Papers for first steering group meeting by iV0ZpZ

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									                        Kia Tutahi Standing Together
        Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                      Relationship Agreement


List of Papers: Meeting on 9 April 2010

Minister Turia’s intentions
The terms of reference for the steering group
The scope of the Relationship Agreement
Timeline of key events and tasks
Fact sheets

1. History
2. Context
3. Outcomes from the 2009 national Community-Government Forum
4. Current work within OCVS that is relevant to the development of the Relationship
   Agreement
5. Examples of similar agreements

       Australia, England & Wales
       The Framework for Relationships between the Ministry of Health and
        Health/Disability Non-Government Organisations
       The Strategic Policy Framework for relations between NZAID and New Zealand
        NGOs
       The Partnering Agreement: Community Waitakere and Waitakere City Council
       Community-Government Relationship Framework: Discussion paper prepared for
        ANGOA by Pat Hanley 2009
       The Christchurch City Council Statement of Intent regarding its relationship with
        the community and voluntary sector
       The Public Service Association Partnership for Quality Agreement
       The Statement of Government Intentions for an Improved Community-
        Government Relationship 2001
       Government Policy on Volunteering 2002




1                                                                           6 April 2010
                       Kia Tutahi Standing Together
        Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                      Relationship Agreement


Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector’s intentions

The portfolio goals of the Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector, Hon Tariana
Turia, are:
       a valued community and voluntary sector portfolio
       empowered communities
       trusting government and community and voluntary sector relationships.

Minister Turia wants to achieve strong relationships between government and the
community and voluntary sector because she believes that when government and the
community are working well together, communities, whānau and families all benefit.

Community-government relationships exist, not for their own sake, but to deliver the best
results possible for citizens, families and whānau.

Minister Turia wants citizens, families and whānau to be enabled to actively participate in
their communities. She is particularly keen to support those who are currently ‘hard-to-
reach’ and whose voices government often fails to hear.

A principles-based Relationship Agreement will guide community-government
relationships.

Minister Turia is constantly urging and offering guidance to her Cabinet colleagues on
the benefits gained from working constructively with the community and voluntary sector.

She has asked government agency chief executives to commit their organisations to
strong relationships with the sector and expects them to use their influence and show
leadership in this area.

The Office for the Community and Voluntary Sector exists to help government agencies
do a better job when interacting with community and voluntary sector organisations and
to promote the importance of government and the sector working together productively.




2                                                                           6 April 2010
                       Kia Tutahi Standing Together
      Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                    Relationship Agreement


Terms of Reference for the Steering Group

Steering Group to develop the Relationship Agreement
The Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector has established a Steering Group
to lead the development of the Relationship Agreement. Cabinet has approved the
membership of the Steering Group, whose members will be accountable to the Minister
for the development of the Relationship Agreement.
The Steering Group will oversee development of the Relationship Agreement and lead
and participate in the consultation process on the draft Relationship Agreement.
Nominations to the Steering Group were sought from the community and voluntary
sector and the state sector and members were selected on the basis of their skills,
experience and networks.
As far as possible, the Steering Group membership reflects the diverse nature of the
community and voluntary sector, and in particular, Māori, Pacific peoples, ethnic
minorities and the disabled.

Steering Group composition and structure
The Steering Group consists of seven community and voluntary sector members and
seven state sector members. In addition the Minister has appointed two co-chairs, one
from the community and voluntary sector and one from the state sector (see figure
below).

Diagram of the proposed structure



                        Government                      Community
                         Co-chair                        Co-chair




                                       Joint group

            reflects the interests of:
             tangata whenua, Pasifika, ethnic and disability communities, sector
                 umbrella organisations and the wider sector.
             subsectors such as sport, arts, environment, health, social services
                                                       Community &
                   State sector                        voluntary sector
                   members                             members




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Skills and experience
Steering group members are:
 well networked within the community and voluntary sector and/or government.
 well respected amongst their peers, able to influence and lead others.
 able to present and communicate effectively, increasing awareness about the
   Relationship Agreement through their networks
 have a collaborative and participatory approach

State sector members are senior officials with the ability to influence others across
government.

