixty-nine percent (69%, up 3%) reported they frequently
or occasionally attended religious services during the previous year. Women report having a
religious preference more often than men do; and peers from public institutions report having a
religious preference more often than UI respondents.

In a question restored to the survey this year from previous years, freshmen were asked how
often they had studied a variety of subjects during grades 9 to 12. Ninety-five percent of
University of Idaho students reported studying English for four years, ninety-two percent (92%)
studied mathematics for three (24%) to four years (68%), seventy percent (70%) reported
studying foreign language for two (50%) to three (20%) years, sixty-nine percent studied
physical science for one (38%) to two (31%) years, eighty-three percent studied biological
sciences for one (53%) to two (29%) years, eighty percent (80%) studied history and American
government for three (34%) to four (46%) years, thirty-four percent (34%) studied computer
science for one year (while 31% did not study computer science at all), and twenty-four percent
(24%) studied arts and/or music for one year (an additional 48% studied for more than one year.)

Eight percent (8%, no change) of University of Idaho freshmen had taken courses for credit from
the University of Idaho, while only four percent (4%) of their peers had taken courses for credit
from their own institutions. Fourteen percent (14%) of University of Idaho students had taken
courses from other institutions since leaving high school, as had ten percent (10%) of their peers.

The 2010 CIRP Freshman Survey asked responded whether or not they had any disabilities or
medical conditions. University of Idaho students responded:

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                            3
      3% Learning disability (dyslexia, etc.)
      4% Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
      3% Physical disability (speech, sight, mobility, hearing, etc.)
      1% Chronic illness (cancer, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, etc.)
      5% Psychological disorder (depression, etc.)
      2% Other
Seventy-one percent (71%, down 1%) of students reported that the University of Idaho was their
first choice for college this year, compared with only sixty-two percent (62%) reporting the same
nationally regarding the university they are attending. Ninety-two percent (92%) reported they
were accepted by their first choice college, compared with only seventy-nine percent (79%) of
their peers at public universities. Twenty-nine percent (29%, down 3%) did not apply for
admission to any colleges other than the University of Idaho.

RESPONSE COMPARISONS
Skills and Abilities
Each year, freshmen are asked to rate themselves on a list of skills and abilities "compared with
the average person your age". University of Idaho students’ ratings are typically lower than
similar self-ratings provided by their peers at public universities on all attributes. The chart
below shows the differences in the ratings.
                                      Freshman Academic Self-Confidence
                                Rating Self "Above Average" or In "Highest 10%"
                                                     2010
                                     Writing ability
                             Understanding Others
                               Self-Understanding
                            Social Self-Confidence
                       Intellectual Self-Confidence
                            Public Speaking ability
                                         Popularity
                                    Physical health
                                Mathematic Ability
                                 Leadership Ability
      Public
      Universities                Emotional Health
                                  Drive to Achieve
                                          Creativity
                                  Cooperativeness
                                   Computer Skills
                                  Competitiveness
                                     Artistic Ability
                                 Aacademic Ability
         Seeing the World from Other's Perspective
                      Tolerance of different beliefs
               Openness to Having View Challenges
                                        Spirituality
            Work Cooperatively with Diverse People

                                                        0   10   20   30   40    50    60   70   80   90
                                                                             Percent



IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                                      4
Activities
Each year students are asked to report on their activities during the previous year, typically their
senior year in high school. The top five activities in which students reported participating
“frequently” or “occasionally” were the same as in 2009: “used the Internet for research or
homework” (99%, up 1%); “was bored in class” (96%, up 1%); “socialized with someone of
another racial/ethnic group” (95%, up 2%); “felt overwhelmed by all I had to do” (89%, no
change); and, “discussed politics” (86%, down 1%). The table below illustrates the areas with
differences of more than five percent (5%) in responses from University of Idaho students and
students from other public universities who participated in the activity “frequently” or
“occasionally.”
                        Activities Performed During the Past Year
               100
                90
                80
                70
                60
     Percent




