; Herb Greenberg Bike Rodeo Manual
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

Herb Greenberg Bike Rodeo Manual

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 42

  • pg 1
									         Safe Kids Sonoma County

Office
         1165 Montgomery Drive, Mail Stop 1A01
         Santa Rosa, CA 95405


Copy     Jan Gritsch
         Coalition Coordinator

         707-525-5300 x3262
         Jgritsch@stjoe.org
Safe Kids Sonoma County will provide the following for your use at your event.

•   A Bike Safety Rodeo Kit, on loan to you, which includes:
               This “How-To” manual.
               Master copies of flyers, permission slips, and other materials for conducting
               and promoting the event.
               Equipment for setting up a bicycle riding skills course (traffic signs, cones).
               Equipment for making on-the-spot ID cards or “bicycle drivers license” cards.
               Educational brochures to distribute to rodeo participants.
•   Bike helmets, when available (see Bike Helmet Bank application).
•   Help coordinating with a local bike shop for free bike safety inspections.

Your school/ organization must provide a bike rodeo organizer who is
responsible for:
As soon as possible

•   Pick a date and time to hold your rodeo. Complete and submit a bike rodeo
    application. You are responsible for providing an appropriate and safe site to hold
    the event, i.e., a large parking area or playground for setting up a bike riding course,
    a suitable place for families and children to wait/play (if trees or shelter are not
    provided, a canopy may be needed in hot weather months).

•   Apply for helmets from the Herb Greenberg Helmet Bank if any children will need
    helmets (see application form). Safe Kids Sonoma County asks for a $5 donation
    per helmet in order to keep the helmet bank sustainable.
        Please note: For-profit organizations are requested to pay the full cost of
        purchasing helmets (cost is $8/ helmet)

•   Bike rodeo organizer should attend another rodeo in order to get an idea of how it is
    done and receive training on how to set up the course.


4 weeks ahead of time:
    •   Find volunteers for the following positions:
           o   Course lay-out (2 hours day before rodeo- 3 volunteers)
           o   Course set-up (2 hours before start of rodeo- 3 volunteers)
           o   Rodeo course volunteers (during rodeo- at least 8 volunteers)


U:\Beth\Bike and Pedestrian Safety Action Team\Bike Rodeos\Bike Safety Rodeo
Materials CD\Bike Rodeo Protocol 10_19_09.doc
           o   Other rodeo stations (registration, education, helmet fitting, bike license,
               bike safety inspection, refreshements- at least 6 volunteers)


   •   Market and promote the event to the appropriate media outlets and the targeted
       population. This may include direct mailing flyers to parents, press release to the
       media, paid advertisements, etc. The Safe Kids Sonoma County Coordinator
       must approve all event marketing/promotional materials before they are released.
       All marketing materials must note that the event is co-sponsored by Safe Kids
       Sonoma County.

1 week ahead of time:
   • Bike Rodeo Station Preparation

       a. Pick up the bike rodeo kit and get familiar with the written material and
           equipment included in the kit.
               i.     Print copies of all handouts needed for the day of the rodeo
       b. Bicycle Driver License Kit
               i.     Provide digital camera and USB cord.
               ii.    Purchase ID laminator pouches (available at Office Depot or other
                      office supply store) and Pogo Printer Paper (available at Target)
               iii.   Print bicycle driver license cards
       c. Egg drop demonstration
               i.     Buy eggs and trash bags for this demo
       d. Provide refreshments/cold water for all volunteers and, if possible, the event
       participants.

Day before Rodeo:
   • Draw out course lay-out with chalk.

Day of Rodeo:
   • Secure the site for the day of the event with barricades, cones, signs, or other
       means.
   • Bike repair- if possible, have kids bring their bike before the event (at least 1
       hour) so the bike shop can start on repairs
   • Station Set-Up
       a. Station 1- Registration and Helmet Donation
              i.      Turn in Permission Slip
              ii.     Collect $5 donation if participant needs a new helmet
              iii.    Hand out checklist of rodeo stations

       b. Station 2- Bicycle Driver License
             i.       Take pictures for the bicycle driver licenses (do first so ID’s will be
                      ready at completion).
             ii.      Have kids sign bicycle driver license card and turn in permission
                      slip (if needed)
             iii.     Print pictures, assemble licenses, and laminate cards so that kids
                      can pick up complete licenses at the end of the event




U:\Beth\Bike and Pedestrian Safety Action Team\Bike Rodeos\Bike Safety Rodeo
Materials CD\Bike Rodeo Protocol 10_19_09.doc
       c. Station 3- Helmet fitting (have at least 2 or 3 volunteers for this station)
             i.      If child has a helmet, adjust so it fits correctly
             ii.     If child does not have helmet, fit with new helmet (see Herb
                     Greenberg Helmet Bank Application)
             iii.    Egg drop demonstration; Educate participants on the importance
                     of wearing a helmet (may also be done during safety talk or as
                     separate station)

       d. Station 4- Safety Talk
             i.       Go over Rules of the Road, hand signals, etc. (“Simon Says”)
             ii.      Review policy of school /organization (if applicable/ see examples
                      to create policy)
             iii.     Handout (5 Rules to Live By)

       e. Station 5- Bicycle Safety Check
             i.       Review the parts of the bike/teach kids how to check their bike for
                      safety (safety checklist)

       f.   Station 6- Rodeo Course setup is dependant upon available space. We
            recommend that you use the 4-Station Course, but if there is not room, you
            can combine the elements from bullet 2 into one large course.
               i.      4-Station Course
                         • Safetyville
                         • Turtle Race
                         • Super Slolam
                         • Quick Turn/ Fast Dodge
               ii.      Course Elements:
                         • Look Back and Hand Signals
                         • Figure 8/ Circling and Changing direction
                         • Intersection/ Driveway
                         • Zig-Zag/ Maneuvering and Weaving
                         • Stop and Swerve
                         • Straight Line Control/ The Gauntlet

       g. Station 7- Quiz/ test
             i.      Written or oral test
             ii.     Distribute completed bicycle driver license or certificates of
                     completion (optional)

   •   Collect data on helmet distribution (if distributing helmets from Herb Greenberg
       Helmet Bank).
   •   Complete a Bike Rodeo Evaluation form.