Support to the Steering Group
A secretariat from the Office for the Community and Voluntary Sector (OCVS) supports
the Steering Group and will work with the Steering Group to report on progress to the
Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector and Cabinet.

Expectations of the Steering Group
Steering Group members are expected to work together to oversee the development of
the Relationship Agreement. There is a tight timeline for completing the work and it is
likely that deadlines will have to be met at short notice. At this stage, the following is an
indication of the expected commitment by members.
Steering Group Meetings
    Attend eight meetings between early April and November 2010.
    The dates for the first two meetings are 9 and 23 April 2010.
    At least half-day preparation will be required for each meeting and meetings will
       be held in Wellington.
Email and other correspondence
   Review the draft Relationship Agreement - around seven hours in April.
   Review the final Relationship Agreement - around seven hours in September.
   Provide comment and feedback as required at other times.
   Feedback will usually need to be provided within a two day turn-around.
Consultation
    Attend and present at two regional meetings during the consultation period.
    Review the feedback from the consultation process – around seven hours.

Co-chairs will be also expected to meet with the Minister as required, in order to report
on progress; to meet or be in contact with the OCVS weekly; to sign-off on minutes of
meetings, reports and other correspondence from the steering group; and to jointly
facilitate Steering Group meetings.

Remuneration
Remuneration is in accordance with Cabinet Office guidelines on fees for members
appointed to bodies in which the Crown has an interest.

The fee for the community and voluntary sector co-chair is $435 per day (exclusive of
GST) for attendance at Steering Group, co-chair and consultation meetings, with an
additional payment of $215 (exclusive of GST) for preparation, and feedback and review
of papers prior to each meeting.

The fee for community and voluntary sector members is $325 (exclusive of GST) per
day for attendance at Steering Group and consultation meetings, with an additional


4                                                                              6 April 2010
payment of $160 (exclusive of GST) for preparation, and feedback and review of papers
prior to each meeting.

All travel expenses and other reasonable approved expenses will be met by the OCVS.
OCVS will meet the cost of travel and reasonable approved expenses during the
consultation period.

State Sector officials represent their departments, and as such will not be paid a fee for
their service on the Steering group.




5                                                                            6 April 2010
                        Kia Tutahi Standing Together
       Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                     Relationship Agreement

The scope of the Relationship Agreement

The Relationship Agreement could take a number of forms but it needs to relate
specifically to the context in New Zealand and the particular characteristics of the
community and voluntary sector in this country. Issues for discussion include:

Content
   Is it a high-level document setting out a vision, principles and commitments?
   Should it include a plan for future implementation?
   Should it be designed to have supporting documents that deal with the detail, eg
    around measuring performance, capacity building and disseminating the vision?
   What can be built on from the SOGI and other relationship documents?
   Are there other documents that should be integrated into the Relationship
    Agreement, such as the Government Policy on Volunteering?
   How is the Treaty of Waitangi expressed in the form and content of the agreement?
   What are the key issues it should address?
   Is the language simple and accessible?
   Does it assist the voices of Pacific peoples, people with disabilities and ethnic
    communities to be heard?
   How does the agreement meet the needs of Maori, eg by recognising the roles of
    whanau, hapu, iwi in the relationship with government?
Form
   Should it be one agreement at Ministerial level that can be used as a template for
    other agreements at departmental, regional and local level?
   Should it be a series of frameworks? The ANGOA discussion paper Community-
    Government Relationship Framework advocates four – policy engagement,
    advocacy, legal and resourcing.
   Should it be a short document like the Australian Compact or more detailed like the
    English Compact?
Signing the agreement
   Who signs the agreement – could the agreement be signed at various levels, eg
    Ministerial, departmental, regional?
   How are the signatories chosen?
Implementation
   What capacity is needed in the community and voluntary sector and government to
    ensure that the Relationship Agreement is implemented?
   How will that capacity be built?
   How does the Relationship Agreement relate to other government and sector
    activities, eg addressing high priority contracting issues?
   How will the performance of the sector and government be measured?
   How will the message about the Relationship Agreement be disseminated?
   How will be Relationship Agreement be sustained in the long term?


