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					Becoming A Quality Provider

Quality Plans, Marks and Assessment




  This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                  templates to relate to their working practices
What is Quality?
Quality management is an organisation-wide approach to understanding precisely what
customers need and consistently delivering accurate solutions within budget, on time and
with the minimum loss to society.

How can quality be achieved?

The first step is to gain top management commitment, once gained an assessment of the
current situation with in organisation should be carried out. Quality must be built in at every
stage of the process, from identifying the customer needs, through planning and
implementation, right up to the point of product or service delivery. Staff involvement is key to
continuous development.




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Contents

2a. Preparing for Matrix Accreditation ..................................................................................... 4
3. Introduction to ISO9001 ....................................................................................................... 7
4a. Investors in People Action Plan ......................................................................................... 9
5. The Customer First Standard ............................................................................................ 16
5a. Guidance to the Self-Assessment Process...................................................................... 19
6. OFSTED Inspections ......................................................................................................... 21
7. Self Assessment Review Template ................................................................................... 22
7a. Ofsted Quality Improvement Plan Template .................................................................... 55
8a Ofsted Taxonomy Action Plan .......................................................................................... 57
9. The Common Inspection Framework ................................................................................. 63
13. Lesson Plan Template ..................................................................................................... 66




       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                       templates to relate to their working practices
   2a. Preparing for Matrix Accreditation
   Introduction to the Matrix Standard

   The Matrix Standard is a national quality standard for information advice and guidance on learning & work (this includes training support & business advice). The
   matrix standard focuses on two areas `delivery of the service & management of the service`.

   Delivery of the service focuses on how we provide IAG to our clients/learners and how they actually receive and experience what ......... provide.
   Management of the service focuses on how we plan, organise, support and improve our activities.

   Each area has 4 elements of which a criteria clearly describes what the requirements are in order for ......... to meet the Matrix Standard.

   Before we register our interest in applying for the standard it is standard practice at ......... to carry out an internal assessment to identify whether we are
   conforming to the Matrix criterias – we carried out a very similar exercise when working to the Customer First Standard.

   The action plan below outlines the key stages to get ......... through the Matrix accreditation successfully; this will be co-ordinated by the Quality Manager and the
   Matrix team.

                                                         Internal Matrix Self Assessment Review – Action Plan
State 1 - Briefing                Action                                     By whom               By when                                        Updates/Action completed
support from Top Managers           Agenda item for next Management           Quality Manager             Next management review meeting         Received
                                                                                                               nd
                                       Review Meeting                                                      22 July 08
                                                                                                            th
Agree status of application        Agree what options applies to the           Alan Thompson/Alison        7 July 08                              External confirmed
                                   organisation                                Raphael
                                    External IAG Services
                                    Internal IAG Services
                                    both external & internal services
                                                                                                            th
Identify Matrix Team                Confirm Matrix status with each           Proposed Matrix             7 July 08                              Ali R - Quality
                                       divisional Director/Key staff           Team:                                                              Jim M - Skills
                                                                               Alison, Robin, Duncan,                                             Annette B - Skills
                                                                               Annette, Ian or Tracey,                                            Nick W – F&Ops
                                                                               a BA? And Nick                                                     (first mtg to be held when
                                                                                                                                                  Jim has started)
                                                                                                             th
Matrix Team Meeting                 Set a date for Matrix team meeting                                    27 Aug (Ali & Jim only)                Meeting held
                                                                                                             th                                       th
                                                                                                           29 Aug (team)                          29 mtg not required - Jim &
                                                                                                                                                  Annette will meet to
                                                                                                                                                  complete self assessment
                                                                                                                                                  form
      This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                                                 th
Prepare self assessment           Design internal self assessment       Quality           16         July 08              completed
review form                        form                                  Manager/Quality
                                                                         Assistant
                                                                                                       th                                  th
Deliver presentation              Present to Matrix Team                Quality Manager   w/c 29 Aug                      Completed – 27 Aug
Stage 2 – Self Assessment
Complete self assessment          Matrix Team to complete self          Matrix Team       Team to agree                   First draft to be completed by
                                                                                                                            th
form                               assessment form based on                                                                5 Sept.
                                                                                                                                                  th
                                   services provided to clients                                                            Next team meeting 12 Sept.
                                                                                                                                            th
                                                                                                                           Followed up 15
                                                                                                                           Next team meeting to review
                                                                                                                                    th
                                                                                                                           SAR 18 Sept.
                                                                                                                                             rd
Internal Audit                    Conduct an internal audit             Quality Team      Mid Sept                        Scheduled – 23 Sept 08
                                  Show me evidence
                                  1-2-1 discussions with staff.
                                                                                            st                               th
Matrix Assessment Report          Write up findings of assessment.      Quality Manager   1 week Oct                      24 Sept – send results to
                                   Action plan areas for development                                                       Belinda
                                   including costs
                                                                                            nd
Feedback                          Share findings with top managers      Quality Manager   2      week Oct
                                   & with Matrix Team
Stage 3 - Development
External Support                  Bring in external assessor (matrix    Belinda Tankel    Support to commence early Oct   2 days
                                                                                                                                                 nd
                                   approved)                                                                               1. Action planning – 2 Oct
                                                                                                                                           th     th
                                                                                                                           2. Validation 10 or 16 Oct
Register interest to apply for    Apply to ENTO for a certificate of    Quality Manager   Mid Oct                         Following above results
Matrix                             commitment to be achieved within
                                   12 months.
Accreditation approved            Estimated timeframe                                     Dec 08

Cost                              To be identified following internal
                                   self assessment




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       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
3. Introduction to ISO9001
Quality management is an organisation-wide approach to understanding precisely what
customers need and consistently delivering accurate solutions within budget, on time and
with the minimum loss to society.

How can quality be achieved?

The first step is to gain top management commitment, once gained an assessment of the
current situation with in organisation should be carried out. Quality must be built in at every
stage of the process, from identifying the customer needs, through planning and
implementation, right up to the point of product or service delivery. Staff involvement is key to
continuous development.

ISO9001
ISO 9001 is for all organisations large or small and covers all sectors, including charities and
the voluntary sector. It will help you to be more structured and organised but doesn’t require
bureaucracy. By being able to achieve the right results first time, your customers will benefit
from your consistency and you’ll save on the cost of re-work. ISO 9001 is also a proven
business winner with most certified organisations qualifying for more tenders and winning
more orders.

The starting point is identifying customer needs and from that we must plan our processes
and resources and apply monitoring and controls. We need to be continually assessing our
performance against our own objectives and standards and to strive for improvement. We
need to establish a management system in order to ensure that we fulfil requirements
efficiently and effectively. ISO 9000 defines a management system thus:

Management System – System to establish policy and objectives and to achieve
those objectives.

The management system in total can cover a number of different elements, for example it
may encompass environmental management and safety management, however one
important element is identified as the quality management system and ISO 9000 defines this
as shown:

Quality Management System – A Management System to direct and control an
organisation with regard to quality.

ISO 9001:2008 sets out the requirements for a quality management system.

For a useful ISO9001 guidance document ‘Keys to Quality Success’ go to:
http://www.iso9001help.co.uk



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     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                templates to relate to their working practices
    4a. Investors in People Action Plan                                                 Company Name: ........    Date:



                                   Practice currently in place                Areas for Discussion/Actions            By whom?   By when?

Management Theme
1 A strategy for improving   Defined Vision, Missions and Values –       Are these clearly understood by all?
  the performance of the     these have recently been updated and
  organisation is clearly    amended
  defined and understood.                                                All staff have been sent the 5 themes from
                             Business Plan is currently being            the Business Plan which were discussed
                             produced and highlights have been sent      at the company briefing – will all staff
                             out – discussed at company briefings.       understand the KPI’s or measurable
                             Staff are involved within the planning      targets?
                             process by developing their objectives
                             within their own teams/departments.         Are team objectives clearly understood by
                                                                         all?

                                                                         Work in progress
                             Strategic Plan – to be circulated shortly

                             Company objectives are underpinned
                             through the following:

                             Company briefings

                             All Staff Away Days

                             Team meetings

                             Company Newsletter - Buzz

                             Various E-Mails and Intranet: MD
                             update; Company Announcements
                             End of Year Message from CEO.

                             Individual objectives are underpinned

      This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                 through:

                                 Annual appraisal and quarterly reviews

                                 121 meetings – which normally take
                                 place monthly but will depend upon       Check communication for associates
                                 each manager                             .




2   Learning and development     Organisational Development Plan and      Check managers’ understanding of the
    is planned to achieve the    Learning and Development Plan used to    development policy – eg what can/cannot
    organisation’s objectives.   identify Company wide training           be funded, etc

                                 Team development is discussed and        Need a set policy, work related,
                                 monitored through team meetings          Example given
                                                                          Professional qualifications it would have
                                 Annual Performance Management            some benefit to organisation, how much
                                 System used to identify individual       would be funded, lines of agreement.
                                 development –                            Outline L&D arrangements in Staff
                                                                          Handbook.
                                 Business objectives are linked to the
                                 training plan and PMS
                                                                          Check managers’ understanding of team
                                 PMS linked to Competencies for all       development issues and how this has
                                 members of staff                         benefited their team – link to company
                                                                          objectives

                                                                          Newly appointed manager – remind
                                                                          managers what development contribute to
                                                                          company objectives, Teams point of view
                                                                          rather than individual.
                                                                          Managers might identify group training that
                                                                          would impact on the whole team/division.

                                                                          Ensure that all managers’ understand the

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                            new online PMS process and have had the
                                                                            appropriate development – see Indictor 4

                                                                            Managers training

                                                                            Embed ownership of your own L&D when
                                                                            approved, training not to be left if approved


3   Strategies for managing      All members of staff are included within   See above
    people are designed to       the PMS for their development – see
    promote equality of          above indicator 2
    opportunity in the
    development of the           Departmental/Team Meetings take place
    organisation’s people.       on a regular basis – timings down to
                                 each manager – staff are encouraged to
                                 contribute

                                 121 and PMS meetings are also used to      What is the policy on developing
                                 discuss ideas and gain staff input         associates or ensuring that they have the
                                                                            appropriate skills to meet the needs of the
                                                                            company objectives?

                                                                            Anyone contributing to company objectives
                                                                            how do you make sure they have the
                                                                            skills.

                                                                            How do we know that long serving
                                                                            associates maintain their skills?



4   The capabilities managers    There are competencies for all staff       Discuss – what do all members of staff
    need to lead, manage and     including managers within the PMS.         understand what capabilities that
    develop people effectively   There is also a staff handbook which       managers should have?
    are clearly defined and      highlights the formal policies and
    understood.                  procedures (HR Guidance)                   Outside of the core responses

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
5   Managers are effective in   The majority of staff were positive about   See above indicator 4 – ensure that staff
    leading, managing and       the support that they receive and used      link the formal (and informal) processes to
    developing people.          positive words to describe the support –    their expectations of the support from
                                approachable, supportive, etc. They         managers.
                                were also able to describe the formal
                                processes – PMS, 121’s, etc.

