Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Get this document free

Running Head SCHOOL BUSING The Effects of School Busing on

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 43

									                                                               School Busing 1




Running Head: SCHOOL BUSING




                    The Effects of School Busing on Students

                                  David Black

                                   EDL 681
                                                                          School Busing 2

                                       CHAPTER 1

                                    INTRODUCTION

               I grew up in Farmington, Illinois and lived within walking 
        distance from my school. Other than those friends who lived in the 
        country, most of my friends walked to school as well. Walking to school 
        was part of the adventure. When the weather was warm, we rode our 
        bikes. Most of us participated in after school activities because we 
        could stay after and walk home. We often stayed after school for study 
        sessions before major tests. Student attendance at sporting events was 
        very high from students of all ages because transportation was not 
        required in order to attend. Since the school was in the center of the 
        town, most people walked to games and met at the gate. When the new 
        school was constructed outside of the city limits, the experience I had 
        as a youth became one that my children would not be able to 
        experience. The opening of the new campus meant the closing of 
        neighborhood elementary, junior  high, and high schools.  Unless a 
        student is old enough to drive, know someone who is or has a parent 
        who drives them to school, students ride a bus. If you live in the closest 
        town, your bus ride might be only 10­15 minutes. However, for some 
        students in outlaying rural areas, the bus ride can reach an hour or 
        more. 
                                  Statement of the Problem

        The problem of this study was to examine the perceptions of the staff of 

     Farmington Central with regard to the effects of school transportation on a 

     student's overall school experience including achievement, wellbeing, and effect 

     on parent/school involvement. 

                                   Research Question

1.      What are the perceptions of the staff of Farmington Central with regard to 

the effects of school transportation on a student's public school experience?

                                  Purpose of the Study
                                                                      School Busing 3

      The purpose of the study is to successfully complete EDL681. An additional 

purpose of this study is to better understand how busing potentially affects 

students so as to better focus instruction. 

                               Significance of the Study

      The significance of the study is to broaden the understanding of how long bus 

rides impact students. These data will enhance and ultimately improve how 

administration and faculty of Farmington CUSD #265 plan the education 

experience for students who have long commutes and their families. 

                                      Methodology

      The methodology of the study includes both quantitative and qualitative 

pieces. This mixed methods approach uses a multiple step sampling process. The 

combination of convenience and proposive sampling will be used. Teachers and staff 

with Farmington Central CUSD #265 will be surveyed using an online survey called 

Survey Monkey. The Likert scaled instrument will examine their perceptions of the 

effects of busing on students and their families. Open ended questions will be 

included on the survey instrument.

                                     Assumptions

1.    I grew up with a community school and may be biases against busing for that 

      reason
                                                                        School Busing 4

2.    I was able to walk and ride a bicycle to and from school. This may bias me 

      against busing

3.    I assume that people will answer honestly when they take the survey.

4.    I assume respondents will trust that their responses will be anonymous.

5.    I assume that respondents will be able to manipulate the online survey.

                               Limitations of the study

1.    Time: Though plenty of time is alloted for participants to complete the 

survey, it is possible that issues come occur that would limit that allotted time.

2.    Gender: 70% of the the potential respondent pool are female. 

3.    I am an administrator at the school district from which the participant pool is 

drawn. This could potentially affect how someone answers if they do not completely 

believe in the anonymity of the instrument.




                              Delimitations of the Study

The number of the respondents is small as it is limited to the faculty and staff of 

Farmington CUSD #265. The respondents are only from Farmington CUSD #265 so 

the results could only be applied to that population.

                                 Definition of Terms

School Bus. A vehicle used for transporting children to or from school or on 

activities connected with school. (Merriam­Webster Online)
                                                                        School Busing 5

Student Achievement. Academic achievement as measured by standardized test 

scores. (National Middle School Association)


School Consolidation. The process of combining two or more small schools into one 

larger school (Answers.com)


                               Organization of the Study


         Chapter 1 included the statement of the problem, the significance of the 

problem, assumptions, limitations, delimitations, and definition of terms. Chapter 2 

includes a review of the literature used to form a knowledge base for this study. 

Chapter 3 includes the methodology used in the mixed methods study, the sampling 

methods, instrumentation, and analysis of data. Chapter 4 includes a report of those 

data that answered the research questions. Chapter 5 reports the conclusions of the 

study.
                                                                        School Busing 6

                                     CHAPTER II


                       REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE


                                     Introduction


      This chapter includes a review of the literature on the effect of school busing 

on the overall school experience of students. The topics include: history, 

consolidation, busing and student achievement, mixing age ranges, safety, 

discipline, and extra curricular. 

                                       History


      In a report sponsored by the Commission on Rural Education and the War, 

Butterworth (1945) painted a picture of the problems faced by rural schools after 

the end of World War II. It was at this time that many policies were drafted that 

changed the way public education and policymakers viewed rural schools. The 

article examines many of the social and economic issues faces by American citizens 

living in rural areas and outlines future goals for this population. The majority of 

the report focuses on economic data and statistics regarding all aspects of rural life 

from health and disease control to standards for teacher competency. Hidden within 

this report is what can be considered the blue print for school consolidation and the 

beginning of mass school transportation. As with most of the studies in existence 
                                                                          School Busing 7

regarding school transportation, this one focuses on the equipment required and 

fails to mention the customer being transported. On page 131 of the study, the 

author lists seven consideration for school transportation cost including that the use 

of larger vehicles can increase the length of a route and thus make it possible to 

save on driver cost.


