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PLUK eNews For the Week of May Issue Welcome Powered By Docstoc
					PLUK eNews For the Week of May 26-30, 2003
Issue 26

Welcome to the weekly PLUK eNews!

   We are proud to present news of interest for Montana families of children with
disabilities and chronic illnesses, and for the professionals and educators who serve them,
however, it does not constitute an endorsement.

                               Edited by: Roger Holt rholt@pluk.org
                  Proofed & condensed by: Elisabeth Mills emaymills@hotmail.com

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•     Please be aware that some links provided are time sensitive. Contact us if you have
      difficulty accessing any of the information.
•     View an archive of all Weekly eNews at http://www.pluk.org/eNews.htm

    Highlights:
     Government/Legal:..............................................................................................2
        Mikulski to introduce Legislation to help alleviate financial stress on Family
        Caregivers....................................................................................................2
        National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) letter to
        House of Representatives on H.R. 1350, Reauthorization of IDEA ........................3
     News: ................................................................................................................5
        Despite Breakthroughs, Cystic Fibrosis Answers Remain Elusive..........................5
        Bionic Eye Can Restore Some Sight to the Blind ................................................6
        Has Copyright Law Met Its Match?...................................................................6
        TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICES RULES MODIFIED;.............................6
        New Courses Available on the Section 508 Standards ........................................7
        Head Start Improves Achievement and Reduces Crime ......................................7
        HHS TO AWARD $13 MILLION TO STATES TO IMPROVE THE VOTING
        ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.....................................8
        ImagiMath Wins Media & Methods Magazine Highest Award for Math Software......8
        DISCARDED CHILDREN? ARE SCHOOLS FAILING DISABLED CHILDREN?..............8
        PLUK Approved for Supplemental Education Services.........................................9
     Like to help PLUK? Go shopping! ...........................................................................9
     Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy: ............................................................9
         OSEP Issues First Report from Second Transition Study .....................................9
     Technology/Web/Resources:...............................................................................10
         DEPARTMENT SEEKS BROAD INPUT FOR NEW NATIONAL EDUCATION
         TECHNOLOGY PLAN .....................................................................................10
         Our Children Left Behind website...................................................................10
         Apraxia-Kids Web Site .................................................................................10
         Virtual Pencil, making math accessible...........................................................11



                                                                                                                          1
         Effective College Planning.............................................................................11
         Home Modifications for Wheelchairs...............................................................11
         tech.life@school | Connecting with authors and artists behind favorite books......11
         The Guide Horse Foundation .........................................................................12
    Summer Activities/Support Groups ......................................................................12
       Brain Injury Support Groups in Miles City & Kalispell........................................12
       Three CommuniCamps in Billings This Summer...............................................12
       Transportation Security Administration Info for Travelers with Disabilities ..........13
       NICHCY Guide to Summer Camps 2003..........................................................13
    Events/Training/Workshops:...............................................................................13
        “New Developments in Special Education in Montana”, May 29, Billings..............13
        Family Guide to Second Step Facilitator Training, May 30-31, Billings ................13
        Research to Practice: Impact of Trauma on Childhood Development, May 31,
        Whitefish....................................................................................................13
        Project Common Vision Continuing Education Workshop, June 6 & 7, Missoula....14
        Creating Healthy Communities": A Wellness and Empowerment Conference, June
        6-7, Great Falls...........................................................................................14
        Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind - Family Learning Weekend, Great Falls,
        June 6-8 ....................................................................................................15
        Healthy Sexuality for the Developmentally Disabled, June 10, Billings................15
        Voting: Everyone Must Have a Voice, Tuesday, June 10th 1:30 – 3:00 PM EST ...15
        "Preparing for Post-Secondary Education", June 12, Billings..............................15
        Power Mobility Camp in Missoula June 16-20 ..................................................15
        Treatment of Anxiety in Children and Adolescents, June 15-17, Billings..............16
        COGNITIVE COACHING 8 Day Foundational Seminar, June 23-26 & August 4-7,
        Polson........................................................................................................16
        North West Rocky Mountain Regional Irlen Conference, June 25-26, MSU-Billings16
        National Deaf Women United Conference from June 28th to July 2nd, 2003 in
        Sioux Falls, South Dakota.............................................................................16
        Sensory Integration Tool Kit Workshop, Billings, June 30 – July 1......................17
        IntelliTalk II Workshop, July 10-11, 9AM - 4PM at Museum of the Rockies..........17
        Digital Media as a Teaching and Learning Tool, August 5-8, Yellowstone National
        Park, Wyoming ...........................................................................................17
        Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22 .18
        CSPD “Goings On ”......................................................................................18
        TASH Teleconference Series on Education ......................................................18
        Future Activities/Events: ..............................................................................19

  ##

Government/Legal:
  Mikulski to introduce Legislation to help alleviate financial stress on Family
Caregivers
  http://mikulski.senate.gov/~mikulski/press/03/05/2003513913.html
  Cosponsors of Senator Mikulski’s amendment include Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton
(D-NY), Jon S. Corzine (D-NJ), Tim Johnson (D-SD), and Paul S. Sarbanes (D-MD). Over
100 local and national organizations support this legislation including the Alzheimer’s
Association, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Easter Seals, and the National Family Caregivers
Association.




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   Sen. Mikulski’s bill the “Family Caregivers Tax Credit” will establish a tax credit of up
to $5,000 to help pay the expenses of families who care for loved ones of all ages with
chronic care needs.
   Why is this needed?
      • Approximately 12 million Americans need some form of special care
      • Chronic care is predominately provided in the community or at home
      • An estimated 5.2 million seniors and 3.5 million persons aged 18-64 receive some
           assistance in the home because of disability limitations
      • Children account for 15% of all those with chronic conditions
      • Medical costs for people with multiple chronic conditions average over $5,500 a
           year
      • Nearly 30% of families spend more than $1,000 annually on medical expenses
      • Nearly 30% of caregivers earn less than $20,000; half earn less than $35,000 a
           year
      • Caregivers spend an average of 11% of their income on care-giving each year.
   Who would this help?
      • Families caring for a loved one with serious chronic conditions, or an individual
           with serious chronic conditions. That means:
      • multiple chronic conditions or severe cognitive impairment
      • unable to perform activities of daily living without substantial assistance;
      • children with a complex medical condition, or who meet age appropriate criteria
           for similar levels of disability
   What could the credit be used for?
   Senator Mikulski’s tax credit would reimburse caregivers for expenses like prescription
drugs, home health, respite and adult day care, durable medical equipment, physical, or
rehabilitation therapy, and specialized services for children
   How would the credit work?
      • Caregivers would list chronic care expenses on their tax returns
      • Reimbursement would come as part of their tax refund