Day after the event:

   •   Return all items in the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit in good condition (To be checked in
       by DHS staff).
   •   Replace any lost or damaged kit items.



U:\Beth\Bike and Pedestrian Safety Action Team\Bike Rodeos\Bike Safety Rodeo
Materials CD\Bike Rodeo Protocol 10_19_09.doc
Organization/School:

Your Name:                                                            Title:

Address:                                                    City:                                        Zip:

Phone:                                     Fax:                                E-mail:


Type of Event:            Bike Rodeo only                            Health/Safety Fair                         Other


Date of bicycle safety event: _______________

Date you will pick up the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit: ______________

Date you will return the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit: ______________

________________________________________________________________________________________

Please carefully review the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit Protocol and note that all components of the kit must be
returned in good condition. The Prevention and Planning Division Receptionist will check it in. Polaroid film
that is used must be replaced when the kit is returned. If you are able to fulfill the required responsibilities as
an event organizer, please sign the agreement below:

I agree to use the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit to advance the safety of children in Sonoma County and for no other
purpose. I will abide by the provisions of the Bike Safety Rodeo Kit Protocol, and will return all components of
the kit in good condition.

Signature: __________________________________________________ Date: _____________________


Please send the completed application to:

                                                                                           Approved:
Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Action Team
490 Mendocino Ave., Suite 202                                                     Yes _____         No _____
Santa Rosa, CA 95401
(707) 565-6681; FAX (707) 565-6619                               _______________________________________


                                      A local coalition of Safe Kids Worldwide
8/02                   Mission: To prevent unintentional deaths and injuries to children ages 14 and under
                                   THE HERB GREENBERG
                                 HELMET BANK APPLICATION
Program/Organization:                                                                                            _

Your Name:                                                             Title:                                    _

Address:                                                     City:                                        Zip:   _

Phone:                            Fax:                                E-mail:                                    _

Please describe your bicycle safety project or event. (If event, indicate date and who you intend to reach). You
may include additional sheets or attachments.

                                                                                                                 _

                                                                                                                 _


In addition to the description above, please answer the following questions:

1)       How many helmets do you need? ___________

2)       Who of your staff or volunteers is trained to properly fit helmets? ____________________________

         _______________________________________________________________________________

3)       Do your staff or volunteers need free training to properly fit helmets and deliver bike safety messages to
         children? Yes ____ No _____


4)       Would you like a supply of free English/Spanish bicycle safety brochures? ____Yes____No

5)       Is this a new bicycle safety program? Yes _____             No _____

Please send the completed application to:

Safe Kids Sonoma County Bike and Ped Safety Action Team Chair
490 Mendocino Ave. Suite 202
Santa Rosa, CA 95401
(707) 565-6681; FAX (707) 565-6619



                                       A local coalition of Safe Kids Worldwide
1/09                    Mission: To prevent unintentional deaths and injuries to children ages 14 and under
      The Herb Greenberg Bike Helmet Bank 

              Organizations serving Sonoma County Children
Safe Kids Sonoma County wants to help kids stay safe while bicycling. Because
bicycle helmets have been shown to reduce the risk of brain injury from bicycle
collisions, a Bike Helmet Bank was established to promote the use of bike helmets.
Free bike helmets are awarded to qualified groups and organizations in
Sonoma County. All child-serving not-for-profit organizations with the capacity to
identify and serve low-income children living in Sonoma County are eligible to apply.
Your responsibilities will include:

9   Receiving free training in proper bike helmet fitting
9   Identifying low-income children under age 18
9   Fitting all helmets to the individual children who receive them
9   Providing appropriate safety messages with each helmet

To ensure a proper fit, all helmets given through the Safe Kids Sonoma County Bike
Helmet Bank must be fitted on each child by a trained person. Contact us to learn of
training opportunities. Organizations and groups awarded helmets will be required to
complete a brief evaluation of their bicycle safety/helmet event and return it to Safe
Kids Sonoma County Coalition within 30 days of the event.

A non-biased panel of Safe Kids Sonoma County members, who have injury
prevention expertise, will review all applications. If you wish to be considered to
receive free helmets from the Helmet Bank, please complete the attached application.


       Safe Kids Sonoma County
       475 Aviation Blvd., Suite 210
       Santa Rosa, CA 95403
       (707) 565-6678 Phone
       (707) 565-6619 FAX
                                               Including:
When:
                                           Bike riding skills course

Time:                                      Bicycle Safety
                                           Inspections

Where:                                     Helmet Inspection and
                                           Fitting

                                           Picture ID Cards

       For more information call:          Fun!!

