Leadership in England

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					    The importance of school leadership
      on the quality of schools and the
      achievements of pupils: England
                  DOES LEADERSHIP MAKE A
                       DIFFERENCE?




1    peter@apmatthews.com
    1. WHERE HAVE WE COME
    FROM?




2   peter@apmatthews.com
         20 years of education reform in
         England

         1988-1997                  1998-2008
       Financial delegation to      National literacy and
        schools - autonomy              numeracy strategies
       New powers for governors       Zero tolerance of failure
       National curriculum            Benchmarking and value
       Assessments at                  added
        7,11,14,16                     National leadership
       Parental choice of school       college
       Regular inspection             School partnerships
       Annual published results       Qualification for principals
       Freedom from local             ‘Every Child Matters’:
        authority                       integration of services
3        peter@apmatthews.com
       20 years of education reform in
       England

       1988-1997 Rhetoric         1998-2008 Rhetoric


     Zero tolerance of failure    Challenge and support
                                   Raising the baseline
     Reliance on better            and reducing the
      managed schools               achievement gap
                                   Government’s ‘New
     15,000 teachers are not
                                    Relationship with
      doing a good job              Schools’
                                   Personalised learning
                                   Leadership
                                    development

4      peter@apmatthews.com
    The quality of schools in England: 2007/08



    Secondary schools        17               40                 34             9




      Primary schools    13                   50                      33            4




      Special schools             26                  54                   18       2




                 Outstanding           Good   Satisfactory   Inadequate

5     peter@apmatthews.com
      PISA 2006 Results (~57 countries)
    100%

     80%

     60%
                             Outperforming
     40%                     England
     20%
                             Not significantly
                             different
      0%                     Significantly below




6     peter@apmatthews.com
    2. LEADERSHIP &
    MANAGEMENT




7   peter@apmatthews.com
    Difference between leadership and
    management

     “Management is about producing order and
      consistency”

     “Leadership is about generating constructive
      change.”
                                        (Kotter 1990)




8   peter@apmatthews.com
       20 years of education reform in
       England
    1988-1997                     1998-2008
     Financial delegation to      National literacy and
      schools - autonomy              numeracy strategies
     New powers for governors       Benchmarking and value
     National curriculum             added measures
     Assessments at                 National leadership
      7,11,14,16                      college
     Parental choice of school
                                     School partnerships
     Regular inspection
                                     Qualification for principals
     Annual published results
                                     School diversification
     Freedom from local
      authority control              ‘Every Child Matters’:
                                      integration of services
9      peter@apmatthews.com
     3. WHAT RESEARCH
     SUGGESTS




10   peter@apmatthews.com
     The three thing that matter most in
     high performing school systems

     1) Getting the right people to become teachers

     2) Developing them into effective instructors

     3) Ensuring that the system is able to deliver the
       best possible instruction for every child
                                           (McKinsey 2007)




11   peter@apmatthews.com
        The effect of teacher quality
 100%
                                   90th percentile
                                          Student with high
                                          performing teacher

                                          Student with low
     50th percentile
                                          performing teacher
                                    37th percentile



      0%
                   Aged 8      Aged 11

12      peter@apmatthews.com
        The effect of continuous professional
        development
 100%
                                         ?th percentile

                                               Teacher with high
                                               quality CPD
                                               Teacher with low
 50th   percentile                             quality CPD

                                         ?th percentile




     0%
               New teacher     After 3 years
13      peter@apmatthews.com
     The two most important roles of the
     principal in raising pupils’ achievement
     are:
     i)    Promoting and participating in teacher learning and
           development – through leadership that not only
           promotes, but directly participates with teachers in,
           formal or informal professional learning.
     ii)   Planning, coordinating and evaluating teaching and
           the curriculum – through direct involvement in the
           support and evaluation of teaching through regular
           classroom visits and the provision of formative and
           summative feedback to teachers. Direct oversight of
           curriculum through school-wide coordination across
           classes and year levels and alignment to school goals.

