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Guide to the brakes

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					GUIDE TO THE BRAKES
You just can’t take your brakes for granted. Here’s
how they work.
INTRO
 Brakes are possibly the single most important
  part of any car. After all, if you don’t have them,
  you can’t stop. A pretty important part of driving,
  we’re sure everyone would agree!
 Unfortunately though, many people take them
  for granted, and only notice faults with them
  when something goes wrong.
 As such, we’ve prepared this guide aiming to
  illustrate how your brakes work, hopefully it’ll
  give you a better understanding of them, and will
  alert you to potential issues quicker.
BASIC PRINCIPLES
 A lot of people don’t understand how putting
  pressure on your brake pedal can lead to your car
  stopping. That’s fair enough!
 In short, when you put pressure on a brake
  pedal, this transmits this force to your car’s
  brakes through a fluid. Your car transmits this
  force through both leverage and hydraulic force
  multiplication.
 Want that in something closer resembling
  layman’s terms? Read on…
TIRES
 The force from your brake pedal is transferred to
  your tires using friction, just like the tires
  transmit that force to the road surface itself
  using friction.
 Naturally, the harder your press on your pedal
  the stronger the reaction from your brakes.
BRAKE PEDAL
 The brake pedal is designed in such a way that
  the that it absorbs the force of your foot. This
  pressure is then transferred to your hydraulic
  system.
 Despite everyone knows the principle of a brake
  pedal, taking the time to stop and look at it’s
  design shows just how clever it is.
HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
 The hydraulic system transfers the pressure from
  your foot to your tires.
 The most basic way to describe a hydraulic
  system would be this: force applied at one point is
  transmitted to another using an incompressible
  fluid (usually some sort of oil).
 These two points usually consist of two pistons
  which are fitted into glass cylinders full of oil.
  Force is transferred between these pistons
  through downward force being applied to one
  (through the brake pedal).
LEAKAGE
 A potential problem with a brake system that
  relies so heavily on fluids is leakage. If fluid
  leaks, eventually there won’t be enough fluid left
  to fill your brake cylinder, resulting in non-
  functioning brakes.
 Fortunately, most modern cars are designed to
  deal with these potential failures. However, it’s
  worth finding out a little more about them – you
  can never be too careful.
ANTI-LOCK BRAKING SYSTEMS
 Many modern cars are fitted with Anti-Lock
  Braking Systems (or ABS for short), which aims
  to help cars stopping on a slippery road.
 A very simple ABS system would have a
  controller which monitors speed sensors at all
  times. If it finds decelerations in the wheel that
  are out of the ordinary, it reduces the pressure to
  that brake until it sees an acceleration, then
  increases the pressure until it sees a
  deceleration.
 The upshot of this is that the tire slows down at
  the same rate as the car, with the brakes
  preventing the tires from locking up.
THINK YOU’VE GOT A BRAKE PROBLEM?
 Then get it looked at either way. While it might
  seem like a no-brainer for some, other people
  might be tempted to drive it to a garage – don’t
  do it!
 Get a mechanic to come and look at it where you
  are, or call to get your car towed.
 Driving with bad brakes isn’t worth it – if you
  crash, the best case scenario is dealing with
  cracked windshield repair, the worst is life itself.
 Get them looked at!

				
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Description: You just can’t take your brakes for granted. Here’s how they work.