                                                                            What Management Development takes
                                                                            place – is there a consistent approach to
                                                                            managing staff?

6   People’s contribution to    Company Bonus Scheme, etc
    the organisation is         Socials, etc
    recognised and valued.      Various Complimentary E-Mails and
                                feedback
7   People are encouraged to    Company Taskforce                           Ensure highlights are distributed and
    take ownership and                                                      understood by all – including what actions
    responsibility by being     Staff briefings                             have taken place as a result of people’s
    involved in                                                             input – what improvements/changes have
    decision-making.            Team Meetings                               taken place

                                Staff surveys                               This relates to staff survey
                                                                            & company away day.


8   People learn and develop    L & D Feedback Form                         Induction for job changers (for example
    effectively.                                                            Managers) – this is more on-the-job –
                                Inductions                                  ensure that their views are taken into
                                                                            account when evaluating the induction
                                Staff Handbook                              process

                                Staff Introduced via Weekly Buzz Letter     Induction for new staff is robust, but not for
                                                                            staff changing jobs.
                             PMS
       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                         Ensure that benefits of development is
                               121’s                                     understood by all

                               Team meetings                             Evaluation sheets
                                                                         What Impact external training has had ie 3
                                                                         month follow up etc not consistant

                                                                         Ensure that L & D needs have taken place
                                                                         where agreed
                                                                         Referred to SFEDI training agreed but not
                                                                         taken
9   Investment in people       Impact assessments                        Senior Management Evaluation of
    improves the performance                                             Business and Training Objectives – e.g.
    of the organisation.       Board meetings – end of year              we spent this much and these are the
                               evaluations – what went well              benefits.
                                                                         Impact assessment
                               Team meetings – evaluation of team
                               learning                                  Ensure that the results from the impact
                                                                         assessment are understood by all – the
                               PMS/121’s – benefits of learning          key themes/highlights
                                                                         Senior Managers awareness of main
                               Accreditations – Customer First; ALI;     benefits L&D has had on company
                               Ofsted (including self assessment )
                                                                         Revisit the input from managers into the L
                                                                         & D plan regarding their team
                                                                         requirements and results from Team
                                                                         development evaluation
                                                                         As above impact training has had


10 Improvements are            First year that the PMS process will be   End of year reviews, impact assessments,
   continually made to the     online                                    etc – what are we doing differently/better
   way people are managed      Better communication                      to manage and develop our people (as a
   and developed.              Better inter-team working and             result of last years review)
                               understanding of each-others roles        Relates to staff not referring to what has
                                                                         improved in the organisation, needs to link
                                                                         to better communication, cross team

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                           working.
                                                                           More away days, PMS on line.




                    Previous Assessor Feedback – July 2007                                           Completed

1.          Ensure that the imminent Business Plan clearly sets out the     Date
            key measurable objectives against which the success of
            2007/2008 will be assessed. Ensure that these objectives are
            clearly understood by people throughout the company and
            that they are kept informed as to how they are performing.

2.          Clearly link the measured objectives agreed above to the        Date
            planned learning and development activity for the
            forthcoming year. Ensure that top managers are able to
            describe what return on investment is anticipated from the
            learning and development activity.

3.          Look to continue to work on the “One Company” ethos with        Potential areas for Development
            further activities combining fun with knowledge testing. In
            particular as a method of encouraging people’s awareness of
            the business plan objectives.

4.          Look at methods of further reinforcing the importance of        Potential areas for Development
            managers delivering against their role’s competencies.
            Consider some form of upward appraisal with which to
            assess and track the quality of their performance.



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     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
5. The Customer First Standard

The Customer First Standard focuses on the customer and their interface with and
experience of your organisation’s service delivery. It has three key parts for you to work
through, each encompassing a series of specific quality Statements.

The three key areas of focus are:

   Building Customer Relationships
    How do you identify and then meet your customers' needs?
    How do you follow up your customers?
    What practices are in place to deal effectively with customer complaints and
    queries?
   Maximising Market Awareness
    What is your approach to understanding the market?
    How is the target market identified?
    How are your services improved and new ones developed to better meet your
    customers' needs?
   Developing your People
    How do your people understand and assess customers' requirements?
    Are your recruitment methods ensuring you have the best person for each position?
    How do you ensure that your people are continually developing their skills so they can
    provide the best service to your customers?

The 32 Statements

These are the criteria against which you will be assessed against on your journey towards
achieving the Customer First Standard. There are 32 Statements in all, split across the three
core elements.

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS SECTION

   1. We build successful long-term relationships with our customers
   2. We build successful long-term relationships with other related service providers and
      suppliers for the benefit of our customers
   3. We identify our customers' needs at the first point of contact with us
   4. We always ascertain customers' existing relationships with other relevant service
      providers before providing services to avoid duplication
   5. Our customers can access other relevant and related services through their contact
      with us


     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
   6. We always set aims and objectives that specify what our customers can expect from
       the service we provide to them
   7. We deliver services to our customers within agreed timeframes. We review to ensure
       they are achieving what we have agreed
   8. Our customer’s needs are reviewed on a regular, on-going basis
   9. All employees follow clear guidelines to ensure we select the most appropriate
       organisation to either contract with or refer to, in the best interests of the customer
   10. Our employees have access to up-to-date customer information which is updated
       accurately at regular agreed intervals
   11. We always follow up with our customers after we deliver services to them
   12. Where appropriate we always follow up our key customers after we refer them to other
       service providers and suppliers
   13. We always follow up and resolve customer complaints or concerns, swiftly
   14. We understand, evaluate and review the long term impact our services have on our
       customers

MARKET AWARENESS SECTION
  15. Our employees, and all those working on our behalf, understand the purpose and
      aims of our organisation
  16. We have processes in place to keep our employees up to date with the changes in our
      industry sector and other related service provision
  17. We develop our services by working in partnership with other relevant service
      providers
  18. We have overall business objectives that we measure and regularly review
  19. We set overall objectives for service delivery which we regularly review to ascertain
      how our performance affects our customers
  20. We have processes in place to identify our customer groups and their needs which are
      reviewed regularly
  21. Potential customers are carefully selected and targeted in any marketing activity
  22. We have processes in place to share good practices with our customers and with
      other relevant organisations
  23. We support continuous improvement – we are able to demonstrate that we learn from
      our experience and make improvements to our services as a result
  24. The introduction of every new or changed service is based on a clear rationale

PEOPLE SECTION
  25. We ensure we recruit the best people for the job by using effective and appropriate
      recruitment methods in line with Equality of Opportunity principles
  26. All our employees understand their role within our organisation and are clear about
      what we expect from them


     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
27. Our employees have the necessary skills to effectively understand and meet customer
    needs
28. We use customer feedback to evaluate our employees’ performance
29. We regularly review and appraise our employees and ensure they are developed to
    perform their job effectively
30. All employees have appropriate, and recent, training and development to perform their
    job effectively
31. We evaluate employee training and development to ensure it has a positive impact on
    customer delivery
32. Our employees deliver an impartial and objective service, acting in the best interests
    of the customer at all times

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 This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                 templates to relate to their working practices
5a. Guidance to the Self-Assessment Process

The purpose of self-assessment is for your organisation to understand, and evaluate itself
against, the statements within the Customer First Standard, in preparation for external
assessment.

In doing so, you will not only identify strengths and areas for development within your
organisation, but the process will also help your organisation to prepare by understanding
what you will be assessed against and therefore what evidence you could show to your
Assessor. The self-assessment is very much for your benefit, and although the Assessor will
want to see the self-assessment prior to your assessment to help them prepare, the
document is aimed to support you through the process.

Where you are to complete a re-accreditation assessment, i.e. where you are to be assessed
after a two year period of accreditation to the Customer First Standard requirements, you
may wish to evaluate your previous self-assessment findings and evidence, to determine
whether your approaches and evidence examples have changed or are still valid.

Our guidance for conducting self-assessment includes:

      1. Discuss the statements with members of your team
      We suggest that you involve other members of your team in evaluating yourself
      against the three sections of the Standard, with representation from your HR team, the
      customer facing team, staff dealing with service development and marketing and your
      senior team.

      2. How do you think you rate as an organisation against each statement?
      Do you think that you have approaches and complete activities that show you wholly
      comply with the statement? What evidence examples do you have that help you to
      support meeting the Standard requirements? Is the evidence that you suggest
      relevant to the particular statement requirement? Are your approaches consistently
      carried out and embedded within your organisational practices? Are they robust and
      well managed? Are they customer focused? Is there an opportunity to improve your
      approaches?(Compliance)

      Do you think that you have some examples of relevant evidence but there is a gap in
      other areas regarding potential evidence or your approaches? Is your evidence
      inconsistent, insufficient or not well managed? Are feedback or monitoring processes
      missing? Do you need to work on certain approaches to strengthen or develop them
      further? Is there an opportunity to improve your approaches?
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
      (Partial Compliance)

      Do you think that you do not have any evidence available to support compliance with
      the statement requirements? Are there no agreed and understood approaches in
      place? Is potential evidence historical and, therefore, not current? Do you need to
      develop new approaches?
      (Non-Compliance)

      3. Identify the evidence
      Please list your evidence to demonstrate how you comply with each statement;
      examples of applicable evidence are detailed under each statement. You will need to
      consider how the evidence you put forward fulfils the requirements of the statements.
      Evidence does not need to be procedural or paper based and could be an activity
      regularly undertaken, an accepted working practice or an agreed way of working. In
      this instance you will need to substantiate approaches in place.

Thinking About Your Service Delivery

To prepare for your self assessment you need to think about what you deliver and who is
directly involved in that delivery. Here are some questions to help you identify your key
activities and enable you to self assess yourselves appropriately.

     1)   What is the fundamental role of your organisation?
     2)   How many people do you employ?
     3)   How many of these are involved in the delivery of services?
     4)   Who are your core customers / customer groups?
     5)   Who is involved in:
             i) Strategic direction / planning of your service delivery
             ii) Marketing
             iii) HR- people management and development


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     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
6. OFSTED Inspections

Introduction

Ofsted’s new inspection framework for further education and skills went “live” in September
2009. Using the new framework, inspectors will not only consider how well provision is
matched to local needs (of employers and learners) but also how well it reflects national
priorities. In the Handbook for the inspection of further education and skills from September
2009 (updated SEPT 2010); The handbook provides guidance for providers, OFSTED
Inspectors, and additional inspectors on the implementation of the Common Inspection
Framework for inspecting all education and training within the further education and skills
sector.