                                   Robinson 2007

14   peter@apmatthews.com
     4. WHAT THE MOST
     EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS DO




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        i.To procure high quality teachers
      Schools have autonomy to recruit teachers
      They advertise for and appoint the best
      They train their own, where they can, in partnership
       with higher education
      They induct, mentor and support new teachers
      They provide professional development pathways
       and career opportunities




16      peter@apmatthews.com
ii.To improve instruction, the best
schools…
      Provide a stimulating learning environment
      Provide rich, well-planned curriculum
      Have high expectations of teaching and learning
      Monitor quality of learning and performance of
       teachers
      Focus professional development on constantly
       improving teaching
      Seek the views of students and parents




17      peter@apmatthews.com
iii. Success for every child? The best
schools…
      Create a culture of expecting success
      Personalise learning
      Assess and track the progress of every child, with
       targets for learning and support or intervention
       where needed
      Continuously evaluate the quality and effectiveness
       of everything the school does
      Work as a consistent team
      Learn from others



18      peter@apmatthews.com
     5. The role, expectations and
     development of school leaders

19    peter@apmatthews.com
     National Professional Qualification for
     Headship (NPQH)
     Six areas:
      Shaping the future (strategic vision)
      Leading learning and teaching
      Developing self and working with others
      Managing the organisation
      Securing accountability
      Strengthening community




20   peter@apmatthews.com
        Characteristics of outstanding
        headteachers as school leaders
      Clear vision and purpose , very high expectations
      Gets the best out of people Motivating: Providing
       opportunity; Promoting professional development;
       Encouraging initiative; Showing interest and being generous
       with praise; Building teams and empowering them.
      Approachable
      Innovative
      Enthusiastic
      Determined and decisive
      Focused on quality and every pupil’s
       achievement                    Matthews 2006
21      peter@apmatthews.com
        Structure and principles of school
        leadership in England
      All leaders must be responsible and accountable
      Every teacher is a leader
      Middle leaders have responsibility for the quality and
       effectiveness of their areas
      Senior leaders have corporate and distributed
       responsibilities
      The principal has ultimate responsibility for the
       effectiveness of the school



22      peter@apmatthews.com
     System level support for school
     leadership
      Development programmes available for middle and
         experienced leaders; National College for School
         Leadership
        Assessment instruments for student progress
        Data for school benchmarking
        Encouragement of innovation and diversity within national
         Framework
        Cross-provider work to ensure that ‘Every Child Matters’
        Encouragement of networks, partnerships and federations
         of schools
        Highly autonomous schools and school boards, with
         rigorous accountability systems

23   peter@apmatthews.com
     6. POWER TO PRINCIPALS: FROM
     SCHOOL TO SYSTEM
     LEADERSHIP




24   peter@apmatthews.com
          CHARACTERISTICS OF HEADS WHO
           BECOME SYSTEM LEADERS

 They are committed to young people achieving
    their potential.
   They know how to improve schools
   They lead very good or excellent schools
   They are influential beyond their schools and
    communities
   They see the benefits of partnering and
    networking with other schools
   They seek new challenges
     The quality of schools in England: 2007/08



     Secondary schools        17               40                 34             9




       Primary schools    13                   50                      33            4




       Special schools             26                  54                   18       2




                  Outstanding           Good   Satisfactory   Inadequate

26     peter@apmatthews.com
    THREE CHALLENGES FOR SYSTEM-LEADING
    SCHOOLS:
    1. ACHIEVING EXCELLENCE

•Leadership with vision, courage and
conviction
• High expectations and ambitions for
children
•Staff consistency
•Personalised learning       Next aspiration:
•Tracking learners’ progress To be consistently outstanding
•Distributing leadership
•Constantly reflecting on what they do and
analysing impact
•Investing in professional growth
•Recognising everyone as a learner
  2. SUSTAINING EXCELLENCE

•Seeking to improve further
•Raising attainment; reducing the gap
•Growing leaders
•Systematically improving teaching and
learning; be a training schoolNext aspiration:
                               To
•Researching and innovating help other schools improve
•Opening their doors to other professionals
•Systematically reducing barriers to
children’s learning and wellbeing
•Extending their frontiers; in the community,
nationally and internationally
  3. SHARING EXCELLENCE, THROUGH

•Active school partnering
•Assessing need and engaging with purpose
•Strategic clarity and setting high
expectations
•Injecting commitment and expertise
                              Next
•Addressing underperformance aspiration:
                              To become ‘World Class’
•Modelling principles
•Earning trust
•Challenging and supporting
•Monitoring progress
•Building capacity
     The three core beliefs:
     “The quality of an education system cannot
       exceed the quality of its teachers”
     “The only way to improve outcomes is to
       improve instruction”
     “High performance requires every child to
       succeed”
                            (McKinley/Barber 2007)
         The only way to achieve this is through
           effective and determined school and
                    system leadership.
30   peter@apmatthews.com

				
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