Emergency Management and Homeland Security by zhouwenjuan

VIEWS: 19 PAGES: 40

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Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
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                    Emergency Manager’s Weekly Report
                                9-5-08
                      Hurricane Gustav Special Edition




The Weekly Report is also posted on the following websites:
    Pearce Global Partners (http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html)
    California Emergency Services Association, Southern Chapter
      (http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st)
    IAEM Oceania (http://www.oceania-iaem.com/resources/aoi)
    6P International
      (http://www.6pinternational.com/news.php?category=Emergency%20Managers%20Wee
      kly%20Report&)
    EMPOWER (http://www.empower-
      women.com/mc/page.do?sitePageId=49319&orgId=emp)
    All-Hands.net (http://www.all-
      hands.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2235&Itemid=114)




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 1
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                  Table of Contents
News Reports                                                                   3

Storm Track and Impact                                                         3

Emergency Preparations                                                         4

Special Needs                                                                  6

Response and Recovery Efforts                                                  7

Evacuations, Sheltering and Re-Entry Management                                17

Critical Infrastructure Impact                                                 24

Political Issues                                                               26

Other                                                                          35

Caribbean Impact                                                               38

Additional Information                                                         39




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 2
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                      News Reports

Storm Track and Impact
For complete information on the present track visit the National Hurricane Center’s website at:
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at2.shtml?5day#contents

Hurricane Hunter aircraft fly into the belly of the beast
http://www.usatoday.com/weather/storms/hurricanes/2008-08-30-hurricane-hunter_N.htm

Hurricane Gustav: Fuzzy science confounds predictions
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/sep/01/gustav.weather

Maps: Storm Surge Risk from Tropical Storm Gustav
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/08/maps-storm-surg.html

Miss. 'dodged a bullet' with weakened Gustav
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-01-gustav-mississippi_N.htm




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 3
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Emergency Preparations

President Declares Emergency Federal Aid for Louisiana
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45576

After Katrina, New Orleans won't be fooled again
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/28/gustav.evacuations/index.html

Agencies get ready for massive Gulf Coast storm
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40840&dcn=todaysnews

Governor Bobby Jindal Met With The Unified Command Of The Emergency Operation Center
http://www.katc.com/global/story.asp?s=8917198

Not finished with Katrina, not ready for Gustav
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/08/29/opinion/edkatrina.php

Northcom ramps up emergency response for Gustav
http://www.krdo.com/Global/story.asp?S=8920851&nav=menu552_1

Governor Rendell Says PA Resources Being Sent to Support Hurricane Gustav Preparedness
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/governor-rendell-says-pa-resources,522085.shtml

Coloradans mobilized to respond to gulf hurricane
http://www.denverpost.com/spencer/ci_10335977

Kaine invokes mutual aid pact to help Gulf states as Gustav nears
http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-articles-RTD-2008-08-29-0210.html

U.S. more prepared for Gustav, than Katrina: FEMA
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2008/08/30/us_more_prepared_for_gust
av_than_katrina_fema/

French Quarter empties as Gustav approaches
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/31/gustav.scene/index.html

New Orleans Leaders Confident Police Won't Bolt
http://www.cfnews13.com/News/National/2008/8/31/new_orleans_leaders_confident_police_won
39t_bolt.html

Students pitch in with sandbagging as Gustav nears (Louisiana)
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/31/gustav.sandbagging/index.html

FEMA eyes Gustav with air of confidence
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/chronicle/5976891.html

Commentary: U.S. needs 'culture of preparedness'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/honore.gustav/index.html

FEMA stockpiles supplies for hurricane victims
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40865&sid=60

How FEMA got ready for its chance at redemption
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40863&sid=60

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 4
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/



Bush: Cooperation for Gustav better than Katrina
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-09-01-gustav-bush_N.htm




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 5
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Special Needs
Information on special needs issues can also be found at:
http://www.nemrc.net/infoupdate.aspx

ULM to serve Gustav special-needs evacuees (Louisiana)
http://thenewsstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080829/NEWS01/808290311

LSU Health Care Hospitals Evacuate Patients (Louisiana)
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=7314988&version=17&locale
=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=3.2.1

DHH, DSS Ask Media to Carefully Distinguish Between Shelter Types when Distributing
Information (Louisiana)
http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/083008ShelterPhones.html

OJJ Completes Evacuation Plans for Youth Facilities (Louisiana)
http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/082908OJJYouthFacilities.html

Hospitals use lessons from Katrina to prep for Gustav
http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/08/31/gustav.medical/index.html

New Orleans: Tiniest evacuees sent to safety
http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/08/31/nicu.gustav/index.html

La. Hospitals Could Be Evacuated
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1838172,00.html

Illegal immigrants opted to stay during Gustav
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26513677/




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 6
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Response and Recovery Efforts

Bush administration vows Gustav response will be different
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40858&sid=60

Holdouts stay on as Gustav approaches
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav.riding/index.html

Coordinating the Hurricane Relief Effort
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94170217&ft=1&f=1001

County rescuers readying to help hurricane victims (California)
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20080901-9999-1m1rescue.html

Weakened Gustav spared New Orleans
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-01-gustav-monday_N.htm

Gustav knocks out power to 800,000, threatens levee
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav/index.html

Gustav evacuees urged to stay away
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav/index.html

Thousands seek shelter from Gustav
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav.shelter/index.html

Gustav devastates smaller Louisiana towns
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-02-gustav-tuesday_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Defense moved swiftly to aid in Gustav response
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40871&sid=60

IAEM-UCC Establishes Higher Education Mutual Aid Network to Help Obtain Resources Needed
from College/Universities to Respond to and Recover from Hurricane Gustav
http://www.iaem.com/publications/news/news.htm#UCC090108

Baton Rouge emergency responders on Gustav vigil
http://scitech.blogs.cnn.com/2008/09/01/baton-rouge-emergency-responders-on-gustav-vigil/

Local 211 volunteers to handle Gustav calls
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20080902-9999-1m2b2briefs.html

Donations for Gustav Victims Made Easy
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45621

Federal Support for States Facing Gustav: Get Serious, Get Moving, Get Ready
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45594

FEMA Chief Praised for Cool Head, Preparation as Gustav Approached
http://online.wsj.com/public/article_print/SB122039461921192533.html

Gustav response highlights Army's improvement in disaster communications
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40875&dcn=e_gvet


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 7
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

After Gustav, a Different Recovery
http://www.mercatus.org/MediaDetails.aspx?id=20858

Wal-Mart's Emergency-Relief Team Girds for Hurricane Gustav
http://online.wsj.com/public/article_print/SB122004887058784517.html

Governor: Gunmen fired at MPs protecting supplies in Louisiana
http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/09/gunmen-fire-at.html

Where Gustav Came Ashore
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1838428,00.html

Rain-soaked rescuers brave Gustav floods
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/03/gustav.rescues/index.html

Gustav damage may hit up to $10 billion
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/insurance/2008-09-02-gustav-insurance_N.htm

After Gustav: Federal Resources Focus On Health & Safety
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=45622




In New Orleans, Wariness About Rebuilding Again
Gustav Could Drive Them Away for Good, Say Some Who Started Over After Katrina

By Jacqueline L. Salmon
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, August 31, 2008; A02

NEW ORLEANS, Aug. 30 -- Charlene and A.J. Barre quickly rebuilt after their home in the New
Orleans Lakeview neighborhood was flooded in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina when the city's
levee system gave way.

But if the levees fail, they will not return to start over again.

"We won't stay, and that's scary because New Orleans would really be in trouble," Barre said.

The Barres' decision to abandon the city if it floods again illustrates the knife's edge on which
New Orleans is teetering as Hurricane Gustav pushes its way through the Gulf of Mexico.

If there is a repeat of the devastating flooding that overwhelmed this coastal city and killed 1,800
people, say residents and business owners in this mostly middle-class community, they're gone
for good.

"I would not come back except to get what I could salvage -- that would be enough for me," said
Gerald Levin, who owns a shoe store in Lakeview. He lost everything in the flooding and
reopened only last year.

Since Katrina devastated the city, it has undergone a gradual, painful recovery.



   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 8
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

It has regained its population, which stands at about 70 percent of the pre-Katrina level of
450,000. School enrollment is climbing, and joblessness is low. Tourists have returned along with
the raucous drinking on Bourbon Street in the French Quarter.

But only a small fraction of residents have returned to some neighborhoods, including the Lower
Ninth Ward, Gentilly and Eastern New Orleans. Those people have moved and probably will
never return, city officials say.

One in three homes in the city is vacant or abandoned -- the highest level in the nation, according
to the nonprofit New Orleans Community Data Center.

Mayor C. Ray Nagin (D) said Saturday that New Orleans does not expect Gustav to bring
Katrina-like flooding that would force the city to start over yet again.

"We have invested significant amounts of money into preparation, and we are not anticipating the
kind of flooding we had in Katrina."

The Army Corps of Engineers has poured billions into shoring up the levee system, including a
huge set of black and yellow pumps and locks at the mouth of the 17th Street Canal to keep out
floodwaters.

Lakeview was submerged when several panels on the canal failed, sending a torrent of water into
the neighborhood.