The handbook can be found here:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/Ofsted-home/Forms-and-guidance/Browse-all-
by/Other/General/Handbook-for-the-inspection-of-further-education-and-skills-from-
September-2009

The handbook has two parts: the first is guidance for inspectors and providers on the
preparation for, and conduct of, inspections; and the second is the full Common Inspection
Framework and guidance on how it will be used by inspectors to award the main and
contributory grades. The handbook is made available to ensure that providers and other
organisations are well informed about the process and procedures of inspection.

Revisions to the framework on evaluating outcomes for learners now includes whether
learners are involved in community based development activities and projects; and how well
they develop skills, knowledge and understanding relevant to community cohesion and
sustainable development.

In OFSTED’s Taxonomy of Issues, a list of all issues in the learning and skills sector,
arranged under the steps of the learner’s journey and leadership and management,
sustainable development comes under category 18, Leadership.

The OFSTED Good Practice Database on the Excellence Gateway features sub sections on
leadership and management. Within this is information on building better practice for the
sector to be a leading exponent of sustainable development through its management of
resources, the learning opportunities it delivers and its engagement with communities. The
website lists examples of best practice already identified in inspections, and offers a “health
check” as well as suggestions of what providers could be doing to improve.

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                     templates to relate to their working practices
7. Self Assessment Review Template

Contents

Introduction
The Services We Provide
Number and Location of Learners
Structure and Staffing
Location
Local Labour Market Information
Our Commitment to Quality
The Self Assessment Process
Overall Effectiveness
Summary of Grades
Leadership and Management
Partnership Working
Management of Associates and Partners
Quality Assurance
Equal Opportunities
Business Administration Management and Professional
Retail Customer Service and Transportation
Appendices




    This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                    templates to relate to their working practices
Introduction – Recommended 1 page

(organisation name) is a social, economic and cultural regeneration development company,
working largely on public sector-funded economic regeneration initiatives. The company was
established in 1995 in response to increasing needs for services, from a wide range of public,
private and voluntary sector organisations.

Today (organisation name) is a culturally diverse and multi-disciplinary company of some 50
staff supplemented by a register of some 70 specialist associates and an important part of
our business model is to ensure choice for our learners through drawing on the specialist
support represented by our associates coupled with robust programme management skills
and underpinning support of our staff team.




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
(organisation name)’s Vision

(organisation name)’s vision is

(organisation name)’s Mission

We promote innovation, excellence and achievement in social, economic and cultural
development - at the interface between policy and practice - to assist businesses and
communities to achieve their potential.

(organisation name)’s Values

We have established a number of core values to underpin our approach to our business:

      High quality services for clients, customers and learners
      We are one company
      Innovation and creativity at the heart of our work
      Bring benefit to the communities and local economies we work in
      Ensuring honest dealings bringing integrity to all that we do

The services we provide

Our work ranges from direct support for people on training and business support
programmes, to delivering this support to local community and voluntary organisations, small
business federations, SMEs, local authorities, institutes of further and higher education,
national charities, LSCs and Business Links, National Training Organisations, the
Government Office for London and the DfES.

(organisation name) offers services in the following key areas:
     Staff and leadership and management training and development (ESF Funded)
     Specialist advice to start up and micro businesses and social enterprises
     Structured business advice and support (business plan development, financial
       planning, access to finance, accessing tendering opportunities, human resources)

Accessed through:
    1-2-1 support with specialist business advisers
    Seminars, workshops and training courses
    Learning materials and online resources
    Networking events

We are currently delivering 6 ESF co financed programmes at both Pan London and sub
regional levels that focus on the delivery of:
    Getting ready for IIP recognition for SMEs (Non accredited)
    NVQ Leadership and Management at Levels 3, 4 and 5
    NVQ Customer Service at Level 2
    Accredited Short Courses in Project Management for SMEs and VCOs

(organisation name) has direct delivery responsibility for the IiP programme and NVQ
Leadership and Management at Level 3 and manages partnerships around other
qualifications by working with:

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
    Fusion (College of North West London) delivers the NVQ management level 4 and
     level 5.
    Maintrain Associates deliver the Customer Service Level 2 qualifications
    The Project Company deliver Project Management training for the Voluntary Sector
     Organisation
    PMP Professional delivers Project Management training for SMes
    We work with Capital Quality Limited to support SME’s in achieving IIP accreditation
     and are an accredited centre with OCR to deliver all of our NVQs.

Numbers and Locations of Learners

All of our learners are currently based with their employers in the London region. As of
January 2007 we have the following breakdown of learners.

Programme                              No of Learners
IIP                                             20
Leadership and Management                      122
Customer Service                                 4

Structure and staffing

(organisation name)’s governance arrangements include a Board Chaired by the Founder
that incorporates a scrutiny function. The Board is complemented by an Executive Team
comprising of the Managing Director and two Executive Directors that are in turn supported
by five Senior Managers. ESF Delivery is headed up by the Director of Enterprise and
managed by two Project Co-ordinators who each have one assistant and three Business
Advisers (one of whom is an IiP practitioner). In addition there are associate agreements with
71 associates who are actively involved in delivery. Programme delivery is supported by the
Quality Manager who helps to develop and implement good practice and foster a culture of
continuous improvement.



                            Male     Female         White     Ethnic      PWD
Full Time Employed            19        28            29        19         1
Part Time Employed             2         1             2
Part time Associates          34        37
A breakdown of the ethnicity and gender of staff involved in ESF Delivery

We have not collected information on the ethnicity and gender of associates however this will
be collected in the future.

Location

The company is based in Islington in a serviced office which is close to rail, tube and bus
links. Based on the 3rd floor with lift access, there are six open plan offices, one large training
room and two small meeting rooms. There is a kitchen area with tea and coffee making
facilities which is available for use by staff and clients. There is currently limited disabled
access to our offices although training is arranged in other premises as and when required to
ensure that disabled learners have full access to our services.

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Local labour market Information

Within Greater London, levels of unemployment although falling, are still higher than the
national average with young people in these areas suffering from poor educational
achievement, low levels of literacy and numeracy and low levels of self-confidence. In
addition these areas have a high proportion of people whose first language is not English,
poor quality housing and high levels of crime. Of particular concern in the region are the
relatively low levels of employment compared with other English regions leading to marked
contrasts in earnings and lifestyle.

The population of London is diverse with 29% of Londoners coming from ethnic minority
groups against a national average of 9%. Recent research by GLA DMAG highlights that
workers born outside the UK account for around 30% of people employed in London and
although many of these have lived in the capital for some time and form part of the long-
standing local communities, many have never learnt to speak English to a standard which
would enable them to gain employment. 20% of London workers come from BME groups and
for many of them English is not their first language. This makes it more difficult for them to
achieve the qualifications required to meet either their own needs or those of their employer’s
business as many qualifications require a minimum level of English proficiency and
(organisation name)’s role as Train to Gain broker enables it to transform the lives of workers
and their businesses placing the company firmly at the heart of the recommendations of the
Leitch Review. The Greater London Authority estimates that London’s population will grow by
a further million people between now and 2020, and that the majority of this growth will be
represented by BME and groups for whom English is not their first language.

Although there has been a government strategy to ensure that young people achieve level 2
and 3 qualifications (by the age of 19, (2004/2005) 65% of young people were qualified to
level 2 and 44% to level 3), there remains a skills gap for older (25+) workers who have not
previously had access to funding for qualifications. This is currently being addressed through
ESF Projects and the new Train to Gain programme of which (organisation name) is an LSC
approved broker organisation.

Many organisations are employing staff who have not had the opportunity to gain the
qualifications required to meet their employer’s needs and there is a real need for SMEs and
particularly those from BME groups to be able to access both lower and higher level
qualifications to ensure that their businesses remain competitive in the current economic
climate and who are likely to rely heavily on the skills and knowledge of their staff to be able
to develop their businesses.

(organisation name) has identified a range of development needs for individuals and
organisations through the various activities they undertake and has developed these into
funding proposals for consideration by colleagues at the LSC.

Our commitment to Quality

Quality Assurance

(organisation name) is a quality assured supplier on a number of approved consultancy
registers including Government Office for London, the London Development Agency, the
Greater London Assembly, the Department for Education and Skills, the Department for
Work and Pensions, the Employment Service, the National Learning and Skills Council’s
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Equality and Diversity Framework Agreement, the Arts Council of England, London Arts,
Business Link for London, Welsh Development Agency, North Fulham NDC, London
Borough Grants, the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, Thames Gateway London
Partnership, Thames Gateway Kent (Medway and SWALE) Sector Skills Councils and a
number of other regional and local public bodies.

(organisation name) is committed to the ongoing development of quality systems and
procedures and the achievement of relevant quality marks, and awards and has achieved the
following:
     Investors in People recognition (2001 and 2004 and is currently going through the re-
       recognition process)
     Customer First – (organisation name) was one of the first 5 organisations in the UK to
       achieve this award in 2003 and has since been re-recognised in 2005
     Twice listed in the prestigious Inner City 100 index from the New Economics
       Foundation demonstrating our values of community and economic benefit
     ISO 9001 recognition (2007),
     In March 2007 (organisation name) will be one of the first companies in London to
       secure the new ISO 27001 recognition for high quality and secure ICT operations

In addition The Chair has been appointed by the European Commission as one of the UK
Experts in the fields of vocational education and training, lifelong learning and
entrepreneurship.

Recent Quality Improvements

(organisation name) is continuously making improvements to its systems and processes to
ensure that it consistently meets the needs of its clients and remains a market leader in the
services it provides. Recent quality improvements include:
     Re-organising the Operations Team and improving internal administrative and
       planning systems, including staff training in project management to enhance the way
       that projects are delivered and managed
     Introducing weekly one to one programme management meetings which support
       project managers through coaching, helping them to focus on key performance and
       quality issues which has led to improved project performance
     Developing and implementing a client database to support the effective capture and
       reporting of information relating to client progress, attainment and achievement.
     Designing and implementing new feedback routes for learners, stakeholders and
       employers to enable services to develop according to defined needs.
     Creating a company Task Force to promote (organisation name)’s values and embed
       the organisation’s Quality Agenda throughout the organisation.
     Developing “Buzz” - an in-house weekly news bulletin to all staff to ensure they are
       kept up to date with current organisational activities, the employment of new staff and
       quality improvements.
     Introduced launch events for all new Projects to ensure that Business Advisers,
       Telemarketers and project delivery staff have a clear understanding of the project
       aims and objectives which has led to more appropriate recruitment of learners onto
       programmes.
     The development of protocols for working amongst the in house and specialist teams
       including a “charter” of rights and responsibilities to ensure smooth delivery of
       services to learners.