                                           Games
        Contact Person:
                                           Prizes


Sponsored by:
•   Safe Kids Sonoma County

•   Dave’s Bike Shop

•




                          RETURN TO PROTOCOL
ƒ   CD of Bicycle Safety Rodeo Materials
       Flyer for Advertising                     Permission Slip
       Registration Station Check-off List       Bike Safety Inspection Sheet
       Completion Certificate
       Bicyclist License/ID Card
       Sample School Bike Safety Policies and Procedures

ƒ   Bicycle Safety Resource Directory

ƒ   Videos:
       “The Ride Safe Way to Fit a Bicycle Helmet
       SK Cycle Smart (Jell-O in a Jar – ages 8 - 10)
       Get the Big Picture ( Rules of the Road, 8 minutes – ages 10 - 14)

ƒ   Brochures:
       “Use Your Head” leaflet (USDOT, NHTSA, USCPSC) http://www.cpsp.gov
       “Show What You Know at the Bike Rodeo” quiz booklet – AAA
       “5 Rules to Live By When Riding a Bike – AAA

ƒ   Posters (Laminated)
       “It’s the Law” - 1 English, 1 Spanish
       “Correct Way to Wear a helmet” - 1 English, 1 Spanish

ƒ   Riding Safety Skills Course
        Six sign stanchions: Large yellow rubber cones, black adapters, wood staffs
                               Traffic signs: 2 stop signs, 1 one-way right, 1 one-way left, 1 yield
        Nineteen – 18” orange vinyl traffic cones
        Five – 12” orange plastic cones
        Twenty-Four orange course markers
        Chalk for marking skills course

ƒ   To Make ID Cards
       Poloroid “I-Zone” instant pocket camera for miniature photos
       Poloroid “I-Zone” film
       “Docuseal 40” 4” card laminator
       ID Card Master on CD

ƒ   Other
       Reflective tape


       4/05



                            RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                                                Permission Slip


Name                                                                            Grade

School

Address

City                                                        State                       Zip

Home Phone                                            Work Phone




   The signature of a parent or legal guardian is required for youth participation.


I, the parent or guardian of the child named above, do hereby agree to allow my child to participate in the
Bicycle Skills Course and other bike rodeo activities. I further agree to indemnify and hold harmless
________________________________________________________________,SAFE KIDS of Sonoma
                                (school name)
County, and other sponsoring organizations and their employees, officers, and volunteers from and
against any and all liability associated with my child’s participation. I agree to allow use of photographs of
my child taken at this event for program publicity.




  Signature_______________________________                          Date _______________________



 Check appropriate box:               Parent           Legal Guardian




                         Participants in the bicycle riding activities
                               are required to wear helmets.

                               RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
PROTECT YOUR CHILD’S HEAD




   Bicycle riders under the age            It’s the
   of 18 must wear a helmet.                  Law!
           RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
           RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
      F ITTING                   AB ICYCLE H ELMET
                                 RIGHT

 1� The helmet
should fit snugly.
Use the foam pads
to make it fit.

 2� The helmet
should cover
the forehead.

                                                3� Move the
                                               plastic slide to
 4� Fasten the strap
                                              make the straps
under the chin, with                          meet just below
one finger’s width of                              both ears.
space between the strap
and the chin. The
helmet must ALWAYS
be buckled.

 Gently try to roll the helmet
 backwards and forwards, and
 side to side, on the head. The
 helmet should not move more
 than 1/2 inch in any direction.

State of California
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
State and Local Injury Control
Sacramento, California
¡PROTEJA LA CABEZA
   DE SU NIÑ O!
                  PROTECT YOUR CHILD’S HEAD!




Toda persona de menos de 18 años de edad
que ande en bicicleta debe usar un casco.
                                                         !Es la ley!
Bicycle riders under the age of 18 must wear a helmet.     It’s the law!
     C OMO P ONERSE EL C ASCO DE
     B ICICLETA Y H ACERLO BIEN
                          Fitting a Bicycle Helmet RIGHT

 1   El casco debe de sentirse
ajustado. Use las esponjitas
para ajustarlo.
The helmet should fit snugly. Use the
foam pads to make it fit.




 2    El casco
debe de cubrir la                                                          3
frente.                                                           Mueva la
The helmet should                                                 hebilla de
cover the forehead.                                                 plástico
                                                           deslizable para
                                                           que las correas
 4    Abroche la correa                                             queden
bajo la barbilla, dejando                                       justamente
un espacio del ancho de un                                   debajo de las
dedo entre la correa y la                                            orejas.
barbilla. El casco SIEMPRE
                                                              Move the plastic
tiene que estar abrochado.                                   slide to make the
Fasten the strap under the chin,                               straps meet just
with one finger’s width of space                             below both ears.
between the strap and the chin.
The helmet must ALWAYS be
buckled.

 Mueve el casco hacia atrás y hacia
 adelante, y de un costado al otro,
 lentamente al tenerlo puesto en la
 cabeza. El casco no se debe de
 mover más de media pulgada hacia
 ningún lado.
 Gently try to roll the helmet backwards and
 forwards on the head. The helmet should
 not move more than 1/2 inch in any direction.


State of California
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES
State and Local Injury Control
Sacramento, California
       B ic yc li st                     I always:
       L i ce n se                       • wear a helmet.
                                         • look both ways.
Sponsored by           placeholder for   • use hand signals when stopping or
                         individual        turning.
                           picture
                                         • obey the rules of the road.
                                         • ride in the same direction as traffic.
Signed                                   • keep my bike in good repair.

Date

       B ic yc li st                     I always:
       L i ce n se                       • wear a helmet.
                                         • look both ways.
Sponsored by           placeholder for   • use hand signals when stopping or
                         individual        turning.
                           picture
                                         • obey the rules of the road.
                                         • ride in the same direction as traffic.
Signed                                   • keep my bike in good repair.

Date

       B ic yc li st                     I always:
       L i ce n se                       • wear a helmet.
                                         • look both ways.
Sponsored by           placeholder for   • use hand signals when stopping or
                         individual        turning.
                           picture
                                         • obey the rules of the road.
                                         • ride in the same direction as traffic.
Signed                                   • keep my bike in good repair.

Date

       B ic yc li st                     I always:
       L i ce n se                       • wear a helmet.
                                         • look both ways.
Sponsored by           placeholder for   • use hand signals when stopping or
                         individual        turning.
                           picture
                                         • obey the rules of the road.
                                         • ride in the same direction as traffic.
Signed                                   • keep my bike in good repair.