Yet officials have warned that the improved levee system will not be fully complete until 2011.
Saturday, R. David Paulison, the Federal Emergency Management Agency's administrator,
warned that the flood-control system is not prepared for a storm with the volume of rain expected
in Gustav.

Lakeview, too, has undergone a resurgence since a recovery plan largely wrote off the
neighborhood shortly after the storm, along with the Lower Ninth Ward across the city.

Lakeview's population stands at 10,000 residents, from an original 24,000, according to the report
in June by a local civic organization. About 900 homes are under construction, and 144
businesses have reopened or opened, according to the Lakeview Civic Improvement Association.

Melinda and Edward Carney tore down their ruined home, which was submerged in 10 feet of
water, and built a larger four-bedroom home, with a great room, deep porches on each side of the
house and a pool in the side yard.

"I just had to give it one more chance," said Melinda, an elementary schoolteacher.

Not every Lakeview resident has taken the same view. Its final population is expected to reach
about one-half its original size, according to the civic association.

The streets feature bungalows and columned homes with bright gardens and trimmed lawns --
and also boarded-up and abandoned homes, and empty lots where homes and businesses once
stood.

To fight the blight, pro-bono lawyers are helping Lakeview residents file lawsuits against owners
of abandoned properties.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 9
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 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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But some of those who have moved back say their deep roots here make it difficult to
contemplate leaving again.

Some have rebuilt to withstand another flood of the magnitude of Katrina so they could return if
water once again pours through the streets of Lakeview.

Brian White Sr. is rebuilding his contemporary-style home on a 10 1/2 -foot-high base -- the
height of the flooding that destroyed his previous home. on the site.

"As long as it don't flood to here," he shouted down from the scaffolding Friday night, gesturing at
the floor joists near his hips, "I'm coming back."

Bonnie and Neil Herberger had the exterior walls of their three-story home built out of concrete
instead of wood, to better withstand floodwaters. "This house could weather just about anything,"
Herberger said.

Further north, closer to the 17th Street Canal, a bare-shirted Michael Gowland sweated as he
changed a tire to get his family on the road to Pensacola, Fla. Gowland, a firefighter, will remain
in the city through the hurricane.

Gowland said he is praying the levees hold.

"This ain't gonna happen again," he said fiercely.




After the Storm, La. Officials Focus on Cleanup
Massive Power Outages Among Immediate Challenges

By Jacqueline L. Salmon, Spencer S. Hsu and Dana Hedgpeth
Washington Post Staff Writers
Tuesday, September 2, 2008; 5:05 PM

NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 2 -- Hurricane Gustav weakened to a tropical depression as it meandered
slowly northwest Tuesday, sparing this city the brunt of its force but leaving damage across a
broad swath of Louisiana and Mississippi.

As the storm dissipated on a path toward northeastern Texas, emergency officials throughout
Louisiana began what promises to be a massive cleanup effort. An estimated 1.4 million homes
and businesses are without power, and some communities reported damage to water and sewer
facilities as well.

The White House announced, meanwhile, that President Bush would visit Louisiana Wednesday
to view the damage caused by Gustav. Bush plans to make several stops in the state, but the
schedule has not yet been finalized.



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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Thousands of National Guard troops, federal law enforcement officials and other emergency
workers were being deployed to clear debris, distribute supplies and secure communities isolated
by the storm.

While the worst was avoided -- there were no major levee breaks of the sort that inundated New
Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 -- Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) said in a morning
news conference it will still take time for the state to return to normal.

"This was a serious storm that has caused major damage," Jindal said, as the storm's trailing
edge continued dumping rain across the state. "This is a challenge that is not going away
overnight. We did not have the levee breeches, but we have major challenges from Hurricane
Gustav."

Massive power outages were among the most immediate challenges, with some towns
completely without power. Of immediate concern were about a dozen hospitals with limited
electricity service, raising the possibility that some of the 800 patients will need to be evacuated --
in addition to the hundreds already removed to more secure facilities, Jindal said.

State and federal officials said they were moving fuel supplies to hospitals and other key facilities
to ensure they can continue running generators.

In addition, Jindal said, an engineering brigade from the National Guard was beginning to focus
on debris removal, while local officials had enlisted prison labor to start clearing and reopening
roads. Tractor trailers carrying water, food, ice and protective tarps were moving into a half dozen
locations to distribute supplies to residents of the state who remained through the storm.

On Deslonde Street in the Lower 9th Ward, where Hurricane Katrina unleashed some of the city's
most devastating floods, Ottley "Big O" Smith and his mother, Elizabeth Smith, celebrated the
passing of Hurricane Gustav, which left their neighborhood with hardly any damage.

Ottley Smith lit a charcoal grill in front of his house Tuesday morning to grill pork chops for his
family.

"I'm living!" cheered Smith, wearing a T-shirt that read, "Thank You Jesus."

His mother, too, was thanking heaven for sparing the city they love. "I'm celebrating the fact that
I'm alive, yes indeed," said Elizabeth Smith, 78. "The levees did hold up!"

During Gustav, she said, she read scriptures and prayed. "God protected us," Elizabeth Smith
said from the front porch of their beige stucco duplex, dotted with potted cactus, jasmine and
other plants. "I was testing my faith to see how much strength I had in him."

In the West Bank community of New Orleans, which city officials feared would flood if a nearby
canal gave away during the hurricane, insurance agent Ron Guidry was working in his darkened
office, taking calls from evacuated clients who wanted to know about damage to their homes.
There wasn't much, he told them. Some trees were down, a few signposts had blown over, and
some house gutters were hanging loose.

Guidry, 58, who rode out Hurricane Katrina in his home a few miles away, compared Gustav to
that event. "Am I relieved? Yes, absolutely. I'm too old to do this again," he said.



   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 11
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

In Washington, Bush said Tuesday morning that the relative lack of damage to oil rigs during the
storm should prod Congress to open up more coastal areas to offshore oil drilling.

"When Congress comes back, they've got to understand that we need more domestic energy, not
less," Bush said before meeting members of his Cabinet to assess the aftermath of Gustav. "One
place to find it is offshore America, lands that have been taken off the books, so to speak, by
congressional law."

Bush has been urging Congress for weeks to lift a legislative ban on offshore oil drilling, following
his own move to rescind a presidential prohibition implemented by his father.

The president also signaled his intention not to repeat the mistakes of Hurricane Katrina, in which
he and his administration came under fierce criticism for a slow and uneven response.

"We recognize that the pre-storm efforts were important and so are the follow-up efforts," Bush
said. "In other words, what happens after the storm passes is as important as what happens prior
to the storm arriving."

Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman said initial flights showed no visible signs of damage to
3,842 oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf coast, and he anticipated quick restoration of
production.

"At this point, we believe there's little damage that has been caused, and within two weeks we
can see us approach that 100 percent production level," Bodman said. He said authorities saw no
signs that rigs were set adrift, dragging anchors that could damage pipelines on the sea bed, as
occurred during Hurricane Katrina.

Earlier, a major insurance risk modeling firm, AIR Worldwide Corp., estimated that damage to oil
and gas facilities offshore could exceed $10 billion, although it said insured losses likely ranged
between $1.8 billion and $4.4 billion. The firm said Gustav produced an estimated $3 billion in
insured losses for properties on the U.S. mainland, not counting any flooding that may develop
from levee breaches.

Gustav was smaller and weaker than both hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 and struck less
populated areas. Still, analysts expect significant flood damage from Gustav's storm surge in low-
lying parishes, said Peter Dailey, director of atmospheric science at AIR Worldwide.

Gustav's angled track as it approached the coast affected more offshore oil and natural gas
facilities than it would have if the storm had struck the coast head-on, Dailey said. The company
estimated the greatest impact on rigs and platforms in Atwater, Bay Marchand, Eugene Island,
Ewing Bank, Grand Isle, Lund, Mississippi Canyon, Ship Shoal, South Delta, South Pass, South
Timbalier and West Delta.

Gustav inflicted less than $100 million in insured losses in the Caribbean, despite destroying tens
of thousands of homes in Cuba, the company reported.

According to a preliminary estimate by the U.S. Army Corps Engineers, Gustav caused about
one-tenth as much damage as the 2005 Gulf Coast hurricanes, measured by debris and
damaged roofs. Maj. Gen. Don T. Riley, deputy commanding general of the corps, said Gustav
damaged roofs of about 25,000 homes, compared with 200,000 damaged by hurricanes Katrina
and Rita in 2005.


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 12
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

The corps estimated that it would need to remove 10 million cubic yards of debris, compared with
120 million cubic yards of debris left by the 2005 storms, Riley said.

Heavy rain from Gustav continued in some parts of Louisiana on Tuesday, and several parishes
were under a tornado watch. Flooding from the hurricane's storm surge was still being assessed
throughout coastal Louisiana and parts of Mississippi, although in many locations the water level
had begun to drop. In the town of Houma, southwest of New Orleans, the streets were littered
with downed trees, telephone poles and power lines, but there was no standing water.

Global oil markets also signaled that the worst was over. The price of crude oil fell by around $7
in early trading, to around $109 a barrel, after it became apparent that Gustav had spared oil and
gas production in the Gulf of Mexico. On Wall Street, stocks rose sharply, with the Dow Jones
industrial average up 150 points after the first 90 minutes of trading.