                50
                                                                                     UI
                40
                30                                                                   Public
                                                                                     Universities
                20
                10
                 0




Other activities of interest included: “demonstrated for/against a cause” with fifty-six percent
(56%) of University of Idaho students reporting “frequently” or “occasionally” compared to sixty
percent (60%) of peers; “studied with other students” (UI 86%, peers 88%); “smoked cigarettes”
(UI 18%, peers 14%); “performed volunteer work” (UI 85%, peers 88%); “asked a teacher for
advice after class” (UI 85%, peers 86%); “voted in a student election” (UI 76%, peers 73%);
“came late to class” (UI 56%, peers 56%); “discussed religion” (UI 83%, peers 81%); “worked
on a local, state, or national political campaign” (UI 8%, peers 10%); and “fell asleep in class”
(UI 50%, peers 48%). Two new activities were added this year: “publicly communicated my
opinion about a cause (e.g. blog, email, petition)” (UI 41%, peers 49%), and “helped raise money
for a cause or campaign” (UI 53%, peers 60%).


IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                               5
Financing College Education
This year’s survey results show that while students from public universities in general are
slightly less concerned about their ability to finance their college education, University of Idaho
students are more concerned. Sixty-seven percent (67% up 3%) of University of Idaho students
are concerned; higher this year that the last several years. Eight out of ten students report that
there is “some” or a “very good” chance that they will have to get a job to help pay for college
expenses, with one-quarter (25%) reporting the chances are good they will work full-time while
attending college. Of students who report they expect to work during the current fall semester,
six percent (6%) expect to be working 25 or more hours per week.

University of Idaho students are less likely to use "family resources" than are their peers, with
forty percent (40%, down 1%), reporting they will use less than $1,000, compared with only
thirty percent (30%) at public universities. Seventy-two percent (72%, up 2%, compared to 68%
of peers) expect to help pay for college with their “own resources.” Slightly fewer University of
Idaho students are receiving aid which need not be repaid (grants, scholarships, military funding,
etc.) than last year (1%). In addition, University of Idaho students receive slightly more aid that
need not be repaid than their peers at public universities. Sixty-eight percent (68%, up 1%)
anticipate using more than $1,000 from “aid which need not be repaid” (2% higher than their
peers), and forty-seven percent (47%, up 4%) from “aid which must be repaid” (compared to
48% for their peers). About five percent (5%, up 1%) will use money from “other” sources.

Reasons for Attending College
The most frequently selected reason for attending the University of Idaho is “this college has a
very good academic reputation” (92%, up 6% from the previous year). Additional top reasons
for choosing the University of Idaho include “the cost of attending this college” (89%, up 1%,
10% above peers); “this college’s graduates get good jobs” (81%, up 1%, but 8% lower than
peers); “this college has a good reputation for its social activities” (81%, up 1% but 5% below
peers); and “I wanted to go to a school about the size of this college” (80%, up 2%, 5% higher
than peers).

Those items with the least impact on the decision to attend the University of Idaho, and reported
as “very important” by the fewest number of respondents, included “private college counselor
advised me” (1%), “the ability to take online courses” (2%), and “I was attracted by the religious
affiliation/orientation of the college” (2%).

Other reasons that students felt were “very important” or “somewhat” important in their decision
to attend the University of Idaho were:

      “A visit to campus” (79%);
      “I was offered financial assistance” (78%)
      “This college’s graduates gain admission to top graduate/professional schools” (56%);
      “I wanted to live near home” (45%);
      “Information from a website” (45%);
      “My parents wanted me to come here” (44%);
      “Rankings in national magazines” (31%);

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                            6
      “My teacher advised me” (28%);
      “Could not afford first choice” (27%);
      “My relatives wanted me to come here” (27%);
      “My high school counselor advised me” (26%);
      “I was admitted through an Early Action or Early Decision program” (18%);
      “The athletic department recruited me” (10%), and,
      “Not offered aid by first choice (1%).