Date

       B ic yc li st                     I always:
       L i ce n se                       • wear a helmet.
                                         • look both ways.
Sponsored by           placeholder for   • use hand signals when stopping or
                         individual        turning.
                           picture
                                         • obey the rules of the road.
                                         • ride in the same direction as traffic.
Signed                                   • keep my bike in good repair.

Date
                “SIMON SAYS” 


Objection: Each child will learn the rules to safe riding
including their hand signals, traffic signs, and the
importance of wearing a helmet, etc.

Lesson:
  1. Teach children the importance of wearing a helmet.
     Wearing a helmet decreases your chance of head
     injury by 85%. If a head injury occurs without a
     helmet, brain cells will die. Once brain cells die,
     they do not grow back. A severe head injury could
     impair your ability to talk, walk, speak, etc.
     Wearing a helmet is a law in several other states.
  2. Teach children the rules of the course:
        a. There are six stations that they must go
           through before passing. This is station one.
           Each station has specific bike safety rules to
           learn. Children do not have to go through
           stations in numerical order. They may skip
           around to other stations at different times as
           long as they complete all six.
        b. Each station has traffic signs. Each child must
           always follow traffic signs when seen.
  3. Discuss with the children the different traffic signs
     and their meaning (ex. Yield, stop, RR crossing,
     pedestrian crossing, right turn only, etc.)
  4. Teach children hand signals (ex. Right turn, left
     turn, stop, slow down, etc.)




          SAFE KIDS Clark County Coalition

                 RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
All students riding bicycles to and from school must:

1. 	 Be in grades 3 or above. For their protection, children grades K-2 are not allowed to ride to
     school, since most are not ready to ride unsupervised in traffic.

2. 	 Have a signed Bicycle Safety Agreement on file in the office.

3. 	 Walk the bike on school grounds.

4. 	 Keep the bike locked in the school bike rack during school hours.

5. 	 Follow these safety rules:

       •	 Always wear a bicycle helmet while riding. Keep the strap fastened and the helmet
          forward over the forehead (about 1 inch above the eyebrows).

       •	 Ride with traffic, in single file. Keep as far to the right as possible.

       •	 Obey all traffic laws just like a car. Stop at all stop signs and red lights.

       •	 Look both ways before riding out of driveways or entering intersections.

       •	 Look over your shoulder and give a hand signal before changing lanes or turning.

       •	 Only one person may ride on a bike at a time.

       •	 If you are riding in the dark, use a headlight, rear reflectors, side reflectors, and bright
          colored clothing.

       ƒ	 Walk bike across crosswalk at busy intersections.


                                           (Detach and return to office)


                                    Bicycle Safety Agreement

My parent(s) and I have read and understand all the bicycle rules. I will follow the rules and ride
safely at all times. I understand that if I do not follow all the rules, my privilege of riding to
school may be suspended.



                    Student’s Signature	                                             Date

I have reviewed the bicycle safety rules with my child. I give my permission for my child to ride
a bicycle to and from school. I agree to reinforce bicycle safety rules at home and require my
child to wear a helmet every time she/he rides.



                    Parent’s Signature 	                                             Date
                                   RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
Yard Duty and Teaching Staff Role

1. All student bicyclists who are seen riding with a helmet used incorrectly will be
   stopped and:
   a. 	Instructed to lace helmet correctly on the head with straps fastened under the
      chin with straps making a “V” below the ears.
   b. 	Instructed to take helmet off handlebars and placed correctly on head.


2. 	All student bicyclists who are seen riding without a helmet will be stopped:
   a. 	Name and room number of all offenders will be recorded and submitted to the
      office.
   b. 	Student will be instructed to report to the office, if it is still open, and get a
       loaner helmet for use until helmet can be purchased.
   c. 	If the office is closed or there are no loaner helmets available, student will be
      instructed to walk their bicycle home and to not ride the bicycle to school until
      they are able to get an approved helmet.


Office Staff

1. Will provide a loaner helmet to students who report to the office in need of a
   temporary helmet. Obtain student’s name, teacher name, room number, home
   phone and parents name.


2. Send parental notification letter to parents of students that were reported by staff
   as not having a helmet in possession or who came to office to request a loaner
   helmet.




                        RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
“ Day-glo”
Safety Flag


                                  Seat           Handlebars



                                         Frame
                                                    White Reflector
              Red
              Reflector                                       White or
                                                              Yellow




                                                                  Tire


                                         Chain
White or
                                         Guard
Red
Reflector                 Chain      Pedal




                RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
      Bicycle Safety Resource Binder (all materials in binder must be returned):
               CD – “Bike Safety Rodeo Materials” 

               Local “Bicycle Safety Resource Directory” 

               Forms and literature 


      Videos:
               The Ride Safe Way to Fit a Bicycle Helmet

               SK Cycle Smart (Jell-O in a Jar – ages 8 - 10)

               Get the Big Picture (Rules of the Road, 8 mins – ages 10 - 14)


      Posters (laminated):
               “Protect Your Child’s Head”   

                       1 English 

                       1 Spanish 


               “Fitting a Bicycle Helmet Right”
                        1 English 

                        1 Spanish 


      Riding Safety Skills Course:
               6 sign stanchions          

                        6 large yellow rubber cones 

                        6 black rubber adapters 

                        6 two piece wooden poles


               Traffic signs         

                        2 Stop signs 

                        1 Right turn sign (“One Way”) 

                        1 Left turn sign (“One Way”) 

                        1 Yield sign 


               Nineteen 18” orange vinyl traffic cones 

               Five 12” orange vinyl traffic cones 

               Twenty-four course markers            



      To Make ID Cards:
               Polaroid “I-Zone” instant pocket camera for miniature photos
               Polaroid “I-Zone” film
               “Docuseal 40” 4” card laminator

      Other:
               “Squiggle-Brain” mold & instructions

               Reflective tape (red, yellow, silver) 