      Zars (1998) illustrates examples of very rural schools in states like Montana 

and Arizona where students ride school buses for up to three hours. She points out 

that twenty­three million children ride school buses for over twenty­one million 

miles every day. School busing became an issue with school consolidation in the 

early 1900s when one room schoolhouses began closing and students were attending 

larger regional schools. In the 1960's, it was used in an effort to equalize school 

funding issues and desegregate the student population. Despite this, Zars points out 

that busing is now and has always been primarily driven by school consolidation. 

Closing schools was the goal and busing became necessary. Politicians and school 

officials saw this as a way to save money by using economies of scale. 


      Zars found that, for whatever reason, research on the effects of busing 

virtually stopped after the early 1970's. Statistics on busing now seem to focus on 

the equipment rather than the passenger. Cost and logistics are the focus of most 
                                                                       School Busing 8

studies. Though anecdotal information abounds, and Zars gives several examples of 

this in the final part of the article, research is scarce. 


                                      Consolidation 


       Bard, Gardener, and Wieland (2006) presented a paper to the NREA 

Consolidation Task force which defined consolidation, addressed current research 

and issues concerning consolidation, and presented their recommendations. The 

consolidation movement began in earnest with the rise of industry in urban areas. 

The industrialized model proposed that there was one best model for educating. 

They saw larger schools as more efficient and economical. There were studies in the 

1950's that stated a school must have at least 100 students in its graduating class 

in order to adequately prepare students for college. Studies from this period also 

found that small high schools needed to be totally eliminated in order to best 

achieve efficiency and expand course offerings. The study also points out that 

International Harvester was one of the biggest promoters of school consolidation 

during this time. It was probably no coincidence that this was also the company 

that built and sold school buses as a major segment of their business. 


       Bard et al. (2006) continued on to discuss desegregation, the economic 

downturns in the 70's and the A Nation at Risk report in the 1980's as forces that 

continued to drive the consolidation movement. The author does spend some time 
                                                                        School Busing 9

discussing the recent studies that have found that the big school consolidation 

movement may have been a mistake. There has not been evidence that 

consolidation of small districts into larger ones has reduced fiscal expenditures or 

improved student achievement. The author also notes that consolidation increased 

travel time for children and that no recent research has been done to show the 

effects of busing on student achievement. For decades, politicians and education 

officials have promoted a model that was not based in research. In fact, research 

tends to show the opposite. The article recommends that rural communities should 

make every effort to maintain a physical school presence in their community. 


      Witham (1997) performed an analysis of the comparative costs and benefits of 

closing small rural schools and consolidating them into more of a regional education 

center. Though the majority of the article focused on comparing the traditional costs 

of running small schools versus a more central, larger school, Witham did 

something unusual in that he assigned a dollar value to the time of the school 

children. He points out that transportation costs are generally not considered in the 

performing cost comparisons. The author then presents evidence that closing 

schools does not necessarily reduce the cost of education. The evidence in this study 

shows that the costs are merely redistributed. The study discusses the social costs 

of closing a school and how sometimes promises of an expanded curriculum at a 

larger attendance center do not materialize. Witham presents evidence that 
                                                                         School Busing 10

redistributing the cost of education into a larger school does not magically produce 

more money to expand curriculum offerings. And, because transportation becomes a 

part of a student's everyday school experience when local schools are closed, the 

student has less time for additional activities as hours may now be spent sitting on 

a school bus. Finally, the author discusses distance education as a method of 

expanding curricular offerings and discusses the lack of evidence supporting larger 

schools. 


       Killeen and Sipple (2000) focused a study on the relationship between school 

consolidation and district transportation costs, the effects of costs for the 

institution, and other factors that might support consolidation. Killeen and Sipple 

noted that historical evidence has not shown the economies of scale argument to be 

valid with regard to school consolidation. Transportation costs and time have been 

so significant that it has offset whatever savings that might have been realized. 

State authority has supported consolidation and that has frequently overridden the 

local control argument. Also, national land use and housing policy has played a 

significant role in pushing for consolidation even though the promised cost savings 

has not been realized. The authors also found that transportation costs have been so 

extensive with consolidation in rural areas that no money has been left to expand 

the expanded curriculum that is usually promised with bigger schools. This article 
                                                                        School Busing 11

provides more proof that student wellbeing and student achievement are generally 

not considerations in most consolidation discussions. 


                          Busing and Student Achievement


      Lu and Tweeten (1973) wrote an article describing the results of their study 

of the impact of busing on student achievement on Oklahoma students. Their data 

was obtained from a 1970 survey of almost 5000 students in grades four, eight and 

eleven. Of these students, approximately 2000 were bused and the others were used 

for comparison. Lu and Tweeten go to great lengths to explain exactly how they 

used their data to arrive at the findings of the study. They factored out variables 

that could affect the results. For example, in high school, they examined the 

relationship of a high school student working and how the having a job affected 

their achievement in school. Though they admit that socioeconomic factors could 

play a role in that students from rural areas may be in a lower income bracket than 

those who lived close to the school, they found that student achievement was 

negatively related to riding a bus. 


      Howley and Howley (2001) wrote a document for ERIC Digest that 

summarized information regarding what they called the hidden costs of schools and 

district consolidation. Specifically, they discussed busing and the effect of long bus 

rides on students. The authors gave a very brief history of busing pointing out that 
                                                                         School Busing 12

policymakers and education leaders saw consolidating small, rural schools into 

larger education centers as a valuable way of accomplishing national political and 

economic goals. What these decision makers did not consider was the effect on the 

student. History has shown that it is smaller schools, not larger, that have a 

positive correlation with increased student achievement. They do point out, 

however, that an insufficient research base makes it difficult to pinpoint specific 

consequences of long bus rides. The Howleys refer to a very dated study from the 

early 1970's with regard to a specific link to long bus rides and lower student 

achievement. This study did find that longer bus rides lowered student 

achievement. No research on that specific topic has been done since and the authors 

take the final paragraph of their article to outline the need for more. 