Sixty-five percent (65%) of University of Idaho respondents “agree strongly” or “agree
somewhat” that “the current economic situation significantly affected my college choice.” This
question is new this year.

Students were again asked how important certain elements were in their decisions to go to
college in general. Those responses, in order of importance, were “to learn more about things
that interest me” (99%); “to be able to get a better job” (98%); “to get training for a specific
career” (97%); “to gain a general education and appreciation of ideas” (96%); “to be able to
make more money” (95%); “to make me a more cultured person” (83%); and, “to prepare myself
for graduate or professional school” (80%).

Nearly three-quarters (71%) of University of Idaho respondents reported that the highest
academic degree they intend to obtain “at any college” was either a bachelor’s or master’s
degree, with an additional twenty-seven percent (27%, up 3%) reporting they plan to obtain a
Ph.D., Ed.D., J.D., medical, or divinity degree. Ninety-eight percent (98%, down 1%) of
University of Idaho respondents reported they intended to obtain their degree at this college.
However, when asked specifically “do you expect to complete your degree at University of
Idaho”, only seventy-six percent (76%, up 1%) responded “yes”, while eight percent (8%, no
change) do not plan to earn a degree or plan to transfer, and seventeen percent (16%, down 1%)
reported, “I don’t know.” For the six percent (6%, down 1%) who are planning to transfer, the
primary reason is “personal” (32%, down 1%), with an additional twenty-nine percent (29%, up
4%) reporting that they are looking for a “stronger program in major/career interest.” Other
reasons for transferring include: “financial reasons” (19%, up 4%), “the UI doesn’t offer a major
in my chosen field” (11%, down 3%), and “other college/university closer to home” (8%, down
4%).

Student Effort and Engagement
One component of an effective teaching and learning environment is an understanding of not
only the academic engagement of students, but also the attitudes and experiences beyond
academia of our incoming freshman. Several items in the CIRP Freshman Survey ask students to
report on their participation in specific activities during their last year in high school.

It is interesting to note that University of Idaho students spent slightly less time studying than
reported in the previous two years, and significantly less than their peers at public universities.
Seventy-four percent (74%, down 1% from the previous year) of the respondents reported
spending between one and ten hours in a typical week studying or doing homework during their
last year in high school; the largest group of students (33%, up 2%) reported they spent “3 to 5
hours” in a typical week, and eighteen percent (18%, down 2%) reported spending “6 to 10

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                            7
hours.” Seventeen percent (17%, up 1%) of their peers from public universities reported
spending 11 or more hours studying per week, compared to twelve percent (12%, up 1%) from
the University of Idaho.

The median amount of time spent “socializing with friends,” for those who reported more than 0
hours, was “6 to 10 hours” again this year. Other category medians for those elements of
activities in a typical week include “student clubs/groups” (“1 to 2 hours,” ), “exercise or sports”
(“6 to 10 hours”), “playing video/computer games” (“1 to 2 hours”), “volunteer work” (“less
than one hour”), “watching TV” (“3 to 5 hours”), “reading for pleasure” (“less than one hour”),
“talking with teachers outside of the class” (“less than one hour”), “household/childcare duties”
(“1 to 2 hours”), and “online social networks (MySpace, Facebook, etc.)” (“1 to 2 hours”).

Interestingly, University of Idaho students spend less time “partying” than in any previous year,
with over one-half (56%, up 1%) reporting they spent less than one hour or none per week,
which is the lowest rate since the University of Idaho began participating in the survey in 1992.
However, their peers spent slightly less time than University of Idaho students, with fewer than
one-half (48%) spending no time or less than one hour per week “partying.”

In addition, sixty-three percent (63%, down 4%) of University of Idaho students worked for pay
during the previous year, with nearly one-half (45%) working six or more hours in a typical
week. Only fifty-six percent (56%) of students from public institutions worked for pay with
forty-three percent (43%) working six or more hours per week.