Borrower Signature ______________________________________________Date_____________

Prevention and Planning Staff Signature ______________________________Date_____________

Comments:                                                          RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                                         SAFETYVILLE

Safetyville Course Objectives

Following Rules of the Road
   1) Staying in the right lane
   2) Stopping at stop signs
   3) Making turn signals
   4) Practicing pedestrian right of way
   5) Coming out of driveway
   6) Yielding at yield signs and making left turns
   7) Avoiding rear-end collisions

Instruction:

   1. If you have a group of kids starting at the same time, instruct the kids to line up behind
      each other in groups of three. After you give them the following instructions, they will
      be pulling out of their driveway and entering into the roadway. The student on the left
      hand column will turn left out to the driveway, the student on the right column will turn
      right out of the driveway and the center column will cross the road and continue
      straight. If you have just one child starting at a time, choose which way to direct them.

   2. Tell the students that you are the “Mayor” of Safetyville, and that Safetyville is a place
      where bikes get to take over the road. Since bicycles and cars are both vehicles, bikes
      need to follow all the rules of the road. Students will get a ticket or time out (placed into
      the middle of the route for 1 minute) if they break a rule.

   3. Ask kids why it is so important that look left, right and then left again and be sure the
      road is clear before pulling out of a driveway onto the road. (cars may be approaching,
      may not be looking out for kids coming out of driveways)

   4. Ask kids what they should do if a barrier, like a car or bush, is blocking their exit or turn?
      (edge up and peek around the barrier, then look left, right, left, etc)

   5. Ask kids what they should do when they get to a stop sign or intersection (stop fully at
      edge, put food down, look left/right/left, and signal if turning, before proceeding).
   6. Introduce the concept of “Yield.” It means to surrender of give up your right of way.
      When you see the Yield sign you let other people go first unless there is no one there. At
      intersections you yield to pedestrians and the other riders who were there first.

   7. Explain that pedestrians have the right of way (right to go first) at intersections, and that
      pedestrians may be crossing in the marked crosswalk areas.

   8. Explain that on the course, the kids should be demonstrating appropriate stopping
      procedures, hand signals and yielding practices. They should also practice looking left,
      right and left before proceeding through the intersections.

   9. Teach and/or review hand signals with kids

   10. Tell kids that they can get a ticket/time out for speeding and passing.


Volunteers:
   • Course Leader
   • 2 Course Monitor(s) - at intersections to reinforce the use of hand signals and looking
     left, right and left before proceeding through intersections.

Course monitors or children can also occasionally act as pedestrians at cross works to reinforce
the idea of pedestrian right of way.
                   TURTLE RACE AND RED LIGHT/GREEN LIGHT

Turtle Race Course Objectives:
   • Practicing control of bike/balance while going slowly, preferably in low gear
   • Staying in lane
   • Feathering brakes
   • Continuous pedaling
   • Shoulder Check
Red Light/Green Light
   • Power pedal position
   • Emergency braking/quick stopping

Instruction:

Stage one: Turtle Race: How Slow Can You Go?

   1. Ask the riders if they find it harder to control their bikes at slower speeds. They will
      most likely agree. Explain that this is a balance exercise, that we want them to practice
      controlling their bikes at slow speeds. *The objective for kids on scooters is to coast as
      much as possible, pushing off with their foot the least amount of times.

   2. Explain the Power Pedal Concept: Starting from a stop with your pedal up in a 2 o’clock
      position gives cyclist a strong start. If kids are on scooters, demonstrate what a “scooter
      step” looks like and contrast it to a strong “power pedal position”.

   3. Explain that staying in your lane is the most important thing because you never want to
      swerve out in front of a car. So as they progress down the turtle course, they will not
      only be practicing going slow, but also staying in their lane.

   4. The last person across the finish line is the winner

   5. Try not to put your foot down!

   6. Start the riders by saying “Ready, Set, SLOW!” coach the riders, offering positive and
      encouraging feedback and challenging them to stay in their lanes. Cheer the riders
      enthusiastically
Things to watch out for:
If a child is having difficulty going slow without swerving into other lanes, encourage them to
put their foot down if they have to.

Stage 2: Braking (Red Light/Green Light)

Explain that now that we have mastered straight-line riding we will be adding a new challenge.
This time they can pick up some speed, but the marshal will be standing at the end of the lanes
and will hold up a ”stoplight” There are three circles, red, green and yellow. Review what each
color means at a stoplight. As they ride down the lane they must do what the card means.
(Slow down for yellow, stop for red or keep going for green.)

Teaching Points:
o Breaking evenly to keep from going over the bars
o Shifting your weight back, over the rear wheel to maintain control

Stage 3: Shoulder Check
   1. Increase the challenge by looking over your shoulder while riding in a straight line.
   2. Model this by riding up the lane and scanning back to the right and the left without
      swerving.
   3. Explain that the natural tendency when we look back is to swerve in the direction we
      are trying to see. When riding on the street this can put you in the path of traffic. This
      exercise is easiest if students can take one hand off the handlebars when peering behind
      them.
   4. Riders proceed down the lane one at a time
   5. Marshal stands behind the rider and randomly calls out either “check right” or “check
      left” and holds up one of the big red, yellow or green colored circles which tells to slow,
      stop, or keep riding.

Volunteers:
   • Course Leader
   • Extra volunteers can be used as cheerleaders and to help kids move from the end of the
     race back to the starting point efficiently and safely.

Modifications for younger kids: Just do the Turtle Race and power pedal demonstration.
                              C;t-AR.-t­
                                                                          cp
         T I
              9
                  ,
                  ,
                                 <f7
                                   !
                                   ,
                                   i
                                   ,

                                   i
                                   ,
                                                 I

                                                 !