6                                                                            6 April 2010
                             Kia Tutahi Standing Together
        Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                      Relationship Agreement
Indicative timeline for developing the Relationship Agreement

                       Jan     Feb   Mar   Apr   May   June   July   Aug    Sept    Oct   Nov

Seek nominations
to joint group

Briefing to Minister
on nominations

Cabinet approval
of Steering Group

Steering Group
appointed

Draft Relationship
Agreement
prepared

Cabinet approval
sought for
consultation

Consultation on
draft agreement

Analyse
responses and
revise agreement

Agreement
finalised by joint
group

Seek Cabinet
approval to the
final agreement

Signing of the
Agreement




7                                                                          6 April 2010
 Timeline of key events and tasks
 Full day meetings           Half day or less          Briefing           Cabinet approval


     Date                                            Actions
18 Jan         Call for nominations for community representatives
22 Jan         Minister writes to PM on possible co-chairs and the proposed approach
26 Jan         Nominations for state sector members sought
10 Feb         Nominations returned and assessed
16 Feb         Minister gets mandate for appointing co-chairs & confirms them
26 Feb         Selection panel chooses short-list of the Steering Group members
1 March        Minister is given the panel’s recommendations for the Steering Group members
               Paper requesting confirmation of proposed Steering Group members goes to
23 March       Cabinet Appointments and Honours committee
29 March       Cabinet confirms the recommendations for Steering Group membership
9 April        First meeting of the Steering Group
23 April       Second meeting of the Steering Group
30 April       Briefing to Minister on the draft Relationship Agreement
7 May          Steering group meeting to confirm the draft agreement and consultation process
               Briefing to Minister with a draft Cabinet paper recommending consultation on the
10 May         draft Relationship Agreement
               Steering Group Meeting confirming options for consultation, signing and
14 May         implementation
               Paper to Cabinet Social Policy Committee seeking approval of the proposed
16 June        consultation on the draft Relationship Agreement
21 June        Cabinet agrees to consultation on the draft Relationship Agreement
24 June        Steering Group meeting to approve consultation documents
28 June        Consultation starts on the Relationship Agreement
               Steering Group meeting on initial consultation outcomes and any changes to the
3 Sept         Relationship Agreement
               Briefing to Minister and draft Cab paper recommending signing of the final
10 Sept        Relationship Agreement
17 Sept        Final version of the Relationship Agreement signed off by co-chairs
               Paper to Cabinet Social Policy Committee seeking agreement to sign the
27 Oct         proposed Relationship Agreement
31 Oct         Cabinet agrees to sign the Relationship Agreement
               Steering group meets to review the Cabinet decision & confirm press release &
4 Nov          signing process
               Signing of Relationship Agreement
26 Nov         Steering Group Wrap up meeting - consider next steps
8 Dec          Briefing to Minister on the Steering Group recommendations and final thoughts




 8                                                                          6 April 2010
                       Kia Tutahi Standing Together
      Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                    Relationship Agreement


Fact sheet 1: History

The last ten years has seen a sustained conversation between Government and the
Community and Voluntary Sector about what constitutes the relationship between them.
It started with the 2001 Community and Voluntary Sector Working Party, which asked
the Government to show commitment to sector relationships. At the time community and
voluntary sector organisations indicated that they were not ready for a joint agreement
with Government.
December 2001
The then Prime Minister and the Minister Responsible for the Community and Voluntary
Sector signed the Statement of Government Intentions for an Improved Community-
Government Relationship (the SOGI) which sets out Government’s position (copy
attached).
December 2002
The Government published its Government Policy on Volunteering (copy attached).
June 2009
The Association of Non-Governmental Organisations of Aotearoa (ANGOA) assessed
government agencies’ responsiveness to the SOGI in the report Good Intentions and
recommended that the current Government support a statement of government
intentions.
July 2009
The Building Better Government Engagement (BBGE) reference group produced the
report From Talk to Action: Government Engagement with Citizens and Communities,
that focused on government engagement with citizens and communities.
September 2009
The Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector presented a paper to Cabinet,
responding the Good Intentions and From Talk to Action reports, and outlining
recommendations to ensure substantial progress on the various concerns expressed in
the reports.
Cabinet agreed to a national Community-Government forum to discuss development of a
Government-community and voluntary sector Relationship Agreement, to replace the
SOGI [Cab (09) 31/5A refers] (copy attached).
November 2009
The Minister hosted a national Community-Government forum at which participants
discussed how government and the sector could work together in future and what a
relationship agreement might look like.
April 2010
The Minister set up a Steering group to oversee the development of a relationship
agreement to replace the SOGI.
The following chart illustrates some of the key events of the last ten years. Further
information is available at http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/


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Some key dates

1999 – Community and Voluntary Sector Ministerial Portfolio established


2000-2001 – Community and Voluntary Sector Working Party (joint community and government). Its report -
Whakatopū Whakaaro: Potential for Partnership (May 2001).