Hundreds of crews from Louisiana and neighboring states were expected to begin addressing
power outages that Entergy Corp., the local power provider, said were among the largest in its
nearly 100-year history.

The company said its system had suffered "massive damage." With more than 130 transmission
lines and dozens of substations out of service, Gustav was surpassed only by Hurricanes Katrina
and Rita in 2005 in the destruction caused to the electric grid.

Company maps showed the damage concentrated along the coast but pushing inland beyond
Baton Rouge and as far north as Natchez, Miss.

Problems in some spots went far beyond the lack of power.

Morgan City, a hard-hit town of around 14,000, had lost all of its electricity, and the local water
and sewer plants also were damaged, according to a news release on the city's Web site. As with
many cities and parishes, the town's mayor encouraged citizens to stay away for now.

New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin extended an evacuation order for at least another day and said
that local authorities would establish checkpoints outside the city to turn away anyone who tries to
return prematurely. The evacuation order may be lifted as early as Wednesday -- at least for
some residents. Officials are considering a phased return in which workers at major corporations
and retail stores would return first, and the rest of the city's residents would be allowed back
starting possibly Thursday, Nagin said.

Jindal said the state was deferring to local authorities to determine when different areas are safe
for return. Hundreds of buses were waiting to bring people home. The state was also working with
Amtrak and different airlines to coordinate the return once local leaders approve it.

As officials mulled their options, a faint sense of normality began to return to New Orleans
Tuesday. Many of the estimated 10,000 residents who rode out the storm in the city emerged
from their homes. They walked dogs, cruised the streets in cars and bicycles and looked for open
grocery stores.

Downtown commercial New Orleans had the feel of a Sunday afternoon, with closed restaurants
and office buildings and empty streets.

"When you live down here, hurricanes are a part of life," said attorney Jerald White as he went for
his usual walk. "I think people bounce back quickly."

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 13
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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The storm smashed into Louisiana's Gulf Coast on Monday as a Category 2 hurricane,
unleashing torrential rains and 110-mph winds that sent waves of water splashing over this city's
levees. But early indications were that the weakened storm -- Gustav had once been a Category
4 -- caused far less damage than feared, and New Orleans appeared to have avoided a disaster
on the scale of Hurricane Katrina three years ago.

As the storm made its way inland, federal, state and local officials expressed confidence that the
levees protecting New Orleans would hold, sparing the city from catastrophic flooding. U.S. Coast
Guard helicopter overflights late Monday afternoon confirmed that there were no levee breaches
so far, according to Marty Bahamonde, spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management
Agency.

Still, officials' hopes were tempered by persistent concerns about pressure on the levees and
floodwall system from a storm surge that Gustav pushed up the Mississippi River from the Gulf of
Mexico, and by vivid recollections that the Katrina disaster developed gradually after initial reports
indicated that the city had dodged a bullet.

The optimism Monday prompted Mayor Nagin (D) to suggest that evacuees could be allowed to
start returning to the city as early as Tuesday. But Jindal quickly cautioned that it is "too early to
be telling people today that they can come back tomorrow." Nagin backpedaled late Monday,
announcing his plan for a phased return.

In the southern areas of Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes, which sit to the west of New
Orleans, there were mandatory evacuations for the storm because officials expected storm
surges well over 10 feet and as high as 20 feet in some lower-lying areas close to the Gulf of
Mexico. But the feared flooding did not materialize, and even the older, weaker levees in the area
held, officials said.

In Houma, uprooted trees lay in people's yards, and downed power lines stretched across parts
of the main drag -- Highway 24. There was no major flooding, officials said.

"I've been through more than that," said Marie Billiot, 56, as she came out of her trailer in Houma
with her daughter Tuesday morning to survey the damage, which included a broken window from
a fallen tree and some minor roof damage. "It could have been much worse."

Closer to the Gulf of Mexico, fishing and shrimping communities on the low-lying bayous along
Route 24 had water standing in front yards and up about four steps of homes sitting on stilts. In
Montegut, a small town on the bayou, fire department officials said they had not been able to fully
assess the damage because there were so many downed telephone poles, but they had not
received any reports of injuries or stranded people -- just reports of wind damage.

"It's no Katrina, it's no Rita, but we got our share of damage," said Kyle Neal, a sheriff's deputy for
Terrebonne Parish. "I'm very, very happy it wasn't worse."

Farther down Highway 24 in Cocodrie, where Gustav's eye passed through Monday,
thoroughfares named Crab Street and Catfish Street had standing water several feet high, but it
largely didn't flood houses or businesses too badly since many are on stilts. At the very tip of
Cocodrie -- as far as one can drive toward the Gulf of Mexico -- Harbor Light Marina had about
three feet of water lapping at its entrance steps.

It may not look good, but to us this is good," said Donna Domangue, 45, a lifelong resident who
owns a restaurant along the bayou. "This is a blessing compared to what Rita did."

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 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Sept. 3, 2008

Effective Response to Gustav — Courting Complacency or Heralding a Habit?
By Daniel Fowler, CQ Staff

By most accounts the local, state and federal response to Hurricane Gustav was a success —
hundreds of thousands heeded the call to evacuate and there were few deaths associated with
the storm some had feared would be the second coming of Katrina.

But in preparing for Gustav as if it were going to be the next Katrina, the fact that it wasn’t might
begin to lull some coastal residents into a false sense of security.

“The good news is everything held,” said Hank Chase, a former policy officer to the president of
the American Red Cross. “The bad news is ... it may lead to some complacency.”

According to FEMA spokeswoman Hannah Vick, approximately 1.1 million people evacuated their
homes in Louisiana. She said only about 7,500 remained in New Orleans, a city with a post-
Katrina population of roughly 239,000. People in Mississippi, Texas and Alabama also evacuated.

“I think in New Orleans, having lived on the Gulf Coast, that people will go, ‘Everything was fine.
I’m not leaving next time.’ . . . I think there is that possibility,” Chase said.

Complacency “is a huge concern in this type of situation because (of the notion that) ‘nothing
happened,’ well then everything is going to be fine next time,” said Richard B. Cooper, a principal
in the homeland security lobbying firm of Olive, Edwards and Cooper LLC. “There is never a
guarantee it’s ever to going to be fine or it’s going to work like clockwork the next time because
every circumstance is going to be different.”

While he agreed that there’s a chance that success — or luck — could breed complacency,
James J. Carafano, a senior homeland security fellow at the Heritage Foundation, offered another
possibility.

“There is also the likelihood, as we get more efficient and effective in these evacuations, that
people will be less fearful about leaving,” he said. “Leaving will become more convenient. It will
be less scary. Nothing will happen to their property. They’ll get it right back. And so it’ll perhaps
become more of a matter of habit. So, I think it could go either way.”

Carafano said which way it goes will depend on such issues as whether evacuation plans are
good and the effectiveness of communications.




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“People are pretty smart animals,” he said. “If you give them a rational thing, they’re more likely to
be rational. They’re also creatures of habit. So, if they are used to evacuating for a hurricane and
it’s no big deal and you’re back in your house in a few days, then they’re more likely to do that.”

Better Safe Than Sorry

Despite the limited damage wrought by Gustav — at least in comparison with Katrina — the
consensus was that the response by officials was appropriate.

“Gustav was a storm with extraordinary potential to not just meet Katrina, but to surpass it,” said
Drew Sachs, vice president for crisis and consequence management at James Lee Witt
Associates, part of the GlobalOptions Group.

“And I think it’s important to note that state and local officials did the right thing in this case, as did
the federal officials in warning about the significant risks that were posed here,” said Sachs, who
agrees that complacency becomes a concern “when you have an event where an evacuation was
called and it did not have the devastating impact that was forecast.”

However, with regard to Hurricane Gustav, he said, “It would be difficult for people to claim that
the local and state officials cried wolf.”

“But that’s always going to be a concern until the science of meteorology can be perfected,”
Sachs said. “Local officials and state officials will always be forced to make decisions before
they’re 100 percent that the storm is going to do what they predict it will do.”

Cooper said public safety officials and elected leaders faced a “damned if you do and damned if
you don’t” situation and responded properly.

“If they had not evacuated and something would have occurred again, the cries from Congress
and the American public would have been further off the charts than they were with Katrina,” he
said.

Had people not adhered to official calls for evacuation, the situation in the Gulf Coast could have
been worse, said Ken Murphy, president of the National Emergency Management Association
and director of Oregon’s Department of Emergency Management.

“It wasn’t obviously as serious as Hurricane Katrina, but if those . . . people would have stayed
in place, there probably would have been some serious problems,” he said. “And, so I think when
you weigh the cost of people’s frustrations versus people being safe, I think it’s just so obvious
that it’s the right thing to do and so very important to head the warnings of the elected officials.”

Neal Denton, senior vice president of government relations and strategic partnerships for the
American Red Cross, said he hopes people don’t become desensitized to the risks.

“Good heavens, I hope not,” he said. “If [Gustav] had been another couple of degrees to the east
or hadn’t struck the cooler, shallower water the way that it did, we would have had another
catastrophic hurricane in the same region.”