                                                 I
                                                                            !
                                                                            1

                                                                            1


                                                                            I

                                                                            ,
                  I
     J                                       !
               I           1

                                                      ~
                                                                            I

               I                                                            I

                                                                            ,
              (j)
                  ,

                  i               <?                                     cp
             1
                                                 I

                                                                !
                       "
                                                 I
            \k"
                                                 I

                                                 1


I

 !
0        0    0                   0              0        <3              0
                           F=r,J I ~    r+                               1

                                                                     (!.;) ,..) E;;'
                                      SUPER SLALOM

Super Slalom Course Objectives:
   • Bike handling
   • Smooth stopping
   • Peripheral vision
   • Yielding to cross traffic
   • Navigating obstacles (Railroad Tracks)

Introduction: Tell kids that the object of this course is to follow the chalk line drawn on the
blacktop with their front wheel. Cones are set up to mark the course and they must stay
within the cones. Keeping their tire right on the line will be very difficult to do (impossible
actually), but they can try, and everybody should be able to stay within the cones. As riders
practice, suggest they pick up their speed.

Instruction:

  1) Reading signs while staying on path within cones (peripheral vision)

      Have students hold their hands out in front of them at shoulder level and wiggle their
      index finger and thumb. They are easy to see in front of us. We are used to seeing this
      way, but we are going to learn about how much we can see on either side. Have
      students look forward while moving their arms at shoulder level out to the side. Find out
      how far you can hold your arms out to the side and see your wiggling fingers. This side
      vision is called Peripheral Vision. Explain that is “what we see out of the corners of our
      eyes”; we can see things without looking directly at them. Use this vision to help you
      read the any signs (out loud) that you pass while riding, and to watch for things out on
      the road. We always want to focus on where we are going, so instruct them to follow
      the chalk line but also to be aware of the other riders, they must avoid collisions at each
      intersection and avoid running into the rider ahead of them.

  2) Practicing right of way (Crossing at Intersections)

      Students will need to slow down where the paths cross. The goal is to take turns. Explain
      that slowing or stopping to let someone else go ahead is the best way to stay safe and
      the kind, courteous thing to do. The concept of “Yield” or surrendering your right of way
      will be introduced in Safetyville.
  3) Going over railroad tracks (if available) while pushing upon pedals so body doesn’t get
     jarred and approaches tracks at 75-90 degrees. Tracks can eventually be placed
     diagonally so kids can cross them perpendicularly.

      Crossing Rail Road Tracks is an important skill. Start the course with the railroad track
      section closed off. After students are comfortable with the triple figure 8 course, open
      the RR section. The railroad track unit can be turned over and the height adjusted or
      surface to be crossed changes from metal to wood to increase or decrease the difficulty
      of crossing. Initially angle the railroad tracks to be perpendicular to the slalom course
      line. As the course is being run, they will get used to crossing on this angle. Later on,
      change the orientation of the tracks and have students adjust their crossing angle to be
      perpendicular. Feed the riders onto the course one at a time, several seconds apart.


Volunteers:
   • Course Leader
   • Sign-holder(s)
   • Extra volunteers can be used to clean up knocked over cones & to help students
     navigate through intersections

Things to watch for:
Talk to the riders, offering positive and encouraging feedback but holding riders to the goals of
the exercise. Keep the riders at a safe speed and do not allow passing. Replace cones when
they get moved and/or knocked over.
    /0
    (
                a   I
                         o

    D
                                  I OP'f!oNAL
            o
                                  i
                                  RR. XIf.J&
        "
                                 ~
                                 '-+­
                             o



                    ()




c
                               QUICK TURN/FAST DODGE

Quick Turn/Fast Dodge Objectives
  • Quick decision making
  • Fast turning
  • Balance and control
  • Dodging an obstacle

Instruction:

1) Ask kids why is it more dangerous to hit something with the front wheel but not such a
big deal if you roll over something with the rear wheel?

Hitting something with the front wheel affects steering, the rear does not steer. Hitting things
causes flats.

2) Ask kids why is it more dangerous to get a flat on your front tire?

A front flat makes it harder to control because you are steering with the front. A rear flat is not
so bad because our weight is over the rear and this helps to stabilize the bike.

3) Ask kids why it is important to learn how to avoid making wide turns when you are
avoiding something with your front wheel.

Because it could be dangerous if you are swerving into traffic or into another obstacle.

4) Demonstrate scissors movements of front wheels to quickly dodge obstacle and return to
path. Have kids do scissors movements with their front wheel.

5) Explain what they will do: Tell kids that they will be riding through the marked chute
toward the Marshal at the other end of the course. When they get to the “rock”, they must
“flick” their front wheel around the obstacle to dodge it without going outside the boundary
marks around it. This practices dodging road hazards like glass or rocks. When they get to
the Marshal at the other end, the Marshal will direct the rider to turn right or left (quickly).
The rider will then circle back to the top of the chute and repeat the drill. As they circle back,
depending on which direction they take, they will either have to look over their shoulder and
tell a volunteer what is in the picture they see, or they will have to weave through cones to
practice balance and control.
Demonstrate this! Encourage them to build up speed as they become comfortable with
the activity. Also, demonstrate turning head in direction of travel to make tight turn at end of
path while looking ahead.

Volunteers:
   • Course Leader
   • Quick Turn Marshall
   • Over-the-Shoulder Marshall

Modification for younger Kids:

With younger kids, you can remove the rock and just have them practice quick turns and riding
through the “chute” where the rock would normally be located.
\
     \
     ,   /'
     1/ 


(
,
"




'I




Ii 

j
   LOOK BACK AND HAND SIGNALS
   (corresponds to Chapter IX. “Signaling” in
              Bicycle Skill Tests)

Objective: Participant will learn the importance of
looking over his shoulder for oncoming cars.
Participant will also learn to use proper hand signals
for appropriate traffic sign. Participant will learn to
look back for traffic without swerving more than one
foot to either side and without falling.