December 2001 – Government publishes the Statement of Government Intentions for an Improved Community-
Government Relationship


2001-2002 – Community-Government Relationship Steering Group (joint community and government). Its report -
He Waka Kotuia: Joining Together on a Shared Journey (August 2002)



December 2002 – Government Policy on Volunteering
published

                                                                Community                   Te Wero
                                                                Forum/Sector                established and
August 2003 – Government establishes Office for the             Taskforce                   reports in 2004
Community and Voluntary Sector                                  established


                                                                2004 Taskforce national forum (Hamilton) –
Examples of other government actions, 2001 onwards:
                                                                agrees Te Tiriti/Treaty relationship model way
 Treasury’s contracting guidelines
                                                                of working and publishes Declarations
 OCVS good practice websites
                                                                established and reports in 2004
 OAG good practice guidance
 SSC online engagement guidance
 Individual agency actions, eg DOC guidelines for              2005 – Taskforce national forum (Wellington)
  community partnerships
 Ministry of Health NGO Framework
 NZAID NGO Framework                                           2005 – COMVOICES set up to profile and
                                                                promote the value of the sector



2006 – Charities Commission established




2007 – national Community-Government Forum                     2007– Community and Voluntary Sector
                                                               Research Centre established



2009 – Building Better Government Engagement report           2009 – Association of Non-Governmental
From Talk to Action published                                 Organisations of Aotearoa (ANGOA) publishes
                                                              Good Intentions


2009 – Kia Tutahi Standing Together
national Community-Government Forum




                2010 – Kia Tutahi Standing Together
                Steering Group to develop the Community-Government Relationship Agreement



        10                                                                                   6 April 2010
                        Kia Tutahi Standing Together
         Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                       Relationship Agreement

Fact sheet 2: Context

The relationship between government and the community and voluntary sector is more
important than ever before. Government recognises the significant role of the community
and voluntary sector in society.
Government wants to engage more with the sector because it recognises that
government and the sector need to work together to address complex problems. The
Relationship Agreement will assist government agencies to engage better with the
community and voluntary sector.

The Community and Voluntary Sector
The Community and Voluntary Sector refers to around 97,000 organisations that meet
the definition of a non-profit organisation (definition developed by the Johns Hopkins
University in its comparative international study of non-profit and used by the United
Nations). The structural-operational definition suggests that non-profit organisations can
be defined as the set of entities that are:
        organised – have some degree of internal organisational structure, meaningful
         boundaries, or legal charter of incorporation
        not-for-profit – do not return profits to their owners or directors and are not
         primarily guided by commercial goals
        institutionally separate from government – while government funds may be
         received, the organisation does not exercise governmental authority
        self-governing - the organisations control their management and operations to a
         major extent
        not compulsory - membership and contributions of time and money are not
         required by law or otherwise made a condition of citizenship.
http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/work-programme/building-knowledge/study-of-the-non-profit-
sector/index.html

The sector:
        has around 1.2 million volunteers
        has over 105,000 paid employees – but only 10% of organisations employ paid
         staff
        contributed 4.9% to GDP in 2004 including volunteering contribution
        is diverse, representing 12 sub-sectors:
         o   Culture, sport and recreation
         o   Education and research
         o   Health



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         o   Social services
         o   Environment
         o   Development and housing
         o   Law, advocacy and politics
         o   Philanthropic intermediaries and voluntarism promotion
         o   International
         o   Religion
         o   Business and professional associations and unions
         o   Others not elsewhere classified.
        operates at national, regional and local levels.