      In an article for the Rural Education Issue Digest, Spence (2000) discusses 

the effect of long bus rides on a school's budget, the family life of  a student, and 

student achievement. The vast majority of the article discussed the history and 

rising cost of busing. State transportation reimbursement formulas are also 

discussed as the author compares reimbursement rates by state. 


      Spence discussed some of the minimal research that does exist on busing and 

its effects on student achievement. One study by White in 1970 studied children 

who were bused for racial desegregation and found no effects on student 
                                                                       School Busing 13

achievement. The author did note that these students were all bussed 45 minutes or 

less with some riding as little as 10 minutes. Therefore, comparison to rural kids 

who ride the bus for long periods of time may not be valid. Other research by Lu 

and Tweeten was discussed which found that long bus rides had a detrimental 

effect on student achievement. However, Spence stated that this study was 

inconclusive because the sample size was small and factors such as socioeconomic 

status were not considered. The author then discussed a 1997 study of students in 

Montana that the Spence said concluded that bus rides of up to 90 minutes had no 

effect on student achievement. The author then cited much anecdotal evidence from 

Zars and testimony from public hearings in West Virginia that indicate there long 

rides do affect student achievement. The author concludes that more research is 

needed in this area as Spence feels that most of the research base that exists is 

inconclusive. 


                                 Mixing Age Ranges


      Ramage and Howley (2005) performed a study on the perceptions of parents 

with regard to their experiences of long bus rides for their children. The subjects 

were located on a single bus route for a Midwestern school. The article gave a brief 

background on busing children along with some historical information showing how 

busing has become such a pervasive presence in the lives of so many students and 
                                                                      School Busing 14

their families. The researchers used interviews to collect their data. These data 

showed that parents were most concerned with the atmosphere on the bus, the 

length of the ride, and general bus safety. 


      Overriding the Ramage and Howley study was the fact that the district used 

a practice called double­routing. This is where children of all ages, Pre­K through 

high school, are all transported on the same bus. Riders are sorted by their location 

rather than their age or maturity. This practice seemed to lead to most of the 

concerns expressed by the parents. Though most parents felt the ride was too long, 

a majority of the parents of younger children reported that their children were 

subjected to objectionable behaviors by older students. Some of the behaviors 

included being picked on, called names, bullied, and even some forms of sexual 

harassment.


      Thurman (2000) found that a type of informal social hierarchy exists on a bus 

that contains students of all ages and grade levels. As students progress through 

the grades, they advance in their school bus status level. Harassment and bullying 

are seen as a part of life and older children see the harassing of younger children as 

a rite of passage. High school students teach younger middle schoolers to harass 

and pick on younger elementary students. This serves as a sort of harassment 

training that middle schoolers many times take too far as they lack the maturity to 
                                                                        School Busing 15

be able to tell when they are crossing the line of what is socially acceptable in the 

school bus culture. Thus, this behavior causes younger children to experience stress 

that continues on into the school day or carries on into the evening after the child is 

dropped off at home. 


                                        Safety


      In her dissertation, Thurman (2000) set out to investigate what happened on 

school bus rides in a small, rural Southern Appalachian school system. She found 

that three themes rose to the surface during her interviews: safety; physical comfort 

issues; and behavior. There were varying levels of concern from the different 

stakeholder groups she interviewed. Parents were the ones who worried about their 

children getting to and from school safely. They were also concerned with the 

comfort of their children during the ride. Emotional and mental safety was a 

concern of the parents as they felt that their child picked up inappropriate language 

from older students who were riding on the same bus as their younger student. 

Parents reported bullying as a major concern as well. In the area of safety, teachers 

expressed concern of student on student harassment and the fact that issues like 

these had a tendency to spill­over into the school environment. Bus drivers felt that 

safety would be increased if there were bus monitors. Middle school students 

reported that they were sometimes encouraged by older high school students to 
                                                                      School Busing 16

bully and pick on the younger elementary students. Drivers and students reported 

that there was an informal hierarchy on the bus with the high school students 

having the highest status and younger elementary students the lowest. 


      Thurman gave several examples of various scenarios to illustrate various 

answers and conclusions of the study. These scenarios were ones presented to her 

by subjects during her interviewing of them. The author makes the point that a 45 

minute bus trip one way means that a student will spend 270 hours annually riding 

on a school bus. She then adds up the hours over the entire career of a K­12 student 

and concludes that not enough attention is paid to a part of a child's education day 

that will eventually equal about 438 academic days. 


      Solomon, Campbell, Feuer, Masters, Samkian, and Paul (2001) placed 

instruments inside of school buses to measure the level of diesel exhaust in the air 

the children riding the bus breathe. Each bus drove a regular school bus route that 

lasted 45 minutes. They collected over 20 hours worth of samples. These air 

samples showed that children riding a school bus may be exposed up to four times 

the amount of diesel exhaust as someone riding in a car directly behind the bus. 

Solomon et al. point out that the increase of diesel exhaust means an increase of 23 

to 46 times the typical cancer risk of diesel exhaust exposure. The article then 
                                                                         School Busing 17

discusses alternatives like diesel engines that have been developed to release less 

pollutants and examines the possible use of natural gas in buses. 


