Resume Writing

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					  Resumes
     &
Cover letters




     Sandy Brown
 Career Services Center
     Old Main 280
    (360) 650-3240
 www.careers.wwu.edu
LETS FACE IT…

 There is a lot of conflicting advice out
 there about resume writing
 While there is no format that will work
 for every employer we have included
 the most popular guidelines that are
 generally accepted by most
 employers
What is the purpose of a
resume?
 The resume is a tool with one specific
 purpose: to win an interview
 It convinces the employer that you
 have the experience and the skills
 It isn’t a history of your past, a
 personal statement or self expression.
 It IS marketing your skills for future
 potential
Target Your Resume!
        Research companies
           www.workforceexplorer.com
        Research positions
           WorkSource.com
           O*net
           Occupational Outlook
           Handbook (bls.gov)
        Network
        Information interviews
WHAT IS A TARGETED RESUME?


 keywords and content will
 match you with the job,
 industry, career field, and
 employer.
Resume Formats
        Chronological or historical
        * Highlights past job titles, accomplishments
        *Works well if you have relevant
         professional experience
        Combination Resume
        *Emphasizes skills and related job titles
        *Relevant experience can include
        volunteer & class projects/courses
        Skill-based (Functional)
        *Emphasizes skills rather than job titles
        *Works well if you have limited relevant job
        history or are changing careers.
Resume sections

  Qualification Summary-what is it?
A brief paragraph or bullets that
  showcases your most effective skills
  and experience as they pertain to the
  position.
declares what you can do for the
  targeted company
Education and Training
  If you’ve just graduated from college or an
  entry level candidate with little professional
  experience-your education should be
  presented immediately after the
  Qualifications Summary
You could include:
GPA-(if 3.5 or above)
Awards/scholarships
Dean’s list
Course work relevant to job search
Continued……

 If you’re a professional with five or
 more years of experience, education
 should be listed last on your resume.

 Include all specialized training that is
 transferable to the position!
Professional experience
   Can be showcased in the three
 formats
 Chronological- providing work history
 dating back from the present- most
 common
 Combination- stressing what you know in
 one section, while providing work history in
 another-one of the most popular
 Functional- you are stressing what you
 know over where you gained your
 experience.
More!

 Begin with action verbs (see pg 20 of
 green packet), avoid phrases like
 ‘responsible for’ or ‘ duties included’
 Emphasize accomplishments and
 skills
 Quantify what you’ve done- (i.e-
 number of employees supervised,
 savings as a result of your actions) be
 specific!
Highlight your skills and
accomplishments
  List your job title, company name, location
  and dates worked
  Under each job, list problems you solved,
  issues you addressed, accomplishments
  you achieved, skills you gained or used
  List other skills you’ve gained or used in
  school
  AS IT PERTAINS TO THE POSITION!
ONE, TWO, THREE
Skills and accomplishments
  EXAMPLE:
  BARISTA (TITLE)
  Provided excellent customer service in fast paced setting
  serving 200+ customers per day
  Developed efficient strategies for organization of work station
  Created client base of over 50 customers for returning
  business
Formatting for maximum impact

   20 second rule
   Easy to read fonts-Arial
   Use bold or italics sparingly
   Effective use of white space
   Prioritization of data
LETS TALK ABOUT E-RESUMES

 e-resumes are delivered electronically
 -- via e-mail, submitted to Internet job
 boards, or residing on your own Web
 page.
 More than 80 percent of employers
 are now placing resumes directly into
 searchable databases and an equal
 percentage of employers prefer to
 receive resumes by e-mail
FORMATTING

  text-based (ASCII, Text only), you
 might also want to have a Rich Text
 (RTF) version and a scannable
 version.
 Your e-resume must be loaded with
 keywords!
STILL CONFUSED?
 You must tailor your e-resume to each
 employer's or job board's instructions.
 Some employers want your resume as an
 attachment, usually as a Word document
 (but if no format is specified, and you can't
 find out, RTF is the safest bet).
 Others want your resume as text pasted
 into the body of an e-mail message. Still
 others want you to paste your resume into
 an online form!
Recruiter "Pet Peeve" Survey - ResumeDoctor.com undertook
the immense project of conducting a survey of over 2,500
recruiters / headhunters throughout the US and Canada to find out
their "Pet Peeves" with resumes

20. Burying the important info in the resume
19. Gaps in employment
18. 1st or 3rd Person - Resumes in either 1st or 3rd Person
17. Not easy to follow summary
16. Pictures, Graphics or URL links no recruiter will call
  up
15. Resumes sent in .pdf, .zip files, faxed, web page
  resumes
14. Font choice – poor font choice or style
13. Objectives or meaningless introductions
12. Lying, misleading (especially in terms of education,
  dates and inflated titles)
11. Employer info not included and/or not telling what
  industry or product candidate worked in
Recruiter "Pet Peeve" Survey - by
ResumeDoctor.com

10. Personal info not relative to the job
9. Unqualified Candidates – Candidates who apply to positions
     they are not qualified for
8. Paragraphs – Long paragraphs….not Bullet-points
7. Long Resumes – too long
6. Functional Resumes as opposed to writing a Chronological
     Resume
5. Poor formatting – boxes, templates, tables, use of header
     and footers etc.
4. Contact Info – none or inaccurate contact info or
     unprofessional email addresses
3. Dates not included or inaccurate dates
2.   Too Duty Oriented – reads like a job description and fails
     to explain what the job seeker’s accomplishments were
     and how they did so
1. Spelling Errors, Typos and Poor Grammar
       Cover Letters!
Types of Job Search Letters—
Cover Letter or Letter of Application
Letter of Inquiry
Networking Letter
Thank you Letter
Writing Effective Cover Letters

 A cover letter should complement, not
 duplicate your resume
 explain the reasons for your interest
 in the specific organization and
 identify your most relevant skills or
 experiences
 express a high level of interest and
 knowledge about the position.
        Reality check!

Cover letter should be about how you
meet the employers needs

 be able to articulate your personal
value & skills you bring to the position
Format: Three Paragraphs: Keep it short and simple.

A. Introduction
         Why you are writing (application, referral, inquiry)
         Where you heard about the opening
         Capture their interest
B. Body
          Share your interest in why you want to work for the
           company
          Tell the employer what you can for him/her
          Give concrete examples from your experience that
           directly relate to the needs listed in the job
           announcement
          Show how your education is related to this field

C. Closing
         Be direct. Ask for an interview; ask for a spot on the
          Team
         State how and when you will follow up; be specific.
         Give dates and times you are available
         Include your phone number in the body of the letter
 NEED MORE HELP?
 CAREER SERVICES CENTER

Individual coaching          Job & internship listings
Personal                     Candidate referral
Assessments
                             Mock interviews
Workshops
                             www.careers.wwu.edu
Career fairs & other
special events               On-campus recruiting
Career Library

       Subliminal Message: Go to Old Main 280

				
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