Consistent with previous years, University of Idaho women’s responses about their activities
during their last year in high school were slightly different from those of the men, as were those
at public institutions. Women were likely to report they spent more time studying, working,
volunteering, in student clubs or groups, talking with teachers, in online social networks, and
reading for pleasure than were men, but less time exercising, partying, playing video games,
socializing with friends, or watching TV.

In one item students are asked to estimate the chances that they will complete certain activities
which research shows can increase student engagement. In twenty-one of twenty-four items,
University of Idaho students reported their chances of participation were significantly lower than
those reported by their peers at public universities. The top most frequently reported areas in
which UI respondents reported the chances are “very good” were:
     “Make at least “B” average” (62%);
     “Be satisfied with your college” (54%);
     “Socialize with someone of another racial/ethnic group” (53%);
     “Get a job to help pay for college expenses” (46%); and,
     “Discuss course content with students outside of class” (46%).

Those areas in which there was the greatest difference between University of Idaho students and
their peers reporting the chances were “very good” include:
     “Join a social fraternity or sorority” (32% UI, 12% peers);
     “Participate in student clubs/groups” (31% UI, 49% peers);
     “Communicate regularly with your professors” (24% UI, 36% peers);

IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                             8
     “Socialize with someone of another racial/ethnic groups” (53% UI, 64% peers);
     “Participate in a study abroad program” (21% UI, 31% peers); and,
     “Get tutoring help in specific courses” (18% UI, 30% peers).
The final elements ask student how good the chances are they will “participate in volunteer or
community services work” (67% “very good chance” or “some chance”); “seek personal
counseling” (25%); “have a roommate of different race/ethnicity” (67%); and, new this year,
“take courses from more than one college simultaneously” (16%).

Other elements ask students how “frequently” they participated in a variety of activities during
the past year. The chart below illustrates the differences between University of Idaho student
responses and those of their peers at public universities.

                                     During the Past Year, Students Would Frequently

       U Idaho

       Public Universities


                                              Ask questions in class

                     Support your opinions with a logical argument

            Seek solutions to problems and explain them to others

                         Revise your papers to improve your writing

    Evaluate the quality or reliability of information you received

                 Take a risk because you feel you have more to gain

                             Seek alternative solutions to a problem

                   Look up scientific research articles and resources

Explore topics on your own, even though it was not required for a
                             class

                     Accept mistakes as part of the learning process

                             Seek feedback on your academic work

                                             Take notes during class

                     Work with other students on class assignments

                                                                        0%   20%   40%   60%   80%




IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                                9
Objectives Considered Important
The top five objectives that University of Idaho students considered “essential” or “very
important” are the same top five as last year and the same as those selected by all public
universities. Students reported the following as “essential” or “very important”:

       “Being very well off financially” (73%);
       “Raising a family” (70%);
       “Helping others who are in difficulty” (59%);
       “Becoming an authority in my field” (58%);
       “Obtaining recognition from my colleagues for contributions to my special field” (50%);
       “Improving my understanding of other countries and cultures” (44%);
       “Developing a meaningful philosophy of life” (41%);
       “Becoming successful in a business of my own” (40%);
       “Adopting ‘green’ practices to protect the environment” (32%).
       “Influencing social values” (32%);
       “Keeping up to date with political affairs” (30%);
       “Becoming a community leader” (28%);
       “Helping to promote racial understanding” (26%);
       “Becoming involved in programs to clean up the environment” (22%);
       “Participating in a community action program” (21%);
       “Making a theoretical contribution to science” (19%);
       “Influencing the political structure” (15%);
       “Becoming accomplished in one of the performing arts (acting, dancing, etc.)” (14%);
       “Creating artistic works (painting, sculpture, decorating, etc.)” (14%); and,
       “Writing original works (poems, novels, short stories, etc.)” (13%).

Political Views and Opinions
Respondents from both public universities and the University of Idaho are continuing to move
slightly to the right when describing their political views, though, as in the past, University of
Idaho students appear to be slightly more conservative than their peers overall. Nonetheless,
most University of Idaho students characterize themselves as middle-of-the-road (44%, up 2%),
while one-third characterize themselves as conservative or far right (34%, up 3%) and with under
one-quarter reporting they are liberal or far left (22%, down 5%).

