Foot and Mouth Disease by jQ51reo

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									 Foot and Mouth Disease




             Dr. Jim Donahue
              USDA, APHIS


July 2001                      1
    Wisconsin Biosecurity Workgroup
 The information in this presentation was developed
  through a coordinated project of University of
  Wisconsin-Extension, Cooperative Extension;
  Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer
  Protection, Division of Animal Health; University of
  Wisconsin-Madison – College of Agricultural and Life
  Sciences and School of Veterinary Medicine; and
  U.S. Department of Agriculture, APHIS, Veterinary
  Services.




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 Foot and Mouth Disease
  Features of the Disease
   highly contagious
   affects cloven-hoofed animals
  Clinical signs
   high morbidity, low mortality in adults
   may see high mortality in young
   vesicles/erosions in mouth, nose, feet, etc.


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 Foot and Mouth Disease

    Federal Program
               Kill infected and exposed animals
               Burn or bury dead animals
               Quarantine farm and area
               No vaccinations
               Restricted animal movement
               Limited human movement

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            FMD etiology
                   Picornavirus
                   7 serotypes, 60+
                    subtypes
                   Most contagious
                    agent known in
                    human or
                    veterinary
                    medicine

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                  FMD etiology
            Virus remains viable
                 14 days - dry fecal matter
                 39 days - urine
                 28 days - soil surface in fall
                 3 days - soil surface in summer
                 6 months - slurry in winter



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                FMD transmission
               Pigs - amplifying hosts
               Cattle - indicator hosts
               Sheep - maintenance hosts
               Persistent carriers are
                cattle, pigs, sheep



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            FMD transmission
   Direct contact
   Wind-borne transmission - 10-250 km
   Aerosols from milk tanks
   Animal products
     uncooked, salted, cured meats
     unpasteurized milk, other dairy products
     green salted hides
     semen and embryos
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            Clinical signs in cattle
   Incubation 2-10 days
   Fever
   Excessive salivation
   Vesicles
   Lameness
   Milk production drops
   Differentials: VS, BT, BVD, IBR, MD
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            Clinical signs in swine
            •   Fever
            •   Vesicles
            •   Lameness, recumbent
            •   Slough claws




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            Clinical signs in sheep
               Fever
               Vesicles, maybe
               Lameness
               “Iceberg infection”




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  Preventing FMD in the U.S.
 Restrictions on animals and animal
  products
 Increased surveillance
 Updating emergency response
 Awareness activities
   continuing education
   web site: www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/fmd
   traveler’s hotline: 1-866-SAFGUARD
   industry technical information at  1-
    800-601-9327
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            Preventing FMD in
                Wisconsin
                  FAD investigations and
                   testing
                  Promote biosecurity
                  Accelerated emergency
                   response plan
                  Establish liaisons
                     (state, federal,
                     academic, extension,
                     professional
                     organizations)
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Biosecurity recommendations
            Generally applicable to herd health


 Visitors from FMD countries should avoid
  farms for at least one week.
 Reduce exposure from contaminated
  items, such as clothes, shoes, equipment
     Remove all organic material
     Use disposable boots or disinfectants on footwear
 Avoid contact with animal production
  areas
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            What if ….?


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            Emergency response
               National
               Regional
               State
               Local




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    Wisconsin Biosecurity Workgroup

       University of Wisconsin-Extension
       University of Wisconsin-Madison
              CALS/Veterinary Medicine
       University of Wisconsin-River Falls
              Department of Agriculture, Trade and
                     Consumer Protection
       U.S. Department of Agriculture, APHIS,
       Veterinary Services.



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