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					was tightly held. Cripple Creek cancelled stocks seem to come from many sources, and we are not sure if there was
a large single holding at one time, perhaps by a single mining company that may have consolidated many of the
mining companies in order to mine as an open pit. Certainly there are today more than 20 companies whose issued
and cancelled stocks are available. Compared to issued and uncancelled stocks, the cancelled certificates are usually
worth considerably less than the uncancelled certificates. However, when a cancelled certificate has signatures by
the company president, secretary, or the issuee, who are famous people - hence autographs, the value increases
substantially. In the case of several of the important Cripple Creek companies, our consignors here have apparently
made a special effort to collect the important signatures on certificates, whether cancelled or not. In many cases,
they have also collected what amounts to a “founder’s share” by obtaining one of the very first certificates ever
issued for the company.

Townsites. There were more than a dozen different townsites within the Cripple Creek District. As the
organization of these catalogs tends to be a dynamic process, changes in our organization may be reflected on some
entries but not on others. Late in the compilation we began to include these town names where a specific link to the
town could be made; otherwise items are listed under the general Cripple Creek district heading. These towns
include: Cripple Creek, Victor, Goldfield, Cameron, Gillette, Arequa, Independence, Altman, Anaconda, Globe Hill,
Elkton, Lawrence, Cripple Creek Falls, Mound and Fremont.

PEOPLE OF NOTE                   This section offers short biographical sketches of some of those signatures
found in this collection.

Woods, Warren, Frank and Harry.
Harry E. Woods and his brother Frank were founders of the town of Victor. In 1893, funded by their father,
Warren, they purchased the 136-acre Mount Rosa Placer tract for $1,000 and laid out a townsite on it. The lots
sold readily and they reinvested their profits by constructing the Victor hotel. While excavating the site for this
building, Frank uncovered a vein that contained a little gold. He traced the vein to a claim called the Gold Coin
which he bought for a few thousand dollars. In less than a year, the brothers were earning more than $50,000 a
month from this property. With the profits, they acquired the Jack Pot and Wild Horse mines, increasing their
wealth even more. They erected an elaborate shaft house called the Gold Coin over the mine and financed the
development of a business district in Victor. They were known as honest, likable and generous men, readily
giving to their community in the way of parks, a baseball field, a dance hall and other facilities. They continued
to purchase mines and it eventually became apparent to Winfield Stratton, the wealthiest of the Cripple Creek
millionaires, that their intent was to gain control of the entire district by undercutting the cost of transportation,
milling and smelting provided by other companies. By 1900 they owned nearly 40 companies and their assets
totaled close to $45 million. However, their luck turned sour beginning in 1899 when a fire destroyed most of
Victor’s business section, profits from their Gold Coin Mine began a rapid decline, their mill at Arequa Gulch
was operating inefficiently and many of the community service facilities they funded were operating in the red.
Creditors and stockholders began having doubts about their credibility. The fiasco that finished their meteoric
rise to wealth was a hydroelectric power scheme in which they invested heavily. Plans to establish electric
streetcar service in Pueblo, Colorado were squashed by influential local families, and the cost of a wooden
aqueduct to supply water to the power plant was a bottomless money sink. By 1910, their investment company
was dead and the brothers moved to California to live out the remainder of their lives in considerably less
comfortable circumstances than those to which they had become accustomed (Sprague, pp. 100, 165, 226-228,
315; Levine, pp. 20-22).

Brothers Samuel, Douglas and George Bernard were grocers from Colorado Springs. In 1892 they cancelled
William Shemwell’s $36.50 grocery bill in exchange for half interest in his Elkton claim. George financed
development work on the claim for two years until he was nearly broke. Before abandoning the property,
however, they struck pay dirt, netting $40,000 in the first week. The Elkton eventually produced $16 million in
gold. With his profits, Sam purchased the Beacon Hill El Paso that produced $11 million. Not long after the
turn of the century, the brothers retired from mining, buying large ranches and raising livestock. George
purchased a ranch located about 20 miles northeast of Colorado Springs, encompassing 3,750 acres on which he
raised Angus and Galloway cattle. The income derived from investments he had made dropped significantly
after about 1907, but he continued to live the lifestyle of a man of wealth. Eventually his entire fortune made
from the Elkton and El Paso was consumed. These two mines stopped producing after WW I and in 1933
George died a pauper. Samuel’s interest was in horses and he opened an elite stables in Colorado Springs where
he boarded thoroughbreds owned by other Cripple Creek millionaires. He built an elaborate mansion in San
Luis Valley and organized the San Luis Valley Irrigation, Land & Power Co. to develop the land, but the
company was his undoing. It was a money losing venture and he had to sell off shares in the Elkton and other
mines to pay debts. It eventually drained him of his wealth and he too died, completely impoverished, in a state
hospital in 1937. Douglas, who also died that decade, had fared little better. He operated a grocery store in
Victor and a livery in Colorado Springs. With his profits from the mines, he also purchased a large ranch.
After the panic of 1907 he gave up his mining interests to devote more time to livestock, but like his brothers, he
was unsuccessful as a cattleman and lost the ranch. However, his livery business continued to provide him with
an income until his death. (Sprague, p. 126, 309; Levine, p 37-38).

J. R. McKinnie
J. R. McKinnie lived an adventurous early life, fighting for the Union in the Civil War, hunting buffalo and
mining in the San Juan Mountains where he gained valuable experience. He taught school in Steubenville, Ohio
and married a teacher from a neighboring school, took up farming near Bird City, Kansas and eventually settled
in Colorado Springs with his wife and six children. Here he began hauling freight to Cripple Creek, and became
interested in the mining activity there. With R. P. Davie he entered the real estate
business and in 1891 located the Gold King lode, New Moon, Anchor and Mt. Rosa Placer claims near Cripple
Creek. When a townsite was being laid out near his Mount Rosa Placer claim, he shifted the claim down slope
to be better suited to this purpose. Adjacent claim holders on the up-hill side did likewise, opening up a fraction
upon which James Doyle and James Burns located the Portland claim. When the Portland fell into litigation
over apex rights in 1893, Verner Reed, from whom McKinnie purchased his real estate business, engineered the
mines business tactics. McKinnie and Peck approached Reed and negotiated a share of the Portland sometime
in 1894, financed by profits over the previous 3 years from their Black Diamond mine and sale of the Mount
Rosa to the Woods brothers. During 1894 and 1895, he lived in a cabin near the property among other
soon-to-be notables such as Winfield Stratton, James Burns, James Doyle, Sam Strong and John Harnan. By
1895 his mines were paying handsome dividends so he purchased a nice home in Colorado Springs, settling into
a more domestic lifestyle with his family. On April 26, 1896 Cripple Creek was swept by fire and, following
the lead of others, he advanced paychecks to workers at the Moon-Anchor and shut down the mine so workers
could help clear debris. By 1900 he was involved in of a number of businesses. His interests included at least
twenty mining companies at Cripple Creek, in the San Juans, in California, Arizona and Missouri. His financial
solvency had its ups and downs, and the economic panic of 1907 caught him at a low point from which he was
unable to recover. He moved to Los Angeles in the teens and died a few years later, having lost his entire
fortune. (Sprague, pp. 69, 70, 116-118, 129, 163, 165, 195, 308; Levine, pp. 18-19).

Spencer Penrose
Spencer Penrose was a Harvard educated Pennsylvanian from a wealthy Philadelphia family who joined with his
boyhood friend, Charlie Tutt, in a real estate business in Colorado Springs in 1892. Spencer moved to Cripple
Creek as the representative for Tutt & Penrose. Earlier, Tutt had located the C.O.D. claim on which leasers struck
rich ore early in 1893. Penrose bought into the property and revealed his immodest promoter skills by preparing a
glowing prospectus on it that he shopped around Colorado Springs and Denver. Unfortunately, the miners soon
struck a water course and the mine flooded, prompting some of Penrose’s socialite friends to issue a tongue-in-cheek
prospectus of their own entitled “The Tenderfoot’s Delight Mining, Milling and Transportation Company”. The
prospectus read, in part, “The C.O.D. Mine is elevated two miles above sea-level and consequently the grade of the
ore expected to be found will be very high.” Further, “A large flow of water exists in this great mine, which when
pumped to the surface to a canal which is projected from Cripple Creek down the mountain to Colorado Springs,
will form an important artery of commerce.” Tutt & Penrose began buying into many of the mines and businesses
in Cripple Creek. They owned the Topic Dance Hall that was consumed in the Cripple Creek fire of April 25,
1896. They were co-owners with Charlie MacNeill of a chlorination mill in Colorado City that treated half the low
grade ore produced in the district and bought large amounts of stock in the Midland Terminal railway. The trio also
bought the Granite, Gold Coin and Ajax mines. Penrose, Bert Carlton and Eugene Shove bought the Golden Cycle
Mill and associated mines from John Milliken for $4.5 million In 1904, Penrose, MacNeill and Tutt raised half a
millon dollars to finance founding of the Utah Copper Company, a mill proposed by Daniel Jackling for treating low
grade copper ore from a deposit at Bingham, Utah. The success of the mill was underestimated and the district
eventually produced more than a billion tons of ore worth and earning Penrose more than $200,000 per month.
(Sprague, pp. 171-172, 190, 191, 244, 245, 248, 250, 285-288).