   ##

   National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) letter to
House of Representatives on H.R. 1350, Reauthorization of IDEA
   http://www.nasdse.org/government_relations/govhome.htm
   April 23, 2003
   Dear Representative:
   On behalf of the National Association of State Directors of Education, Inc., a nonprofit
organization representing the directors of special education in the states, the District of
Columbia, the Department of Defense and the outlying territories and the Freely Associated
States (FAS), I am writing to share our comments on H.R. 1350, the “Improving Education
Results for Children with Disabilities Act of 2003 (IDEA).” This is a critical piece of legislation
that will affect the educational outcomes of millions of students with disabilities for years to
come. We therefore urge that you give careful consideration to the following issues raised
by our members, who have responsibility for implementing and monitoring special education
services provided to students with disabilities in your state.
    1. While H.R. 1350 authorizes a commitment to full funding of the IDEA, we remain
        concerned that these funding levels will never be appropriated. We therefore urge
        you support mandatory full funding for the IDEA.
    2. Funding must be restored for the Freely Associated States (FAS) of Micronesia, Palau
        and the Marshall Islands. Citizens of these former American territories are fighting
        alongside our armed forces in Iraq. These islands provide a strategic harbor for
        American forces in the far Pacific. It is appropriate to provide special education


                                                                                                 3
     services to these children. We urge that H.R. 1350 include in the definition of
     “outlying area” under Part A, Section 602 (19) and (28) the Freely Associated States
     of Micronesia, Palau and the Marshall Islands and that it be made clear throughout
     the bill that all references to the “outlying areas” include the FAS.
3.   We urge you to increase the state administrative set-aside for the nine smallest
     states from $500,000 to $750,000. In H.R. 1350 as it was introduced, this set-aside
     was increased just slightly to $550,000. However, even this insignificant increase
     was eliminated during Subcommittee markup. Yet, these states are obligated to
     undertake the same administrative responsibilities expected of all states. Further,
     state departments of education have to ensure alignment and compliance with those
     aspects of the ”No Child Left Behind Act” that specifically apply to students with
     disabilities.
4.   NASDSE supports the option for Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to use up to 15
     percent of their funds for pre-referral activities, but the bill needs to include
     assurances that IDEA will not bear the entire funding burden for a program that does
     NOT serve students with disabilities. It is imperative that LEAs use their Title I,
     Reading First and Early Reading First funds collectively with IDEA funds for this
     purpose.
5.   Our members support the need to streamline the discipline provisions of IDEA.
     Nevertheless, H.R. 1350’s elimination of protections and safeguards for students
     with disabilities have the potential to lead to such absurdities as suspending students
     with diabetes from school for eating in class (a violation of most school codes). Our
     members do not support the elimination of functional behavior assessments,
     because when they are done correctly, they can help students remain in their
     regular classroom setting with appropriate supports. NASDSE further believes that
     all teachers should be properly trained and prepared to work with all students,
     including students whose emotional or physical disabilities may result in what some
     may view as “disruptive behaviors.”
6.   There is a great deal of confusion over the incorporation of a definition of “highly
     qualified teacher” and exactly what that means for special education personnel. At a
     minimum, current special education teachers should have the same opportunity that
     teachers have under “No Child Left Behind” – that is, until the 2005-06 school year,
     to meet the highly qualified standards in their state. Additionally, in light of the
     current personnel crisis in special education, thought should be given to
     “grandfathering” in special education personnel as meeting the highly qualified
     personnel standard for core content areas, if they have met rigorous state standards
     for certification.
7.   Section 614(d)(1)(A)(i)(VII) calls for a “statement of transition service need s”
     beginning at age 14 and then beginning at age 16, a “statement of needed transition
     services.” We believe that there is no need to continue to separate out these as two
     distinct activities beginning at two different points in the student’s life. Beginning at
     age 14, the IEP should include needed transition services that should be updated as
     appropriate.
8.   Our members support the option of a three-year Individualized Education Plan (IEP).
     However, this must be at the parent’s option. LEAs must be careful not to impose a
     three-year IEP for a student when it is determined that that would not be in the best
     interest of the student. Language throughout the bill that references annual changes
     to a student’s IEP should be modified to reflect what would happen in the instance of
     a three-year IEP. Greater clarity in the language would help understand the intent.
     For example, make it clear that an annual review does not mean that the IEP must
     be re-written.
9.   Under Section 615, our members support the language that has eliminated the two-
     tier due process hearing system and they applaud the one-year statute of limitations


                                                                                            4
         on complaints. However, under Section 615(b), bill language should more carefully
         distinguish between those complaints to be resolved through the due process
         hearing and those that are appropriate for the formal complaint resolution process.
         Further, it should be made clear that the one-year statute of limitations applies to
         due process hearing disagreements in addition to the formal complaint process.
    10. Our members support voluntary binding arbitration, but recommend that states be
         allowed to provide it as an option, not as a requirement. While voluntary binding
         arbitration may be helpful in many states, those states with extremely low numbers
         of due process hearing requests do not need another process to resolve issues.
    11. Our members do not support Section 617(e) as it is currently written. While we
         support the concept of a pilot program that would allow up to 10 states to be
         granted waivers of paperwork requirements, the language in 617(e) is too vague
         and it could lead to the elimination of paperwork of significant importance to parents
         and/or school and related services personnel. Greater clarity is needed to spell out
         exactly what paperwork could be waived.
    12. With respect to Part D, our members believe that funding under the State
         Improvement Grants should be available to all states as a formula grant, rather than
         a competitive grant, because all states have the same responsibilities to carry out
         personnel preparation.
    13. Our members do not support the language that removes OSEP’s research function to
         the new Institute on Education Sciences because the inherent value of connecting
         research to its practical application in the field could be seriously jeopardized. Our
         members strongly believe that OSEP should retain its research activities.
   We thank you for your support of families and children with disabilities and your
commitment to education. Please feel free to contact me or NASDSE’s deputy executive
director, Nancy Reder, at (703) 519-3800 should you have any questions about these
comments.
   Sincerely,
   Bill East, Ed.D., Executive Director