                                        Discipline


      Coles (1997)  studied the role of bus drivers with regard to student discipline 

on the bus. She provided an example of a bus driver needing to pull over the bus in 

order to quiet the unruly bus load of students. Coles feels that bus drivers are 

required to take on the role of disciplinarian and child psychologist. The author 

referred to a statistic by the National School Transportation Association  that 

pointed out that though drivers of the over 400,000 buses on the road today have to 

first deal with safety, student management follows as a very close second. More 

anecdotal information is given along with a few more examples of real­life student 

discipline issues that have occurred on buses.  The article ends by pointing out that 

the bus ride is basically an extension of the school day. Therefore, it is logical to 

assume that bus drivers deal with the same types of student management issues 

that face teachers on a daily basis. 


                                        Extra Curricular


      In what is probably the most powerful report regarding the effects on extra­

curricular participation with busing, Jimerson (2007) finds significant correlation 
                                                                       School Busing 18

between longer bus rides and lower rates of school involvement. Jimerson focused 

her study on consolidated districts in the state of West Virginia. She organized her 

results around eight key questions:  How do the students get to school? How long is 

the morning commute? How many student's rides are over the state time 

guidelines? How is engagement in extra­curricular activities affected by 

consolidation status? By travel time? By mode of transportation? By very long bus 

rides? And the final question looks for a link between bus ride length and college 

aspirations. 


      The findings of Jimerson's study were startling. Those students with long 

commute times participated in far fewer extra curricular activities. Thirty one 

percent of students had one­way commute times over the one hour guideline set by 

the state of West Virginia. School bus ridership was much higher in consolidated 

district. The study found a strong relationship between mode of transportation and 

participation in extra­curricular activities. Though students in consolidated 

districts who drove also had long commutes, those who drove had a much higher 

rate of participation in extra­curriculars. The study also found that the students 

who had to ride the bus were generally lower socioeconomic status than those who 

could afford to drive a car. Therefore, the author pointed out that the long 

commutes were indirectly causing poor children to have less opportunity to 

participate in extra­curricular activities than children of more affluent families. 
School Busing 19
                                                                        School Busing 20


                                     CHAPTER III

                                  METHODOLOGY 

                                      Introduction


      Riding a school bus is a fact of life for students of rural communities. When 

schools are built in central locations, it often means that the school is built outside 

of any community. The bike racks and crossing guards that were once commonplace 

in small communities are now replaced with bug yellow school buses picking up kids 

at most corners. Though many of their parents grew up walking or riding their 

bicycles to school, much of today's student population will never have that option. 

Unless a student is old enough to drive, know someone who is or has a parent who 

drives them to school, students ride a bus. If you live in the town closest to the 

school, your bus ride might be only 10­15 minutes. However, for some students in 

outlaying rural areas, the bus ride can reach an hour or more.  

                                  Research Questions

1.    What are the perceptions of the staff of Farmington Central with regard to 

the effects of school transportation on a student's public school experience?

                                     Methodology

      I am using a researcher created instrument, I am going to survey the staff of 

Farmington CUSD #265. I used an expert to review my questions, modified 
                                                                        School Busing 21

questions accordingly, used email to send out a link so participants could click to 

take the survey.

                                 Subjects of the Study

Population

      The population requested in this study consists of certified and non­certified 

staff from Farmington Central CUSD #265.

Sample

      The 52 staff that responded to the survey at Farmington Central District 265. 

                                   Instrumentation

      Researcher created as a part of EDL 681. The class professor reviewed the 

instrument, critiqued the questions and provided feedback. The instrument had 

eight questions which were answered using a Likert scale. The Likert scale 

responses were strongly agree, disagree, no opinion, agree, and strongly agree. 

There were also three open­ended questions. The first two open­ended questions 

were relevant to the study while the third was a throw­away question. As the 

researcher completed the review of research, common categories became apparent. 

These categories were used to develop the questions for the survey instrument. 

      Questions were crafted in a fashion so that a positively worded question may 

be designed to illicit a negative response or negatively worded to possibly illicit a 

positive response. 
                                                                       School Busing 22

                                       Validity 

      This instrument was researcher created and has no validity.

                                      Reliability

      This instrument was researcher created and has no reliability.

                                      Procedures

      The researcher emailed Farmington Central CUSD #265 staff requesting 

their participation in the project. The email contained a request from me stating 

that this was for a class, that it would take less than five minutes to complete, and 

that it would be completely confidential.  The email message also contained a 

personal statement from the researcher asking for the recipient's help in completing 

the EDL 681 class. A link to the instrument on Survey Monkey was included in the 

message so that the recipient merely had to click on it in to be taken directly to the 

survey. The email was sent to the teachers the evening before a teacher's workshop 

day. This was done intentionally as the workshop was the day before report card 

day so most had the time to complete it. 

                            Data collection and Recording

      Survey Monkey will generate a descriptive statistical analysis of the 

responses, a frequency count, and a mean score for each Likert score will be given. 

Open ended responses will be analyzed using coding.

                                    Data Analysis
                                                                         School Busing 23

      This report will utilize the data analysis provided by Survey Monkey which provides 

the N and the mean. 




                                    CHAPTER IV 


                                ANALYSIS OF DATA


      The research question was What are the perceptions of the staff of  

Farmington Central with regard to the effects of school transportation on a student's  

public school experience? Survey questions were sent out in the form of a Survey 

Monkey online questionnaire. There were eight quantitative questions using a 

Likert scale of 1 to 5. Categories were strongly agree, disagree, no opinion, agree, 

and strongly agree. Three questions were qualitative with one serving as a throw­

away question. 120 survey emails were sent out and 52 responded for a response 

rate of 43%. Because this was a teacher institute day, program aides, personal 

aides, and classroom aides would not have been in attendance. Therefore, unless 
                                                                            School Busing 24

they checked their work email from home, they may not have received the 

invitation.