The diagram on the next page illustrates the dimensions of the community and voluntary
sector in New Zealand. Further information and statistics on each subsector is available
at http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/work-programme/building-knowledge/subsector-facts.html




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Dimensions of the community and voluntary sector in New Zealand




13                                                 6 April 2010
The Government
Government refers to both State Sector departments and the political executive. The
political executive comprises the Prime Minister and Cabinet (including Ministers outside
Cabinet), ie the Government of the day.
Government in the context of the Statement of Government Intentions referred to core
Public Service Departments and the political executive.
In the context of the Relationship Agreement it may be useful to consider the broader
State Service, such as Crown Entities, and whether entities, for example School Boards
of Trustees, should be included within the definition of Government.
The guide to State Services on the following pages illustrates the breadth of state sector
organisations and can also be accessed at
http://www.ssc.govt.nz/upload/downloadable_files/Guide-to-NZState_Services-flyer-
31July09.pdf




Defining the Parties to the Relationship Agreement
Both parties to the Agreement are made up of diverse organisations operating at a
number of levels. A well-crafted Agreement should set up a framework that recognises
this diversity, while clarifying a mandate and process for signing.
The Community and Voluntary Sector has expressed concerns about ensuring the
sustainability of the Agreement when governments change. The Steering Group will
need to consider how sustainability is achieved when the Agreement is signed by the
Government of the day.
The Community and Voluntary Sector has a large number of volunteers. It may be
appropriate to consider integrating the Government Policy on Volunteering into the
Relationship Agreement.




14                                                                          6 April 2010
                       Kia Tutahi Standing Together
      Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                    Relationship Agreement


Fact sheet 3: Outcomes from the 2009 National Community-
Government Forum

The national Community-Government forum in November 2009 provided an opportunity
for participants to explore the key elements that might be in a Relationship Agreement,
and the steps in the process to develop it. The discussion focussed on:

The need for a robust process
Participants wanted to see something happen quickly that would build on what has gone
before, but cautioned that there needs to be enough time to “ensure the waka is moving
forward and we all participate in the journey”. They stressed the importance of the sector
and government working together and wide participation of the sector at all levels, with
opportunities for extensive engagement and consultation with the sector on a draft
agreement. Participants emphasised the need to build on what has gone before and
learn from the development of similar agreements.
A values-based agreement
Participants strongly emphasised the need for values to underpin an agreement, in
particular respect, trust and inclusiveness, and for it to acknowledge the power
imbalance between the parties, and the Treaty of Waitangi. They stressed the
importance of an agreement being an aspirational document.
Implementation of an agreement
Participants indicated that further discussion is needed about whom in the community
and voluntary sector would be identified to sign-up to the final document. By engaging
amongst its members the sector could ensure that it has an effective platform for
clarifying community leadership and the sector’s aspirations. Once signed, a mechanism
is needed to measure whether the agreement is working and to ensure government
accountability. Participants emphasised the importance of a sustainable agreement
through successive Governments. They stressed the need for leadership and
sponsorship of the agreement at all levels, with a genuine, committed response from
government.
Form and components of the Agreement
Participants advocated for a clear structure but there were no specific proposals. There
was support from some caucus groups for agreements based on a set of frameworks as
discussed in the ANGOA paper (Community-Government Relationship Framework)
circulated at the forum, available at the following link http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/news-and-
updates/comm-govt-forum-2009.html
The agreement should also be written in simple, accessible language, whilst being
detailed enough to enable its effective implementation.
Participants stressed the importance of ensuring that the voices of Pacific peoples,
people with disabilities and ethnic communities are heard and reflecting all levels of the
sector from grassroots to umbrella groups. Maori through whanau, hapu, and iwi, will
need to determine their own pathway.




15                                                                          6 April 2010
For further information on the forum refer to
http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/news-and-updates/comm-govt-forum-2009.html
Agreements from the Community-Government forum in 2007
At the previous Community-Government forum in 2007 the following agreements were
also made:

1. The need for an independent from government, sector-led, government-funded
   group representing the sector and this to be based on The Tiriti/Treaty of Waitangi
   Relationships Framework.