  ##


News:
   Despite Breakthroughs, Cystic Fibrosis Answers Remain Elusive
   Over 60,000 people worldwide have cystic fibrosis, nearly half of them in the US. Cystic
fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder that affects the respiratory and digestive systems of
children and younger adults, robbing them of breath and of the ability to create energy from
food.
   Julie A. Biller, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin,
specializes in CF and pulmonary medicine. Dr. Biller works with CF patients over age 12 at
the Pulmonary Medicine Clinic at Froedtert & Medical College and at the Children's Hospital
of Wisconsin Pulmonary Clinic.
   “The highest incidence of the disease is among Caucasians with roots in Central or
Northern Europe,” says Dr. Biller. “Folk tales from that area predicted that babies who
tasted salty to their mothers’ kisses would not live long. That’s perhaps the earliest
description of CF, because, in general, those with CF do tend to have saltier sweat.”
   Read the complete article at: http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/1031002244.html

  ##




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   Bionic Eye Can Restore Some Sight to the Blind
   By Deena Beasley, Fri May 9, 5:36 PM ET
   LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A bionic retina can restore some eyesight in people blinded by
degenerative eye diseases, and may some day bring vision to children born blind, according
to new research.
   Three patients have so far been implanted with the device, a sliver of silicone and
platinum studded with 16 electrodes -- one-third the size of a contact lens -- that sits atop
the retina.
   Read the complete article at:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=585&ncid=585&e=2&u=/nm/2003050
9/sc_nm/health_bioniceye_dc_1

  ##

   Adaptive Technology Helps Disabled Students Succeed
Adam Schwartz, Bloomington, Indiana, 19 May 2003, 15:52 UTC
  Listen to Adam Schwartz's report (RealAudio)
   The computer revolution has made life easier for many. But for people with disabilities,
computers are more than just a convenience - they're something of a miracle. A growing
number of universities are providing "adaptive" or "assistive" technology to help their
disabled students and staff with their studies and their careers.
   Adam Schwartz takes us to the Adaptive Technology Center on the campus of Indiana
University in Bloomington, Indiana.
   Read the entire article at: http://www.voanews.com/article.cfm?objectID=D8B0903D-
52D9-432E-
B0BD0D0697B3A439&title=Adaptive%20Technology%3A%20%20Tools%20to%20Success
%20for%20Disabled%20Students&catOID=45C9C787-88AD-11D4-
A57200A0CC5EE46C&categoryname=Science%20%26%20Tech

  ##

    Has Copyright Law Met Its Match?
    Mon May 19, 3:00 AM, Elsa Wenzel, Medill News Service
    Electronic books should be the easiest books for the blind to "read." Software can
instantly translate the digital files into sound or Braille.
    So why can't the 10 million Americans who are blind "read" the latest Michael Crichton
thriller or George Pelecanos mystery?
    A copyright law glitch, thanks to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, is the culprit. But
fixing it could also be the key to changing the law's restrictions on using digital material.
    Read the entire article at:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/pcworld/20030519/tc_pcworld/110783

  ##

   TELECOMMUNICATIONS RELAY SERVICES RULES MODIFIED;
   COMMENTS SOUGHT ON EMERGING TECHNOLOGY, PUBLIC OUTREACH CAMPAIGN AND
NATIONAL SECURITY STATUS OF TRS
   FCC, May 15 - The Commission has taken another step in a series of initiatives to afford
persons with disabilities better access to the broad range of telecommunications and
information services available today. The Commission's existing TRS rules mean that
persons with hearing and speech disabilities are able to "get connected," so that they may
participate fully in the economic and social fabric of American life, now shaped by the




                                                                                              6
telecommunications revolution and information age. Today's actions increase their ability to
participate.
   In today’s action, the Commission modified a number of rules pertaining to mandatory
minimum standards for telecommunications relay services (TRS). The Commission also
resolved several petitions for reconsideration of an earlier ruling on TRS matters.
   Read the entire release at: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-
234565A1.pdf

  ##

   New Courses Available on the Section 508 Standards
   http://www.section508.gov
   (5/15/03) Since issuing its standards for electronic and information technology, the Board
has maintained a program of continuing on-line guidance and training on the requirements
of the standards. These standards, issued under section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, cover
various technologies and means of disseminating information, including computers,
software, websites, and electronic office equipment. Federal agencies must ensure that the
information technologies they procure are accessible according to the standards.
   The Board has sponsored the development of a series of interactive web-based courses
on different sections of the standards. The courses supplement previously released material
and provide advanced guidance on how products can conform to the standards. Recently,
three new courses were completed that cover requirements for:
       • software applications and operating systems;
       • desktop and portable computers; and
       • self contained, closed products, such as information kiosks, and calculators.
   The courses are part of the on -line “508 Universe” program, which was developed by the
Federal Information Technology Accessibility Initiative, an interagency partnership on the
implementation of section 508. The program, which is available on the Initiative’s website at
www.section508.gov, also provides a user-friendly introduction to the law, information on
buying compliant products, and previously released courses on designing accessible
websites and accessible video and multimedia.
   Additional information on developing accessible software has also been posted on the
Board’s website. The Board is also developing guidance materials on section 508
requirements for telecommunications products that will also serve as the basis for an
upcoming tutorial. For additional resources, visit the Board's section 508 page.