        Survey Question #1: Bus rides for some of our students are too long. This 

question is part of the consolidation focus. The topic of consolation. The literature 

showed that consolidation has increased bus times to levels that are sometimes well 

past what is recommended by most states (Bard, Gardener, & Wieland, 2006). 


                                              Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree   Strongly 
                                              Disagree     e      Opinion            Agree
Bus Rides for some of our students are too     2.00%     5.90%  17.60%  43.10%  31.40% 
long.                                           (1)       (3)       (9)      (22)     (16)

        Fifty one of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this question show that the respondents overwhelmingly show agreement that 

some of our students have bus rides that are too long. Though no specific time was 

given for what was too long, 74.5% of respondents at least agreed that some bus 

rides were too long. 


        Survey Question #2: The length of time a student spends riding the bus to 

and from school has little effect on a student's academic achievement. The topic of 

how student achievement as it relates to school busing came to light during the 

review of literature (Lu & Tweeten, 1973). 
                                                                                School Busing 25

                                                  Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree    Strongly 
                                                  Disagre     e       Opinion             Agree
                                                     e
The length of time a student spends riding the    13.5%     63.5%     11.5%     9.6%      1.9% 
bus to and from school has little effect on a       (7)      (33)       (6)      (5)       (1)
student's academic achievement.

       Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this question show that the respondents disagree with this statement. 77% of 

the respondents felt that the length of time spent on a bus had an effect on the 

achievement of a student. 11.5% of the respondents felt that there was no effect 

while 11.5% had no opinion. 


       Survey Question #3: Mixing older and younger students on the same bus has 

not been a problem. The topic of how the mixing of older and younger students on 

the same bus came to light as a serious issue in the review of literature (Thurman, 

2000). 


                                                  Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree    Strongly 
                                                  Disagre     e       Opinion             Agree
                                                     e
Mixing older and younger students on the          25.0%     50.0%      9.6%     13.5%     1.9% 
same bus has not been a problem.                    (13)     (26)       (5)      (7)       (1)

       Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this question show that the respondents disagree with this statement. 75% of 
                                                                             School Busing 26

the respondents felt that mixing older students with younger students on the same 

bus . 15.4% of the respondents agreed that this was not a problem while 9.6% had 

no opinion. 


         Survey Question #4: Student behavior is adequately monitored on buses. The 

review of literature showed the area of discipline to be significant on school buses 

(Coles, 1997). 


                                               Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree    Strongly 
                                               Disagre     e       Opinion             Agree
                                                  e
Student behavior is adequately monitored on    15.4%     61.5%      9.6%     13.5%     0.0% 
buses.                                           (8)      (32)       (5)      (7)       (0)

         Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this survey show that the respondents overwhelmingly disagree with this 

statement. 77% of the respondents felt that student discipline is not monitored 

adequately on buses. 13.5% of the respondents felt that there was no effect while 

9.6% had no opinion. No respondents strongly agreed that there was adequate 

monitoring of behavior on buses. 


         Survey Question #5: Behaviors on a school bus have little effect on the 

student's school experience as they are two totally separate environments. The 
                                                                                 School Busing 27

review of literature showed the area of discipline to be significant on school buses as 

it may spill over into the school setting (Coles, 1997). 


                                                   Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree   Strongly 
                                                   Disagre     e       Opinion            Agree
                                                      e
Behaviors on a school bus have little effect on    46.2%      50%       1.9%     0.0%     1.9% 
the student's school experience as they are          (24)     (26)       (1)      (0)      (1)
two totally separate environments.

        Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this survey show that the respondents overwhelmingly disagree with this 

statement. 96.2% of the respondents felt that behaviors on the school bus have an 

effect on the school environment. Only 1.9% of the respondents felt that there was 

no effect while 1.9% had no opinion. 


        Survey Question #6:  School busing is safe for the students of our district. The 

review of literature showed the area of safety to be significant on school buses. 

(Solomon, Campbell, Feuer, Masters, Samkian, and Paul, 2001). 


                                                   Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree   Strongly 
                                                   Disagre     e       Opinion            Agree
                                                      e
School busing is safe for the students of our       2.0%     11.8%     19.6%  64.7%       2.0% 
district.                                            (1)      (6)       (10)     (33)      (1)
                                                                                 School Busing 28

       Fifty one of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this survey show that the respondents at least agree with this statement. 66.7% 

of the respondents felt that school busing is safe for students of the district. Only 

13.8% felt that there were safety issues with busing while 19.6% had no opinion. 


       Survey Question #7: The distance traveled by students to and from school has 

a negative effect on parent involvement. The farther away the student lives from 

school, the less likely the parent will be involved in the school. The review of 

literature showed the area of distance traveled to be related to participation rates of 

parents and students in extracurricular activities. (Jimerson, 2007). 


                                                   Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree   Strongly 
                                                   Disagre     e       Opinion            Agree
                                                      e
The distance traveled by students to and from       9.6%     34.6%     13.5%  36.5%       5.8% 
school has a negative effect on parent               (5)      (18)       (7)     (19)      (3)
involvement. The farther away the student lives 
from school, the less likely the parent will be 
involved in the school. 

       Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this survey show the respondents almost equally split on this question. 42.3% of 

the respondents at least agreed that longer distance reduced participation. 44.2% of 
                                                                            School Busing 29

the respondents felt that there was no correlation between distance and 

participation while 13.5% had no opinion.


       Survey Question #8: School consolidation has caused longer bus rides for 

most students. The review of literature showed that school consolidation was a 

significant issue with regard to school busing  (Bard, Gardner, & Wieland, 2006). 