James Doyle
Doyle was an orphan who came west from Portland, Maine with the sisters of James Burns where they joined
Burns in Colorado Springs. Doyle was 18 years younger than Burns, but the two of them ventured into the
mining business together, in spite of having absolutely no clue about what they were doing. In the spring of
1891 they were busy on their claim on the hill above Winfield Stratton’s Independence mine where they
attracted his attention with their feverish activity. During the summer of 1891, Doyle worked as superintendent
of irrigation in Colorado Springs to finance development of the property, but then lost most of his savings in a
crap game. In January of 1892, Doyle was heading up to the property when he noticed a small fraction of
ground that had opened up as a result of some claim shifting activities centered around the relocation of the
Mount Rosa Placer group (see J. R. McKinnie). He quickly located a claim on it, including Burns as his partner
on the location notice, and named it the Portland after their hometown in Maine. They invited Stratton to the
property for his opinion of its merits, but his unfavorable response angered the two quick tempered Irishmen and
they booted him off. After sinking a 30 ft shaft and not finding anything, they encountered John Harnan,
another Irishman who has been sorting ore at Stratton’s Independence. Harnan immediately recognized
sylvanite, a gold telluride mineral on the dump and asked Burns what he would give him if he located a vein for
them. They offered him a third interest in the Portland, which he accepted. Within a week they were sacking
ore, but the experienced Harnan realized they were headed for problems because of the Apex law that stated
rights to a vein belonged to those on whose claim the vein surfaced. The Portland claim was so small that the
vein surfaced on a neighboring claim. They conceived of a plan to remove their sacked ore at night, have it
surreptitiously refined in Pueblo, and hopefully accumulate enough profit to defend themselves in the inevitable
lawsuits before anyone was onto them. After seven months they had made $70,000, but on one of these
nighttime forays, Burns stumbled into Stratton, and in the course of the evening revealed what they were up to.
Stratton found that the owners of the Portland could help him with some of his own goals, so he agreed to fund
them in the purchase of neighboring claims and in the defense of any lawsuits. The three Portland owners and
Stratton entered into an unwritten agreement to work together. When the lawsuits came, the claims were
staggering - $3 million in 27 separate suits. Stratton hired Verner Z. Reed, a brilliant real estate promoter, to
represent the two mines. Reed cleverly out smarted, outmaneuvered and kept several steps ahead of all the
claimants. He eventually bought out all the claims in the lawsuits, expanding the Portland’s holdings from an
initial 7/10ths of an acre to 183 acres. The cost was a little over a million dollars, but the rewards were
phenomenal - the combined total output of the two mines was $88 million. Doyle was listed in the 1894 Cripple
Creek Directory as an assayer and chemist at Anaconda and was elected Mayor of Victor in the later 1890’s.
About the time he was Mayor, he had a falling out with Burns and the two grew to despise each other. Doyle
eventually left Cripple Creek to pursue mining ventures elsewhere.
James F. Burns
James Burns was born in Portland, Maine and after following various pursuits that took him to Cuba, South
America and New Orleans, he ventured to Cripple Creek in 1886. Burns was later joined by his sisters and
James Doyle, also a Portlandite. Doyle joined Burns in his gold seeking ventures and the two of them located a
small claim they named the Portland in 1892. Neither knew the first thing about mining but in exchange for a
third interest in their mine, they obtain the help of John Harnan, a more experienced in the district. Soon their
claim was yielding significant amounts of ore, but Harnan was able to foresee problems owing to Colorado’s
Apex Law. The law states that rights to a vein belong to the owner of the claim on which the vein crops out.
The Portland claim was so small that the vein they encountered at a depth of 30 feet cropped out on an adjacent
claim and rightfully belonged to its owner. They devised a plan to mine as much as possible, pack the ore out at
night, have it refined in Pueblo and accumulate enough profit that they could fight any lawsuits that were sure to
come. All went well for several months until one night Burns stumbled across Winfield Stratton who owned the
Independence mine 400 feet below the Portland, and revealed their secretive operation. Stratton saw an
opportunity that would benefit them both, and after a meeting with Doyle and Harnan, Stratton agreed to help
finance their inevitable lawsuits in exchange for a part interest in the Portland. They agreed and when the news
of their activity was discovered in October of 1893, Stratton hired Verner Z. Reed to act as their corporate
affairs. The lawsuits amounted to nearly $3million, but Reed was such an astute businessman that he kept a
step ahead of the claimants and eventually succeeded in buying them out and increasing the property from less
than a tenth of an acre to over 183 acres in the process. Burns ran operations at the Portland which employed
125 men. He was sympathetic to the worker’s needs and supported their cause during the “Bull Hill War” in
1894 in which workers demanded better pay and working conditions. Because of his position on this issue the
Portland was one of the few mines that continued operations during these violent strikes. His support for the
workers strained relations with his partners, especially after he spent a considerable sum to recover the bodies of
8 miners killed in a cave-in and to compensate their families for their losses. Harnan sold out his interest in the
Portland in 1894. Doyle brought suit against Burns, but in 1909, he too sold out and went on to pursue other
interests. Burns continued on at the Portland which ultimately became the largest gold producer in the district,
yielding $60 million in production over its life time. Burns died in 1917 leaving an estate to his wife and
children valued at nearly $1.2 million.

Henry Blackmer
Henry Blackmer was a legal counselor from Massachusetts who had an office in Colorado Springs. In 1892 he
was made El Paso County District Attorney, but gave up a legal career for involvement in the mining business.
He and a partner formed the Colorado Trading and Transfer company, made profitable by Blackmer’s business
acumen. Blackmer became involved in nine mining companies and several railway companies. He left Cripple
Creek in the late teens to invest in Wyoming oil where he became involved in the Teapot Dome scandal. In
1925 he fled to France to avoid prosecution, but eventually returned to the US, paying nearly $4 million in fines.
He died at the age of 92 in 1962. (Levine, pp. 40-41).

Blackmer was president of the Orphan Gold Mining Company and had an interest in several other mining
companies including the following:

Buckhorn GMC.                                         Findley GMC.
Gray Horse GMC.                                       Morning Star GMC.
New Haven GMC.                                        Olive Branch GMC.
Pilgrim Consolidated GMC.                             Southern Boy GMC.

He also organized the Cripple Creek Railway Co. to acquire the following properties from the Denver and
Southwestern Railway Co.:

La Bella Mill, Water and Power Co.                    Colorado Trading and Transfer Co.
Midland Terminal Railway Co.                          Florence & Cripple Creek Railway Co.
Golden Circle Railroad Co.                            Canon City & Cripple Creek Railroad Co.
                                                      United States Reduction and Refining Co.

A. D. Jones—- Jones was a prominent Cripple Creek figure and, who, like others, dabbled and invested in
other mining companies besides the Pharmacist Consol. MC, of which he was a co-founder and president.
Jones started out as a druggist, having been born from a Civil War surgeon, but, like many others, when he heard
about the success in Cripple Creek, he abandoned his profession and stole for Colorado. He did worked for a
short time under J. K. Wagner, future founder of the Pharmacist Claim, as a pharmacist at the Miller Brothers
drug company, but after the company was sold, he, with J. K. and J. W. Miller, co-founded the Pharmacist MC,
one of the first claims, which made the second Cripple Creek mineral shipment and the first carload shipment
“from the divide on the Midland.” The story goes that the unskilled claim jumpers, Jones and J. K. Miller, had
no clue as to where to begin digging, so Jones solved the problem by simply tossing his hat into the air and
digging where it happened to fall. This became a $600/ton legend!