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
 Introducing regular associate meetings to support them in meeting organisational
  objectives
 Developing a new salary structure which includes clear guidelines on how staff can
  progress within the organisation including rewarding long standing staff, especially
  ‘junior’ staff, with enhanced job roles, progression plans and remuneration that has led
  to increased staff motivation and improvements in work performance
 Introducing a new company pension and profit sharing scheme to encourage staff
  loyalty




 This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                 templates to relate to their working practices
The Self Assessment Process

Although the organisation is constantly reviewing the quality and effectiveness of their
learning provision through weekly project review meetings, self assessment against the
Common Inspection Framework and the completion of an SAR has not been undertaken until
recently, when ESF programmes came under the scope of the ALI.

(organisation name)’s first SAR was put together in June 2006 based on learner feedback
systems already in place, however it was recognised that the self assessment process was
not sufficiently robust, particularly in view of the need to triangulate evidence as
recommended by the Adult Learning Inspectorate and the report lacked this kind of evidence
to back up the identified strengths and weaknesses. With this in mind (organisation name)
decided to re-write the SAR in December 2006.

In putting together this SAR, (organisation name) has used a wide range of different
information sources including:
     Feedback from project co-ordinators based on their self assessment activities
     Analysis of learner and employer satisfaction surveys
     Data relating to retention and achievement
     Feedback from staff through a staff survey
     Interviews with delivery staff and associates
     Reviews of learner files
     IV/EV reports
     Minutes of meetings

The draft report was sent to relevant staff for consultation and relevant changes made based
on the feedback received.

Overall Effectiveness

(organisation name) has a strong commitment to the development of quality policies and
procedures and has a good and improving understanding of our strengths and weaknesses
although this was not always easily backed up by the data available at the time of writing this
report. New IT systems and a commitment to the development and implementation of a
comprehensive Quality Improvement Plan which includes the development of more effective
MI systems (which is almost complete) should enable us to accurately identify and evidence
strengths and weaknesses in the future.

Whilst there is good evidence to support the fact that learner needs in relation to their training
and development are largely being met, (organisation name) needs to focus on quality
improvements which will further enhance the service they provide.




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Summary of Grades


Leadership and Management                                            3
Contributory Grades
Equality of Opportunity                                              3
Quality Assurance                                                    3

Overall Effectiveness                                                3

5. Business Administration , Management and Professional             3
Contributory Grades
5b. Management                                                       3

7. Retail, Customer Service and transportation                       4
Contributory Grades
7G. Customer Service                                                 4




    This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                    templates to relate to their working practices
Leadership and Management

(organisation name) has a 3 year strategic planning cycle which includes the development of
a yearly business plan which focuses on interim developments towards the achievement of
the strategic plan.

(organisation name) has a robust recruitment process which includes a competency based
interview. Once employed all staff participate in a comprehensive induction process that
includes:
     Briefing on company protocols for dealing with customers and clients, ICT usage and
        all company policies including health, safety and welfare, H&S, equality and diversity,
        whistle blowing and sustainable working practices.
     A job specific induction process related to the specific requirements of the post

The recent staff survey reveals that all staff found the induction to be useful to some extent
with 62% finding it good or excellent in welcoming them to the company.

The performance management process is designed to ensure that staff are supported to be
effective in their roles. Annual objective setting is complemented by bi-annual reviews of
progress that are in turn reviewed monthly at staff 1-2-1s. Under performance is identified in
consultation with staff at these meetings and agreement reached on ways to improve
performance.

Training and development needs are also identified through the performance management
process. These needs are fed into the costed company training plan, and implemented in a
variety of ways according to demand including in house courses, bespoke professional
qualifications and job specific external courses. Although 70% of staff rated the range of
training and development opportunities available to them satisfactory, disappointingly only
57% of staff rated it as good or excellent. (organisation name) needs to ensure that staff are
aware of the range of training available and encourage staff to take more ownership of their
training and development to ensure their expectations and aspirations are being consistently
met.

All new staff meet the Managing Director and there is an annual all staff company away day
where new strategies and business development is discussed. Staff give a great deal of input
into the day and their ideas and suggestions are implemented where appropriate. Examples
include:

       Developing uniform Project Management Systems
       Improved Communication
       Minimising unnecessary emailing
       Staff involvement in business development
       The development of a company Task Force which meets monthly
       Developing a process for ensuring that all staff understand and adhere to the
        company values
       Developing a process for staff to report incidents which go against company values

In addition the Managing Director circulates quarterly updates on progress towards company
targets and goals and other topics which are relevant to staff such as new projects, new
developments, staffing changes and forward planning.

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                       templates to relate to their working practices
(organisation name) believes that effective communication is crucial to keeping staff
motivated and improving performance and quality. A variety of methods have been
developed to encourage open communication and ensure that the information needs of staff
are consistently met including:-

    Regular attendance by staff at team meetings including those of other divisions
    Extensive use of email communication
    A company server which holds all relevant policies, procedures and associated
     documents
    Weekly updates of activity in each division through “Buzz”, the in house company
     newsletter
    The company Task Force with representative from each of the three divisions to take
     forward initiatives
    Quarterly company breakfast meetings
    The annual company away day for all staff which looks at past performance, future
     planning and where they are encouraged to make suggestions for improvements
    Team away days
    Running bespoke meetings on specific areas such as business planning, quality
     management and performance
    An active company social group arranging quarterly events, outings and occasions
     arrived at by presenting options to vote on by all members of staff.

The effectiveness of staff communications is reviewed through the staff survey which
suggests that communication is reasonably effective with:
    86% of staff rating the effectiveness of communication as good or fair. No member of
      staff rated communication as excellent and this provides opportunities for
      improvements.
    Over 90% of staff have a fair or better understanding of the company’s values and
      objectives




The frequencies of meetings vary according to need and level. The main cycle of meetings
is:

Meeting                               Frequency
Board                                 Every two months
Executive Director                    Every fortnight
Divisional operational                Every week
Company task force                    Every month
Project Management                    Weekly

Typical agenda items in these meetings include actions from previous meetings,
performance, quality, business development, human resources. Minutes are produced at the
end of each meeting with actions required clearly identified.

Information from senior management meetings is cascaded through the company through
the various meeting structures. After each Executive Director Meeting (EDM) Divisional
Meetings take forward agreed actions. Responses, information, items and recommendations
from staff are then taken back to the EDM for consideration.
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Project Performance is closely managed. The company collects and uses management
information and reflects on this to encourage quality improvement and support the decision
making process. This has been further enhanced through the development of a central
database that provides ease of access to a broad range of MI that can be interrogated across
a range of fields. However to date most of the monitoring activity has related to the meeting
of targets and compliance as opposed to quality. The Quality Manager will be developing an
audit process which focuses on quality as well as compliance to further support quality
improvements.

The ESF project portfolio is managed by teams of dedicated staff that act to support the
delivery partnership, securing management information and reporting this to the LSC and its
agents, supporting audit and monitoring visits by the LSC, and distributing funds to partners.
Staff also programme in and monitor delivery by (organisation name) staff and associates.

Staff have access to a wide range of resources to enable them to carry out their jobs
effectively including computers with internet access, shared access to staff diaries, a
company intranet which is currently being overhauled to ensure that it is fully up to date,
marketing materials and a wide range of training materials.

(organisation name) encourages the development and sharing of good practice both
internally and externally through a range of mechanisms including away days, the Task
Force, assessing current performance against agreed targets at divisional and team
meetings and fostering a culture of debate, innovation and creativity through our values that
enables experimentation within defined limits and under supervision. In addition evaluations
are undertaken at the end of each project the results of which are used to inform practice
within other projects and the business development function. However despite this Project
Managers run and manage their projects in quite different ways and we feel that the impact
of the sharing of good practice is more effective at company level than at learning
programme level.

(organisation name) operates within several formal and informal networks to further
encourage the sharing of good practice both internally and externally which is critical to
continuous improvement, enhancing learner services and for maintaining good relationships
with partners and funding bodies.

As a regeneration consultancy the company is also invited to develop and disseminate good
practice through our EQUAL funded programmes and is often approached to undertake case
study development for sharing across a wide audience, for example, the Business Link for
London and the Learning and Skills Council.

Partnership Working

(organisation name) places a high level of importance on developing and maintaining
effective partnerships. In particular considerable work has been carried out to encourage
partnership working within the voluntary sector who frequently do not have the capacity to
retain dedicated business development resources. To address this (organisation name)
provides a capacity building function to these organisations. (organisation name) values the
role of the VCS in particular in reaching hard to reach groups and those disadvantaged in the
labour market as they support the company in achieving its mission and values particularly

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
relating to benefit to the community. Our partnership strategy has resulted in participation
rates in our services of 36% for women and 38% for BAME groups.

(organisation name) uses its consultancy resources to undertake research, evaluation and
development work which has led to the development of projects which has supported the
creation and development of an umbrella social enterprise; ACBBA – the Association of
Community Based Business Advice that provides support to business in hard to reach
communities through voluntary and community organisations.

This partnership development work has been particularly useful in supporting innovative new
partnerships to deliver ESF co financed programmes. In particular, (organisation name)’s
systems and expertise around programme management has enabled it to offer delivery
partners extra capacity to manage their activity and ensure that evidence is robust in order to
support claims. It also enables the company to offer its own clients and those of partners a
broader range of provision that enables greater tailoring of support to their needs.



Management of Associates and Partners

Associates are a key part of the (organisation name) business model providing the company
with a range of flexible and specialist resources to meet the varied needs of individuals and
businesses. They are selected through a variety of means, but in general they are recruited
through (organisation name)’s extensive network of contacts across learning and business
support. Associates are self employed but must go through a registration and approval
process which includes a requirement to be interviewed for potential work, agree to abide by
company policies and undertake a service level agreement. Associate conduct and working
requirements are detailed in a Customer Charter that outlines rights and responsibilities to
the company and the in house staff team, and this forms a key part of their induction.
Although all associates receive an induction into the organisation there is a lack of
consistency in how this is delivered.

Generally, the resources available to the in house staff team are also available to individual
associates, and hot desking space is available in our offices. Access to ICT resources and
HR is available as appropriate. Progression for associates depends upon performance
against their Service Level Agreement which is agreed with them at induction. Associates are
able to use their (organisation name) work experience to support their continuous
professional development and this is positively encouraged, for example through developing
assessment skills and SFEDI accreditation.

Performance management of Associates is conducted through regular review of service level
agreements. Variances to the SLA are discussed with associates at review meetings and
plans are put in place to deal with under performance in a variety of ways including agreeing
extra resources or a re profiling of the service level agreement. Communication with
associates is managed through a variety of media including attendance at review and project
based meetings, telephone and email contact from Project Managers and through networking
events.

Service level agreements are also used to underpin partner delivery and operate in much the
same way as those for associates. Persistent underperformance by both partners and

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
associates is identified at divisional meetings and contingency plans are agreed where
required within our overall risk management activity.

The development of Service Level Agreements for partners, is further undertaken at the
partnership development and funding proposal or tendering stage where particular expertise
that meets the needs of the prospectus for funding is identified and outline agreement around
roles reached. This then feeds into contract negotiations with partners in line with those of
the funding body. This is particularly helpful in ensuring we gain commitment from delivery
partners to meet project objectives.
.