  ##

   Head Start Improves Achievement and Reduces Crime
   A Research Brief by Fight Crime: Invest in Kids
   Quality pre-kindergarten and childcare programs have produced dramatic, long-term
impacts on the lives of children from disadvantaged families. These include increasing high
school graduation rates and decreasing crime. Head Start is one of the programs that
produces results in these areas. Quality improvements to Head Start hold the promise of
even greater impact. Inadequate funding allows Head Start to serve only 60 percent of the
three and four year-old children in poverty. Early Head Start can serve less than 5 percent
of younger children in poverty. Increased funding is needed so that more children that are
eligible can be enrolled and improvements can be made such as increasing teacher
qualifications, implementing proven curricula, including parent-coaching, and interventions
for children with behavioral problems. Investing in quality services now will help millions of
vulnerable children become productive, responsible adults, and will prevent millions of
Americans from being victims of crime.
   View the complete report at: http://www.fightcrime.org/reports/HeadStartBrief.pdf


                                                                                                 7
   View other Research Briefs by Fight Crime: Invest in Kids at:
http://www.fightcrime.org/reports.php

  ##

   HHS TO AWARD $13 MILLION TO STATES TO IMPROVE THE VOTING
ACCESSIBILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
   Wednesday, May 21, 2003
   HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson today announced the availability of $13 million in
grants for states and territories to establish, expand and improve access to voting areas and
increase voter participation by individuals with disabilities.
   The grants will be used by states in collaboration with local governments to enhance
accessibility to polling places for individuals with disabilities; provide outreach to the
disability community about polling accessibility; and to train poll workers, elections officials
and volunteers on methods to promote access and increase voter participation for
individuals with disabilities.
   "The cornerstone of the United States is its reliance on a free, democratic society,"
Secretary Thompson said, "ensuring that individuals with disabilities have the same access
to voting services that other Americans experience is an essential right and works to make
our nation stronger."
   Read the complete release at:
http://www.dhhs.gov/news/press/2003pres/20030521.html

  ##

   ImagiMath Wins Media & Methods Magazine Highest Award for Math Software
   SAN MATEO, Calif., May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- ImagiWorks, Inc.
(http://www.imagiworks.com ), the leader in inquiry-based science and math programs for
Palm Powered(TM) handhelds and other portable computing devices, today announces that
ImagiMath(R) was chosen by K-12 math educators for Media & Methods Magazine's annual
award for instructional excellence. ImagiMath, a suite of three mathematics applications,
includes the ImagiGraph(TM) application, a mathematics visualizer; the ImagiCalc(R)
application, a full-featured calculator; and ImagiSolve(TM) application, a mathematics
worksheet and equation solver.
   Read the complete release at: http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-
bin/stories.pl?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/05-19-2003/0001949328&EDATE=

  ##

   DISCARDED CHILDREN? ARE SCHOOLS FAILING DISABLED CHILDREN?
   How does a boy, once a member of gifted prog rams, descend through a series of
disciplinary actions and suspensions, ultimately to be barred from school entirely by the age
of 14? His parents say it was because of his emerging learning disability, and rather than
deal with his problems, they say his school system, like many school systems across the
country, simply tossed him aside. It's a case that education experts and advocates for
children with disabilities say is emblematic of a disturbing trend that is becoming endemic
across the country as schools grapple with funding cuts, understaffing and increased
pressure from the federal No Child Left Behind program to raise overall performance levels.
Instead of having him evaluated to try to find the reason for his problems -- as required by
the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, as it's called -- his family
says school officials have tried to ban him from school altogether.
   http://abcnews.go.com/sections/us/Living/special_ed030512.html




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   PLUK Approved for Supplemental Education Services
   Parents, Let’s Unite for Kids (PLUK) has been approved through the Office of Public
Instruction as a Provider of Supplemental Education Services under Title I, Part A of the No
Child Left Behind Act of 2001. PLUK is currently accepting applications from teachers who
hold a valid Montana Educators License and want to provide after-school tutoring in math
and/or reading at schools in the following areas: Billings, Box Elder, Brockton, Browning,
Butte, Fortine, Frazer, Hardin-Crow Agency, Harlem, Hays, Heart Butte, Lame Deer; Lodge
Grass, Poplar, Pray, Pryor, Rocky Boy Reservation, St. Ignatius, Vaughn, Willowcreek,
Wyola, and Wolf Point. If you know someone interested in providing tutoring services in one
of these areas, please have them call 1.800.222.7585 or e-mail buildingbridges@pluk.org
for more information. Resumes can be faxed to 406-255-0523. Please include a folio
number and expiration date.

  ##




Like to help PLUK? Go shopping!
   That’s right, go head and buy something for yourself –– from Amazon.com, eBay, Dell or
any of the internet’s most popular shopping sites. First join by visiting this link:
http://www.iGive.com/PLUK. Every time you shop at one of the over 410 name-brand
stores in the Mall at iGive.com, we will receive a donation of up to 25% of each purchase
you make, at no cost to you.
   Remember, donating to PLUK will not cost you a thing. We will miss a lot of extra dough,
if you do not join. So, visit http://www.iGive.com/PLUK now. Membership is free and
your privacy is guaranteed.
   Joining and shopping is easy! Visit http://www.iGive.com/PLUK now!

  ##

Transition/Employment/Housing/Advocacy:
    OSEP Issues First Report from Second Transition Study
    In 1987, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) of the U.S. Department of
Education began the first effort in this country to document the experiences and outcomes
of youth with disabilities. It launched the National Longitudinal Transition Study (NLTS),
which generated nationally representative information about secondary school-age youth
who were receiving special education services at the time. To assess the status of youth
with disabilities and how they differ from their predecessors, OSEP has commissioned the
National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). NLTS2 addresses many of the same
issues as NLTS, but extends its scope in important ways.
    Comparisons of findings for youth who were included in NLTS with those in NLTS2
illuminate the ways in which special education and the youth it serves have changed in the
years between the studies. OSEP's report, Youth with Disabilities: A Changing Population,
documents the extent and direction of differences between the population of 15- to 17-year-




                                                                                           9
old youth with disabilities in 1987 and those in 2001 (referred to as cohorts 1 and 2) using
data reported in interviews with parents about the following topics:
       • Characteristics of students, including aspects of students' disability profiles and
          demographic characteristics (Chapter 2).
       • Characteristics of students' households, including household demographics and
          parents' expectations for their children's futures (Chapter 3).
       • The services provided students by their schools (Chapter 4).
       • Achievements of students in the academic and social domains and in moving
          toward independence (Chapter 5).
   Findings are presented for youth in the nine disability categories that were in use in both
1987 and 2001 and for youth with disabilities who differed in their gender, the income of
their households, and their racial/ethnic background.
   To read the Executive Summary, go to: http://www.cec.sped.org/pp/nlts2.pdf
   To read the entire report, go to: http://www.nlts2.org/

  ##

Technology/Web/Resources:
   DEPARTMENT SEEKS BROAD INPUT FOR NEW NATIONAL EDUCATION
TECHNOLOGY PLAN
   The U.S. Department of Education today announced that it is calling for broad
participation and input from a wide array of education stakeholders in crafting a new
National Education Technology Plan, as required by the recently enacted No Child Left
Behind law.
   The department is actively seeking advice from a variety of constituencies in education,
especially students, parents, K-12 educators, colleges and university leaders, and business
and industry. Individuals and organizations are being asked to identify and communicate to
the Department of Education their top issues, priorities, concerns, and barriers that need to
be addressed for technology to improve teaching and learning in the 21st century.
Interested parties can give their input by visiting the National Education Technology Plan's
Web site at HTTP://www.NationalEdTechPlan.org , and clicking on the "Participate in the
Plan" link.