                                              Strongly  Disagre     No      Agree    Strongly 
                                              Disagre     e       Opinion             Agree
                                                 e
School consolidation has caused longer bus     0.0%     21.2%      5.8%     40.4%    32.7% 
rides for most students.                        (0)      (11)       (3)      (21)      (11)

       Fifty two of fifty two participants responded to this question. The responses 

for this survey show that the majority of respondents agreed with this statement. 

73.1% of the respondents felt that consolidation has resulted in increased ride times 

for students. 21.2% of the respondents disagreed with the statement while 5.8% had 

no opinion.  


       The following graph shows the mean score for all questions. The mean scores 

were calculated manually after accounting for the whether or not the question was 

worded negatively or positively. These scores show that the most agreement among 

the respondents was found with question number 5. The respondents 

overwhelmingly felt that behaviors occurring on the bus do spill over into the school 
                                                                                School Busing 30

building environment. The least agreement was found on question 7. The 

respondents were fairly split with regard to whether or not distance traveled to and 

from school resulted in a decrease in parent involvement. 


Question     Question    Question    Question    Question    Question    Question    Question 
1            2           3           4           5           6           7           8
3.96         3.72        3.83        3.79        4.38        3.53        2.94        3.85

       An open ended question asked to the survey respondents was, What effect, if  

any, do you believe busing students has had on student participation in extra­

curricular/after­school activities? 67% of the respondents gave answers that were 

positive in that they agreed with the statement. A theme that was in many 

responses was that the district needed to provide an activity bus that runs later in 

the evening to various communities to make it easier on parents to pick up their 

children. 


       The final open ended question was, What type of behaviors on the bus, if any,  

do you consider to be a major concern? The two main themes in these answers were 

bullying and language. Bullying was the most common concern as it was mentioned 

by 61% of the respondents. 
                                                                      School Busing 31


                                    CHAPTER V 


                                      Summary


      School consolidation has been a movement promoted by political and 

educational leaders since the early 1900's. Communities are told that, because of 

economies of scale, cost savings and expanded course offerings make consolidation 

beneficial to all parties. Because smaller, local schools closed and were combined 

into larger, more regional education centers, students who did not live near the 

school needed to be transported. Students who live in outlying rural areas 

experience the longest rides. Studies reported students in some areas riding buses 

up to three hours one­way. Though this was not the norm, rides of over an hour 

each way were much more common with one study reporting over 30% of students 

who rode the bus riding for more than one hour each way. As a cost saving measure, 

students of all ages and grades are placed on the same bus. Studies noted that 

discipline issues abound on buses with mixed age levels and long commutes. Survey 

respondents indicated that bullying and bad language were issues, especially when 

older and younger children rode the same bus. 


      Busing also affected student participation in extracurricular activities. 

Studies noted that students with the longest commute were generally those from 
                                                                         School Busing 32

very rural areas. Other studies noted that students from very rural areas were often 

in a lower socioeconomic class than those from urban areas. Parents were also less 

likely to be involved in their child's school when the school was a very long way 

from home.


      Survey respondents felt that busing was a major deterrent to after­school, 

extracurricular participation. The majority of respondents indicated that students 

would be less likely to participate in any activity if they lived a significant distance 

from the school. Students with working parents were also less likely to be in an 

after­school activity.


                                      Conclusions


      What are the perceptions of the staff of Farmington Central with regard to 

the effects of school transportation on a student's public school experience? The 

respondents to the survey indicated that busing was an issue for Farmington 

Central CUSD #265 for several reasons: the ride is too long for many students, staff 

has noticed a negative effect on student achievement, and older and younger 

students are assigned to ride the same bus. Most of the respondents felt that there 

was not adequate supervision on the bus routes. Bullying and bad language were 

noted as being issues on buses. Respondents felt that these issues spilled over into 

the classroom when they were not handled properly on the bus. Additionally, long 
                                                                      School Busing 33

bus routes seem to be a deterrent to extracurricular participation by students who 

have the longest commutes. 


                                  Recommendations


      As pointed out in most of the research reviewed for this paper, very little 

research exists regarding busing. What current research exists mostly discusses 

costs, equipment, and logistical planning. Very little research is spent on the human 

cost of busing.


      Farmington Central CUSD #265 administration needs to study the issue of 

busing. The survey respondents generally agreed that issues abound on buses in the 

area of discipline, inadequate supervision, and bullying. Research indicates that 

busing, which is an extension of the student's school day, does have a direct affect 

on the students and their families. Much time is spent examining curriculum. 

Perhaps some time should be spent on the bus ride the student experiences each 

day before he or she is ever exposed to the curriculum.
                                                                       School Busing 34


                                      References


Bard, J., Gardener, C., & Wieland, R. (2006, Winter). Rural school consolidation: 
      History, research summary, conclusions, and recommendations. The Rural  
      Educator, 27(2), 40­48.

 Butterworth, J. E. (1945). Rural schools for tomorrow. Yearbook. Department of 
      Rural Education (National Education Association). Retrieved April 9, 2009 
      from ERIC database. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED329379)

Coles, A. D. (1997, October 29). School bus drivers trying to keep the peace. 
       Education Week. Retrieved April 6, 2009, from 
       http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/1997/10/29/09drive.h17.html?
       tkn=LOTFatE917xzWNTqVRkhKS4RVyLDhPsoCVtY 

Howley, A., & Howley, C. (2001). Rural school busing. Charleston, WV: ERIC 
     Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small School. (ERIC  Document 
     Reproduction Service No. ED459969) 

Jimerson, L. (2007). Slow motion: Traveling by school bus in consolidated districts 
      in West Virginia. Rural school and community trust. Retrieved April 2, 2009 
      from ERIC database. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED499440)

Killeen, K., & Sipple, J. (2000). School consolidation and transportation policy: An  
       empirical and institutional analysis (Working Paper for the Rural and 
       Community Trust Policy Program). Retrieved April 2, 2009 from ERIC 
       database. (ERIC Reproduction Document No. ED447979)

Lu, Y., & Tweeten, L. (1973, October). The impact of busing on student 
       achievement. Growth and Change, 4(4), 44­46.