Quality Assurance

The quality assurance process for the company is based on the effective operation of the
management cycle which allows for planning, action, reflection and monitoring of
performance with adjustments and actions agreed to ensure qualitative and quantitative
targets are consistently achieved. This includes:

    Project planning at the tendering stage with partners and relevant staff
    Implementing documented project management systems and procedures
    Conducting regular progress reviews carried out at all the levels of the business
     although these tend to focus on performance more than quality
    The use of the company Task Force of staff representatives including Quality
     Champions as a consultation, quality implementation and development structure
    Holding regular staff seminars and events to promote quality, the business plan and
     other strategic work
    Holding regular social events to underpin communication and effective working
     relationships amongst the staff team.

The company has an overall quality system, with structures and procedures designed to
support the delivery of services of the highest quality as part of our commitment to the pursuit
of excellence. We are currently working towards achieving the ISO 9001 quality standard and
updated system and procedures manuals are due to “go live” on 7th February 2007.

Systems and procedures are stored on the company server, which all staff have access to
and receive training in as part of their induction. However although Project Managers are
issued with briefing and Guidance packs for each new project they take on some procedures
are not fully documented which has led to an inconsistent approach to project delivery and
management.

Quality is monitored in a variety of ways including:
   Through divisional programme and project meetings (an analysis of retention of
       learners led to (organisation name) working with different business advisers which
       resulted in a significant improvement in this area)
   Through the analysis of management information up to Board level
   Through compliance testing of procedures
   Evidence testing against claimed outputs for projects
   Through feedback from learners, employers, stakeholders and staff (feedback from
       associates led to the development of more robust Service Level Agreements which
       have given them a clearer understanding of what is expected of them)
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
The majority of the audit activity which has taken place in relation to project delivery has
tended to focus on compliance rather than quality and there has been little quality audit or
classroom observations undertaken however with the engagement of a new Quality Manager
this issue should be resolved imminently.

(organisation name) has identified that an important part of the QA process is to seek the
views of learners, staff and stakeholders.

(organisation name) has regularly sought the views of service users about their satisfaction
with the service provided (90% were satisfied) and has used the questionnaire to make
programme improvements such as more detailed joining instructions, however these surveys
have not been consistently analysed which has made it difficult to identify trends or make
comparisons between different courses and/or tutors.

(organisation name) has recently upgraded the evaluation questionnaires and process for
gathering feedback used during and after learning programmes to ensure that appropriate
information is gathered and analysed about the quality and effectiveness of the training
process to ensure that strengths and weaknesses of provision can be better identified and
addressed.

An annual staff survey has recently been introduced and has highlighted that whilst 97% of
staff had a fair or better understanding of the company goals and objectives over half of them
rated their understanding as only fair. This is disappointing and something which needs to be
improved upon through our induction process, Buzz newsletter, away days and breakfast
meetings.

The staff survey has also highlighted that
    81% of staff rated their satisfaction with (organisation name) as an employer as good
      or better
    87% of staff had a good or better understanding of their job role and responsibilities
    73% had a good or better understanding of their team’s role and responsibilities
    84% of staff felt that they were encouraged to take ownership and responsibility within
      their job role
    81% of staff are happy in their current job role most or all of the time

Stakeholder feedback is carried out through our market research activity and has highlighted
that:

    The company is well perceived in the market in terms of branding, product and
     position
    That the leadership model that has been developed over the last 3 years is now
     embedded into the company and is now contributing the effective ddelviery of projects
    That the quality of provision by partners and stakeholders is ranked highly
    That the SMT is seen as an effective vehicle for growth
    That there is more work needed on defining the USP of the company
    That the recent changes in the company need to be expressed to all partners and
     stakeholders
    That product definition is an area that needs to be developed



     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Although (organisation name) carries out ongoing monitoring of projects and contracts, these
activities have not been subject to self assessment in line with ALI requirements. The self
assessment process undertaken to complete this SAR needs to be formalised and further
developed to ensure that accurate judgements as to the strengths and weaknesses of
provision can be made. In addition although (organisation name) makes continuous
improvements to programmes through its review processes, a formal Quality Improvement
Plan has not been developed. This will be addressed immediately through consultation with
relevant staff.

Equal Opportunities

(organisation name) has a strong commitment to providing equality of opportunity for their
staff, associates and service users. The staff handbook which is issued to all staff during
induction includes a statement on the importance of equal and fair treatment and staff is
required to read our Equal Opportunities Policy.

A review of our Policies and Procedures during the self assessment process has highlighted
that (organisation name)’s Equal opportunities Policy needs to be updated to reflect our
service users and that we need to develop formal procedures to ensure that equal
opportunities is promoted, implemented and monitored effectively in all areas of the
business.

Although we have an internal and external complaints policy and grievance procedure, some
complaints go unrecorded which makes it difficult to identify any trends or ensure that
systems are put in place to prevent their re-occurrence.

(organisation name) has developed a diverse and multi lingual staff team of 50 and a register
of over 70 quality assured specialist associate consultants and advisers to meet the different
needs of our client groups and support the delivery of our ESF projects which support hard to
reach employers who come from a diverse range of communities.

Associates are required to follow a Code of Conduct which requires them to comply with the
organisations equal opportunities policy however the self assessment process has
highlighted that they are not actually issued with a copy of the Policy. This weakness is
currently being addressed.

Although staff have access to a wide range of training activities, equality training has not
been carried out for two years and this needs to be addressed immediately.

To aid the promotion of equality of opportunity, (organisation name) takes a proactive
approach to staff welfare. Examples of this include:
    Ensuring that staff with disabilities are receiving appropriate support through holding
      regular review meetings with them
    Making adjustments to meet the needs of staff with additional needs such as adapting
      their job roles, adapting responsibilities, adjusting hours, providing transport to assist
      staff in getting to and from work after sustaining injuries and providing facilities where
      staff who need a short break during the day due to pregnancy or back problems can
      go for a short break during the day.
    Ensuring that staff who attend work related events are provided with transport home
      outside of normal working hours
    Providing opportunities for staff to work from home if appropriate
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
      Adjusting working hours to ensure staff can study towards qualifications they wish to
       achieve to meet their individual aspirations

During a recent staff survey 81% of staff felt that they were treated fairly by the company.

In addition we have implemented and embarked on a number of initiatives and activities to
ensure our learners/employers and prospective learners/employers have equal access to our
services including:-

    Providing female business advisers for Muslim women
    Arranging interpreters and signers for learners on our programmes
    Visiting a community group run by a paraplegic women who was unable to attend out
     offices to talk to her about IIP. She organised other attendees who were also either
     disabled and non English speakers thus providing access to our services that these
     individuals would not otherwise have had access
    Providing training for women into non traditional occupations (WINTO) – due to start in
     January
    Attending training run by Prowess to help advisers support female businesses
    Attending seminars to develop expertise in dealing with the special needs of women
     and those with special needs which led to the provision of a crèche for an open day
     promoting business support
    Working towards Prowess Accreditation which will help to ensure that our systems are
     inclusive and women friendly
    Ensuring that one of our business advisers is a qualified Basic Skills Broker to enable
     her to talk to employers about the importance of their staff and themselves having
     appropriate levels of basic Skills to meet their business needs.
    Developing a unique and proven ability to inspire and lead collaborative relationships
     and new partnerships between the public, private, voluntary and education sectors
     which has led to a variety of new partnerships including Supporting Inclusion for
     Enterprise Development. This has led to the engagement of hard to reach employers
     specifically in the Islington area
    Creating new pathways for excluded communities to re-engage in learning through the
     creative sector.

Although we have developed many initiatives to promote equality of opportunity, we have not
consistently promoted equality to learners and employers as individuals and ensured that
they are fully aware of their roles and responsibilities in this area. This needs to be
addressed.



Key Strengths

      Effective partnership working with a wide range of organisations
      Strong commitment to and the achievement of capacity building within the voluntary
       sector
      Effective process for promoting the sharing of good practice within the voluntary sector
      Effective and varied forms of communication adopted within the organisation
      Considerable effort made to involve staff in organisational development

Weaknesses
   This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                   templates to relate to their working practices
    Under-developed process for the consistent collection and evaluation of
     learner/employer feedback
    Under-developed Self Assessment process against the requirements of the Common
     Inspection Framework
    Inconsistent approach to the induction of associates
    Some processes not fully documented
    Emphasis on compliance rather than quality
    Weak promotion of equality of opportunity to learners and employers




    This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                    templates to relate to their working practices
Area of learning - Business Administration Management and Professional

5b Management

Within this Area of learning we deliver 6 Projects:
Project Title     Brief description                     Outputs
Project           This project aims to embed a          Association of Project
Management        culture of lifelong learning and      Management level 2 (Introductory)
Training for      skills development to foster the      Certificate or equivalent Project
micro/SMEs        competitiveness of micro/SMEs,        Management Qualification or Units
                                                        Towards
Project          This project aims to capacity build    Association of Project
Management       micro/SME employees in the VCS         Management level 2 (Introductory)
Training for     to understand Project                  Certificate or equivalent Project
VCS              management principles and              Management Qualification
micro/SMEs       techniques through Project
                 Mangement training
Developing       This project provides innovative, 1.   Achievment of non-accredited
Micro/SME        flexible advice, support and           qualifications - (Owner Manager
Leaders          training packages on leadership        Certificate Level 2/3) (Manage To
                 and management to                      Grow)
                 owner/managers of micro/SMEs 2.        Organisations referred to Investors
                 through gaining commitment to          in People
                 the IiP process. The project aims 3.   Organisations achieving
                 to increase business productivity      recognised quality standards
                 through developing skills of           referred to Investors in People
                 owner/managers and upskilling
                 employees.
ESF Co-          (organisation name) is delivering      NVQ Level 3 in management
financing        this small project in                  NVQ Level 4 in management
Project – RCO    Partnershipwith Ealing PCT to
– Renewal        promote wider access and
SRB              participation in life long learning
                 for disdavantaged groups.
Access to        The project will provide               CMI Certificate in Management
Proactive        management training aimed at           CMI Diploma in management
Management       SMEs to meet the needs of
(APM)            disadvantaged employees within
                 the key target groups of BME
                 communities and/or people with a
                 disability for enhanced
                 managment skills.

                 A key aim is to provide
                 beneficiaries with management
                 skills to access higher paid
                 positions and reduce economic
                 exclusion while meeting the
                 needs of employers for increased
                 competitiveness.
Embedding a      The project aims to support the 1. Organisations confirming
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Culture of        successul achievement of of the      commitment to IiP
Progression                                         2.
                  IiP award for SMEs by embedding Organisations achieving IiP
(ECP)             Leadership and Management            accreditation
                  qualifications in key FRESA       3. NVQ Level 3 and 5 in Management
                  priority sectors..
                  This project aims to add value to
                  mainstream SME advisory
                  programmes by embedding a
                  culture of & commitment to
                  workforce development & training,
                  so that SMEs may continue to
                  thrive and grow in the
                  marketplace.
For a full breakdown of recruitment retention and achievement data see appendix 1.