Percy Hagerman—- Percy Hagerman, of Colorado Springs, came from a long line of Colorado land and
development growth. Father, James J. Hagerman, connected with the iron mills in Milwaukee, gradually
worked himself up the totem pole of the Milwaukee Iron Co., after having rubbed shoulders with bigwig Captain
E.B. Ward of Detroit, a prominent figure in iron works, factories and mines. This would be the beginning of
James’ success in the mining business, having developed the iron mines in the Menominee district and founded
the Chapin mine, the U.S.’s largest producing mine. Percy, born January 24, 1869, would follow in his father’s
footsteps as he
watched his father transform the Colorado and Pecos valley of New Mexico and launch the organization of the
Colorado Midland RR. After his return from the east, where he attended and graduated from Cornell University
and Yale Law School, Percy continued his father’s work in the development of Colorado Springs

Albert E. Carlton—- The Carlton family was one of the most successful of the Cripple Creek settlement,
dipping their toes in virtually every business. Born in Illinois on February 20, 1866, Albert E. Carlton suffered
from tuberculosis, which became the core reason for the family’s move to Colorado Springs. The interest in
Cripple Creek would be sparked by overheard conversations at his place of employment as a youth. In 1893,
after becoming fired up about the prospects of rumored ensuing wealth, Albert and brother Leslie left for Cripple
Creek District, where in that same year, with partner Henry Blackmer, they began the Colorado Trading &
Transfer Co. Due to the community’s need for burning fuel, the Trading Co. was a huge success, which enabled
the brothers to invest heavily in the First National Bank of Cripple Creek.
      Their extreme success would rely on their ability to use their status with the FNB to access information on all
of the major mining properties. This somewhat devious tactic allowed them to “snatch-up” properties that maybe
hadn’t been before considered, but which would later enable a mass consolidation under the Golden Cycle MC
name. This keen ability to profit from potentially unprofitable situation led to further developments, such as the
Cripple Creek Drainage & Tunnel Company in 1906. In short, the brothers were perfectly competent as
businessmen, resulting in one of the most successful empires Cripple Creek would ever produce. In 1911, after a
long battle with John T. Milliken, then owner of the Golden Cycle MC and many other properties, A.E. finally
accomplished the consolidation project he had for so long coveted, a consolidation which now totaled over
$240,000,000 in Cripple Creek assets. On Sept., 7, 1931, while trying to gain control over the Portland MC, Albert
E. Carlton died, leaving his estate to brother, Leslie, and wife, Ethel.

James W. Miller—- Born in Ohio on Oct. 5, 1864, James W. Miller was among the profitable of Cripple
Creek. Like A. D. Jones, Miller was a pharmacist, and with his brother, J. K., moved to Colorado Springs
where the two started a pharmaceutical company, quaintly called the Miller Brothers. The Pharmacist MC
claim was staked by J. W.’s brother J. K. Miller, along with A.D. Jones, long-term president of the Pharmacist
MC. During its reign, J. W. served as the company’s treasurer, secretary and director. He became known as a
valuable property owner in both Cripple Creek and Colorado City, and owned interest in other companies, such
as the Favorite MC, of which he served as vice-president and director, and other claims.

Frank G. Peck—-- Born on June 7, 1862 in Illinois, Peck’s family moved to Colorado Springs in 1872. He
first became interested in the mining business when he began prospecting in San Juan. Later, in Leadville, like
so many others, he owned and sold mining property before its true value would ever be known. He owned
several groups that he never fully developed, such as the Ingleside Group, and the Robinson Group. By this
time, Cripple Creek was staked and claimed at every turn, so Peck resorted to the brokerage business, where he
began investing in profitable mines, such as the Portland MC. Peck and McKinnie purchased the Black
Diamond claim from Bill Fernay for $500 in 1892, which between 1892 and 1894 made a net profit of $70,000.
And because of the skyrocketing of stock value in the Portland MC, they negotiated the Black Diamond for
shares in the Portland MC, for which Peck served as president, secretary and treasurer.


CRIPPLE CREEK MINING DISTRICT

Please see the map section for maps that may directly pertain to these companies.

1947. Teller. Cripple Creek. Abe Lincoln Lode title abstracts and letter. Lot of 3 pcs. Letter, 1903, is
addressed to the El Paso County Abstract Co., in regards to the mining co. The abstracts are from 1892-1903.
All are very fine. Letter- 5 x 8”; abstracts- 8 x 16”. Est. $25-50

1948.    Teller. Cripple Creek. Adams Express Co. receipt for payment from A.E. Carlton. Datelined Aug.
24, 1912. Very fine. 3 x 8”. Est. $10-20.

1949.       Teller. Cripple Creek. Adams Express Receipts, 1915. Three pcs. Two are for Sears and the
third is unknown. Each has an adhesive 1 cent revenue stamp attached. Very fine. 5.5 x 8”. Est. $25-50
1950. Teller. Cripple Creek. Advertising thermometers. Two Glass Framed Advertising
Thermometers. One is for Lehew’s Service Station, reading “We have what your auto needs / Wholesale and
Retail / Phone 189 Cripple Creek, Colo. Mountain scene. Mint. 5 x 7”, circa 1945. The other one is for
Ormint Pontiac Co., “Dollar for Dollar, You can’t beat Pontiac-GMC… Cripple Creek, Colo., Phone 56.”
Scene of the Last Supper. Glass cracked. 4 x 5”. (1956). Est. $50-75
1951. Teller. Cripple Creek. Ajax GMC. Lot of 24 various Ajax GMC related papers and photos. Title
abstract dating from 1891-1905, 8.5 x 17”; three small notes regarding the mine, 1890’s; envelope which used to
contain the deed to the lode, noted on the envelope, 1895, 8.5 x 4”; receipt from FNB, 1897, 8.5 x 5.5”;
letterhead from C.S. Wilson, attorney, regarding the deed, 1896, 5.5 x 8.5”; location certificate and amended
location certificate for the lode (2pp.), 1891/93, 13 x 8”; timecards from the mine (unissued), 5.5 x 3.5”;
newspaper clipping headlining, “Rich Ore in the Ajax”, c.1895, 5.5 x 2.5”; letter from the Portland GMC, 1911,
11 x 8.5”; copy of the Mining Reporter, featuring a photo of the car haulage machine at Ajax Mine, 1903, 12.5 x
9; lot of 8 treasurer’s reports dating from 1900-1910, 11 x 8.5”; 3 photo reprints of both the mine, and miners: 10
x 8” photo featuring approximately 43 workers posed in front of and on the mine shaft elevators, c.1899, 10 x 8”;
photo of the Ajax Mines explosion, c.1900, 8 x 10”; postcard of Ajax and Portland Mines, 3.5 x 5.5”, and
panoramic, color postcard of the Ajax Mines, 3.5 x 5.5”. All in varied conditions, most very fine. The Ajax
owned four patents on Battle Mountain overlooking Victor. It had a controlling interest in the Hallett &
Hamburg GMC. The Ajax GMC mined their own property; it did not use lessees. It was a closely held
corporation according to engineer Fred Hills in 1900. The production was very large, but unreported. They began
in 1895, employed 140 men by 1905. The geology there was similar to the Portland mine according to Hills.
Est. $200-400

1952. Teller. Cripple Creek. Ajax Group Title Abstracts. Approximately 300pp. c.1895-1935. See
above for story. See lot #1947 for similar image. Est. $100-200.

Teller. Cripple Creek. Ajax Mine. Other Ajax mine documents can be found in the Victor section.