  ##

   Our Children Left Behind website
   A group of diverse parents working together on the IDEA reauthorization has created a
website, http://www.ourchildrenleftbehind to support parent and family IDEA
reauthorization activities. We invite you to visit the website and contribute your ideas and
feedback. The IDEA reauthorization battle promises to be swift and hard-fought, but we still
have time and opportunity to make a difference in the final product.
   Our Children Left Behind hopes to be both a resource for parents, families, students and
others committed to preserving IDEA and a leader in the IDEA reauthorization struggle
itself. We look forward to your visit and your support in the battle we fight for our children.

  ##

   Apraxia-Kids Web Site
   http://www.apraxia-kids.org/
   Apraxia-KidsSM Internet Resources - your online source for reliable and comprehensive
information about Childhood Apraxia of Speech for families, professionals and all those
who care about a child with apraxia.



                                                                                             10
   ##

    Virtual Pencil, making math accessible
    http://www.hentermath.com/
    The traditional pencil is a problem for people that are blind, or people that cannot grip it
or move it, or those that are learning disabled. A pencil plays a key part in learning Math,
and other equation-solving disciplines. Typically, a student uses a pencil to "work through" a
math problem, writing down the intermediate answers and using them to get the final
answer. However, if you cannot operate a pencil then you cannot write down the
intermediate answers, which makes it very difficult to use them in acquiring the final
answer, and does not leave anything on the paper to show that you actually worked through
the problem and you know how to solve it. Of course, if you are blind, the pencil does not
tell you what numbers to add together either.
    We are developing software to teach mathematics to people that are Pencil Impaired .
This is not a tutorial, although tutorial mode is part of the package. Think of it as a virtual
pencil, a tool that can be used to interactively solve a math problem. The software does the
job of the pencil. It moves to the right spot on the "paper", guided by the user, and inputs
the answers that the user selects. When used with a screen reader the numbers and actions
are read aloud. The user must navigate the screen and provide the input.
    The current product handles addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. You can
download a demo from the downloads page, or purchase it on -line for $99 from the orders
page. Future versions will do higher levels of math, like algebra, trigonometry, differential
equations, and calculus.

   ##

   Effective College Planning
   The eighth edition of “Effective College Planning” is available in print and online. This is a
comprehensive planning guide for students with disabilities who are contemplating post
secondary education. The guide is published by the WNY Collegiate Consortium of Disability
Advocates.
   http://www.ccdanet.org/ecp_index.html

   ##

   Home Modifications for Wheelchairs
   This page offers tips and resources to help make every living area in a home more
accessible to someone who uses a wheelchair.
   http://www.wheelchairnet.org/WCN_Living/homemod.html

   ##

   tech.life@school | Connecting with authors and artists behind favorite books
   Today, the lives and works of authors are made more accessible through portals that
aggregate author material from all over the Web, allowing students and teachers to study,
be inspired by, and to connect with the people behind their favorite books and characters.
Perhaps the richest and most exciting of these hubs is http://www.TeachingBooks.net. The
goal of the site is to give all educators easy access to children's book authors and
authoritative teaching resources. The huge multimedia children's literature database uses
"cutting-edge technologies to connect educators and families with authors, books and
authoritative teaching materials," said Nick Glass, who, before launching the site, was an
educator and a bookseller. Glass is rightly proud of his accomplishment. He calls


                                                                                               11
TeachingBooks "the ultimate children's literature portal -- indexing by author, title, subject
and grade, all multimedia programs and resources about trade books that are currently
freely available on the Web." Among the gathered goodies are teacher guides (more than
3,200!), National Public Radio interviews, a wealth of multimedia links, and authors'
personal websites -- more than 6,500 links that are continually updated and checked for
reliability.
   Read the complete article at:
http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/living/columnists/joyce_kasman_valenza/5863031.htm

  ##

  The Guide Horse Foundation




   The Guide Horse Foundation was founded in 1999 as an experimental program to access
the abilities of miniature horses as assistance animals. There is a critical shortage of guide
animals for the blind.
   In early experiments, Guide Horses have shown great promise as a mobility option,
and people who have tried Guide Horses report that the Guide Horses perform exceptionally
well at keeping their person safe. These friendly horses provide an alternative mobility
option for blind people. People who have tried Guide Horses report that the horses
demonstrate excellent judgment and are not easily distracted by crowds and people.
   Guide horses are not for everyone, but there is a strong demand for Guide Horses among
blind horse lovers, those who are allergic to dogs, and those who want a guide animal with
a long lifespan.
   http://www.guidehorse.com/

  ##

Summer Activities/Support Groups
  Brain Injury Support Groups in Miles City & Kalispell
     • Miles City meets the third Tuesday of every month at 6:30pm at the Holy Rosary
         Hospital.
     • Kalispell meets the 2nd Thursday of each month at 6:30- 8:30 at The Summit.
  Questions about the groups or about transportation to meetings? Call 800-241-6442.

##

   Three CommuniCamps in Billings This Summer
   CommuniCamps are based out of the Language Clinic. The camps practice goal-oriented
language activities in the morning, and language enrichment outings to various places in
our community, in the afternoon. Each camp will be staffed by two speech/language
pathologists, volunteers and communication aides as needed.