Reason: Making turns or swerves without looking back
is a mistake that leads to many bike accidents. It is the
2nd leading cause of fatal accidents. Cyclists often
complain that looking back makes them swerve. Yet
this lesson proves that they can look back and ride a
straight line.

Lesson:
1. Teach children- “You will ride down this line
which represents a street. When you get to the corner
you will follow the traffic sign as posted using your
hand signals. However, before you reach that corner,
you must look over your shoulder to make sure that no
vehicles are behind you. When I tell you to look, you
tell me which vehicle is behind you. I will be holding
up pictures of different vehicles. You are to continue
riding on that straight line while turning around
identifying the vehicle.”


        Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition

            RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                  FIGURE 8 

   (corresponds to Chapter II. “Circling and
  Changing Direction” in Bicycle Skill Tests)



Objective: Participants will learn bike control on
curvy streets or roads and learn to yield and watch for
traffic.

Reason: 30% of all bicycle collisions with cars occur
because the cyclist was not yielding or scanning for
traffic.

Lesson: Have participants ride around the Figure 8
staying within the lanes, while yielding (using the
slow down hand signal) where the lanes cross in the
middle.



       Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition




                RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
             INTERSECTION/DRIVEWAY 

(corresponds to “Station 6: Demon Driveway” and “Station 7:
Crazy Crossroads” on pages 19-22 of An Organizer’s Guide to
              Bicycle Rodeos by Lois Chaplin)

Objective: Cyclist will learn to always ride WITH traffic instead
of against traffic. Cyclist will learn to pull up to the stop sign or
end of driveway, look left and right beyond obstacles, then look
left again, and proceed with caution.

Reason: There are some very good reasons to ride with traffic.
First, the law in every state requires it. Second, 1 in 4 bike
crashes involves wrong way riders. Third, traffic control devices
face the normal flow of traffic. Cyclists that ride against the flow
of traffic have trouble seeing traffic signs. Most collisions
between bicycles and cars occur when the cyclist is entering the
roadway from a side street or driveway.

Lesson: Teaches the importance of riding WITH traffic. Also,
teaches the importance of always stopping at a cross street,
looking both ways beyond obstacles, signaling a turn, and
proceeding with caution. Cyclists must ride up the street on the
right hand side of the road. When they get to the stop sign, they
must signal and position themselves correctly for where they
intend to go after stopping. It may sometimes be advisable for
young cyclists to walk bike in the crosswalk at busy
intersections.



             Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition

                  RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                     ZIG ZAG 

    (corresponds to Chapter V. “Maneuvering and
           Weaving” in Bicycle Skill Tests)


Objective: Participants will learn to maneuver bikes
around obstacles.

Reason: Cyclists must dodge potholes, grates, rocks,
glass, and other debris on the road. Often riding into an
obstacle can throw a cyclist to the ground. The best
option is to go around it.

Lesson:
1.    Teach riders that there are often obstacles in the
road that they must swerve around. But, remind them
that many collisions with cars take place when an
inexperienced cyclist is swerving to the left without
looking over his shoulder.
2.    Have participants swerve in and out of the cones
without hitting any and without putting their feet on the
ground. .

        Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition




           RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
           STOP AND SWERVE 

(corresponds to “Station Five: Rock Dodge” on pages 17-18 in An
     Organizer’s Guide to Bicycle Rodeos by Lois Chaplin)


Objective: Cyclist will learn to turn his front wheel
around an obstacle at the last moment without veering
more than one foot to either side. He will also learn to
go between two close objects without hitting either. The
student will learn to pull up to the stop sign and stop.

Reason: With so much to pay attention to, cyclists
sometimes fail to notice a rock or a pothole in the road.
When the cyclist can control precisely where the wheels
go, he becomes a more confident rider. The rider who
does not know the rock dodge may swerve wildly into
traffic.

Lesson: Teach riders the importance of avoiding
potholes, rocks, etc. in the road. Have riders swerve
around the center obstacles while staying within the
outside boundary markers, and then stop at the stop
sign using their hand signals.

Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition




               RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
           THE GAUNTLET 

(corresponds to Chapter IV. “Straight Line and 

        Control” in Bicycle Skill Tests) 




Objective: Participants will learn bike control and
poise while riding straight between two parallel lines
of boundary markers.

Reason: When riding in traffic, it is important for
cyclists to maintain a straight path without swerving.

Lesson: Have participants ride the 8” to 10” lane at
any speed, keeping their tires between the two
parallel lines without touching the sponges or
boundary markers.



       Sonoma County SAFE KIDS Coalition




                RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                              Bicycle Helmet Bank Evaluation & Reporting Form

                              Please return this form upon completion of your bicycle safety event or
                              activities. Fax to 707-565-6619 or mail to Department of Health
                              Services, Prevention and Planning Division, 475 Aviation Blvd.,
                                Ste. 210, Santa Rosa, CA 95403

How many helmets did you receive from the Helmet Bank?

How many helmets did you distribute…

              at an event (type of event:                                                       )

              through on-going activities (describe:                                            )

Please rate the helmets:
                                            Excellent        Average            Poor
     Helmet style / looks
     Ease of fitting

Please rate the Bicycle Helmet Bank:
                                            Excellent        Average            Poor
     Application process and
     turnaround
     Helpfulness or assistance
     provided
     Educational materials provided

What barriers or complications did you run into while fitting and distributing the helmets (if
possible, please include suggestions to help others prevent this in the future)?



What suggestions do you have to improve the Bicycle Helmet Bank (the helmets, training
process, etc)?



Please use the back of this form to note feedback from children on helmet style/appearance.

Name:                                     Organization:
Phone: __________________
If you have remaining helmets that will not be used, please call 707-565-6680 to return them.