1953. Teller. Cripple Creek. Alert Gold Mining Co. Bill of Sale, 1900. Signed by vice-president M.
Starwood and secretary J.N.D. Stovell. Very fine. Est. $25-50

1954.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Altman Water Co. Incorporated in Colorado. First mortgage, 6% 25 year
bond. Unissued, no cert #, unsigned, 1900. Vignette of steam powered pump? Green border. Cancelled by
hole punches of same. 14 x 9. Printer - Pueblo Litho & Print, Co, Pueblo, Colo. We could find no specific
reference to this company among our resources. Altman is a small community in the Cripple Creek district,
located between the towns of Cameron and Goldfield and this company presumably was organized to provide a
domestic and industrial water supply for the town and local mines. Very fine. Est. $25-75

1955. Teller. Cripple Creek. American Eagle Consolidated MC. Incorporated in Delaware 1919.
Issued to S. G. Fox & Co. for 100 shares, cert #49, in 1919. Signed by president William W. Rowan and
secretary Jacob F. Keyser. Vignette of spread winged eagle atop crag. Red border. Uncancelled. 8 x 11.
Printer - Border K. B. 1911. Possibly a consolidation of mines surrounding the American Eagle mine located
on the southwestern slopes of Bull Hill. Very fine. Est. $25-50

1956. Teller. Cripple Creek. American Smelting & Refining Co. related billheads. One is on ASARCO
company billhead, for receipt of .57 oz of silver and 2.65 oz. of gold, 1899. The other is on The Taylor &
Brunton Sampling Co. billhead which notes the consignment of ore to ASARCO, 1900. Both are stained, the
latter with some tearing. Est. $25-50

1957. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda GMC. Lot of 2 certificates. Incorporated in Colorado in 1892.
The first was Issued to Taylor J. Downing for 775 shares in 1893. Cancelled. Singed by president D.H.
Moffat and secretary R.H. Reid. The other was issued to F.H. Pittingill for 22 shares in 1893. Cancelled.
Corporate signatures. Gilt border and underprint with no vignette. 7.75 x 10. Holes punched at bottom and at
left. Folds, crease. Mines included the Lone Star, Lone Star Nos 2 & 3, Rustler, Puffer, Anaconda, Grover,
Cleveland, Superior, Excelsior, Great View, Hub, Little Mack Free Milling, Sarah B., Napoleon, Kitte M., No
Name, Oro Fino and Ivy Wild. All located on Gold Hill just a couple of miles southeast of Cripple Creek. By
1900, there were 13,483’ of tunnels, drifts and winzes. (Hills, 1900) Est. $200-300

1958. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda GMC. Inc. in Colorado, 1892, issued to W.F. Drake for 250
shares in 1893, signed by R.H. Reid, sec., and D.H. Moffat, pres. Cancelled by rubber stamp and hole punches.
Stub glued to left edge of certificate. Cripple Creek, Colorado printed on certificate at top right. No vignette, gilt
border, black print, embossed gilt seal. Slight stains where stub was glued, otherwise extremely fine. 13.5
(including stub) x 8.5”. Est. $100-200

1959. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1892. Issued to C.W. Wood
for two hundred shares in 1893. Signed by president Moffat and secretary R.H. Reid. Cancelled. Gold
border and black print. Fine, cancellation stamp across owner’s name, and hole punches at the bottom near the
signatures. 8 x 11”. Est. $100-200
1960. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1892. Issued to W.H.
Leonard for five hundred shares in 1893. Signed by President Moffat and secretary R.H. Reid. Cancelled.
Gold border and black print. Fine, cancellation stamp across owner’s name, and hole punches at the bottom
near the signatures. 8 x 1”1. Est. $100-200

1961. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1892. Issued to F.L.
Roudebush, Trustee for 500 shares, cert #4989, in 1896. Signed by president Moffat and secretary R. H. Reid.
Fancy masthead. Gold border, seal and background design. Cancelled by hole punches above signatures and
red rubber stamp. 8 x 10.    Very fine. Est. $200-300

1962. Teller. Cripple Creek. Anaconda MC. Incorporated in Wyoming 1900. Issued to Marr &
Middagh, Trustees for 500 shares, cert #1721, in 1901. Signed by president Adolph J. Zang. Black print. A
Reorganization of the Anaconda Gold Mining Company of Colorado Principal Mines at Cripple Creek,
Colorado printed on certificate. Cancelled by hole punches of same across signatures. 7 x 10. Printer -
Denver Lith, Co. Mines are similar to above lot. Adolph Zang lived in Denver where he established the
Rocky Mountain Brewery Co. He was one of the organizers of the Schirmer Insurance & Investment Co. which
was turned into a banking company. He was one of the founders of the Vindicator Consolidated GMC and was
president of the company up to the time of his death. He established the town of Goldfield about 4 miles
southeast of Cripple Creek. He became one of the directors of the Cresson Consolidated GMC and one of its
largest stockholders. One of his sons, Frank, became vice president of the Vindicator Cons GMC and also
secretary of the Cresson Cons GM&MC. (Hills, 1900; Sprague, 1953; Stone, 1918) Stub glued at left edge.
Very fine. Est. $100-200

1963. Teller. Cripple Creek. Apache GMC. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to Jas. A. Phillips Trustee
for 1000 shares, cert #482, in 1896. Signed by W. H. Kistler president and secretary faded away. Vignette at
top of Indian woman leaning on shield of Colorado State Seal. Orange border with unique underprint.
Underprint vignette of Victor, Colorado with the major mines marked and Victor Battle Mtn and Mines printed
at left. Uncancelled. 8 X 11. Printer - W. H. Kistler, Denver. Tears about .5 in down along folds. Staining
along left fold. Owned the Minnie Merle and 10,331 acres southeast of Cripple Creek. The mines marked in
underprint vignette are true names of the major mines of Cripple Creek. (Horn & McMahan, 1899). Fine to
very fine. Est. $50-150

1964. Teller. Cripple Creek. Arcadia Consolidated Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1896.
Certificate number 1069 issued to S. A. Nay for 4,000 shares in 1897. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by
Vice-President J. C. Salmon and Secretary N. W. Salmon. Cancelled by rubber stamp of same. Vignette top
center of 4 miners working underground. Gold border and seal. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. This company
was owned and controlled by W. S. Stratton. The property was located on Gold Hill on the east edge of the
town of Cripple Creek. (Hills, pp. 63, 442-43). Very fine. Est. $50-150

1965. Teller. Cripple Creek. Arcadia Consolidated Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1896.
Certificate number 1460 issued to S. S. Bernard for 1000 shares in 1897. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed
by Vice-President J. C. Salmon and Secretary N. W. Salmon. Cancelled. Vignette top center of 4 miners
working underground. Gold border and seal. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. See lot above for the story. Wear to
folds. Chip in lower left corner, crease at upper right corner. Fine. Est. $75-150

1966. Teller. Cripple Creek. Arcadia MC. Stock certificate and Post card. Incorporated in Colorado in
1895. Issued to H.L Sherwood for one share in 1895. Signed by president J.C. Plumb and secretary W.W.
Salmon. Cancelled. Mast Head is garnished with flowers. Brown border. Very fine, Ex. Stock Dividend
stamp vertically across the left side. The post card features men working a winch at the Arcadia Mine. The
company owned just five acres in two claims. In 1900 it was bought out by W. Stratton and became the Arcadia
Consol. MC. [ref: Hills] Very fine. 3 x 5”. Est.-$75-150

1967. Teller. Cripple Creek. Arequa. Various Arequa Townsite Title Abstracts ranging from
1895-1930. Est. $50-150.
Teller. Cripple Creek. Assay
In order to value a property on which metal bearing rock is found, it is necessary to determine the “grade” of the
“ore”. Technically, “ore” is any rock from which metal can be extracted profitably, so it is a relative term.
Most mining companies today spend in the range of $90 to $250 to recover one ounce of gold. (This wide range
is due to variations in ore type, some of which are more costly to process than others; differences in labor and
regulatory costs; etc). Today’s gold price has been hovering around $260 per ounce, so
some of these companies are marginally profitable while others have a comfortable operating margin. Most
companies have “ore stockpiles”, and those whose operating costs are in the $250 range could suddenly find they
have a “waste stockpile”, should the price of gold drop below $250 per ounce.
          “Grade” is simply a measure of the amount of metal in rock. If the grade is above a certain amount, the
rock can be considered “ore”. For precious metals such as gold and silver, grade is usually reported in the unit
“ounces per ton”, commonly written as oz/ton or opt. During the period circa 1790 to 1934 the price of gold
was fixed by the federal government at $20.67 per ounce, so people became accustomed to rating the grade in
units of “dollars per ton”, saving a conversion step (the price of silver was not fixed so the grade of this metal
has always been reported in ounces per ton). In 1934 the government-fixed price of gold was raised to $35 per
ounce, so “dollars per ton” was still used after that change was made. However, in 1976 when price controls
were lifted, the value of an ounce of gold began to fluctuate daily, rendering the unit “dollars per ton”
meaningless, so “ounces per ton” then became the normal unit for reporting grade of gold. In metric based
countries (ie, the rest of the world) grade is measured in grams per tonne. That is a metric tonne, equivalent to
1,000 kg; 1 gram being one millionth of a metric ton.
          The most reliable method of determining the grade of ore is by fire assay. This method has been in use
for over 500 years and is still used routinely in gold mines and by explorationists throughout the world.
Geologists are trained in sampling theory, so they know that the collection of the sample must be done in such a
way as to be as representative of the whole as possible; they understand the biases that can be introduced during
sampling, and can make an intelligent interpretation of the data when the analytical results are returned to them.
          Fire assaying can accurately determine the amount of gold and silver in samples collected from soils,
outcrops, alluvial material in stream beds, cuttings and core from exploratory drilling and even vegetation whose
roots take up minute amounts of metals and incorporate them in the structure of the plant. For inorganic
material such as soils, rock chips and so on, a sample in the 2 to 10 pound range is typically collected. These
are crushed, producing a coarse granular material that is thoroughly mixed. Then a 1/4 to 1/2 pound,
representative portion of the crushed rock is pulverized to an extremely fine powder called a “pulp”. From this
pulp, about an ounce is carefully split from the whole then precisely weighed and fired in the assay furnace. An
assay of this amount of material is called a “One ton fire assay”. This comes from the term “1 Assay ton”
which equals 29.1667 grams. One assay ton has the same relation to one milligram that one short ton (2000 lbs)
has to one Troy ounce; that is 29,166.7:1. Therefore, the weight in milligrams of precious metal obtained from
a one ton fire assay is directly equivalent to “ounces per ton”.