Recruitment

Learners are recruited as a result of a variety of marketing activities including enquiry lines,
networking events, word of mouth, telemarketing, leaflets/brochures, cold calling, door to
door selling and re-contacting old/existing clients. Using this variety of methods helps to
ensure that we access a wide range of prospective learners and organisations many of
whom come from areas of deprivation or from disadvantaged groups.

Learners are engaged from SME’s through business advisors who are either SFEDI
accredited or working towards it. The advisers conduct a comprehensive company training
needs analysis from which learners are identified that would benefit from (organisation
name)’s ESF funded training programmes. Business Advisers identify what level of
programme learners should be placed on, however as they do not always have the industry
background to identify appropriate levels accurately, this has sometimes led to learners being
signed onto inappropriate courses which has affected achievement on all programmes.

Many of our learners are actually the owner managers of the organisations which
(organisation name) support. A holistic approach is taken by Business Advisers to ensure
that the individual need of each of the organisations that they come in contact with is given
top priority. This can mean that organisations/Owner managers are referred to other
programmes not run by (organisation name).

Induction and Initial Assessment

For the project management and IiP course, learners attend an introduction/induction session
that provides detailed information on the course structure and content and establishes
learner commitment. During this session learners complete an individual training needs
analysis to identify their training needs. This helps to ensure that learners are undertaking the
correct courses. At the end of the session the trainer feeds back to (organisation name)’s
project manager on learner progress and informs him of any issues that relate to the learners
including whether additional support will be required. Any issues identified are addressed by
the Project manager although this is not formally recorded.

(organisation name) has identified that additional learning needs are not always identified
accurately during the first session and is currently looking into the feasibility of learners

     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
completing a basic skills initial assessment even where this is not a payment trigger as we
recognise that this is a weakness in our process.

The Renewal SRB project starts with an NVQ Induction day where learners are given
information about the training schedule and the NVQ process and completed Individual
Training Needs Analysis which is based around the specific needs of refugee community
organisations. This Training Needs Analysis builds on the organisational Training Needs
Analysis carried out by the business advisers and helps the trainers identify support
requirements

Learners on CMI programmes attend an Induction day where they cover a wide range of
topics and activities including who’s who, rules and regulations, details of the programme,
health and safety, additional support available, contact details for assessors, attendance
details, scheme of work, issue of portfolios, identification of special needs and assessment of
prior attainment.

There is little evidence to support the information provided to learners during the Induction
process on the Project Management/IIP programme.

.Developing an Individual Learning Plan

Learners on Project Management and IIP programmes have not completed ILPs largely
because they have not been a funding requirement and the programme is only between one
and three days long, however (organisation name) have identified that it would be helpful if
learners agreed learning objectives, attendance and additional support requirements on their
first day which could be reviewed at the end of the course.

On the Renewal SRB project learners have not completed ILPs again because this was not a
funding requirement.

Learners undertaking CMI qualifications complete ILPs during the induction process in
consultation with their tutor and are given copies.

The Business Adviser, Project Manager and Tutor then work out an appropriate programme
for the group as a whole as opposed to individual learners.

Training Delivery

The Project Management and IiP programmes are all very practical courses which mould
themselves around the needs of the group undertaking the course.

The non accredited Manage to Grow courses are very flexible and are adapted to meet
individual needs within the existing workshops.

All the above courses are 3 days long. The Project Management courses are one day
followed by two consecutive days and the IiP courses are delivered over three days which
are timed two weeks apart.

Training on all courses is held in group sessions, usually 8 – 12 people.



     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
On the Project management Course there is a non accredited introductory day delivered by
an associate trainer and then PMP Professional or the Project Company delivers the 2 day
workshop which leads to a Certificate in Introduction to Project Management which is
accredited by Association of Project Management

Learners complete a Personal Development Plan and a course questionnaire at the end of
the first day to help establish how well they are grasping the course content. This helps
learners, the tutor and the Project Manager to identify whether the learner has the ability to
continue the course and make the appropriate recommendations to the learners who can
then choose whether to continue the course and/or take the exam which is at the end of the
third day.

After each session the tutor feeds back to the project manager so that issues can be
addressed as and when required. Feedback is also given to business advisers to help
improve the recruitment process and ensure that the correct people are placed on the correct
programmes.

IiP learners develop an organisational action plan based around the IiP Standards. Between
each session they are then able to work on their actions so they can progress to the next
stage. On completion of the three days learners will complete and implement a final action
plan with the one to one support of the (organisation name) IiP Practitioner who will carry out
a mock assessment where requested and organisations who pass this stage can then apply
for accreditation.. This is a supportive process which helps to ensure that organisations do
not waste valuable funds on assessment fees if they are unlikely to pass the assessment.

The renewal SRB Course lasts for approximately 12 months, with workshops being delivered
over a nine month period. Learners attend half day training sessions on a fortnightly basis
which are based around the NVQ unit requirements. This helps learners complete the
essential knowledge questions which are required for their portfolio. Assessors visit learners
every 4-6 weeks with a view to assessing two units.

Level 3 and 4 learners have been brought together for workshops with the result that learners
have shown greater commitment to attendance and completing their qualifications.

The ECM project is structured so that it can offer a flexible, individual & centred training route
for each participant

APM and ECP Programmes - The course lasts between six and nine months and learners
attend twelve fortnightly training sessions to cover the theory of the qualifications. During
these sessions learners attend monthly one to one tutorial reviews on how they are
progressing through the course. Topics discussed include how they are coping with the
classroom sessions and completion of assignments. These sessions help identify leaner
needs and how these will be met. These reviews are fully documented and relevant
information copied to learners in the form of guidance notes on how to further enhance their
assignments.

Reviews

Due to the duration of the Project Management and IiP courses no reviews of learners are
undertaken however feedback from the training is received from learners following
attendance.
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Although learners receive ongoing tutorials which are used to discuss progress towards the
completion of assignments, there is no formal process to review progress on their training
course as a whole

Assessors delivering the renewal SRB NVQ qualifications carry out ongoing reviews on
learner progress, setting action plans with SMART targets which are regularly reviewed.

Support Provided

Learners on (organisation name) programmes have access to a wide range of support
services including:-
    Approved Information, Advice and Guidance prior to starting the course through
       Fusion which is the commercial training arm of the College of North West London who
       are Matrix accredited for CMI courses
    Business/learner support through initial contact with Business Advisers
    Referral to health and safety or other relevant support organisations to address
       business weaknesses
    Carrying out research activities to support business/learner needs
    Support with Dyslexia
    Provision of additional learning tools
    Adaptive materials or equipment
    Provision of interpreters or signers
    Use of a guide to assist with travel from the tube station
    Additional tutor time
    Disabled access
    Access to all college facilities and support mechanisms for CMI learners
    Access to female business advisers if requested
    Access to short course through the college for CMI learners
    Ongoing support through the Manage to Grow website for learners undertaking IiP
       programmes
    Flexible start dates throughout the year for IIP and Project management courses
    Provision of networking opportunities
    Contact detail for Project manager, assessors and relevant college staff so learners
       have access to a wide range of information/help sources for CMI learners
    Referral and access to additional training opportunities

The provision of additional support is not consistently recorded and its effectiveness is
therefore not evaluated.

Added Value

Due to the diversity of the programmes offered through (organisation name) learners on our
programmes have the opportunity to undertake further learning opportunities to enable them
to undertake continuous professional development

In addition our programmes bring together learners from a wide range of organisations who
are then able to develop and share good practice and develop networking opportunities. This
is crucial for SME and voluntary sector organisations who need to become competitive in the
market place.
    This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                    templates to relate to their working practices
Exit process

Unless it has been a funding requirement, (organisation name) has not tended to follow a
formal exit process in the delivery of its programmes; however it has been identified that the
carrying out of an exit review/interview would be of great benefit both to learners and to
(organisation name) who could use feedback gained through this process to make
programme improvements.

How well do learners achieve?

92% of learners on the Developing Micro/SME Leaders Project have achieved non
accredited qualifications against a target of 60%. Although this is a good result, the nature of
the organisations we are working with (2-10 employees) makes it very difficult for them to be
able to progress to the next stage. This is born out by the fact that only 34% of organisations
felt able to commit to working towards IiP. Due to the time required and the additional cost
involved to prepare for IiP accreditation it is going to be very difficult for any of these
organisations to achieve the recognised quality standards to be put forward for accreditation.

Another issue which has affected organisational achievement on this project is that the
learners who attended Manage to Grow workshops were not necessarily eligible to be
recruited for the IiP part of the project.

(organisation name) needs to look at the recruitment processes, what additional support
these organisations can be offered to increase their ability to commit to the IiP process and
monitor distance travelled where learning aims have not been achieved to improve the
learner/organisational achievement

On the Project Management Training for Micro SMEs 57% of learners have achieved their
qualification/learning aim against a target of 62%.

73% of learners on the Project Management for VCO micro/SMEs have achieved a
qualification against a target of 83%

Due to the commitment of the learners and assessors on the Renewal SRB Project not only
are all learners expected to complete their qualifications but 50% (4) of them are likely to
complete early.

Learner success rates in relation to the achievement of accredited and non accredited
learning, has been very encouraging considering the challenges that many of these learners
face whilst working for small, often community based organisations.

Informal feedback from many of our learners on our VCO project suggests that their training
has helped them run their own projects more effectively. As many of these projects are
designed to support disadvantaged communities our learners are able to make a positive
contribution to their local communities.

The APM and ECP Certificate and Diploma in Management Provision were originally
delivered in association with Eden College, however (organisation name) received a number
of complaints from learners related to the course tutor, and (organisation name) took
immediate action and suspended the delivery of the course until a review had taken place.
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
The review concluded in giving learners the option to remain with Eden College under
another tutor or wait until we had recruited a new delivery partner. This resulted in 4 learners
remaining with Eden College and 32 learners choosing to wait for an alternative provider

Whilst (organisation name) were developing a partnership with Fusion, learners was kept
informed fortnightly on the recruitment progress during which time a large number of learners
left the programme. From the 36 recruited, 14 learners have remained on programme (4
Eden learners and 10 Fusion learners).

Breakdown:
             Recruited for     Continued with      Left Programme      Transferred to
             Eden              Eden                                    Fusion
APM Cert             10                0                     9                 1
APM Dip              24                4                    12                 8
ECP Cert             0                 0                     0                 0
ECP Dip              2                                       1                 1
Total                36                  4                  22                 10

Since Fusion have been involved in programme delivery 100 Learners have joined the
programme and 1 learner has left the project early.