                                                                                             12
   The first CommuniCamp, scheduled for June 23 - 27, is designed to develop phonological
skills in children who are at risk for or struggling with reading difficulties. The camp will
teach prereading skills through hands-on exciting activities.
   The second CommuniCamp, scheduled for July 14- 18, is designed for children who have
a diagnosis of autistic spectrum Disorder, Asperger’s Syndrome or Pervasive Developmental
Disorder. This cam p will teach social language skills through role-playing, hands-on
activities and social outings.
   The third CommuniCamp, scheduled for July 28 - August 1, is designed for children who
rely on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (MC) devices to communicate. This
camp will train children to use their AAC devices more effectively and independently,
through fun and innovative activities in a camp-like atmosphere.
   For more information, contact the Scottish Rite Childhood Language Disorders Clinic, 514
14th Street West, Billings MT 59102 (406) 259-1680

  ##

   Transportation Security Administration Info for Travelers with Disabilities
   Do You Require Additional Assistance during the airline Screening Process?
   The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has developed standardized security
screening procedures for all airports. Therefore, you can expect that you will encounter
essentially the same procedures at each airport you visit. You can also expect to be treated
with the same courtesy and respect.
   While the same screening procedures are used for virtually all passengers, we recognize
that some passengers may have special needs or require additional assistance during the
screening process. To maintain excellent security and customer service, TSA security
screeners have been trained to be sensitive to and respectful of the needs of all passengers.
   For additional information, visit the web site:
http://www.tsa.gov/public/display?theme=11

  ##

  NICHCY Guide to Summer Camps 2003
  http://www.nichcy.org/pubs/genresc/camps.pdf

  ##

Events/Training/Workshops:

    “New Developments in Special Education in Montana”, May 29, Billings
    Seminar, sponsored by Lorman Education Services, http://www.lorman.com/ May 29
Billings, MT. Call 715-833-3959 or 715-833-3940 or visit web site.

  ##

  Family Guide to Second Step Facilitator Training, May 30-31, Billings
  Please call the Family Tree Center for information and registration at 252-9799.

  ##

  Research to Practice: Impact of Trauma on Childhood Development, May 31,
Whitefish
Saturday May 31, 2003 9 AM - 4 PM O'Shaughnessy Cultural Center - Whitefish, MT



                                                                                           13
  Spend the day with Dr. Bruce Perry to gain a deep understanding of the long-term effects
of early childhood trauma. An expert for over 15 years on the neurobiology of maltreated
children, Perry's research demonstrates that environment and human contact play crucial
roles in brain development.
  This daylong symposium will give all those working with children a new perspective as
Perry illustrates the tangible anatomical differences found in children exposed to trauma at
an early age. The symposium is appropriate for caregivers and professionals working with
high-risk children and families.
  Fee including lunch - $90.00 CEU's available
  To be added to the mailing list, or to request a full conference brochure, please email
Melody Domph at: melody@nurturingcenter.org.
  The Nurturing Center
  146 3rd Ave. W.
  Kalispell, MT 59901
  406-756-1414 Phone
  800-204-0644 Toll free
  406-756-1410 Fax
  http://www.nurturingcenter.org
  melody@nurturingcenter.org

  ##

   Project Common Vision Continuing Education Workshop, June 6 & 7, Missoula
   Families First has been planning the Project Common Vision Continuing Education
Workshop with Danette Wollersheim, Ph.D. It is set for June 6 & 7, 2003.
   Do not miss this opportunity to attend a continuing education workshop that is both
cutting-edge and affordable!
   Project Common Vision: Professionals Collaborating to Help At-Risk Children & Families
   Presented by Glen Cooper, Kent Hoffman, and Bert Powell
   Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, 2003, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
   Registration/sign-in begins 8:30 am. Friday’s workshop is a prerequisite to Saturday’s
session.
   North Underground Lecture Hall, UM Campus, Missoula
   Fees: $30 for both days (thanks to a generous donation made by an anonymous
community member who wishes to honor the work of those who improve the lives of
children and families)
   Space is limited. Please pre-register by May 30, fees increase $10 thereafter! Contact
Families First 721-7690 or info@familiesfirstmt.com
   Twelve CE Hours — CEU and OPI credits are available at no extra charge.

  ##

    Creating Healthy Communities": A Wellness and Empowerment Conference,
June 6-7, Great Falls
    Sponsored by Rocky Boy Chippewa Cree Tribe and Fort Belknap Assiniboine and Gros
Ventre Tribes; coordinated by Native Wellness Institute, http://www.nativewellness.com/
June 6-7, Great Falls, MT, Call Jillene Joseph at 503-666-7669 or e-mail
jillene@nativewellness.com or visit web site.

  ##




                                                                                            14
   Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind - Family Learning Weekend, Great
Falls, June 6-8
   The Learning Weekend is a creative program that provides opportunities for families of
sensory impaired children to learn about deafness, share their experiences with other
families, and learn how to communicate more fully with each other in a warm, caring
atmosphere.
   This will be our seventh Learning Weekend. At each of our previous Learning Weekends,
we have had more than 100 participants including parents, professionals, all ages of
children both deaf and hard of hearing and their siblings. In addition to the wealth of
information that was presented by audiologists, computer specialists, transition specialists,
speech therapists, teachers of the deaf, assistive technology specialists and parents,
participants especially benefited from interacting with each other. Therefore, your presence
at this weekend will help ensure that it continues to be a valuable experience for everyone
involved.
   If you have questions, contact: Sarah Eyer (225-4373), Sandy McGennis (245-5912),
Dessica McKeehan (771-6052) or Jim Kelly (771-6120)

  ##

Healthy Sexuality for the Developmentally Disabled, June 10, Billings
  Ruthann Bertram is the Heath Education Coordinator of the Springfield, IL Planned
Parenthood. The workshop will be an opportunity for families and professionals to learn
about sexuality issues and proactive strategies for individuals with developmental
disabilities. Cost is $150. Register by June 1 to guarantee a space. For more information
and registration, contact IMPP at 248-3636.

  ##

    Voting: Everyone Must Have a Voice, Tuesday, June 10th 1:30 – 3:00 PM EST
    http://www.tash.org/tc03/#Voting
    Voting is a basic right of all Americans that many people with disabilities do not exercise.
It is critical for citizens with disabilities to have a voice and express self-determination
through participating in the voting process. Members of The Voters Education Project (a
project designed and conducted by self-advocacy leaders) will discuss the importance of
voting and ways to overcome barriers to voting, including guardianship and cog nitive,
attitudinal, and physical accessibility.

  ##

  "Preparing for Post-Secondary Education", June 12, Billings
  Sponsored by Montana State University's Disability Support Services, June 12, Billings,
MT. Call Trudy Carey at 406-657-2283.