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Evacuations, Sheltering and Re-Entry Management
At Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, emergency personnel watch, and wait (Texas)
http://www.star-telegram.com/dallas_news/story/873691.html

Churches called on to register as evacuation shelters for hurricane victims (Texas)
http://www.star-telegram.com/religion/story/873658.html

Fla. prepares for influx of Gustav evacuees
http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/08/fla-prepares-fo.html?csp=34

Mississippi Guard goes door-to-door to warn of Gustav
http://hattiesburgamerican.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080830/BREAKING_NEWS01/8083
0017/-1/rss01

First train with evacuees leaves New Orleans
http://www.katc.com/global/story.asp?s=8926472

Gustav evacuees ponder future from a bus
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26477122/

Strapped for cash, some in New Orleans stay and hope
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/30/new.orleans/index.html

Texas Evacuees Urged Not To Return Home Yet
http://cbs11tv.com/local/Southeast.Texas.Evacuees.2.807512.html

FEMA sets up family locator system
http://www.news8austin.com/content/your_news/default.asp?ArID=218746

Dallas County, Texas preps for Hurricane Gustav evacuees
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/texassouthwest/stories/083008dnmetgustav
.2433953b.html?npc

Crowds await evacuation as Gustav eyes Gulf Coast
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/weather/hurricane/orl-bk-gustav-083008,0,768199.story

City of New Orleans enacts evacuation plan (Louisiana)
http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/083008NOLAAssistedEvacuation.html

EPA grants waiver to keep gasoline available (Louisiana)
http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/082908EPAGasWaiver.html

Department of Agriculture Issues Livestock Evacuation Update (Louisiana)
http://emergency.louisiana.gov/Releases/082908AgLivestockEvacuation.html

Mandatory evacuations to begin Sunday morning in New Orleans
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/30/gustav.prepare/index.html

Gustav could give Texas' new evacuation plan first real test
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/08/30/0830storm.html?cxtype=rss&cx
svc=7&cxcat=52


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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

New Orleans Police Urge Evacuations
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1837448,00.html

Top Disaster Officials Lay Out Evacuation Plans
http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf/2008/08/top_disaster_officials_touch_d.html

Gulf Coast residents flee deadly Gustav
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/08/30/gustav.prepare/index.html

Gov. Barbour Orders Mandatory Evacuations
http://www.wkrg.com/hurricane/article/mississippi_emergency_management_ordering_evacuatio
ns_of_low_lying_areas_on/17389/

Fort Smith Able To Accommodate 4,000 Gustav Evacuees (Arkansas)
http://www.4029tv.com/news/17330642/detail.html?rss=fts&psp=news

Emergency officials credit Gustav evacuation
http://www.cfnews13.com/News/National/2008/9/1/emergency_officials_credit_gustav_evacuatio
n.html

Gustav evacuees grow weary in crowded shelters
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080902/ap_on_re_us/gustav_inside_the_shelter

Gustav weakens, evacuees urged to stay away one more day
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/02/gustav/index.html

Family finds shelter, seeks comfort
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav.family/index.html

La. sees most evacuees in state history, avoids past mistakes
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-01-louisianna-evacuations_N.htm

Louisianans can return to powerless homes
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/02/gustav/index.html

New Orleans reluctantly lets residents return home
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080903/ap_on_re_us/gustav


In New Orleans, no shelter for those who stay

By BECKY BOHRER
The Associated Press
Friday, August 29, 2008; 11:17 PM

NEW ORLEANS -- Police with bullhorns plan to go street to street this weekend with a tough
message about getting out ahead of Hurricane Gustav: This time there will be no shelter of last
resort. The doors to the Superdome will be locked. Those who stay will be on their own.

New forecasts Friday made it increasingly clear that New Orleans will get some kind of hit _ direct
or indirect _ by early next week. That raised the likelihood people would have to flee, and the city
suggested a full-scale evacuation call could come as soon as Sunday.


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Those among New Orleans' estimated 310,000 to 340,000 residents who ignore orders to leave
accept "all responsibility for themselves and their loved ones," the city's emergency preparedness
director, Jerry Sneed, has warned.

As Katrina approached in 2005, as many as 30,000 people who either could not or would not
evacuate jammed the Louisiana Superdome and the riverfront convention center. They spent
days waiting for rescue in squalid conditions. Some died.

Stung by the images that flashed across the world, including the photo of an elderly woman dead
in her wheelchair, her bodied covered with a blanket, officials promised to find a better way.

This time, the city has taken steps to ensure no one has an excuse not to leave. The state has a
$7 million contract to provide 700 buses to evacuate the elderly, the sick and anyone around the
region without transportation.

Officials also plan to announce a curfew that will mean the arrest of anyone still on the streets
after a mandatory evacuation order goes out. Police and National Guardsman will patrol after the
storm's arrival, and Gov. Bobby Jindal has said he requested additional urban search and rescue
teams.

On Saturday police planned to roam neighborhoods, directing residents-in-need to pick up points.
The city also planned to reach out to churches, hoping to spread the word about where the buses
will pick up evacuees.

But many weren't waiting to be told to leave: Northbound traffic was heavy Friday on Interstate 55
_ a major route out of the city _ and backseats of some cars were stacked with clothes, boxes
and bags. Gas stations around the city hummed with activity. Meanwhile, hospitals and nursing
homes also began moving patients further inland.

In an effort to keep track of where people go after they leave the city, officials planned to give
evacuees who provided authorities their information ahead of time bar-coded bracelets containing
their ID.

Still, advocates for the poor worried that the message would not get to the city's most
marginalized residents _ and that could spell disaster.

"It's an enormous concern, an extraordinary concern" for day laborers, the homeless, renters and
public-housing residents, said Saket Soni, director of the New Orleans Workers' Center for Racial
Justice. "Hundreds if not thousands will fall through the cracks of an evacuation plan, and they
will be left in the city, not out of choice but out of necessity."

Gustav strengthened into a hurricane Friday and appeared to stay on track to hit the Cayman
Islands, then western Cuba before moving into the warm waters of the Gulf bound for the U.S.
coastline early next week. At 11 p.m. EDT, Gustav's center was about 55 miles east-northeast of
Grand Cayman Island, and its top sustained winds were near 80 mph.

FEMA Deputy Administrator Harvey Johnson said Friday he anticipated a "huge number" of Gulf
Coast residents will be told to leave the region this weekend.

Those in most need of help _ the elderly, sick, and those without transportation _ will be moved
first. Mayor Ray Nagin said buses and trains would begin to evacuate those people beginning
early Saturday morning. Those on buses will go to shelters farther north, Sneed said. Those on

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trains will go to Memphis, Tenn. Neighboring states already were making offers to house
evacuees, remembering how many people fled Katrina.

Several parishes announced plans for evacuations beginning Saturday. By early Sunday, Nagin
said officials would look at the potential for a mandatory evacuation.

In Mississippi, Gov. Haley Barbour had already called for the evacuation of residents along the
Katrina-scarred coast, many of whom still live in temporary housing. And in Louisiana, residents
of low-lying Grande Isle were under a voluntary evacuation order beginning Friday. The
community is traditionally one of the first to vacate when tropical weather threatens.

Making the decision about exactly when and where to evacuate was tough. Gustav confounded
emergency preparedness officials as its forecast track shifted through the day, confronting them
with the possibility of ordering evacuations not only in the New Orleans area but across more
than 200 miles of vulnerable coastline. Johnson said officials in four states _ Alabama,
Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas _ planned evacuations.

Authorities also wanted to avoid creating any unnecessary panic.

In New Orleans, the locations of the evacuation buses were not made public because people who
need a ride are supposed to go to designated pickup points, not to the staging area.

But that approach worried some residents. Elouise Williams, 68, said she called the city's 311 hot
line Thursday until she was "blue in the face."

She was concerned about getting a ride to the pickup point and about what would happen to
those who left. As of late Friday afternoon, she planned to remain in the Algiers neighborhood
and look in on any other residents who stayed behind.

"My thing is, my fright is, if we have somebody in these houses and they're not able to get out,
they're going to perish," she said, "And we had enough of that in Katrina."

Critics said New Orleans was waiting too long. Bob Wheelersburg, a former Army Reserve major
and liaison officer for emergency preparedness, said National Guard units are suffering from
equipment and manpower shortages.

"If I was the governor of Louisiana, I'd give the evacuation order as soon as possible,"
Wheelersburg said. "I think it's going to be a huge disaster."

But authorities have emphasized that New Orleans can't just up and leave _ there is a phased
order to evacuations, and coastal communities or those outside of levee protections get first crack
and moving residents out.

Some residents weren't waiting for a formal call _ they left Friday, long before the storm was even
close to the shoreline.

"I'm getting out of here. I can't take another hurricane," said Ramona Summers, 59, whose house
flooded during Katrina. She hurried to help friends gather their belongings. Her car was already
packed for Gonzales, nearly 60 miles away.




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No Easy Road Home
New Orleans Residents Are Blocked at Almost Every Turn

By David Montgomery
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, September 3, 2008; C01

NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 2 -- The sky was royal blue between the puffy clouds, and the sun was so
hot that marbles of sweat were rolling down the face of the Louisiana state trooper as he told the
people he encountered at an interstate roadblock that, sorry, it was just way too dangerous for
them to be going home now.

This news seemed incredible to some folks who had been driving all night, had run out of gas and
money, and just wanted to go home. But such are the ironies of a hurricane's aftermath: Even on
a beautiful day, bad weather can foil you. The reason you can't go home, officials tell you over
and over on the radio, is your home has no power -- but neither does the motel room where you
took shelter, so what's the difference?