2. The way forward for the Sector needs to operate locally, regionally and nationally.

3. There is a need for a sector-led review, with government, of the all funding
   relationships with the sector.

4. The way forward builds on all of the existing developments, such as the Tangata
   Whenua, Community and Voluntary Sector Research Centre of Excellence, the
   clearing house, ComVOiceS etc.

5. To provide continuity, ANGOA be asked to facilitate discussions on interim and
   transitional arrangements with the Community Sector Taskforce towards the
   independent body in dialogue with the sector.




16                                                                         6 April 2010
                     Kia Tutahi Standing Together
      Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                    Relationship Agreement


Fact sheet 4: Current work within OCVS that is relevant to the
development of the Relationship Agreement


The OCVS is currently carrying out work that contributes to and supports the
Relationship Agreement.
A Code of Funding Practice will support government agencies and non-profits in
managing government funding arrangements. It will provide guidance on the
implementation of the Auditor-General’s Good Practice Guidance on funding NGOs and
Treasury’s contracting guidelines
Good practice principles/guidelines on effective engagement: This will be a short
guide to involving citizens and communities in government policy and service delivery
decision-making. It will cover key pointers for consulting and partnering, and
implementation tips.
Good practice seminars and workshops to promote the sharing of information and
good practice in strengthening relationships between government and the community
and voluntary sector.
Good practice websites provide public servants and community sector organisations
with resources on funding practice and engaging with communities and citizens.
Contract with the Community Sector Taskforce to build and strengthen local
community networks to engage with each other and assist community organisations to
adopt bicultural engagement models and ways of working.
Chief executive forums convened by MSD’s Chief Executive, in order to commit high
level leadership to strong relationships with the sector.
Measuring government agency responsiveness to the community and voluntary
sector. This work aims to build on and harmonise with wider work on measuring
government performance across a range of domains.
Cabinet report back: The OCVS is due to report back in November 2010 on progress
with the various actions in the August 2009 Cabinet paper (which responded to
recommendations from ANGOA and the Building Better Government Engagement
reference group). The Relationship Agreement is to be endorsed as part of this report
back.




17                                                                        6 April 2010
Diagram illustrating the current work within OCVS that is
relevant to the development of the Relationship Agreement




                               Minister’s portfolio goals

            Valued                                            Trusting
            Community &             Empowered                 government-
            Voluntary               communities               sector
            Sector portfolio                                  relationship




                                      Relationship
                                      Agreement




                               OCVS contributory work

           Build capacity            Communicate the                     Measure
                                        message                        performance




        Develop a Code of         Good Practice in Action         Monitor state agencies’
         Funding Practice           and Good Engagement              responsiveness to the
        Develop Principles         seminars and workshops           community &
         for Effective             Good practice websites           voluntary sector
         Engagement
        Contract with
         Community Sector
         Taskforce
       




18                                                                      6 April 2010
                              Kia Tutahi Standing Together
        Steering Group to develop the Community-Government
                      Relationship Agreement


Fact sheet 5: Examples of similar agreements

Overseas examples
A small number of countries have developed written agreements between government and
the community and voluntary sector. The best known examples are discussed below1.

Australia
On 17 March 2010, following two rounds of consultation, the Federal Government
launched National Compact: working together. The Compact is described as a high-
level, aspirational and principles-based document that provides a framework for new
ways for the Sector and Government to work together. It sets out the context, shared
vision, purpose and status, shared principles, shared asprirations and priorities for action
as developed by the Government in consultation with Australia’s Third Sector2.
The Federal Government has set up a National Compact Sector Advisory Group to work
with Government to develop an action plan to implement the Compact’s shared
principles and aspirations. The Compact website enables community and voluntary
sector organizations to sign-up to the Compact. http://www.nationalcompact.gov.au/

England
A compact was launched in 1998, with five associated codes of practice (on funding,
consultation, black and ethnic minority groups, community groups, and volunteering).
Local compacts have also been negotiated by 90% of local authorities. The compact has
been championed by the Prime Minister and Treasurer. A Commission oversees the
compact and codes of practice, and a compact action plan is annually laid before
Parliament.
In December 2009 a revised compact was produced. It sets out overall principles and
commitments from Government and the third sector in respect of policy development,
allocating resources and advancing equality. http://www.thecompact.org.uk/