Ramage, R., & Howley, A. (2005). Parents’ perceptions of rural school bus rides. The  
     Rural Educator, 27(1), 15­20.

Solomon, G. M., Campbell, T. R., Feuer, G. R., Masters, J., Samkian, A., & paul, K. 
     A. (2001). No breathing in the aisles: Diesel exhaust inside school buses.  
     Washington, DC: Natural Resources Defense Council. (ERIC Document 
     Reproduction Service No. ED450878)
                                                                        School Busing 35

Spence, B. (2000b). Long school bus rides: Their effect on school budgets, family life,  
      and student achievement. Charleston, WV: AEL, Inc. Retrieved May 12, 2008 
      from ERIC database. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED448955)

Thurman, S. W. (2000). “A rolling town”: The long school bus ride in a rural 
     southern Appalachian county. Dissertation Abstracts International, 62(04). 
     (Publication No. AAT 3012331)

Witham, M. (1997, July). The economics of [not] closing small rural schools. Paper 
     presented at a Ph.D. symposium for candidates and supervisors: A Focus on 
     Rural Issues, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. Retrieved May 13, 2008 
     from ERIC database. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED415036)

Zars, B. (1998). Long rides, tough hides: Enduring long school bus rides. Report for 
       Rural Challenge Policy. Retrieved May 13, 2008 from ERIC database. (ERIC 
       Document Reproduction Service No. ED43241
                                                                          School Busing 36


Appendix A: Open Ended Question 1: What effect, if any, do you believe busing  

students has had on student participation in extra­curricular/after­school activities?  




                                                        Has 
                                                                 No 
                                                        an 
                                                                 effect
                                                        effect
     I have had several students whose parents 
1. use this as an excuse for the student not to  x
     serve afterschool detentions.
     Gas prices continue to flucuate and this is 
2. going to stop parents from allowing thier            x
     children to participate in activities.
     If a student is interested in extra or after 
3. school activities and his parents support it,                 x
     there won't be a problem with busing.
     The farther away the more burden it puts on 
                                                  x
4. families to make activities especially in harsh 
     weather.
     Students who live farther away do not 
5.                                                      x
     participate in extra curricular activities.
     Many can't stay, unless they can be bussed 
     again later. I have an after school study 
6.                                                      x
     session that some students have wanted to 
     attend, but can't due to issues with a ride.
     Limited some who don't have access to 
7.                                                      x
     transportation or parents work
     If there is no "activity bus" participation may 
8.                                                      x
     decrease.
     Some students may not be able to 
9. participate because of the distance they live  x
     from school.
10. it is a hardship for students and parents that  x
     live farther away­ esp when the student can't 
                                                             School Busing 37

      drive­ students that live near town have it 
      easier to go home eat and rest before a 
      game­ further bused students may ride 
      home­ and have to turn around and come 
      right back­
      Probably a decrease b/c if they don't have a 
11.                                                      x
      ride, they can't participate
      Although it effects some greatly, those who 
12.                                                      x
      truly want to participate will find a way.
      Without after­school transportation, many 
13. students are limited in their ability to             x
      participate.
      Some students are unable to participate for 
14.                                                      x
      that reason.
      Since we no longer have after practice 
      buses, some students can not participate in 
15. after­school activities. Some of their parents  x
      have to work later and can not pick­up the 
      students on time.
      If parents work, younger students may not 
16. have transportation home from practices,             x
      etc.
      The district needs to run after school activity 
      busses. Students can not always participate 
17. in those activities because parents are still  x
      working and are unable to pick up their 
      student.
      I believe some students, in the furthest 
      reaches of the district or with parents who 
      can not transport them, are not able to 
      participate as much as students who are 
18. closer. Consolidation has added to this as  x
      some students were able to walk home after 
      an activity when the grade schools were 
      smaller. I believe this problem effects the 
      grade school/junior high more than the high 
                                                                   School Busing 38

      school.
      I don't think it's had much of an effect. If the 
19. students and their parents really want to be               x
      involved, busing has nothing to do with it.
      Some students do not have rides to practice. 
20.                                                        x
      So they don't get to play.
      I believe it has become more of a problem 
21. as of late with gas prices being what they             x
      are
      I don't think it is a factor. If students want to 
22. participate in extra­curriculars, they seem to             x
    find transportation.
23. None                                                       x
24. No effect                                                  x
    Students that can't get here or there can't do 
25.                                                        x
      sports because of no after­school buses.
      Lot's of effect. They can't stay after school to 
26.                                                        x
      get extra help or participate in activities.
      If families live a longer distance from their 
      student's schools and bus transportation is 
27. their only option, I believe there is less             x
      chance that child will be involved in extra­
      curricular activities.
28. none                                                       x
29. None                                                       x
30. None                                                       x
      I believe that families who want their kids 
      involved will find ways to get their students 
31.                                                            x
      back and forth to school activities regardless 
      of the distance.
32. None to my knowlegde.                                      x
33. Many parents work...and students have no  x
      way of attending school events if they do not 
      have transportation. Busing students creates 
      a school district that can include students 
      who cannot get to school on foot or by 
      bicycle. This reduces the amount of students 
                                                                School Busing 39