The final irony: The lessons of Katrina that worked so well during Gustav were starting to be
unlearned yesterday. As generals fight the last war, so people prepare for the last hurricane.

"The next one, I'm staying," vowed Reynold LeBouef Jr., who, after Katrina, shrewdly got in the
house-raising business to supplement his and his dad's struggling shrimp trawling operation in
Terrebonne Parish. "I have better resources."

"I'm not leaving no matter what no more," said his father and shrimping partner, Reynold Sr. "I'm
putting up with too much [expletive]."

Those hassles included, they said, renting two rooms in a motel near Baton Rouge, where the
roof blew off and the rain seeped into their bottom-floor rooms, where Tunisia, junior's mother and
senior's wife, was also staying, along with their border collie, Lady Byrd Dawg. They were still
charged $61.05 per room per night, then watched the motel staff lock the office and evacuate
themselves. Trying to get home, they were detoured twice by police, and were finally blocked
from continuing east on Interstate 10 about 20 miles west of New Orleans.

They caravanned in two pickup trucks and a Dodge minivan with Rhonda Bruce and her fiance,
Sedrick Johnson, who also had learned his new lesson: "It's better to stay. Look where we are
now. We're in a worse position."

Where they were now was near the roadblock at the only gas station plaza open for miles, a Shell
station where a borderline "Mad Max" scene was unfolding, with credit cards instead of guns. But
before we go there, let's return to the roadblocks, where plump dragonflies were buzzing merrily
back and forth across the police lines in the summer sun.




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Listen, Lt. Eddie Moses of the state police is not a hardhearted man. He had sympathy for these
folks. But the governor and local officials had decided it would be easier to fix the city without the
citizens.

"I am looking at the nature and the need of it," he said, explaining his method of screening
people. Folks with one of two types of passes indicating they were business owners or first
responders, he waved right through. The easiest way to apply for those passes was online -- an
impossibility for anyone who forgot to deal with it before the power went out.

A Kia SUV rolled up to a nearby checkpoint running on fumes and stopped dead a few feet
beyond. One of Moses's colleagues in his squad car gave it a push to the gas station. The family
inside had actually made it home to St. John Parish from the Jackson, Miss., area, then ran out of
gas hunting for an open store in order to buy food.

Herbert Floyd, 25, a carpenter, got stopped in his red Camaro, trying to get home to New
Orleans. The needle of his gas gauge was on E.

"I ain't got no gas money," he said. "I don't know what I'm going to do. I'm hungry, that's why I'm
trying to get home." The last time he ate was Monday evening, in a motel room. "Like, chips.
There was no place you could get anything hot."

Who says the government can keep people out of their houses based not on many hundreds
dead and entire neighborhoods submerged (Katrina), but just because of wind damage and
power outages (Gustav)?

Actually, between spurts of outrage, the people of New Orleans seem prepared to give their
government a break on this, at least for a day or two.

(In fact, New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin announced late Tuesday that all city residents would be
allowed to come back after 12:01 a.m. Thursday.)

It's hard to forget the last hurricane.

"I think this deal was run a whole lot better than Katrina," said Walter "Butch" Lewis.

Now we're at the Shell station, the LaPlace Travel Center, near the checkpoints on I-10 and I-55,
the first open service station anyone has seen around here in days. Lewis and his wife, Karla, run
the restaurant portion, the Huddle House, which was still closed, as were the restrooms.

Did the Lewises take officials' advice and evacuate from the area? Heck, no. They moved two big
air mattresses into the windowless truckers lounge, next to the gas plaza's casino with slot
machines (also closed for the storm), and rode out the hurricane with their four Chihuahuas and
the Maltese.

Good thing, too, because they were there when the gas-thirsty hordes started arriving. A big
$50,000 generator, installed after Katrina, provided power to the pumps. The casino was closed
and so was the plaza convenience store (all those snacks!) because all the staff besides the
Lewises had evacuated. The pumps still worked, though, after Karla fixed a computer glitch.
There are "Mad Max" times, when gas can get more important than food.




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Folks had to pay with credit cards, because there were no cashiers to deal with the money --
that's not the Lewises' department. This caused a problem. Not everybody fleeing a hurricane has
a credit card.

But it was worked out: Some of the people with credit cards offered gas to the people with cash.
Do you think they exploited the crisis and charged a profit? No, indeed. Did they give it away?
Nope. The vital juice was re-sold to people in need at face value. And Floyd in his Camaro ran
into a friend who spotted him 10 bucks.

Up and down the strip just off the interstates, the fast-food stores and other gas stations were
closed. The Shell looked a little worse for wear, with big sheets of yellow-and-red aluminum
dangling from the awning into the middle of the plaza.

Jane Lagarde and her 12-year-old daughter, Andi, slept in their Nissan Sentra in back of the
plaza waiting for the gas station to open. They had driven from San Antonio, where they could
have stayed in a shelter, but Lagarde didn't like the fact that the women's cots were mixed with
the men's cots. They checked into a hotel for two nights, where they spent money they didn't
really have. So they decided to come home. They were stopped at the checkpoint.

"In San Antonio, it was so nice," Lagarde said. "People were leading normal lives, and you
wonder, why do I have to go through all this?"

She never got the message that she wouldn't be able to go home after the storm. "When they
stop people, they should divert you to somewhere where there's a shelter and some restrooms,"
she said. With a defeated look on her face, she said she was heading back west, in search of
another hotel.

Danielle Merritt can understand the checkpoint mentality, she really can. But after driving from
McComb, Miss., and now being stopped 20 minutes from home in St. Charles Parish, she's not
so patient.

"I don't care what danger's out there, I just want to see my house," she said. "I live in a little small
town called Bayou Gauche, and we're completely surrounded by water as is. That's why I'm
desperately trying to get home and see it." She works in a Winn-Dixie and was traveling by car
with her 8-year-old daughter, Nicole, and caravanning with friends in four campers and another
car. The campers had found a way around the police and were already home, ahead of the cars.

"We didn't have water or power where we were either, so we decided we'd rather camp in our
yard," Merritt said.

"I don't think they're trying to keep people from their homes; they're trying to keep people out of
danger," said Merritt's friend, Nicole Espey, a real estate agent who lives in Luling, La., traveling
with her son Landon, 1, and her mother, Patricia Stanley. "But we were so close. And we were
already without power and water."

The gas began to flow through the pump in Espey's hand. Like the campers, she would find
another way back.

"Yes!" she cheered.

"Gas, gas, gas!" chanted Merritt.


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"We're going home!" said Stanley, bouncing Landon in her arms. "We're going home!"




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Critical Infrastructure Impact
Oil industry may get first post-Katrina test
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26457621/

What does overtopping mean?
http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/09/what-does-overt.html?csp=34

Gustav no Katrina, but exposes flaws in levees
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20080901-1813-gustav-levees.html

New Orleans wonders if rebuilt levees will hold
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26444204/

Army engineers are pleased with New Orleans levee performance so far
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40872&sid=60

Gustav challenges wisdom of saving sinking New Orleans
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080903/sc_afp/usstormweatherneworleans_080903024013;_ylt=
Anjo6ehPCPGu4ii8Eid88YrPOrgF

Shored-up levees appear to withstand surge
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-01-levees_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Louisiana governor: Speed up power grid repairs
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/03/gustav/index.html




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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Political Issues

Gustav prompts talk of altering RNC agenda
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/08/30/rnc.gustav/index.html

Bush, Cheney to Skip Convention
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1837719,00.html

New hurricane brings opportunity and risk for Republicans
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/08/29/america/2katrina.php

Obama: Let's hope lessons of Katrina were learned
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/cvn_obama_biden

McCain Detours to Storm Region of Mississippi
http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/30/mccain-detours-to-storm-region-of-mississippi/

Obama to ask his donors to help storm victims
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080831/ap_on_el_pr/cvn_obama

Louisiana delegation torn between family, duty
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/08/31/louisiana.rnc.delegation/index.html

Democrats suspend "war room" operations
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/cvn_loyal_opposition

McCain-Palin tour storm zone, stump in Mo.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-08-31-mccain-palin_N.htm

For GOP, a second chance at disaster management
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=40864&sid=60

Obama curtails campaign to watch Gustav
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26497308/

President Bush tours Texas operations set up for Hurricane Gustav
http://www.latimes.com/la-na-bush2-2008sep02,0,121353.story

GOP decides to resume convention
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/09/02/rnc.day/index.html

Bush traveling to Louisiana to survey Gustav damage
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/02/gustav/index.html




Gauging Gustav's Political Impact

ST. PAUL -- Hurricane Gustav is blowing the Republican National Convention off course with
tomorrow's proceedings all-but-canceled and John McCain floating the idea that he might deliver
his acceptance speech Thursday night from the area blasted by the storm.

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And, since The Fix is a blog devoted to the nitty-gritty of politics, we can't but help ruminate on
the political consequences of a convention that will be at best truncated and at worst almost
entirely canceled due to the storm. (It goes without saying that our thoughts are with the residents
in the storm's path.)