99% of the learners who are still in learning have achieved their mid point milestone in line
with contract requirements.

Learner feedback suggests that some learners are achieving over and above what they
expected from the course – “I have found this course to be very rewarding as I have learnt a
lot of useful facts and ideas that have improved my management skills already”

There has been a strong focus on gaining commitment from learners on this project and the
success of this can be seen in the fact that all learners have a achieved a minimum level of
95% attendance

The impact on local communities of the training being delivered has been positive. Small
local organisations have employed local people who have traditionally struggled to find work
elsewhere. These employees have been empowered to develop their skills and confidence
and many have shown a commitment to ongoing professional development.

How effective are teaching, training and learning?

Although there is an individual training needs analysis carried out, this does not include Basic
Skills or any occupational assessment. This places a reliance on the tutor or assessor
identifying issues on the first day/early in the assessment process. It would be more
beneficial if any issues could be identified during the recruitment stage to ensure that
additional support needs and how these will be addressed can be agreed with learners and
be included on ILPs prior to their training taking place.

A well planned and structured course has contributed to the excellent achievement rate of
92% in the Developing Micro/SME Leaders course.

Highly qualified and dedicated assessors and an effective assessment process have
contributed to the excellent progress made by learners on the Renewal SRB Project.
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Although all delivery staff are qualified and experienced in the delivery of their training
courses, there have been no classroom observations carried out on any of the Project
Management/IiP courses. Had this process been carried out, improvements may have been
identified which would have led to a higher level of achievements.

Although learners complete course evaluations at the end of each course and issues are
identified and addressed, the evaluations are not formally analysed which makes it
impossible to compare satisfaction level trends with different cohorts over time. In addition an
evaluation of the questions on the evaluation forms has highlighted that they could be more
detailed and therefore more helpful in enabling (organisation name) to make programme
improvements.

How well do programmes and activities meet the needs and interests of learners?

Business Adviser carry out detailed organisational training needs analysis’ and are
responsible for recruiting learners onto projects, however until recently some of the advisers
lacked an in depth understanding of the content of the projects they were recruiting for which
affected how well the courses then met learners aspirations. We need to get feedback from
service users to ensure that the project training which is now being given to Business
Advisers is resulting in learners consistently being recruited onto the correct programmes.

Well structured short courses have not placed too great a time burden on the learners
workplace commitments which is often a major problem for small and voluntary sector
organisations has contributed to learner retention on these projects.

Programmes have been designed to aid the development of organisations who are often
disadvantaged due to their size/capacity. The effectiveness of these programmes in meeting
employer and learner needs can be shown through employer feedback (Project
Management/IiP) which shows that:
    92% of employers rate the value of the training programme their learner was
      undertaking as good or very good.
    68% of employers were totally satisfied with the rate of their learner’s progress and
      24% were partly satisfied
    68% rated their knowledge of what their learner was being trained/assessed on as
      good or very good
    76% have been totally satisfied by the level of service received from (organisation
      name) staff.

Learners on these programmes are generally satisfied with their training which is borne out
by the fact that
     93% of learners rated their overall satisfaction with the course highly
     100% of learners rated their trainer’s knowledge of the subject highly of which 92%
       gave the trainer the top score.
     90% of learners rated the trainer’s presentation highly
     92% rated their enjoyment of the course highly.

How well are learners guided and supported?

A lack of time management by learners undertaking the CMI Certificate has contributed to a
high rate of drop out on this programme. A more detailed initial assessment and induction
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
process would help to ensure that learners on this programme understand exactly what they
are committing to and are therefore better able to make an informed choice as to whether the
course is for them. Learners undertaking the CMI Certificate should be given additional
support to enable them to plan their time so they can complete their qualifications effectively.

Although ILPs are completed on some of the courses run by (organisation name) they are
not consistently used across all programmes. Where they are used they lack detail and are of
little value to the learners. This needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency and will form
part of (organisation name)’s quality improvement programme

Although it is not appropriate to complete detailed ILPs for learners on short courses, they
should be issued with learning objectives and SMART targets which should then be reviewed
at the end of their training.

A well structured and comprehensive induction along with ongoing and effective support and
guidance carried out by Fusion on the APM course has led to a high retention rate (99%) and
milestone achievement rate (99%) since they took over the delivery of this project.

Supportive and encouraging tutors have contributed to the retention rate of 97% on the
developing Micro/SME Leaders Project, 83% on the project management for Micro/SMEs
and 100% on Project management for VCS Micro/SMEs on the Project Management short
courses.

How effective are leadership and management in raising achievement and supporting
all learners.

Project Mangers are supported in the delivery of their projects by a project assistant and the
relevant tutors and assessors

Project Managers tend to adopt a flexible approach to managing delivery staff based on their
individual; needs although this can vary across Project Managers.

Much of the day to day communication is carried out verbally and through email. Although
actions agreed verbally are often confirmed by email, there needs to be a more structured
approach to formal action planning at key project points to help ensure that issues affecting
project delivery are formally addressed. This would help to support the sharing of good
practice and the process of continuous improvement within (organisation name).

Every three to four Project Management IiP courses, the Project Manager, trainer and other
relevant delivery organisations hold a steering group meeting to discuss issues relating to
delivery and identify improvements. These meetings are minuted with actions and
responsibilities identified and followed up.

Although Project Managers monitor performance on an ongoing basis against delivery
profiles, this does not tend to include issues relating to quality.

Learner evaluations are collected at the end of courses but these lack substance and are not
analysed although issues are identified and addressed on an individual basis.




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Although Project Managers endeavour to ensure that learners are treated fairly, and provide
considerable additional support where required there is little active promotion of equality of
opportunity to learners.

Key Strengths

    Good range of additional support available
    Good levels of achievement of non accredited qualifications on the Developing
     Leaders programme
    Courses designed to meet the needs of disadvantaged community organisations
    High levels of retention on short courses
    High levels of learner engagement during CMI classes on the APM and ECP
     Programmes

Key Weaknesses

      Ineffective use of ILPs
      Under-developed initial assessment process
      Little recording of additional support
      No formal process for reviewing learner progress
      Under-developed quality monitoring processes in place such as classroom
       observations, analysis of learner/employer feedback




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Area of learning – Retail, Customer Service and Transportation

7F Customer Service

Within this Area of learning we deliver 1 Project:

Embedding a Culture     This project aims to add value to NVQ Level 2 in
of Progression (ECP)    mainstream SME advisory                Customer Service
                        programmes by embedding a culture of &
                        commitment to workforce development &
                        training, so that SMEs may continue to
                        thrive and grow in the marketplace.

For a full breakdown of recruitment retention and achievement data see appendix 2.

Recruitment

Learners are engaged from SME’s through business advisors who are either SFEDI
accredited or working towards it. The advisers conduct a comprehensive company training
needs analysis from which learners are identified that would benefit from (organisation
name)’s ESF funded training programmes. Business Advisers identify what level of
programme learners should be placed on, however as they do not always have the industry
background to identify appropriate levels accurately, this has sometimes led to learners being
signed onto inappropriate courses which has affected achievement on all programmes.

Induction and Initial Assessment

Learners on NVQ programmes receives a group induction where they cover an overview of
the qualification and sign a letter of commitment which covers rules and regulations. The
assessor identifies the appropriate level of study based on an individual training needs
analysis. (organisation name) has identified that it would be helpful for assessors to complete
an occupational Initial Assessment to ensure that learners are being placed on the most
appropriate level of qualification.

Developing a Individual Learning Plan

NVQ learners do not complete an ILP and again this needs to be addressed with immediate
effect.




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
Training Delivery

This programme is scheduled to last for 6 months and after the induction session, learners
attend workshops at (organisation name) followed by assessment visits in the workplace.

There were some initial problems with the delivery of this project including the frequency and
timing of assessment visits, however following a Project Meeting to review the project
structure with the NVQ co-ordinator, trainer and Project Manager these were quickly resolved
with the recruitment of new assessors and visits being organised around the needs of the
learners and their employers.

Assessment

All assessment activity is carried out in line with awarding body requirements.

Reviews

Learner progress is reviewed by assessors/tutors on an ongoing basis however they tend to
focus on NVQ progress as opposed to a review of the programme as a whole.

Support Provided

Although learners have access to a range of support services including:
     Mobile and email contact details for assessors
     Additional time for learners with learning difficulties
     Flexible assessment times including weekends
     Assessments carried out in learner’s preferred locations which can often be out of
       London
this support is rarely recorded unless it directly relates to the assessment process.

Added value

Learners can be referred to additional workshops to support the completion of qualifications
and address identified weaknesses. These include workshops which are not directly related
to their qualification

Exit Process

Exit questionnaire are sent out when learners leave the programme, however this is a fairly
new process and the impact of this process cannot be properly evaluated.




How well do learners achieve?

The ECP Customer Service Project has achieved all its required outcomes, resulting in all
the learners who have remained on programme achieving their Customer Service Level 2
qualification well within the completion timeframe. Although this can be attributed to the
effectiveness of the assessment process and support provided and the high levels of learner
motivation, 5 out of 9 of the learners who were originally signed onto the programme left
     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
early as they felt the course was not suited to them. The issue of learners being placed on
incorrect courses has largely been addressed through the change in business advisers and
the project training they receive.

How effective are teaching, training and learning?

Poor assessment planning and a general lack of professionalism led to a high level of early
leavers on the first cohort. However these issues were addressed and new assessors
recruited before any new learners were engaged.

The effectiveness of the training delivery and the improved assessment process and the
recruitment of highly qualified and dedicated assessors has contributed to the early
achievements in the Customer Service Level 2 course.

Although an individual training needs analysis is completed at the induction stage this does
not include a basic skills or occupational assessment which makes it difficult to accurately
identify where learners have additional learning needs before they start their training. In
addition associates do not receive any information about the learner before they meet them
for the first time making it difficult for them to plan how any additional learning needs will be
met. The initial assessment process is currently under review and a new process will be in
place in the near future.

Although all classroom delivery staff are qualified and experienced in the delivery of their
training courses, there have been no classroom observations carried out on any of the
Customer Services Courses. Had this process been carried out, improvements may have
been identified which would have led to a higher level of retention or achievements.

Feedback from EV report has highlighted that some improvements to the assessment
process need to be implemented and this is currently being addressed.

How well do programmes and activities meet the needs and interests of learners?

Feedback from learners confirms (Add in data)




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
How well are learners guided and supported?

Although assessors plan assessments with learners to ensure steady progress, the ILP lacks
substance and needs to be updated urgently if it is to be of any value to the learners.

Ongoing support and guidance provided to learners through structured monthly tutorials and
ongoing phone/email contact has contributed to learners completing their qualifications
earlier than planned.

How effective are leadership and management in raising achievement and supporting
all learners.