The table below lists a series of social issues in which students responded “strongly agree” or
“somewhat agree.”




IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                          10
                               Students "Strongly" or "Somewhat" Agree on Social Issues                    Public
                                                                                                           Universities
                                                                                                           UI




     Gays and lesbians should have the legal right to adopt a child

  The chief benefit of a college education is that it increases one's
                           earning power

           Addressing global warming should be a federal priority

   The federal government should raise taxes to reduce the deficit

A national health care plan is needed to cover everybody's medical
                                costs
           The federal government is not doing enough to control
                          environmental pollution
     The federal government should do more to control the sale of
                             handguns

     Affirmative action in college admissions should be abolished

   Wealthy people should pay a larger share of taxes than they do
                               now
                                                                        0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%      70%   80%   90%    100%




 SUPPLEMENTAL UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO QUESTIONS
 The final set of items on the Freshman Survey is a series of supplemental questions provided by
 the University of Idaho for UI students only. As in the past, nearly seven of ten freshmen (68%,
 no change) reported that they made the decision to attend the University of Idaho in their senior
 year in high school. Fifty-six percent (56%, up 2%) reported that they had considered seriously
 other non-Idaho public institutions, while forty-four percent (44%) considered other Idaho
 schools this year and nineteen percent (19%, down 1%) only considered attending the University
 of Idaho.

 Sixty-two percent (62%, up 2%) “agreed” or “strongly agreed” that participating in events such
 as the Jazz Festival, JEMS, FFA or other University of Idaho-sponsored events influenced their
 decision to attend this school. “Personal contacts from a college representative” and “World
 Wide Web admission and information sites” continue to be considerably more effective than
 recruitment videos, informational brochures, or degree specific brochures in assisting students to
 make the decision to attend the University of Idaho.

 Nearly eight of ten students reported they were satisfied with the advising process, and nine of
 ten were satisfied with their class schedules, as in previous years. Whereas eighty-nine percent
 (89%, no change) were “very certain” or “somewhat certain” about their career goals, sixteen
 percent (16%, down 1%) were uncertain of their choice of major.

 Finally, ninety-two percent (92%, up 2%) of respondents report that their overall impression of
 the University of Idaho is “very positive” or “positive.”

 IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                                                            11
CLOSING THE LOOP
The data from the CIRP Freshman Survey are utilized across campus by a variety of faculty and
programs. This information:

         Guides learning activities offered in freshman courses;
         Guides curriculum development in Core Discovery courses to reflect student interests;
         Considers student goals and interests in developing policies for student recruitment and
          success;
         Provides faculty with an understanding of who our students are in order to tailor activities
          and assignments to student interests;
         Is used to help faculty understand and use multiple modes of communications with
          students;
         Is used to help faculty work with students in understanding extreme diversity;
         Is used in designing support for first generation students;
         Helps to shape new student orientation priorities.

ADDITONAL REPORTING
Included among the reports from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program is a series of
constructs designed to measure the experiences and outcomes of students. These constructs
include Habits of Mind, Academic Self-Concept, Social Self-Concept, Pluralistic Orientation,
Social Agency, College Reputation Orientation, and Likelihood of College Involvement. These
reports are available on the Institutional Research and Assessment web page at
http://www.webs.uidaho.edu/ira/assess/surveys.htm.

Details of the frequency distribution of responses are also available on the website, along with
the frequency distribution of responses for men and women, and charts on selected items with
some historical comparisons between University of Idaho and public university responses. In
addition, an overview of The American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2010 produced by the
Higher Education Research Institute is available in the Institutional Research and Assessment
office.

Report prepared by Jane Baillargeon
Contact jane@uidaho.edu or call 885-5828 with questions or comments.




IRA Report, 6/22/2012                                                                              12

				
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