Docstoc

Five Point_ Five Factors

Document Sample
Five Point_ Five Factors Powered By Docstoc
					        AVCA Web Seminar



Coaching Strategy in a 25 Point Set:
  Five Points, Five Factors

                 Kent Miller
            Head Volleyball Coach
             University of Toledo
    Five Point, Five Factors
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
   start in?
2. Risk vs. Reward: When to go for it and
   is it worth it.
3. Serving: Creating a effective strategy.
4. Is Your Offense Your Best Defense?
5. Matching Your Philosophy to Your
   Team.
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
• Served Points vs. Serve Receive Points
  – Must score served points to win
    • Serve Receive Points = Opponent Serve Receive
      Points (+/0/- one point)
    • Serve receive points cancel out
  – Shorter set means fewer opportunities to
    score when serving
    • Make them all count!
       – Served points are precious
  – Sideout steady, Score in streaks!
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
• Urgency
  – Scoring now vs. scoring later
     • Getting off to a good start leads to more wins
• What is better for your team?
  – Consistent serve receive
     • Prevent opponent from scoring served points
        – Your offense vs. Their block and defense
  – Scoring served points early
     • Stopping your opponent’s offense
        – Your blocking and defensive match up vs. Their offense
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
• Know your rotations
  – Points +/- by rotation
  – Serve Receive and Points Scoring %’s
    • Int’l Men:         SR > 70%      Scr > 35%
    • Int’l Women:       SR > 67%      Scr > 40%
    • NCAA Women:        SR > 60%      Scr > 45%
  – How do your score served points?
    • Serving, blocking, transition attack?
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
  – Personnel
    • Where are your best players?
       – Best point scorers
           » Overall, Serve Receive, and Serving
       – Highest Efficiency, Kill %
       – Best blockers, defenders, passers vs. opponent
  – 25 Points = Non-symmetric Rotations
    • SR 60% ~ 15 Rotations
    • 30 Point set ~ 18 Rotations
       – Some players across front row three times, others only
         twice
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
• Possibilities
  – Best hitter Left Front
     • Gets most opportunities
  – Best early serving order
     • Get out ahead
  – Avoid weak serve receive rotations
     • Don’t let them get out ahead
  – Best blocking and defense match up
     • Score as fast as possible: Ace, Stuff, Trans. Attack
1. Match Up: What rotation should you
start in?
  – Best scoring sequence
    • Could be a combination of above
  – Libero/passers vs. their servers
    • More prevalent as serving gets tougher
2. Risk vs. Reward: When to go for it and
is it worth it?
• Served points vs. Received Points
  – Taking greater risks when playing for a served
    point
    • Can you train your players:
       –   To know when they are playing for a served point
       –   To be more aggressive when they are
       –   To be smart when they are not
       –   To handle the emotion of a big, aggressive error or block
  – Risk of losing point less damaging vs. benefit
    of winning point.
    • If the opponent SR % is 60%
2. Risk vs. Reward: When to go for it and
is it worth it?
       – They are likely to win anyway
       – You don’t want to give them easy opportunities
    • Errors hurt more when they are for an opponent
      served point.
  – 20% More risk may equal 40-50% more
    scoring
• Get to the “Promised Land”
  – Total points = 25
  – Aces, Kills and Blocks > ~ 17
    • Virtually can’t lose, even if you make a lot of errors
3. Serving: Creating an effective strategy
for your team.
• Aces and Errors: Not the whole story
  – Ace/Error ratio often cited
     • What about Ace % and Error %?
        – Much better indicators of performance
        – Olympic level may miss > 20% just to get 5-10% aces
• Major benefits of tough serving
  – Simplify opponent offense
     • Improves your block and defense
  – Constant pressure
     • Never an easy serve for opponent to pass
3. Serving: Creating an effective strategy
for your team.
  – Increases upsets and big runs
     • Lindsey Berg, USA vs. Italy!
  – Training can manage risk
• How does your team score it’s points?
  – Aces, blocks, transition offense
  – May vary by rotation
• Does your serving strategy fit your team?
  – How it scores points
3. Serving: Creating an effective strategy
for your team.
    • Each server to each rotation
       – Approach or tactics for each rotation, each servers
         strengths

• Do you vary how aggressive you are
  according to your opponent?
  – When you are much stronger, errors may not
    make sense
  – Can you train you team to serve easier
    sometimes, tougher other times?
3. Serving: Creating an effective strategy
for your team.
• You can train serving
  – Players completely control skill
  – Takes time, lots of time
• Mix it up!
  – Different styles
     • Jump Float, Jump Spin, From Deep, Tall at the
       Line
  – Different tactics
     • Where from and where to
4. Is Your Offense Your Best Defense?

• Championship teams always prevent the
  opponent from scoring
  – In volleyball that is Serve Receive Offense
• “Steady as she goes”
  – Consistency is the key
    • Avoid the opponent serving runs
• In system vs. Out of system
  – What works the most often works!
    • Be in system as much as possible
4. Is Your Offense Your Best Defense?

     • May mean less pass dependent serve receive
       offensive system
     • Allows players to build confidence in system
     • If you have to rely on a great pass, set and hit the
       opponent may never have to do much more than
       serve well
  – Lower your unforced errors
     • Make the opponent earn their served points
  – Keep it simple but set well within it!
     • Lots of “offense” is simple systems with great
       setting
4. Is Your Offense Your Best Defense?

     • First Ball Kill % can still be high
     • Avoid errors in a row
• Save the fancy stuff for transition
  – Higher chance of quality pass and set
     • Risk of system is mitigated by likelihood of good
       pass and set
  – Difference between SR and Transition can be
    tough for your opponent
  – Up the Kill % when you can
5. Matching your philosophy to your
team.
• System must match your players
  – Likely to vary year-to-year
• Identify what you could or should be good
  at.
  – Make sure to highlight those things
• Identify what you struggle at
  – Shore up those things as best you can
  – Avoid having systems rely on any
    weaknesses
5. Matching your philosophy to your
team.
• What can you control?
  – Be realistic
     • You may not be able to train your passers to be as
       accurate as you’d like
        – Maybe they can be very consistent at a larger target
     • Your setter may not be able to jump set every ball
        – But she could be a stud from the ground
  – Control (train) the things you can
     • Enough so they are confident in them
     • High standards on easy plays
5. Matching your philosophy to your
team.
      – Can’t “blow” opportunities
          » Score, Score, Score
      – Train the discipline to be great at the easy plays
      – Pressure the opponent on Free Balls and Down Balls
          » Don’t let them score easy

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:6/21/2012
language:English
pages:20