1968. Teller. Cripple Creek. Assay. 25 Various Assay Papers. Such companies as the Portland GMC,
no signature, 1918; the Copeland Ore Sampling Co., Victor, 1916, having received ore from Stratton; J.B. Page,
1930, from the Mexican G&SMC; Stratton Cripple Creek Mining & Development Co., 1902, form American
Eagle MC; and John C. Staats, 1902, from American Eagle. All but for one are in very good condition. The
Rio Sampling Co. billhead has severe damage to most of the right side and the bottom edge. Est. $100-300

1969. Teller. Cripple Creek. Assay. Lot of Four Assay Documents. Midway Assay Office in Cripple
Creek, to Findley Cons. M. Co., letter stating Findley will be billed under one heading since pulps reached
Midway office without indication of shaft to which they belonged, not dated. Poston Assaying Co.
(rubber-stamped at top), does not indicate to whom this was sent, lists “15 - .01, 20 - trace, 21 - none, 22 - none,
30 - .01, 31 - .045”, states charges for services are $10, not dated. Two pieces from J. B. Page Assay Co. in
Victor to Granite-Portland for Samples Assayed, both dated 1908. Very fine. Est. $25-50.

1970. Teller. Cripple Creek. Assay. Mines Inc. Pulps (2) from a working underground face. c.1930.
See write-up on assaying at beginning of Cripple Creek section. Very fine. Est. $10-25

1971. Teller. Cripple Creek. Assay. Small Town Assay Papers. Lot of 6. From such companies as J.S.
Neall, El Paso, Colo., 1893; The National Gold Extraction Co., Goldfield, Colo., 1899; and Lucky Guss Assay
Office, Altman, Colo., 1899. Some are water damaged. Est. $50-150

1972. Teller. Cripple Creek. Associated GMC. Incorporated in Colorado 1895. Issued to F. L. Duncan
for 1000 shares, cert #201, in 1896. Signed by president J. D. Miller and secretary J. Morton. Vignette of
snow capped mountain. Brown print, gilt seal and Cripple Creek Gold Mining District in gold underprint.
Uncancelled. 8 x 11. Printer - Pueblo Litho. Wear to folds with stain at top of right fold. Owned the Dixie
and Link mines on Mineral Hill. On Straub Mountain, they owned the Little Alice, Lottie, Caliente, Chieftain,
Oaken Bucket, Santa Fe and Golden Tunnel. On Nipple Mountain they owned the Honeycomb, Little Febby
and Georgia claims. They also owned four copper claims in the Hard Scrabble Mining District. The company
employed nearly 60 men and was operating with no debts and $15,000-30,000 cash on hand at all times. In
1898, the company was being to ship ore from their copper claims. (Horn & McMahan, p. 10) Very fine. Est.
$50-150
1973. Teller. Cripple Creek. Atlanta, Cripple Creek and Creede MC. Incorporated in Colorado 1895.
Issued to John W. Proudfit & Co. for 1000 shares in 1899. Signed by president James Smith and secretary
Albert Wagner. Vignette of miners working underground. Gold border with gilt seal and gold underprint and
background design. Principal office, Cripple Creek, Colorado, El Paso and Mineral Counties, Colorado
printed on certificate. Uncancelled. 8 x 10. Owned the Flat Top and Little Susie on Copper Mountain.
Developed by an 80’ shaft and 300’ of cross-cuts and drifts, plus a 400’ tunnel. (Hills, 1900; Horn &
McMahon, p. 11). Proudfit & Co. was a Banker and Broker firm with offices in Colorado Springs. They
issued one of the handbooks of the mines and mining companies of Cripple Creek that we use as a reference.
Trimmed tight at bottom edge (printing error?) Very fine. Est. $50-100

1974. Teller. Cripple Creek. Auto. Pierce Motor Cars & Cycle letterhead, datelined 1905. The
letterhead consists of the company name, surrounded by fancy vines, with an arrow shooting through it. Black
and red print. The letter is addressed to A.E. Carlton of FNB, regarding his interest in purchasing a new
vehicle. 3 x 9”. Very fine. Est. $25-50.

1975. Teller. Cripple Creek. Auto. Smith Motor Truck Corp. letterhead. It addresses the First National
Bank of Cripple Creek, and basically is pushing their latest creation, the Smith Form-a-truck, which is illustrated
in color, in the heading. This letter represents salesmanship at its finest. Very fine. 10.5 x 8”. Est. $15-25.

1976.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Auto. Two Letterheads from the Colorado Automobile Co. One from
Packard Motor Car Co. All three letterheads are communications with A.E. Carlton. 1904-1912. Very fine.
7 x 8” to 10.5 x 8”. Est. $100-200

1977. Teller. Cripple Creek. Autograph. Adolph J. Zang Typewritten on Letterhead paper, dated 1916,
to the First National Bank of Cripple Creek regarding interest payment on notes. Zang was the founder of
Zang’s Brewing Co., and president and treasurer of Zang Realty & Investment Co., both of Denver. (Ballenger
& Richards, p. 1310). He was also a major stockholder in the Vindicator Mine, Zang’s Elmwood Ranch and the
Cresson Mine. 8-1/2 x 8-1/2. Est. $25-50

1978. Teller. Cripple Creek. Autograph. Bernard, George. Lot of four various letterheads related to
George Bernard, including a letter addressed to A. E. Carlton in regards to stock in the Elkton Mine, with which
Bernard was involved. All are in very fine condition, ranging in date from 1902-15. See Bernard biography.
All 10.5 x 8”. Est. $50-150.

1979. Teller. Cripple Creek. Autograph. Burns & Carleton. Various correspondence to
Burns et al regarding stock matters of the Colorado Trading & Transfer Co. Also a billhead to
the Rugby Fuel Co. Three First National Bank checks signed by A.E. Carlton. Total of 10 pieces,
all very fine. Sizes ranging from 3 x 8” to 10.5 x 8”. Est. $50-100.

1980. Teller. Cripple Creek. Autograph. Typewritten letter on H. E. Woods letterhead from
same to William Lloyd in Colorado Springs requesting address of a Mr. J. W. McBane. Signed
by H. E. Woods. Carbon copy on white paper. 8-1/2 x 11. See historical sketch of Woods
family under Woods Investment Co. Est. $50-150

1981. Teller. Cripple Creek. Autograph. Woods Investment Co. Letter dated 1897 to an
attorney requesting transfer of certificate number 1583 for 1,000 shares of Granite Hills to the
name of George Vance. Signed by H. E. Woods. Fancy letterhead in brown on yellow paper.
8-1/2 x 11. See biographical sketch of Woods Family at beginning of Cripple Creek section. Est.
$25-50
There are additional autographs throughout this Cripple Creek section.

1982. Teller. Cripple Creek. Baby Mine Title Abstracts. Lot of 7 pieces all related to the Baby Mine,
among which are Baby Ruth Lode, Baby Mine Lode, Baby McKee Lode. All are circa 1904, and detail a
history of claims transactions and agreements with various mining companies and individuals. The records are
specific by county book
and page, and include notes by the title officer. There is a lengthy section under “Title abstracts” explaining
these important documents. 8 x 17”. Est.- $100-200.