It's facile but perhaps not entirely accurate to assume that the storm has almost only negative
consequences for McCain, his running mate Sarah Palin and the Republican Party generally. A
variety of Republican strategists surveyed this afternoon insist there's a real possibility that
McCain could come out of this week greatly strengthened, even with convention cut short a day
or two and stripped of most political speeches and hoopla, That's because McCain could look
more presidential and decisive touring the region hardest hit by Gustav than hobnobbing with
delegates and GOP officials in Minnesota. And because President Bush and Vice President
Cheney have cancelled their appearances at the convention, the McCain campaign won't be in
the awkward position of having to embrace Republican leaders whose approval ratings are
remarkably low.

"As long as we properly handle the Gustavication of the convention, it may be a positive," said
one GOP operative. He added that with the exception of speeches by Palin and McCain
"everything else is just an opportunity to make a mistake or distract from the historic nature of the
ticket."


Another strategist echoed that sentiment. "Now the Republican brand out there is not so bad," he
said. "The does-Bush-help-or-hurt question doesn't need to be asked or answered. And we won't
be compared to the (Obama speech) 90,000-person spectacle. And most important this gives
Palin time to get her feet under her."

That last point may be the most important. Palin is brand new on the national political scene and
even her allies acknowledge that she has a steep learning curve and the most dangerous time for
her is the first week or two of the general election campaign.

Gustav takes much of the focus off of Palin and, even if she does speak on Wednesday night, the
tenor of her address will likely be much more in her comfort zone; she is likely to avoid direct
partisan attacks and instead talk about the fundamental goodness of the country -- a recipe for
her speech to be well received by a nation looking for encouragement.

The storm could thrust McCain, too, into the sort of commander-in-chief role that his campaign
believes can win him the election. If McCain looks presidential -- meaning not partisan -- over the
next few days, voter perception of him could be altered significantly.

McCain, appearing via satellite from St. Louis earlier this afternoon, clearly sensed the need for a
post-partisan message. "We will take off our Republican hats and put on our America hats," said
McCain. "America, we're with you, we are going to care for these people in their time of need."

While the "McCain as commander-in-chief" image and message is clearly one that Republicans
like, they also recognize that there is potential peril everywhere in this situation.

According to one Republican source, all of the parties set for this week are a mine field for
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McCain when it comes to the political reverberations.

"The biggest downside risk as i see it is media footage of corporate/lobbyist parties going on in
Minnesota while New Orleans floods," said the source. "They should 'recommend' that those
activities get curtailed. I would like to think that the corporate/lobbyist community could read the
tea leaves without having to be told -- but they may need a recommendation."

Already one major party -- being thrown tomorrow night by the Distilled Spirits Council of the
United States -- has been turned into a fundraiser for the Red Cross Hurricane Relief Fund.

McCain's response so far has been pitch perfect. But with the circumstances changing so quickly
surrounding the hurricane, it will be up to the campaign to hit a moving target this week.

If they can execute it flawlessly (and it's hard to even know at this point what that means),
McCain could wind up coming out of the convention stronger than anyone expected.




The Hurricane In Question Is Still Called Katrina

By Dan Balz
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, September 1, 2008; A01

ST. PAUL, Minn., Aug. 31 -- Three years after it battered New Orleans and the Gulf Coast,
Hurricane Katrina upended this convention city Sunday.

For John McCain, struggling to separate himself from the worst of President Bush's record and to
get out from under the weight of his unpopular party, this week was supposed to be about
emerging as his own candidate. His selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his running mate
energized the Republican Party's conservative base and the candidate himself, setting up a
convention week designed to discredit Democratic nominee Barack Obama and boost McCain as
an independent-minded reformer ready to shake up Washington.

Now a storm called Gustav threatens to remind voters of perhaps the signal event that helped
turn them against the GOP -- the Bush administration's botched response to the devastating 2005
storm. What neither McCain nor the party can tolerate now is anything that smacks of insensitivity
or incompetence in the face of another potential natural disaster. As he told NBC anchor Brian
Williams on Sunday, the opening of the convention "has got to be Americans helping Americans.
America first."

Gustav has disrupted McCain's convention, but the storm also presents the candidate with an
opportunity to show that he would be a different kind of president than Bush. His decisions to fly
to Mississippi on Sunday for a pre-storm assessment and then to radically redraw the agenda for
the convention's opening night until it is clear what might happen with the storm send a message
that some top Republicans believe will serve him well in the campaign ahead against Obama.



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"McCain has shown exactly the right values in putting America ahead of the Republican Party,"
said former House speaker Newt Gingrich. "This is a very dangerous situation for thousands of
people and for the country, and it is vital that McCain keep focused on the country. So far he has
done exactly the right things."

Bush and the Republicans have never recovered from Katrina. The president's approval ratings,
already sinking under public dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq through the summer of 2005,
plunged further after Katrina. His halting reaction -- and even worse, the woeful performance of
federal disaster agencies and his widely ridiculed remark to then-FEMA Director Michael D.
Brown, "Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job" -- left an indelible mark on his presidency and his
party. The Republican brand is at its lowest point in years.

Everything here in St. Paul is now on hold until the storm hits and the damage is assessed.
Normally, a political convention is the most scripted of events, a four-day infomercial for the
nominee. No one has a script for what the Republicans are dealing with now. They announced
Sunday that they would dramatically shorten the opening-day schedule, stripping out political
speeches and doing essential business, but out of the glare of television's prime-time hours.
Beyond that, it is anybody's guess what kind of show they will be able to present.

For now, Gustav has denied McCain and the Republicans the kind of platform that Obama and
the Democrats enjoyed in Denver last week. "Gustav is making this a very different, even unique,
convention," said Ben Ginsberg, a Republican strategist and former party official. "It calls for
something appropriate in this situation, which is not drama and spectacle."

Added GOP strategist Todd Harris: "Gustav is completely changing the calculus as far as the
tone and tenor of the convention."

But what will it become? A week of private parties and public festivities has given way to calls for
service, fundraising for victims of the storm, somber reflection and political uncertainty. In some
ways, what this convention may turn out to be is less a week of hoopla and something more in
keeping with McCain's long-stated message that politics should be about a cause greater than
individual self-aggrandizement.

Some Republicans here argue privately that the storm has spared McCain the first uncomfortable
moment of the week. The opening-night agenda was to include speeches by Bush and Vice
President Cheney. Both of their appearances were canceled, and their roles the rest of the week
are not known. If the public judges the administration's performance in responding to Gustav as a
notable improvement on its Katrina efforts, Bush may be a more sympathetic figure by the end of
the week than he is now.

That, of course, depends on how events play out.

McCain's week is far from lost. For years, there have been calls for the parties to shorten their
nominating conventions to two or three days at most. That could be what Republicans end up
with, and a storm-delayed convention might prove even more compelling than one built around a
familiar and in many ways tired model.

Without all the drama over what Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and her husband, former president
Bill Clinton, would say last week, the Democrats might have struggled to keep the public
interested in all four days of their convention. McCain would have been hard pressed to compete
with Obama's final night, the extravaganza at Invesco Field, where more than 80,000 people
turned out to hear the Democratic nominee give his acceptance speech. Now he won't have to
try.
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Beyond that, Republicans had a string of elected officials and party luminaries on the agenda, but
few who could match the star power of the Clintons in Denver or even the program the GOP
opened with in New York four years ago. That group included former New York mayor Rudolph
W. Giuliani, then still the hero of Sept. 11, 2001, but this year a more diminished figure after his
unsuccessful run for the presidency; McCain as Bush's most forceful defender on going to war in
Iraq; and California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

What Republicans may lose is the opportunity to make their case against Obama, a job normally
left to surrogates in the early days of the convention. With politics-as-usual wiped from the early
schedule, that anti-Obama message will be far more muted that it ordinarily might have been.

Here in St. Paul, there were arguably only three key speeches on the four-day schedule. The first
was Bush's, the second the acceptance speech by the little-known Palin and the third McCain's
acceptance speech on the convention's final night.

Gustav will disrupt the Democrats as well. Obama and his running mate, Sen. Joseph R. Biden
Jr. (Del.), will be forced to adjust their own campaign plans to account for the storm. McCain has
moved quicker on that front, but the Democrats will certainly adapt.

For now, the presidential campaign will be frozen in place until Gustav has played itself out.
Whom that helps can't be foretold. McCain's pick of Palin shifted focus from Obama to the GOP,
but Gustav has robbed McCain of the limelight. Americans are now riveted on the storm in the
Gulf Coast rather than the convention center here in St. Paul. As Tom Rath, a veteran Republican
strategist from New Hampshire, put it: "A sure, sensitive and effective response is more important
than staging or rhetoric."




Jindal Presents A Face of Calm During the Storm
La. Governor Hailed for Recovery Efforts

By Peter Whoriskey
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, September 3, 2008; A06

BATON ROUGE, Sept. 2 -- He talks about "helo assets," military-speak for helicopters. He
delivers recovery statistics rapid-fire. And in a nod to local sporting passions, he frequently
resorts to football analogies.

"The evacuation was the pregame," Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) announced at a press
conference Tuesday, appearing calm and unruffled amid the commotion of Hurricane Gustav.
"We're not yet at halftime. We have a lot more work ahead of us."

Thrust in the spotlight by Gustav, Jindal, 37, a political whiz kid in office for all of eight months, is
asserting mastery over his state's response to the natural disaster -- just the sort that can have
serious consequences for politicians.