  ##

   Power Mobility Camp in Missoula June 16-20
   Each day of this weeklong camp features two-hour sessions where various powered
mobility systems will be discussed and tried. There is no age limit. Cost is $50 per
individual. For more information, contact Mary O’Connell at 800-732-0323. Registration
deadline is May 30.

  ##




                                                                                              15
Treatment of Anxiety in Children and Adolescents, June 15-17, Billings
  The Montana Association of School Psychologists, PLUK and LDA are sponsoring the MASP
Summer Institute with Philip C Kendall, Ph.D., ABPP, Director of the Child and Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders Clinic at Temple University, June 15-17 at the Mansfield Health Education
Center in Billings. Cost is $110-$145. A limited number of Parent scholarships will be
available through PLUK. Contact the PLUK office for the informational brochure with
registration form.

##

  COGNITIVE COACHING 8 Day Foundational Seminar, June 23-26 & August 4-7,
Polson
  Part 1 Days 1-4, June 23-26, 2003
  Fee: $300 (includes text and learning guide), Kwa Taq Nuk Resort, Polson, MT

  Part 2 Days 5-8 (requires completion of Part 1), August 4-7, 2003
  Fee: $250, Kwa Taq Nuk Resort, Polson, MT

  Instructor: Elaine Meeks, Training Associate, Center for Cognitive Coaching

   Two graduate credits are available from the University of Montana for each part of the
training (four credits). Fee: $115 for two credits.
   All trainings are limited to 40 persons. District or agency sponsored trainings can also be
arranged.
   For more information, contact: Elaine Meeks at (406) 883-5850 or
emeeks@polson.k12.mt.us

##

North West Rocky Mountain Regional Irlen Conference, June 25-26, MSU-Billings
  Educational Psychologist, Helen Irlen, first identified Irlen Syndrome while she was
working with adult-learners in California in the early 1980s. She observed that some of her
students read with greater ease when they covered a page of print with a Coloured overlay.
The patented treatment-method uses specially formulated, coloured overlays or coloured
lenses worn as glasses or contact lenses to reduce or eliminate perception-difficulties.
  The conference will give Irlen Method users, their families, co-professionals, and Irlen
professionals the opportunity to learn together and from each other.
  Contact Sally Keele, P.O. Box 546, Billings, Montana, 59103. She can be reached at 406-
245-0989, or on email at salkee@180com.net for information or registration material.
Learn more about the Irlen method at http://www.irlen.com.

##

   National Deaf Women United Conference from June 28th to July 2nd, 2003 in
Sioux Falls, South Dakota
   http://www.dwsf.org
   It is with great pleasure that we invite you to attend the ninth National Deaf Women
United Conference from June 28 to July 2, 2003 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This
conference promises to be an exciting opportunity for Deaf and Hard of Hearing women
from across the nation to unite; and share their experiences and support with each other.
You have heard the famous saying, “United We Stand...Divided We Fall.” This philosophy
represents the basis of our organization, and we encourage you to be a part of it!




                                                                                            16
  ##

   Sensory Integration Tool Kit Workshop, Billings, June 30 – July 1
   http://www.ateachabout.com/Workshops1/Workshops.htm
   Do you need some tools to address SENSORY INTEGRATION and CHALLENGING
classroom behaviors in INCLUSIVE classrooms? The Tool Kit TM workshop helps
administrators, psychologists, regular ed. teachers/special ed. teachers/OTs/PTs/SLPs and
parents to collaborate with one another. This workshop will be presented at MSU-Billings;
cost will be $150 for professionals with reduced rates for students, parents and others. Cost
will include the SI Tool Kit. The presenter will be Diana Henry, MS, OTR/L founder and
president of Henry Occupational Therapy Services, Inc. She opened her clinic specializing in
sensory integration (SI) in 1984. She has since been developing occupational therapy (OT)
programs for various school districts in Arizona, emphasizing a collaborative model.
   This training is sponsored by STEP and CSPD Region III. For more information, call STEP
at 248-2055 (http://www.step-inc.org) or Deb Miller at 657-2312
(http://www.msubillings.edu/mtcd/).

  ##

    IntelliTalk II Workshop, July 10-11, 9AM - 4PM at Museum of the Rockies
    This workshop will help you use IntelliTalk II as a curriculum tool. You will have access to
the Museum and all its collections.
    Just imagine gathering information from the museum and using it to create an IntelliTalk
II activity about dinosaurs, or kites, or Native American history, or planets!
    Not only will you learn about IntelliTalk II, you will learn a process to decide when, where
and with whom you should use this valuable technology tool.
    This workshop is intended for persons who are currently using IntelliKeys and IntelliTalk
II. You will need to bring your own computer. Optional equipment to bring: IntelliKeys,
Digital Camera (with proper cables, batteries etc.) Cost is $100/person (includes museum
pass). Register by May 30 and pay only $90/person!
    For more information contact: Terry Lankutis, LankutisT@aol.com, or 406-388-7831.

  ##

   Digital Media as a Teaching and Learning Tool, August 5-8, Yellowstone National
Park, Wyoming
   Looking for a fun workshop this summer? Here it is...
   Sandra Nykerk, a naturalist and photographer, will share her knowledge of photography
and of Yellowstone Park. Terry Lankutis, an education and technology consultant, will share
her knowledge of how to integrate iMovie and iPhoto into the curriculum.
   This workshop is collaboration between the Yellowstone Association Institute, and Ms.
Terry Lankutis. We will be based out of the conference room at the Yellowstone Institute
Education Center in Gardiner, Montana, at the North entrance to Yellowstone Park.
Individuals are more than welcome to register. However, it is suggested you register in
groups of 3-4 people as the course is designed for you to work as a team. Cost is
$275/person. Receive $20 off registration fee for bringing your own Macintosh computer
capable of working with iMovie and iPhoto).
   For more information contact: Terry Lankutis, LankutisT@aol.com, or 406-388-7831.

  ##




                                                                                             17
   Positive Approaches to Solving Severe Behavior Challenges, Billings, Aug 19-22
   The IABA and Bitterroot Valley Education Co-op, MSU-Billings and OPI are sponsoring
four seminars to promote positive practices in the field of challenging behavior. Visit
http://www.iaba.com/brochures/billings_flyer.pdf for more information.