Wales
The Welsh Assembly Government is required by legislation to implement a Voluntary
Sector Scheme. The scheme includes shared values, commitments to partnership, a
consultation procedure, policies on volunteering and community development, and a
code of funding practice. A Voluntary Sector Partnership Council monitors the scheme
and reports annually to the National Assembly. Assembly Ministers have to meet at least
four times a year with voluntary organisation networks in their area of responsibility to
review operation of the scheme.
http://wales.gov.uk/topics/housingandcommunity/voluntarysector/partnership/?lang=en

1
 Other countries which have developed compacts include France (2001 Charter – no longer recognised), Canada – no
  longer active and Estonia (2002 Civil Society Development Concept)
2
 Third sector is the term used in Australia, England and some other countries to describe the community and voluntary
sector.



19                                                                                                  6 April 2010
New Zealand examples of partnering agreements and related documents
The Statement of Government Intentions for an Improved Community-Government
Relationship (SOGI) and the Government Policy on Volunteering are the only existing
agreements between Government and the Community and Voluntary sector. Copies of
these documents are attached.
There are New Zealand examples of agreements that involve local and central
government agencies and community organizations in partnering or declaring common
aims, notably:
        The Framework for Relationships between the Ministry of Health and
         Health/Disability Non-Government Organisations sets out the commitments of the
         Ministry and the NGOs to put the vision of the SOGI into practice.
         www.ngo.health.govt.nz/moh.nsf/pagescm/7427/$File/Framework+Document.doc
        The Strategic Policy Framework for relations between NZAID and New Zealand
         NGOs sets out the rational for relations, based on common goals and interests,
         shared principles and respective undertakings.
         http://www.nzaid.govt.nz/what-we-do/working-with-ngos.html
        The Partnering Agreement: Community Waitakere and Waitakere City Council
        The Christchurch City Council Statement of Intent regarding its relationship with
         the community and voluntary sector sets out its aims, actions, values and
         commitments.
         http://www.ccc.govt.nz/thecouncil/policiesreportsstrategies/policies/groups/commu
         nity/statementofintent.aspx
        The Public Service Association has a Partnership for Quality Agreement with the
         Government and the State Services Commission to advance partnership for quality
         in the Public Service.
         http://www.psa.org.nz/Libraries/Executive_documents/partnership_agreement_200
         7_1.sflb.ashx

Related documents
         The (ANGOA) report Good Intentions assesses government agencies’ responses
          to the SOGI and makes recommendations for further action.
          http://angoa.org.nz/docs/Good-Intentions.pdf
         The document produced by the Building Better Government Engagement
          working group From Talk to Action provides recommendations for work to
          improve engagement between the sector and government.
          http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/news-and-updates/comm-govt-forum-2009.html
         Tangata whenua declaration and Tangata tiriti declaration developed at
          Community Sector Taskforce forums and hui in 2005.
         Community-Government Relationship Framework: Discussion paper prepared for
          ANGOA by Pat Hanley 2009
          http://www.ocvs.govt.nz/news-and-updates/comm-govt-forum-2009.html




20                                                                          6 April 2010
Characteristics of successful agreements
An analysis of sector-government agreements in Europe, Canada and Australia
suggests that while getting the agreement right is important, how it is implemented is
critical to its success. Successful agreements tend to be developed with:
    wide consultation with the sector, probably in several stages
    clear vision and purpose
    agreement up front about who will sign-up to the agreement
    Cabinet support
    multi-lateral political party support
    thinking about specific future actions and an implementation plan


and follow up with implementation that includes:
    wide promotion of the agreement within government agencies and across the full
     breadth of the community and voluntary sector
    a Ministerial portfolio dedicated to the voluntary sector
    funding for identified actions
    a sustainable funding base for the sector to organise and represent itself
    promotion and monitoring of the agreement across government by a lead department
     with sufficient authority
    government agency champions with sufficient authority to ensure actions are
     implemented
    community champions who have wide sector support, with mechanism for enabling
     their rotation after some time
    symbolic breakthroughs early on
    regular review and adjustment
    regular reporting on progress to Parliament or a Cabinet committee
    a disputes resolution mechanism.




21                                                                         6 April 2010

								
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