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Three years ago, Jindal's predecessor, Kathleen Babineaux Blanco (D), sometimes seemed
overwhelmed by Hurricane Katrina, nervous and frowning before the cameras. Her popularity
slumped afterward, and she chose not to run for reelection.

Now Jindal, a rising star in the Republican Party whose name was once bandied about as a
potential running mate for Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), is at the helm as Louisiana weathers Gustav.
He had been scheduled to address the Republican National Convention but canceled his plans
as the storm loomed.

"Bobby Jindal has been pitch perfect during Gustav," said Douglas Brinkley, who wrote "The
Great Deluge," which describes the chaos after Katrina. "He promised to be a hands-on
administrator, and I think he delivered. He had such an easy factual grasp of the situation. It's
almost the exact opposite of Blanco and [New Orleans Mayor C. Ray] Nagin during Katrina."

Gustav presented a far lesser challenge than Katrina did: The levees didn't break, and New
Orleans didn't go under. But whether Louisiana has triumphed over a potentially catastrophic
storm or whether the state had a bit of meteorological luck is a matter of political debate.

At the 25-minute news conference Tuesday morning, Jindal emphasized that Hurricane Gustav
was a major disaster.

"This is a serious storm that has caused serious damage in our state," Jindal said. "We're
pleased we haven't seen breaches in the levees. We're pleased we haven't seen major flooding
in New Orleans or the places that flooded before. But there are serious challenges."

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, speaking immediately after Jindal, likened Gustav
to Katrina.

"I just want to echo what the governor said about the seriousness of the storm," Chertoff said.
"Yesterday I got a number of questions in which people seemed to say, 'Well, wasn't it really kind
of like a false alarm?' Nothing could be further from the truth. This storm came ashore as --
depending on who you listen to -- as either a low Category 3 or a high Category 2, which is
frankly comparable to Katrina in terms of intensity."

Regardless of whether Gustav was anything like Katrina, Jindal has proved adept at handling
voluminous details of the recovery and the minutiae of the bureaucracy. Since becoming the
state's secretary of health and hospitals at 24, he has enjoyed a reputation as being on the fast
track.

As the storm approached, Jindal was caught up in a whirlwind of activity, sending off medical
evacuation teams at an airport and seeing off others at a bus departure point. Since the storm hit,
he has charged into news conferences with lists -- of search-and-rescue stations, of federal
agencies contacted, of fuel and food deliveries.

"There will be an 18-wheeler of food, an 18-wheeler of water, an 18-wheeler of ice and 18-
wheeler of tarps at these locations," he says.

The Department of Transportation and Development "has 500 individuals and 92 crews with 36
front-end loaders, 36 backhoes, several hundred chain saws. They're clearing interstates and
bridges. DOTD has 13 teams of 32 people each doing bridge inspections . . . Last night I
requested Category A assistance from FEMA," he continues.


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And on he goes at a breakneck pace.

He notes that more than 1.9 million people evacuated the state's coastal parishes, which he
called the largest evacuation in U.S. history. He notes the many medical patients evacuated.

He leaves it to others to contend that the only difference between Gustav and Katrina is that
people were ready this time around.

"The reason that you're not seeing dramatic stories of rescues is because we had a successful
evacuation," Chertoff said.

But others are somewhat skeptical.

"Just because a person does well in a Category 1 storm that steers between major population
centers doesn't mean he wouldn't crack in a Katrina," Brinkley said. "But Jindal showed great
calm and intelligence during the storm."




This Time, Bush Finds Better Picture
La. Visit a Contrast to Post-Katrina Trip

By Dan Eggen
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, September 4, 2008; A03

BATON ROUGE, Sept. 3 -- When President Bush visited the Louisiana capital after Hurricane
Katrina, most of New Orleans lay underwater, thousands were stranded in squalor, and his
administration was feuding with the state's Democratic governor over who was to blame.

What a difference three years -- and a much milder storm -- can make. Bush arrived in Baton
Rouge on Wednesday for his first personal look at the damage wrought by Hurricane Gustav,
which leveled trees and knocked out power through much of the state but did not take the human
or political toll exacted by Katrina.

During the trip, Bush praised the well-organized evacuation of New Orleans and other major cities
in the days before the hurricane. And he took credit for his administration's efforts to work closely
with local governments, and a friendly Republican governor, in coping with the storm.

"Phase One of the response to Gustav went very well," Bush said after meeting with Gov. Bobby
Jindal and other local and federal officials at the state's emergency operations center. "A lot of it
had to do with the people in this room. We're much better coordinated this time than we were with
Katrina."

The visit, which lasted about two hours from landing to takeoff, was low-key by presidential
standards, mirroring a Monday visit to Texas to see relief workers and volunteers. Bush did not
meet with evacuees or other victims on either trip.

The administration's relief efforts also come as national politics is centered squarely on St. Paul,
Minn., where Republicans are holding their convention to nominate Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) for
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president and to cheer their vice presidential candidate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin. Bush canceled
his Monday appearance at the convention because of the storm, settling for a shortened address
via satellite the next night.

Bush arrived in Baton Rouge under overcast skies, flying over flooded fields and swaths of fallen
trees as Air Force One descended. His motorcade drove through a mix of neighborhoods
battered by Gustav's winds, including streets littered with branches, roofs torn from homes and
downed power lines. At one nursery school, damaged equipment littered the playground. The line
for a lonely open gas station stretched for blocks.

The visit to Louisiana comes three years after Katrina, which killed hundreds and displaced more
than 1 million people amid a federal response that was deemed slow and ineffective. The episode
was a turning point for Bush, whose popularity ratings -- waning at the time -- never recovered.

White House spokeswoman Dana Perino said Bush did not include New Orleans on his itinerary
in part to avoid interfering with emergency operations.

"The Emergency Operations Center overseeing the operations for the whole state is in Baton
Rouge, so it's the right place to go to be able to do what he wants to do, which is -- get some
business taken care of to make sure that they have what they need from the federal side," Perino
said.

At the command center, Bush met for about an hour with Jindal, Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff and other officials. In remarks afterward, Bush said that although New Orleans
was affected by Gustav, many rural areas were hit disproportionately hard.

"I understand there's a lot of focus on New Orleans, and there should be focus on New Orleans,"
Bush said. "But in the briefings today, it is clear that this state is focused, as well, on people who
live in rural Louisiana and the smaller towns of Louisiana."

Bush said his administration agreed to Jindal's request to tap emergency oil reserves and "will
continue to do that upon request by companies." He did not take questions from reporters at the
center.

Speaking to reporters on Air Force One before Bush's arrival in Baton Rouge, R. David Paulison,
director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said the government response to
Gustav was a notable improvement over efforts for Katrina. Paulison added that federal officials
were moving resources into place as Tropical Storm Hanna threatened to hit the southeastern
United States.




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Louisiana Postpones Primary
Voting on Congressional Seats Is Not Rescheduled Yet

By Ben Pershing and Jonathan Weisman
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, September 4, 2008; A13

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) yesterday ordered his state's congressional primary, which had
been scheduled for Saturday, postponed after the damage wrought by Hurricane Gustav made it
too difficult to organize the balloting on time.

The state hopes to push the election back a week, to Sept. 13, but a definite date has not been
set. The state's runoff election for primaries in which no candidate receives 50 percent of the vote
is still scheduled for Oct. 4, a date campaign officials do not expect to change.

While the hurricane did not cause as much destruction as had been feared, Louisiana Secretary
of State Jay Dardenne (R) told reporters he had not been able to get in touch with local officials in
some congressional districts to determine whether polling places and voting equipment were
damaged.

"We thought it would be only in the southern section of the state, but now it looks like it is of a
statewide magnitude," Dardenne said, according to the Monroe News-Star.

There are only a few genuinely competitive House primaries in the state this year, with the main
event being indicted Rep. William J. Jefferson's reelection effort in the New Orleans-based 2nd
District. Jefferson, who will go on trial on federal corruption charges in December, is trying to hold
off several Democratic challengers.

In the Shreveport-based 4th District, three Republicans are seeking the party's nod to replace
retiring Rep. Jim McCrery. Democrat Paul Carmouche is likely to win his party's nomination
easily.

After Democratic Rep. Don Cazayoux's special election victory this spring in a crimson red
Republican district, the state looks considerably less predictable. Democrats are watching
Carmouche's race closely. The nonpartisan Cook Political Report says the Caddo Parish district
attorney is one of the few Democrats with a shot at a district that was held for 20 years by
McCrery and rates the race a tossup.

Democrats have recruited an African American state senator and reserve police officer, Don
Cravins, hoping to ride a wave of African American support for Barack Obama to unseat Rep.
Charles Boustany Jr. (R) in the 7th District, in southwestern Louisiana. So far, though, that race
has not registered as competitive.

Hurricane Gustav may have given Louisianans a respite from politics, as both parties backed off
their political attacks. But that is about to end. The National Republican Congressional Committee
took a swipe at Carmouche and Cravins yesterday, attempting to link them to House Ways and
Means Chairman Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) and allegations that he failed to report on his taxes
rental income from a beach house in the Dominican Republic.

"The slight shift in the primary schedule is certainly understandable and necessary at this time,
and we are confident that it will not affect our chances of winning in November," said Ken Spain,
spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee.