  ##

CSPD “Goings On ”
Montana CSPD is a unified personnel development system that ensures quality educational
programs and services for all children and youth.

REGION I
  June 9 –11 • “S ’Cool Moves”, Debi Heiberger, Dawson Community College, Glendive
There is no registration fee, deadline for registration is May 18.Contact: Helen Murphy for
further information at 406-485-2140 (W), 406-485-2143 (H), dmurphy@midrivers.com (E-
mail).

REGION III
  June 12, 8:30 –4:00pm, “Handwriting without Tears,” Katrina Erickson, O.T.R, MSU-
Billings. To register call 406-657-2312, or register online at
http://www.msubillings.edu/mcdregister

REGION V
  Region V has an online registration website. Sign on at http://www.cspd.net. Once you
have signed on, you will receive information about upcoming trainings in our region.
  June 17–18 • Paraeducator Academies • Missoula 2-day Academy: Choice of
Orientation to Special Education, Behavior Management, or Instructional Technology.
  June 17–18 • Paraeducator Academies • Kalispell 2-day Academy: Choice of Behavior
Management or Instructional Strategies
  August 11–13 • Severe Communication /Autism Conference • Grouse Mountain
Lodge in Whitefish. This second annual conference includes workshops on TEACCH, Sensory
Integration Toolkit, Assistive Technology, and Asperger Syndrome. Sponsored by NWCASE.
  August 13–15 • Together We’re Better • Region V CSPD ’s sixth Annual August
Institute, UM Education Building, Missoula. Get geared up for the new year with strategies
to help you work with all students. Workshops on Reading & Literacy, low incidence
disabilities, behavior, differentiated learning, legal issues, early childhood, social skills,
paraeducator academies, transition, and more.
  August 18–19 • Paraeducator Academies • Kalispell 2-day Academy: Choice of
Behavior Management, Instructional Strategies, or Student Supervision.
  More information Sign up on the Region V CSPD Online Registration Web site at
http://www.cspd.net or contact Nancy Marks at nmarks@mcps.k12.mt.us or 728-2400 ext
5036 for more information.

  ##

   TASH Teleconference Series on Education
   TASH is pleased to announce an exciting new series of Telephone Conferences on issues
related to "Quality Education in the General Education Classroom for Students with
Significant Disabilities."
   This series provides innovative information for special education and general education
teachers, administrators, related services providers, parents, advocates and anyone else
who is working to provide quality education for students with significant disabilities in
general education classrooms.


                                                                                            18
   Session Titles/Lead Speakers:
        1. Issues in Effectively Supporting Students with Disabilities in General Education
           Classrooms (Douglas Fisher; June 11)
        2. How to Move The System: Elements and Skills Necessary for an Inclusive School
           Environment (June Downing; June 12)
        3. Student-Led Individualized Education Plans (Jacqueline Thousand, Ann Nevin and
           Ida Malian; June 17)
        4. The Effects of Pull Out on Community and Learning (Carol Tashie; June 19)
        5. Relationships Between Academics, Diplomas and Employment (Lou Brown, Anne
           Smith and Michael Wehmeyer; June 24)
        6. How Do We Continue the Movement Toward Inclusive Education? (Jamie
           Ruppmann; June 25)
        7. Getting Informed About Alternate Assessment (Diane Browder; June 26)
        8. Achieving a Quality Education for Our Sons and Daughters with Significant
           Disabilities in the General Education Environment (Judy Gran and Mark Hall; July
           2)
   The teleconference speakers are all leaders in the development, and implementation of
quality supports in general education classrooms for students with significant disabilities.
Speakers include university professors, advocates, attorneys, and parents.
   Complete descriptions of each session with speaker information, as well as dates and
times, can be found on the TASH web site at http://www.tash.org/tc03ed.
   Sessions are conducted over the telephone. No special equipment is needed. Each
session will last for 90 minutes. The session will include the presentation and designated
time for questions and answers with the presenters. Each registrant will receive call-in
instructions and handouts for each session via email or fax. Registrants who are unable to
attend on the scheduled date will have the opportunity to call in and listen to the session at
their convenience within a designated period following that session.
   To register for the teleconferences online go to http://www.tash.org/tc03ed or you can
call 410-828-8274 ext "0" (east coast business hours) and we will be happy to register you
over the phone.
   For more information about TASH go to the website at http://www.tash.org.

  ##

Future Activities/Events:
 Beach Party, June 28, Billings
 Winter Carnival, July 26, Billings
 Blue Jack Band Benefit, September 20, Bozeman
 Missoula Children’s Theatre Tour, October 5-11, Kalispell
 Dinosaur Day with Jack Horner, October 11, Billings
 Halloweek, late October, Billings
 Magical Tymes Party, November 11, Missoula
 Kids at Heart Banquet, February 7, 2004, Billings
 Sports Festival, March 2004, Billings

  ##

 Selected Sources:
      • Monday Morning in Washington, DC, http://www.inclusionresearch.org
      • Rocky Mountain DBTAC, http://www.adainformation.org
      • Transition Newsflash, Montana Center On Disabilities,
         http://www.msubillings.edu/transition


                                                                                            19
       •   PEN Weekly NewsBlast, http://www.publiceducation.org
       •   Reference Points: Transition updates from the TATRA Project,
           http://www.pacer.org/tatra/tatra.htm
       •   Lisa Simmons, The Ideal Lives Express: http://www.ideallives.com
       •   The American Indian Disability Technical Assistance Center Training Calendar
           http://aidtac.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/TrainingCalendar.htm

  ##

PLUK eNews is published by:

  Parent's, Let's Unite for Kids – PLUK
  516 N 32nd St
  Billings MT 59101-6003
  800-222-7585; 406-255-0540; 406-255-0523 (fax)
  plukinfo@pluk.org
  http://www.pluk.org

   Mission Statement: Parent’s Let’s Unite for Kids unites parents, professionals, families and
friends of children with special needs to support one another, and share information for the
benefit of their children.

  Vision Statement: Given information and support, individuals with disabilities and their
families will feel empowered to advocate for themselves and participate fully in educational
and community opportunities.

  Statement on accessibility: Today, we endeavor to be conscious of the need for making all
electronic information accessible, because we are aware of physical accessibility issues in
our communities. For design guidelines visit: http://ncam.wgbh.org/cdrom/guideline/.




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