                                              Thank you!


                                RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
                                                                 +

                              Bicycle Rodeo Evaluation & Reporting Form
                              Please return this form upon completion of your bicycle safety event or
                              activities. Fax to 707-565-6619 or mail to Department of Health
                              Services, Prevention and Planning Division, 475 Aviation Blvd.,
                                Ste. 210, Santa Rosa, CA 95403

How many volunteers participated at the rodeo?

How many children participated in the rodeo?

              Went to all stations and completed the rodeo course

              Went to all stations, but did not have a bike to complete the course

Please rate the rodeo manual:
                                          Excellent          Average             Poor
     Completeness
     Ease of use

Please rate the rodeo kit:
                                          Excellent          Average             Poor
     Condition of equipment
     Ease of use
     Educational materials provided

What barriers or complications did you run into while organizing the rodeo event (if possible,
please include suggestions to help others prevent this in the future)?



What stations were most/least successful, and why?



What suggestions do you have to improve the Bicycle Rodeo Manual/ Kit?



Please use the back of this form to note feedback from children on their bicycle rodeo
experience.

Name:                                     Organization:
Phone: __________________
If you have remaining helmets that will not be used, please call 707-565-6680 to return them.

                                             Thank you!

                               RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
Egg drop, helmet safety demonstration

Objective: To have participants see the value of wearing their bicycle
helmets.

Reason: Wearing bike helmets is an important first step in the safety
education process. While there are many more aspects to bike safety,
seeing a person riding with a helmet is a good indication that some safety
education has been learned.

Materials:
     Eggs (about 1 egg for every 4 participants). 

     Foam egg helmet. 

     Felt marker.       

     Empty plastic paint container (5 gallon). 

     Metal mixing bowl (about 1 gallon). 

     Container with lid to hold used broken eggs. 


Lesson:
1. Have about 4 participants stand around the plastic container. Select one
   to draw a face on 1 of the eggs with the felt marker. Explain that the egg
   with the face drawn on it is like one of them, and to imagine they are
   going on a bike ride.
2. Have participants touch the foam helmet and a demo bike helmet to see
   that it is made of similar material. Explain that this material absorbs
   shock.
3. Take the egg with the face on it, and place it in the foam egg helmet.
   Make sure it is well strapped in. Explain that good fit and taking care to
   buckle the helmet are very important.
4. Select another participant to drop the egg into the plastic container from
   about knee high, as if they had fallen on their bike and hit their head.
   Ask them how the egg face made it threw the fall?
5. Then select another participant and ask them to drop the egg and check
   and report its condition.
6. Finally, take off the foam helmet. 	 Have the last participant hold the egg
   without the foam helmet over the metal mixing bowl and drop it also from
   the same height, with the rest watching. This normally gets a good
   response. Explain that the most important thing is to ride safely, but that
   crashes can happen and our heads are a lot like an egg and that’s no
   yolk.

                     RETURN TO BIKE RODEO PROTOCOL
    Saying good bye to Herb by Christine Culver
    On Wednesday, February 1, Sonoma County           and friend Lee Torliatt, who taught with
    Bicycle Coalition member Herbert Greenberg        Greenberg at Santa Rosa High. For many
    left us for smoother roads. After living for 80   years Greenberg and Torliatt commuted
    years, he died of cancer. Herb, a longtime        together, engaging in deep philosophical
    cycling advocate and member of the Santa          discussions and flights of fancy. “He had
    Rosa Cycling Club, donated his much of his        a wonderful sense of irony, mixed with a
                                                      wonderful sense of idealism. It made for
                                                      interesting conversations,” said Torliatt.
                                                      Greenberg earned both his bachelor’s and
                                                      master’s degrees from Stanford University.
                                                      Before becoming an educator, he served three
                                                      years with the Department of State in Iceland.
                                                      During World War II, he served with the
                                                      Marines in the Pacific.
                                                      After he retired from active teaching,
                                                      Greenberg maintained a busy schedule as a
                                                      volunteer, substitute teacher and avid long-
                                                      distance cyclist. He also started a business
                                                      called the Old Poster Peddler, a mail-order
                                                      company that provided posters and other
                                                      visual-aid materials to foreign language
                                                      teachers across the United States.
                                                      For many years, Greenberg volunteered as
                                                      a third-grade tutor at Burbank Elementary
                                                      School, helping students who struggled
                                                      with math. In recent years, Greenberg used
          Herb fits a helmet at a 2004 bike rodeo

    time and organizational skills to Sonoma
    County’s Safe Kids Program, where he
    managed many bicycle rodeos at schools
    throughout the county.
    He would ensure that children who attended
    his events had helmets that fit correctly and
    then he would guide them through a mock
    road situation, teaching them to look for
    traffic and signal their movements. Herb’s
    bicycle rodeos were often the only bicycle
    education many children ever received. The
    cycling community has lost a true gem.

                                                       Herb explains how a helmet can save your life
    Excerpts from the Press Democrat’s
    February 3 obituary:                              money he earned as a substitute teacher to
                                                      pay for buses so that the school’s low-income
    Herb Greenberg taught French at Santa             students could take field trips for cultural and
    Rosa High for 25 years, retiring in 1984.         educational enrichment.
    He continued in the classroom as a substitute
    teacher until last September, always upholding    In addition to his wife Anne, Greenberg is
    his reputation as a stern taskmaster.             survived by his sons, Mark Greenberg of
                                                      Santa Rosa, Steven Greenberg of Berkeley
6   “Herb was known as Monsieur Greenberg             and Allen Greenberg of Falls Church,
    at Santa Rosa High School. He was intense,        Virginia; his sister, Joan Strauss of Phoenix,
    demanding and effective, reflecting what’s         Arizona; and by one grandson.
    good in education,’’ said retired teacher

								
To top