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Other
Gustav left hotels in New Orleans in good shape
http://www.usatoday.com/travel/hotels/2008-09-02-gustav-hotels_N.htm

Gulf Coast pets largely survive the storm
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-09-01-gustav-pets_N.htm

Gustav sends passengers on ‘cruise to nowhere’
http://galvestondailynews.com/story.lasso?ewcd=bfda175c1269a5b0

Gulf Coast's tourism industry preps for storm
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TRAVEL/08/29/gustav.travel.ap/index.html

Gustav threatens those hardest hit by Katrina
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/gustav_s_most_vulnerable

After opening win, LSU turns attention to Gustav
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/2008-08-31-lsu-gustav_N.htm

Saints to take short-term refuge in Indy while waiting out Gustav
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/football/nfl/specials/preview/2008/08/30/saints.indy.ap/index.
html?cnn=yes

Gustav hits U.S. economy
http://money.cnn.com/2008/09/01/news/economy/gustav_economy/index.htm?cnn=yes

As Hurricane Gustav rolls in, the party rolls on
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26499637/

Gustav Threatens Bayou Ecosystems
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/09/01/national/main4403929.shtml

Social networkers respond to Hurricane Gustav
http://www.fcw.com/online/news/153664-1.html?topic=homeland_security


High Chance of Blowhards
In Storm Reports, Newcasters Exude Bravado

By Paul Farhi
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 2, 2008; C01

Is it really a hurricane, or even just a "tropical depression," unless a TV reporter in a hooded
windbreaker is flopping around in the wind and rain like a landed flounder?

Is it really a weather story at all unless the TV people can go outside in the storm and, while
risking bodily injury, warn viewers that they shouldn't go outside in the storm and risk bodily
injury?

If so, Hurricane Gustav was a real storm: All of the cliches and hyper-theatrical tropes of TV
hurricane coverage were at Category 5 yesterday.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 35
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

TV correspondents bellowing while taking facefuls of driving rain? Got it. Reporters hunched and
squinting in the teeth of hurricane-force winds? Got that, too. Reporters dressed in the standard
uniform of the intrepid weather correspondent -- colorful-but-flimsy network-logo jacket and ball
cap -- to dramatize the effects of the driving rain and hurricane-force winds? Oh, yeah, got that,
too.

It's not enough to report on a storm by showing TV viewers its impact. Dramatic as it is, the
standard B-roll footage of pounding surf, wind-whipped palm trees and mangled power lines
serves as a mere palate-cleanser. On storm stories, TV reporters are required to interact with the
weather and become, potentially, human sacrifices to it.

This makes weather reporting different than every other kind of breaking TV news story. No one
covers a house fire by rushing into the burning building, or reports on a war by doing stand-ups in
the middle of a tank battle.

With the weather, however, participation is mandatory.

During yesterday's coverage, for example, CNN's Rob Marciano was nearly blown off a New
Orleans rooftop as he pointed out the "whitetops" in the surging Mississippi River. His colleague
Don Lemon was at street level, in what appeared to be a big open parking lot, warning viewers
that wind-borne debris "can really shear through you." Another CNN correspondent, Brian Todd,
hit the jackpot: He had to hang on to a pole while doing his report from Baton Rouge.

Everyone seemed to have the must-have production element: the disembodied hand of a TV
camera person wiping the rain-spattered lens in the middle of the correspondent's report.

Poor Jeff Ranieri of MSNBC. All he had to illustrate his contention that "no one was spared the
brunt of Gustav's force" yesterday afternoon was a battered billboard and a few broken branches
on a half-dry New Orleans street.

(Carl Hiaasen, the Miami Herald columnist and satiric novelist, once pointed out that fallen-tree
footage is essential to TV hurricane coverage. The most-sought-after video, he wrote, is "in order
of ratings: 1. Big tree on strip mall. 2. Big tree on house. 3. Big tree on car. 4. Small tree on car. 5.
Assorted shrubbery on car.")

The champion weather-interacter yesterday, though, was Geraldo Rivera. Fox News Channel's
self-described "warrior journalist" wasn't content to shoot his story about New Orleans's levees
from the relative safety of a sturdy bridge or overpass, like his colleagues at MSNBC and CNN.
Rivera went to the base of one of the levee walls, practically daring it to collapse: "The walls are
holding," shouted Rivera, as if covering the fall of Jericho, "but it is fierce here." At least he got
splashed by the "over-topping" waters.

Next up: Geraldo reports on feline dental care by sticking his head into a lion's mouth.

Rivera also brought back footage of . . . Something Dramatic Happening. While out taking in the
weather, he and his crew spotted a man bobbing in the water. "There's a person! Stranded!" he
exclaimed excitedly. "There's a person! Stranded! . . . I'm telling the cops here. He's drowning!
He's got a lifeline. Oh, my God."

The "drowning" man actually looked like a Coast Guardsman or maritime professional with life
jacket and tether line who was trying to secure a loosely moored vessel. It was hard to tell, and


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 36
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Rivera didn't. After showing his video of the scene, he didn't bother to follow up with an
explanation of what had happened.

No worries. Gustav may have been less than the killer hurricane some had predicted, but there
are two more storms forming behind it.

Wipe off the lenses, guys. And keep your windbreakers handy.




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 37
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                  Caribbean Impact
Haitians 'screaming for help' after storms
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/02/haiti.hanna.ap/index.html

Castro Says Hurricane Gustav Hit Cuba Like a Nuclear Explosion
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=ab09FqnRJ5jg

EU DONATES AID TO HURRICANE GUSTAV VICTIMS IN CARIBBEAN
http://www.ttc.org/200809011708.m81h8nk25144.htm

UNICEF, WHO providing emergency aid to Hurricane Gustav victims
http://www.itar-tass.com/eng/level2.html?NewsID=13036603&PageNum=0

Gustav death toll 77 in Haiti, eight missing
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080902/sc_afp/caribbeanweatherstormhaititoll_080902020917

Flooding overwhelms hungry Haitians
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26531599/




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 38
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                               Additional Information
LA Time, Hurricane Gustav Pictures
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-gustav27-2008aug27-
pg,0,2435341.photogallery

Yahoo, Hurricane Gustav Pictures
http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Hurricane-Gustav/sm/events/sc/082908hurricangustav

CNN I Report, Contraflow Pictures
http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-71155

San Francisco Chronicle, Hurricane Gustav Pictures
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object/article?f=/n/a/2008/09/01/national/a022558D00.DTL&o=0

CNN, Hurricane Gustav Pictures
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/weather/09/01/gustav/index.html#cnnSTCPhoto

City of New Orleans, LA Website
http://www.cityofno.com/

Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Website
http://www.ohsep.louisiana.gov/

Is New Orleans ready? (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2008/08/30/cooper.nola.prep.cnn

Stuck in NOLA traffic (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/weather/2008/08/31/dcl.callebs.contraflow.nola.cnn

Gustav doesn't frighten some (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2008/08/31/velshi.isle.evacs.cnn

Hospital ready for Gustav (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/weather/2008/08/31/sloane.gustav.nola.hospital.cnn

Evacuations mostly successful (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/weather/2008/08/31/sots.la.gov.jindal.presser.wafb

Sick children will stay (Video)
http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/weather/2008/08/31/roesgen.childrens.hospital.cnn

Mike Brown on Lessons Learned (Video)
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/26494349#26494349

Text of Bush's remarks on Hurricane Gustav
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080831/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush_text_1

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Credentialing / Re-Entry Procedures (By State) Summary
http://www.iaem.com/documents/CredentialingRe-entryProcedures.pdf

FEMA National Situation Reports
http://www.fema.gov/emergency/reports/index.shtm


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 39
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

FEMA, Hurricane Gustav’s Website
http://www.fema.gov/media/multimedia/2008/gustav/index.html

Ning, Gustav Information Center
http://gustav08.ning.com/


Attn: IAEM US Members
From: IAEM Headquarters on behalf of Rick Cox, EMAC Advisory Group Liaison / IAEM
Treasurer

EMAC ADVISORY GROUP CONFERENCE CALL NOTES: 31 AUGUST 2008

As the IAEM representative to the EMAC Advisory Group I participated in a Conference Call this
morning. The EMAC Executive task force and the EMAC National Coordinating Group (EMAC’s)
management team) requested the following be distributed via to Associations members of the
Advisory Group.
     Notify our membership (IAEM-USA) and ask them to pass on the information regarding
        deployments
     Relay this information to our resources within our jurisdictions.

Deployment Information:
    Please do not self deploy to impacted areas; protection of liability, Workers
       Compensation and recognition of licenses and certifications do not self deploy with you.
    Requests for assistance via EMAC are coordinated through the State EOC and the state
       emergency management agency.
    All EMAC deployed resources will have a Req-A (form) authorizing deployments.

If you have any questions regarding valid EMAC coordination please contact one of the
following:
      Your State EMAC Designated contact in your state EOC
      The EMAC web page: http://www.emacweb.org/

Respectfully Submitted:

Rick Cox, CEM
EMAC Advisory Group Liaison
Treasurer IAEM
rcox@juno.com

Briefing Slides:
http://www.iaem.com/documents/EMACBriefingSlides090108.pdf




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 40
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

								
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