BADGES AND MEDALS
The following is a spectacular collection of Cripple Creek badges and medals. These very colorful items are rarely
found in this fine of condition today.

1983. Teller. Cripple Creek. 1893 St. Patrick’s Day Ribbon. Green ribbon, 8 1/2” long, 2” wide. Very
early ribbon from the first days of Cripple Creek. Probably had a pinback at the top of the ribbon. Frayed edges at
bottom of ribbon. Black lettering reads: “Cripple Creek / Typographical Union. / St. Patrick’s Day, / 1893. Est.
$25-50.

1984. Teller. Cripple Creek. 1904 Governor’s Medal. Breast badge with ribbon and medal. “Colorado City
/ Cripple Creek / Telluride - Trinidad / 1903 / 1904 // Red-white-blue ribbon. // 1.5” diam medal “James H.
Peabody Governor of Colorado / (pic of Peabody) / 1903-4 // (scene of miner etc.) / Law and Order. Smooth edge.
XF-Au with original box. Est. $100-200.

1985. Teller. Cripple Creek. 1910 I.O.O.F. Badge. At top is 1.75” diameter, brown pinback with the IOOF
seeing eye and the letters FLT in interlocking chain. Red ribbon hanging from pin with gilt lettering: “Forty-Third /
Annual Session / Grand Lodge / I.O.O.F. / Cripple Creek, / Colorado / October 1910.” Entire badge is 5” long.
Est. $50-100.

1986. Teller. Cripple Creek. 4th of July, 1899 Badge. “Souvenir” in gilt lettering in red, white and blue
banner. Hanging below is a fancy five-point gilt medal. “1899 / Fourth July / (pic miners) / Cripple Creek, Colo /
Teller / County // Schwaab. 2” x 1.5”. Near mint medal. No pinback. Est. $50-100.

1987. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado State Federation of Labor Convention Badge. “17th Annual
Convention / Colorado State / Federation of Labor / Aug. 12-15, 1912, Cripple Creek” in celluloid oval at top with
fancy gilt border as breast pin. Suspended below is medallic badge with celluloid center, “Colorado State
Federation of Labor / (pic) / Seal. Frame is gilt. Reverse: “The Whitehead Mfg. Co., Newark, NJ.” Est. $50-100.

1988. Teller. Cripple Creek. Gilt Souvenir Cripple Creek Badge, c1899. “Souvenir” with pick and shovel
in banner. Hung from banner is a medal in the shape of an ore bucket. In the top of the ore bucket is mimimicked
gold with “$ Unlimited.” The side panel of the bucket is a scroll and reads: “Cripple Creek / Greatest Gold / (pic
miner’s pack mule) / mining camp / on Earth.” Reverse: Schwaabe & S. Co., Milwaukee. Near mint. Est.
$75-150.

1989. Teller. Cripple Creek. I.O.O.F. Badge, 1899. Breast pin of wreath surrounding tent, hanging from it
are three ribbons, black, gold and purple. “I.O.O.F. / Grand / Encampment / of / Colorado / Cripple Creek / Colo. /
1899” in gilt lettering on purple ribbon. All three ribbons are fringed at bottom. Breast pin is 1.5” x 2”. Entire
badge is 4.5” long. Sticker attached to back reads: “The M.C. Lilley & Co. Military & Society Goods, Columbus
Ohio.” Near mint. Est. $100-150.

1990. Teller. Cripple Creek. I.O.O.F. Lodge No. 101 Badge by Whitehead & Hoag, Newark, NJ. Crème
hanger breast pin with clasping hands in color, gilt frame around breast pin. White outer ribbon hanging from
breast pin with two crossed American flags (small hole in ribbon just below flagon right), and a color, 1.75”
diameter, convex circular disk hanging from it. This disk has the IOOF seeing eye in color with “Independent
Order of Odd Fellows / F.L.T.” in black. The main ribbon is red with silver and gold tassels on bottom. “Cripple
Creek / Lodge, No. 101 / Cripple Creek, Colo” in silver lettering on red ribbon. Reverse is black funeral ribbon
with silver lettering. 2.2” x 6”. Est. $100-300.

1991.      Teller. Cripple Creek. “Magician” Women of Woodcraft, Circle No. 61 Badge. Nearly identical to
the Member badge, but “Magician” inserted into the breast pin portion. The ribbon has no fancy edge, but it does
have gold tassels at the bottom. The disk chows surface wear. The quality of printing on the disk is higher on this
piece. Reverse is black funeral theme. Est. $100-300.
1992.        Teller. Cripple Creek. Rebekah Assembly, I.O.O.F. Pinback with Ribbons. 2” color celluloid with
2 trailing ribbons. Celluloid has “Twentieth Annual Session Rebekah Assembly IOOF” with picture of a woman.
Ribbons say: “Cripple Creek Colorado” and “October 1910” in gold lettering. Ribbons are pink with green edges.
3.5”. Near mint. Est. $50-100.
1993. Teller. Cripple Creek. Three Different I.O.O.F., Cripple Creek Badges. A.) “Souvenir / Sovereign /
Grand Lodge / Denver / Sept. 21, 1908 / Cripple Creek / Lodge No. 101 / IOOF” in silver lettering on 2.5” red
ribbon hanging from silver tri-link IOOF insignia breast pin. IOOF symbolic pinback in color at bottom. Near
mint. B.) “Souvenir” in gilt, breast badge, purple and white ribbon, circular, fancy gilt border, convex IOOF
seeing eye celluloid with “FLT / (Eye) / Grand Lodge Meeting / Cripple Creek, Colo. Oct 17021, 1910.” Nothing
on reverse. Near mint. C.) Interlinked chain breast pin with full color suspended celluloid tent in gilt frame over
purple ribbon. “38 Annual Session / Grand Encampment / IOOF / Cripple Creek / Colo / Oct. 1910.” With round
gilt bordered convex celluloid with picture of log cabin and a man with a dog. Near mint. Reverse blank. Est.
$200-500

1994. Teller. Cripple Creek. Track Medal, 1916. Has initials in flying (winged) emblem: “St. J”.
Underneath is a large winged foot and “1916”. Reverse: “Point Prize”. Est. $20-40.

1995. Teller. Cripple Creek. Two Crystal (Saloon) Book Marks. “Take one to / the Crystal / 226 E. Bennett
Ave. / Phone 310” in ornate heart-shaped aluminum with fringed colored string. 2 x 2 1/2”. Near mint. Est.
$40-60.

1996. Teller. Cripple Creek. Two mule derby ribbons. A.) Green ribbon, gilt writing, “Third / Annual /
Grand / (metal mule sewn in place) / Derby / Cripple / Creek / Colo / (aritificial nugget sewn in place) / September /
2-3-4 / 1933”. 6”. B.) Yellow ribbon, black writing, “Fourth / Annual / (mule sewn in place) / Derby / Cripple /
Creek / Colo / (artificial nugget sewn in place) / September / 1-2-3 / 1934.” Both near mint. Est. $150-300.

1997. Teller. Cripple Creek. US Smelting & Refining Co. thirty year gold lapel pin. “30” in blue enamel
shield bounded by pick and shovel. 0.6” diameter, 3.5 grams. 14 kt gold. Ex. Fine. Employee name unknown.
Comes with Western Federation of Mines lapel pin, “W F M” in white enamel with stars. 0.5” diam black enamel
background. Mint. These pins reportedly belonged to Spencer Penrose, geologist. This lot also includes a
Spencer Penrose 1968 medal with the Broadmore Hotel, Colorado Springs on the other side. Est. $150-250.

1998. Teller. Cripple Creek. Very Ornate and Fancy, Four-Part Medallic Badge. Eagle at top with “FOE”.
Eagle is holding crossed pick and shovel. Directly below an artificial gold nugget is suspended. Suspended on
chain from left and right is elongated metal plate: “Cripple Creek AERIE No. 37”. Suspended by chain below that
is a circular medal with pictorial color celluloid center with two miners, one of whom is holding up a nugget, reads
“Greatest Gold Camp on Earth / Two Miles High.” All metal parts could use cleaning. Fabulous! Est. $200-400.