This project is managed by a Project Manager who is supported by a Project Assistant

The Project Manager has weekly telephone calls with Maintrain (delivery partner) to review
progress, discuss issues and agree actions. All verbal conversations are followed up with an
email confirming actions agreed. The (organisation name) NVQ co-ordinator is in regular
contact with Maintrain to support the assessors and undertakes quarterly standardisation
meetings which are minuted. In addition quarterly meetings are held between the
(organisation name) and the Maintrain Project managers.

The Project Manager has a meeting with Director of Enterprise an a weekly basis to discuss
project performance.

Learners are encouraged to complete course evaluations at the end of each course, however
although they are reviewed by the Project Manager they are not formally analysed.

Mid point evaluations are currently being sent out, and will be evaluated once they have been
returned. However it has been identified that the return rate is not that high and we need to
look at a more effective way of gaining learner feedback.

Key Strengths

    Swift identification of issues relating to poor delivery of the project which were quickly
     addressed.

Key Weaknesses

    Poor retention rate and slow achievement of learners recruited on the first cohort
    Under-developed initial assessment process
    Assessors not provided with information on learners before meeting them for the first
     time.
    Poor recording of additional support
    Under-developed quality monitoring processes in place such as classroom
     observations, analysis of learner/employer feedback

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     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                templates to relate to their working practices
7a. Ofsted Quality Improvement Plan Template


Example Table of            Content                                                       Page No.
Contents
                         1 SAR (Ofsted, Matrix) Actions

                         2 Survey Learner Actions

                         3 Survey Employer Actions

                         4 Customer First Actions

                         5 Health & Safety Actions

                         6 Safeguarding Actions

                         7 Sustainability Actions

                         8 Equality & Diversity

                         9 IiP Actions

                        10 ISO9001 Actions

                        11 ISO27001 Actions




  This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
       Heading: (Example Self Assessment Review Actions (Ofsted, Matrix) Actions)

Weakness:    Under developed processes in accordance with CIF requirements

Objective:   To improve systems & processes to increase delivery performance in line with the CIF requirements. Prepared for Ofsted Inspection

Ref:         Issue and Priority     Actions                     Expected             Person(s)      Due                           Monitoring and Review
             Level                  Required/Progress to        Outcome              Responsible    Date
                                    date
1.           ILPs do not have all   A new ILP to be drafted     Staff will able to   WBL            Mid November                  Quality Improvement Group &
             the required           which covers the 4 points   pick up an ILP       Manager                                      Quality Champion meetings
             information on them    raised.                     and have a clear
             (HIGH)                                             understanding of
                                                                why the learner is
                                                                undertaking their
                                                                chosen
                                                                qualification,
                                                                what they hope to
                                                                achieve as a
                                                                result of
                                                                completing their
                                                                NVQ and what
                                                                they have
                                                                achieved.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.


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         This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
       8a. Ofsted Taxonomy Action Plan


Objective:          1.   Recruitment

Ref:    Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required                 Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                    Responsible   Date
        Example                                 Meeting arranged                ILP part 1
        Access to education                                                     (FJF training)
        Interview practice                                                      Course materials
        Marketing                                                               TNA / FJF
        Recruitment information, advice                                         TNA FJF
        and guidance                                                            FJF recruitment
        Recruitment of disaffected learners                                     ILP part 1 / ILR
        Recruitment of learners with                                            ILP / ILR
        learning difficulties and/or
        disabilities                                                            ILR and Funding
        Responding to local and regional                                        criteria
        priorities
        Screening
        Staff development
        Working with employers
        (recruitment)
        Working with schools (recruitment)

Objective:          2. Initial Assessment

Ref:    Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required                 Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                    Responsible   Date
        Initial Assessment                      Review and finalise potential   TNA ILP FJF
                                                impact of migration from NVQ    registration
                                                to QCF
Objective:          3.   Induction

Ref:    Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required                 Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                    Responsible   Date


        This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
Objective:         4.    (i) Teaching, Training, Coaching and Learning – PLANNING AND RESOURCES

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:         4.    (ii) Teaching, Training, Coaching and Learning – TEACHING AND LEARNING

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          4.   (iii) Teaching, Training, Coaching and Learning – CURRICULUM GOOD PRACTICE

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          5.   Learner Support

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          6.   Assessment

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          7.   Reviewing Learner Progress

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          8.   Retention

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                                  Responsible   Date

Objective:          9.   Achievement

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required            Evidence required       Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          10. Progression

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          11. Curriculum Development

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          12. Data

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          13. Employers

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          14. Equality and Diversity

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          15. Financial Management

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:          16. Health and Safety

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required   Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date



       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
Objective:          17. Inspection Preparation

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:          18. Leadership

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:          19. Management

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:          20. Partnership / Collaborative Working

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:          21. (i) Quality Improvement – POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:         21. (ii) Quality Improvement – EVIDENCE GATHERING

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:         21. (iii) Quality Improvement – JUDGEMENTS AND REPORTING

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review
                                                                                             Responsible   Date

Objective:         21. (iv) Quality Improvement – ACTIONS AND OUTCOMES

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level     Action required         Evidence required   Person(s)     Due    Monitoring and Review

       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:         22. Research

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required     Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:         23. Management of Resources

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required     Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:         24. Staff

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required     Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date

Objective:         25. Subcontractors

Ref:   Ofsted requirement and Priority Level   Action required     Evidence required    Person(s)     Due     Monitoring and Review
                                                                                        Responsible   Date




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       This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
9. The Common Inspection Framework


The Common Inspection Framework relates to the need to improve and maintain standards
in education and training.


The Government’s policy drivers are broadly:
 to improve the UK’s Global Competitiveness and
 to create a Fair and Inclusive Society


– and it sees Learning and Skills as a mechanism through which both of these objectives can
be achieved.


Previously, inspection frameworks did exist but they were inadequate in that they lacked
coherence within a shared framework.
 Inspections were irregular,
 there were no self-assessment arrangements,
 no grading systems,
 no shared reporting formats
 and no post-Inspection requirements


– Which meant that inspections were hard to prepare for and to implement, and the potential
for the findings to be used effectively to raise standards could easily be lost.


A standardised approach to evaluating education and training was needed and the Learning
and Skills Act was passed in 2000 to provide the framework for working towards these
goals.


The Learning and Skills Act established:


 The Learning and Skills Council for England, an intermediary agency through which the
  DfES operates, with overarching responsibility for: Extending Participation, Raising
  Achievement and Raising the Quality of post 16 education and training provision. (LSCs
  commission education and training services by contracting with local providers, and
  work with them on an ongoing basis to ensure they deliver).


 The Adult Learning Inspectorate, a non-departmental public body whose role is to
  inspect and report on the quality of education and training for adults.



     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
 Her Majesty’s Chief Inspectorate for Schools, which inspects and reports on the quality
  of statutory or school education (operating through Ofsted).


…So all publicly funded providers are now subject to independent inspection.


The Act also set out the requirement for a National Framework of objective criteria for
inspections – which is called The Common Inspection Framework. It has 7 main indicators,
which look at 3 broad areas:
 The quality of education and training
 The standards achieved by those receiving that education and training
 Whether financial resources are managed efficiently and used in a way which provides
  value for money.


…So the Common Inspection Framework is the tool through which the Quality of Education
and Training is assessed and graded (on a scale of 1-5), and against which providers of
education and training can evaluate their own performance.


(The 7 indicators are:
 How well do learners achieve?
 How effective are teaching, training and learning?
 How are achievement and learning affected by resources?
 How effective are the assessment and monitoring of learning?
 How well do the programmes and courses meet the needs and interests of learners?
 How well are learners guided and supported?
 How effective are leadership and management in raising achievement and supporting all
  learners?)


The CIF is central to what is called The Inspection Cycle, of Self Assessment, Inspection,
Report, Action Plan.


So providers:

   1. evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses against the 7 indicators,

   2. and then they are inspected by either the ALI or Ofsted to validate those findings (the
      intensity of the inspection depends on previous gradings).

   3. The inspection results in a report which includes judgements about the college as a
      whole as well as judgements about individual curriculum areas.



     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
    4. The issues for improvement will form the basis of action plans, which are implemented
       and evaluated, starting the cycle again.

The same principles are applied in Area Wide Inspections, which look at all 14-19 provision
clustered in a geographical area and evaluate how successfully individual providers, local
LSCs and LEAs are working together to meet the needs of local people and employers.

How is ......... involved in all this?


The work we’ve done around the Common Inspection Framework has been in 3 areas:
 Firstly, capacity-building small adult learning providers (especially voluntary and
  community sector ones) to carry out their self assessments and prepare for inspection.
 Secondly, action planning with providers following the Inspection Reports, and co-
  ordinating the implementation of these action plans. We’ve done this mostly on an
  Area-Wide basis, being contracted by the LSC to produce a strategy in response to
  findings across London Boroughs (with 1 14-19 focus)
 And thirdly, preparing education and training providers (and LEAs) for Area Wide
  Inspection – and this is now happening across borough boundaries, most recently in
  Southwark and Lambeth.


Footnote


   Until very recently it would have been a moot point as to whether ......... itself would fall in
    scope of inspection, since we have not been the lead promoter of any learning project to
    date, but rather an ad-hoc sub contractor / partner
   However, ......... is now a fully –fledged learning provider. We are the lead organisation in
    a number of LSC funded programmes, we are also a named partner in consortia where
    others are leading. We operate a qualifications centre. We are delivering work force
    development programmes.


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     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
13. Lesson Plan Template


           Teacher:                                     Course:



          Location:                                  Company:
   Date and week:                                        Time:           :
  Nos. on register:                               Nos. present:


Topic to be covered in the lesson:

Indicate how topic fits into scheme of work:
(link to syllabus/specification)

Aims of lesson:
(Teacher’s intention)




Learning objectives:                            How objectives will be measured/assessed:


(By end of lesson students should be able to)
                                                - Diagnostic (what do they know?)

                                                - Formative (are they learning?)




Strategies for differentiation & equal          Students with special/additional needs:
opportunities:




Last lesson: (notes, etc.)




     This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                     templates to relate to their working practices
This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own
                templates to relate to their working practices
This lesson:


Time      Content               Teacher Activity             Student Activity     Monitoring Learning   Resources
20mins
(0:20)




25mins
(0:45)

5mins
(1:30

15mins
(1:45)




10mins
(1:55)

40mins
(2.35)

40mins
(3:15)

  This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices
40mins   IAG                    Discuss needs with individual    Assist trainer to       IAG section of ILP    ILP
(3:55)                          learners and comment on ILP      complete ILP


5mins    Recap session
(4:00)
         One to one IAG
         provided where
         requested




Evaluation


What went well? Why?          What did not go well? Why?        What action will I take for future sessions?




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  This document provides examples only. Organisations should develop their own templates to relate to their working practices

				
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