      in after­school activities.
34. No opinion
35. Little effect                                           x
      Very little effect. Those parents that support 
36. their students do so regardless of how far              x
      they live from the school.
      Due to parental schedules, some students 
37. are prevented from participating in extra­          x
      curricular activities.
      If students know the bus is their only way of 
      transportation, they may not be so likely to 
      participate in anything after school. Students 
38. know more than they let on. They know if            x
      their family is in a financial crunch and 
      cannot afford to drive to and from every day 
      for activities.
      I am sure their are some parents who will 
39.                                                     x
      not come to the school to pick up their child.
      For some families, busing is the only 
      transportation available to get children to 
      and from school. For the student to stay 
40.                                                     x
      after school for practice However, other 
      parents most often step up to help if the 
      student truly wants to participate in sports.
      Very little, if any. We still have strong 
      involvement in these activities. We still have 
      one high school. The new facility ­ with Jr. 
41.                                                         x
      High and High School in one building 
      probably makes it more convenient for 
      parents & siblings to participate.
      I do not believe busing has had an effect on 
      student participation. The student 
      participates but may stay at school later 
42.                                                         x
      because it takes the parent longer to pick 
      their student up. The participation fee has 
      had a greater effect than the busing issue.
                                                       School Busing 40

      Negative. Some students don't have 
      someone to drive in to pick them up after 
43.                                                x
      school. Why don't we run a after­school 
      activities bus?
Appendix B: Open Ended Question 2: What type of behaviors on the bus, if any, do  

you consider to be a major concern? 


                                                                                 Weap disres Negative 
                                                                                 ons      pect example
                                                                    bull langu
                                                                                 and           s
                                                                    ying age
                                                                                 violen
                                                                                 ce
      I have had some students with problems with kids picking 
1.                                                                  x
      on them..not always older ones.
      Being able to move around not sit in their seats. Younger                                x
2.    children being influenced by older children's behavior and        x
      language.
      Students being bullied. Some language and topics are not 
3.                                                                  x
      appropriate.
4.    Bullies and really mean bus drivers/monitors                  x
5.    inappropriate language                                            x
6.    weapons, bullying                                             x            x
7.    Inappropriate language, disrespect, bullying                  x   x                 x
      Younger students are witness to negative behaviors                                       x
8.
      presented by the older students.
9.    Bullying                                                      x
10.   Language , teasing others , etc.                              x   x
      The language and behaviors that the older students are                                   x
11.                                                                     x
      doing is transferred to the younger students.
      Younger student exposure to language and poor behavior. 
12.   Students with potential behavior problems can be set off          x
      before getting to school.
      bad language and subjects from older kids to younger                                     x
13.                                                                 x   x
      kids­ moving around ­ bullying
14.   bullying                                                  x
      The education the younger ones get from the older ones is                                x
15.
      not the kind most should get from school.
16.   bullying                                                      x
17.   use and sharing of illiegal substances                        x            x             x
      verbal assult
      physical threats
18.   Physical violence                                                      x
19.   The bigger kids picking on the smaller ones.                                   x
20.   bullying                                                       x
      Older with younger. I have knowledge of older kids                             x
      tormenting younger ones. In one case the high school 
      student looked a fourth grader in the eye and said, "I am 
21.                                                                  x
      going to kill you." She never rode the bus again. She was 
      very afraid. Younger students are also learning vulgar 
      language on the bus.
      One big problem is the language which students are using 
      and to which others are exposed. Younger students have 
      often had their vocabulary increased in a negative way 
22.                                                                  x   x
      from students (usually older students) they ride with. I am 
      also concerned about the threats, teasing, and bullying 
      that occur since it is hard to monitor.
      Inappropriate behaviors between older students and                             x
      younger students...unfortunately some of this gets a little 
23.                                                                      x
      crude or sexual. Crude or foul language is also a big 
      problem!
24.   Name calling, making fun of others, pestering, hitting        x
      Disruptive behavior at a level that distracts the driver and               x
25.
      this the safety of the students
26.   Bullying and harrassment                                       x
27.   Swearing; bullying                                             x   x
28.   Cussing, hitting, bullying                                     x   x
29.   Bullying                                                       x
30    Bullying, language                                             x
31.   Hittting, pushing                                              x
32.   Hitting, improper language use, sexual harrassment                 x       x
33.   bullying                                                       x
      older students language around younger children.                               x
34.                                                                      x
      agressive behavior/bullying, rude behavior towards drivers
35.   language, bullying                                           x     x
36.   Bullying ­ There should a monitor on every bus.              x
      I feel that mixing older and younger students on the bus is 
37.
      a huge problem that needs to be addressed.
38.   bullying                                                       x
      Fighting, language, anything that takes the driver's                     x
39.                                                                    x
      concentration off the road.
      Violence, bullying, unsafe behavior (getting out of seat,                x
40.
      jumping, moving while bus is in motion).
41.   Getting out of seats. Talking too loud.                                      x
42.   Bullying, inappropriate language                                 x   x
      Bad language by the older students is picked up by the                           x
43.                                                                        x
      younger students.
44.   Physical violence and language.                                      x   x
      Behavior that affects the driver to take his eyes off the the            x
45.   road such as: fighting (spiting,hitting cussing), and children 
      out of their seats.
      Bullying, foul language. Bullying being the biggest concern 
      ­ many students push around the little ones or the quieter 
      students. I believe many students are traumatized by the 
      bus ride to and from school ­ that is the hardest part of 
46.   their day. Especially if they do not have any friends who        x   x
      ride that. You would think that would not be the case as 
      they should all be friends in the neighborhood so riding the 
      bus would not be an issue. However, these days, families 
      are kind of isolated with both parents working, etc.
47.   What is in those water bottles?
48.   Bullying and the language of the older students.                 x   x           x
49.   cursing, bullying                                                x   x

								
To top