1999. Teller. Cripple Creek. Women of Woodcraft Breast Medal. “Souvenir” embossed on breast pin.
Red ribbon and medallic piece suspended below. Ribbon blank. Medal is 1.5” diam, but fancy shaped. “3rd
Biennial / Session / Women of Woodcraft / (pic) / Cripple Creek / Aug. 1902. Reverse: The John Emill (?) Mfg.
Co., Denver. 2.7” long. Dark toned. Mint. Est. $75-150.

2000. Teller. Cripple Creek. Women of Woodcraft Circle No. 61, Two Badges. These badges are nearly
identical. Embossed gilt breast pins, one with “Attendant” and one with “Neighbor”. Tri-color vertical striped
ribbon, green, white, red, left to right. “Cripple Creek / Circle No. 61 / Cripple Creek / Colorado” in gilt on ribbon.
(Gilt weakening.) Medallic gilt medal hanging from hanger-piece at bottom of ribbon, “Women of Woodcraft /
(pic) / Alis Volat Propris”. Both holed at 12 o’clock, but hole made in slightly different places. Reverse of ribbon
is typical funeral version. Both badges are 4.5” long. Very nice. Est. $200-30000.

2001. Teller. Cripple Creek. Women of Woodcraft, Circle No. 61 Badge. Ornate white breast pin hanger,
“Member”, gilt metal border, with two ribbons hanging from it. Outer ribbon, off-white, plain, with circular, color
disk hanging from it. Convex, 1.75” in diameter with Women of Woodcraft scene. Backing or main ribbon is
green, white and red (left to right) with gold edging (has a tear at upper right edge) and tassels at bottom, with
“Cripple Creek / Circle No. 61 / W. of W. / Cripple Creek, Colo” in silver lettering. Outer ribbon showing wear.
Lettering also showing wear. Reverse on main ribbon has black funeral theme. Est. $100-300.
2002. Teller. Globesville. Modern Brotherhood of America Badge, c1905. “Modern Brotherhood of
America / NBA / FLP” in breast pin at top. Suspended below is a white ribbon with crossed American flags.
Hanging from that is a round celluloid with “Modern Brotherhood of America” with picture of a man and woman in
mountain setting, gold sunset, in color. Background ribbon is red, white and blue, with gilt writing: “Garden Place /
Lodge / No. 2457 / MBA / Globesville, Colo.” Gold fringe and tassels at base. 7.5” long. Reverse is typical
black funeral version in silver. Near mint. Est. $100-300.

2003. Teller. Goldfield. Goldfield Aerie No. 295 Badge. Full breast badge, above wording in elongated oval
on breast pin with a fancy metal plate suspended below reading “Member”; hanging below that is a large “FOE”
eagle shaped piece. Ribbon back is red, white and blue, left to right, with “Goldfield / Aerie No. 295 / FOE /
Goldfield, Col,” in silver lettering. Silver edging and fringe at bottom. Ribbon is torn at base of eagle. Reverse is
typical black with lodge markings. Est. $100-200.

2004. Teller. Victor. 1899 4th of July Breast Badge with Ribbon. Red ribbon with pinback. Suspended
gilt medal in shield shape. “Fourth July / Celebration / 18 (pic miners) 99 / Victor / Teller Co. Colo // Schwaabe &
S. Co., / Milwaukee.” Wreath underneath. Near mint. Est. $75-150.

2005. Teller. Victor. Gilt Souvenir 4th of July, 1899 Badge. “Souvenir” on gilt banner. Red, white ,blue
backing missing. Hanging from banner is medal in shield shape. “Fourth July / Celebration / 18 (pic miners) 99 /
Victor / Teller Co., Colo.” Wreath underneath, pinback missing. Reverse: Schwaab & BS Co., Milwaukeee.
1.75” x 1.2”. Medal near mint. Est. $50-100.

2006. Teller. Victor. Gold Stick Pin 14 kt, with 1/2 x 3/4” high grade gold ore from the Independence
Mine showing native gold. Circa 1895-1900. Rare. Est. $100-200.

2007.          Teller. Victor. Rathbone Sisters, Grand Temple Guest Badge. “Victor” in celluloid
rectangle in gilt frame on breast pin with suspended white ribbon. In gold lettering on white ribbon: “Grand
Temple of Colorado, 1901”. Suspended from the white ribbon is a celluloid medal of 1.75” with full color
picture of man in armor and a woman, with “Rathbone Sisters” in black lettering. Attached to pinback is an
orange ribbon which reads: “Grand Temple, R.S., August 13, 1901. Guest. Carnation …Temple, Victor,
Colorado.” Near mint. 5”. Est. $100-300.

End Badges and Medals

2008. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank Note Company Letters. Lot of 2. Western Banknote, Chicago,
1901 with a vignette of a buffalo, and Rocky Mountain Bank Note, 1914, with a vignette of the Rocky
Mountains in masthead (2 pp.). Contents are miscellaneous correspondence. 11 x 8.5”. Very fine. These are
considered very collectible by bank note collectors. Est. $50-100.

2009. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank Note Company Letters: Three pieces. Rocky Mountain Bank Note
Co., 1923, in blue litho; Rocky Mountain Bank Note Co., c.1910, in black litho with vignette of Rocky
Mountains in masthead; Western Bank Note & Engraving Co., 1908, in black litho, engraved with Indian head
and buffalo at left. Very fine. 11 x 8.5”. Est. $25-50

2010. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank. Toy Cast Iron Safe with combination lock. “The Home Savings
Bank” cast in door, “Savings Deposit” on top and “Kenton Brand” on reverse. Base: “Made by Kenton HDWE
MFG Co. Kenton, Ohio. Very nice. Collected and used in Cripple Creek. 3.5 x 4 x 5.5” high. Est. $150-300.

2011. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank. Toy Colorado Bank Bank. “Colorado Banking & Trust Co., Cripple
Creek, Colo. Bank” engraved on nickel plated plaque on front. “Patented Aug. 2,1892, Aug. 23,1892 Mfg by
C.O. Burns Co., NY 7063.” Has original key, but lock needs handle repair. Can fit up to half dollar in slot.
Copper construction with curved patterns. Est. $150-350..
2012. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank. Toy Davy Crocket Bank, 1895-1910. This bank was collected and
used in Cripple Creek. Original paint on white metal. Lock and door missing. Est. $25-50.

2013. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bank. Toy Safe. Nickel plated, cast iron toy safe with combination lock
door. Star patterns embossed throughout. No maker shown. Beginning to show rust, particularly at right side
door. 3.25 x 3.5 x 5” high. Est. $100-300.

2014. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beatrice Gold Mining, Milling and Tunnel Co. Incorporated in Colorado.
Certificate number 493 issued to Wm. Oliver for 1,000 shares in 1896. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by
President J. M. Parker and Secretary J. S. Tucker. Uncancelled. Vignette, top center of four miners working
underground. Gray-green border and underprint. 8 x 10. Printer - The Gowdy Printing Co., Colo. Springs.
Owned the Barnes and Silver Wade on Ironclad Hill as well as the Michigan Tunnel site on the northeast side of
Tenderfoot Mountain. (Cripple Creek Stocks and Mines, Levine) J. M. Parker was the owner and president
the first bank in the town of Cripple Creek. (Levine) Professional tape repair along fold edges. Fine. Est.
$50-150

TELLER. CRIPPLE CREEK. BEER BOTTLES
          Beer and breweries were a way of life for miners. Where there was water, there was beer. Curiously,
the early directories of Cripple Creek did not list breweries, which might suggest that all beer was imported from
nearby communities such as Colorado Springs, or perhaps Denver. Other western state directories list liquor
dealers, breweries, and saloons right along with clothing merchants, but this is not the case in Cripple Creek.
Even the lists of saloons in the directories do not lend much to learning about local breweries. Certainly they
advertised in local newspapers, which were not available to us at the time of this writing. Local bottling
companies would have bottled beer and soda or mineral waters.
          In 1894, there were three bottling companies listed in Cripple Creek: Charles Lang, S. Peiffer, and Standard
Bottling and Manufacturing Co. Peiffer was the sole agent for Lemp Beer from St. Louis. Nearby local brewer
Adolph Coors was just underway at Golden, a few miles west of Denver proper. By 1912 only the Standard in
Cripple Creek and Pioneer Bottling Works in Victor were left in business, though Harvey Moulton, Burnside
Merchantile, and E. Asmussen were listed as brewery agents in Cripple Creek. Only Moulton and Burnside had a
saloon attached. We know that the Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co. also bottled soda as well as beer. We do not know
what their relationship is with the Standard Bottling Co. of Denver.
          An outstanding overview of the brewing business in Colorado can be read in Preble’s (really the
Antique Bottle Collectors of Colorado) Impressed in Time; Colorado Beverage Bottles, Jugs, Etc. 1859-1915,
1987. Please see the Soda Bottle section for more of these merchant’s embossed bottles.

2015. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Bottle Openers. Five Coors Beer, open handle, open end openers,
two varieties. One Pepsi-Cola open handle, open end opener. Five flat top can openers for Coors Beer, two
varieties. One Blatz, one Lucky Lager, one Carling: flat top beer can openers. Two advertising plastic handle
openers - one for Baker, Montana, other Oakdale, Cal. 6” long. Est. $15-25.

2016. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Cripple Creek/ Registered/ Bottle/ Bottling Works. Lot of 2
bottles, with company embossed in slug plate. “P” on base. Both .5 pint amber bottles are in mint condition,
other than some minor exterior stains. They are probably as nice as any known. Est.-$ 250-500.

2017. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Harvey Moulton/ Mer. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
Crown top, aqua, plain base. Soda of beer bottle. Very minor stain, otherwise sparkling mint. Est.-$150-250.

2018. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Harvey Moulton/ Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. Aqua, crown top
beer or soda bottle. 1 pint. Plain base. Company embossed in circular slug plate. Broken top, some milky
discoloration. Fine. Est.-$25-50.

2019. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Schlitz Beer Keg End Plate. This is a wood, circular keg endplate. It
is ornate, 16” in diameter made from three pieces of wood. In bold black letters: Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co.’s/
Bottled at the Brewery/ (pic Globe in red with “Schlitz” written across the center)/ 10 dozen small/ Exported
Milwaukee Lager Beer” Slight discoloring to wood at left. Right third piece is glue reinforced. This barrel must
have held ten dozen half-pint bottles. Circa 1900. Attractive. Est. $50-150
2020. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg Co./ Cripple/ Creek/ Colo. seltzer bottle.
Full face etched. Minor rust stain. Top broken. Metal piece in place with clay. Appearance is fine. Rare.
Standard Bottle Co. was the agent for renowned Coors Beer Co Est.-$75-150.

2021. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
Lot 2 of variety 3, aqua blob top bottle (slightly different). Details not mentioned, are same as above. Near
mint condition. [B21 variety] Est.-$50-100.

2022. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
Variety 3, very light aqua bottle. Has “30” near base in front, and “1” within circle at the bottom. Sparkling
mint. [B21] Est.-$50-100.

2023. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
Aqua, blob top, pint beer bottle. Same as variety 3, but with a plain base. Variety 4. “30” along the base near
the bottom. Very fine. Est.-$25-75

2024. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
A clear, variety 5 pint beer bottle, with embossing, and general appearance identical to variety 3, except in color.
“30” embossed at front near base. Broken top. Est.-$25-50.

2025. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek / Colo. in slug plate.
This bottle never sold. Clear, with crown top and plain base. Variety 6. Circa 1901-5. Fairly clean, near
mint. Est.-$50-100.

2026. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling & Mfg. Co/ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plates.
Lot 3 of variety 3, aqua blob top, pint beer bottles (3). “1” within circle on the bottom, and “30” near base. All
have broken tops. Est.-$20-40.

2027. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling/ & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. Variety 1.
Plain base pint, blob top beer bottle. Blue aqua (cornflower) instead of light aqua. Fairly clean, near mint. The
variety notes here are our own, and generally have not been compared to those listed in the Colorado Bottle
Book (CBB), which notes six different varieties of the Standard bottle. Some of those here appeared unlisted,
though we suspect there may be more varieties than those reported. Where we have noted the CBB similarities,
we have noted their catalog number thus: [B21a]. This bottle is [B19]. Est.-$200-400.

2028. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling/ & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. in slug plate.
Lot of 2, variety 1, aqua pint blob top beer bottles. Letters closely spaced and narrow. Both have broken tops.
[B19] Est.-$20-40.

2029. Teller. Cripple Creek. Beer. Standard Bottling/ & Mfg. Co./ Cripple Creek/ Colo. embossed in slug
plate. Lot of 2, variety 2, aqua blob top beer bottles. Letters less crowded and better centered. Both plain base
pints are 8 in. high, and both have broken tops. Est.-$20-40.

End Beer Bottle Section

2030. Teller. Cripple Creek. Belle Plaine GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1896. Issued to Harry F.
Elliott for 100 shares, cert #1119, in 1896. Signed by president A. D. L. Hamilton and secretary J. M. Field.
Vignette of miners working with picks and loading ore into a basket. Black border with orange safety print.
Datelined Kansas City, Missouri. Uncancelled. Nonassessable stamped in red. 8 x 10. Printer - M No. 9. Listed
in the Incorporation list of Dunbar (1898) with main offices in Cripple Creek. No other information was located on
the company. Cripple Creek is well documented for that time period, so it is possible the company never got off the
ground. Very fine. Est. $50-150
2031. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bessie Lode title abstracts, ranging in date from 1891-1903. Lot of 7. One
abstract is makeshift , on yellow lined paper, unlike the others. All very fine. 8 x 16”. See similar lots in Titles
Section. Est. $50-100

2032. Teller. Cripple Creek. Big Four Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Issued to
Charles N. Miller for 1,000 shares in 1900. Certificate number 1144. Datelined Cripple Creek, Colorado. Signed
by Vice-President Charles Miller and Secretary B. F. N. Macrorie. Uncancelled. Vignette of 8 miners working
underground. Gold border, underprint and seal. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. The company’s offices were in
Cripple Creek and owned property in Poverty Gulch just east of the town, on Bull Hill and on Battle Mountain. In
1900, the company had about 500 ft of development work completed on the various properties and lessees were
talking of installing steam hoisting equipment. Gross production to Jan. 1 1900, $5,000.(Hills, p. 83) Macrorie and
Miller were associates of Mollie E. O’Bryan, a local stenographer and astute mining entrepreneur who was a
member of the investor syndicate that formed this company, and president of the Teutonic Consolidated Gold Mines
Company. She was elected to membership on the Cripple Creek Stock exchange and later became a public trustee
in Cripple Creek. (Levine, pp. 50-51; Ives, p. 188) Est. $75-150

2033. Teller. Cripple Creek. Big Mike Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Certificate number
82 issued to R. H. Kooken for 1,000 shares in 1900. Datelined Denver. Signed by President P. Calihan and
Secretary F. D. Willoughby. Uncancelled. Vignette of 8 miners working underground. Gold border,
underprint and seal. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. We could find no reference to this company among our
resources. Very fine. Est. $50-150

2034.     Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. City Warrant, and Billhead for Larry Maroney
Lumber and Building Materials. Two warrants and one billhead. Unique illustration of stump with trees
growing out of it in masthead, in underprint. Checks are signed by Maroney. 1897-1907. 3 x 7.5”/14 x 8”.
Very fine. Est. $25-50

2035.     Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Contracting Company billheads. Lot of 24, with
many from the A.J. Tolan Co., plumbers, 1909-1918; others from H. H. Williams, Colorado Trading & Transfer Co.,
Ed. F. Grey, roofer, and Anton K. Jensen can all be found in this lot. Very fine. Est. $75-150

2036. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads Cripple Creek businesses from c.1896-1947.
From such companies and offices as Colorado Trading & Transfer Co., the Treasurer’s Office of Teller Co., and
The Stanker Supply Co. All 25 pieces are in very fine condition, ranging in size from 2.5 x 8” to 10 x 8” Est.
$50-75

2037. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek illustrated letter sheet, 1908.
Two photos, one of street scene with Pike’s Peak in background titled “Pike’s Peak Ave.”; the other of rugged
canyon titled “Pillars of Hercules”. Very fine condition. 9.5 x 6”. Two litho photos at top, Pikes Peak Ave.
and “Pillars & Arches.” Est. $50-75

2038. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek Lawyer Correspondence. Lot of
9 documents dating from 1898 to 1920. Letter head from various law firms, such as Alter & Upton, Boughton
& Alter, George A. Crowder, James L. Wallace and Spurgeon & Cassidy. Most correspondence is directed to
the City of Cripple Creek. Very fine. Est. $75-150

2039. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek Mine Supply & Hardware Co.
Billheads. Lot of 43 billheads from various Cripple Creek businesses, such as The Cripple Creek Mine & Supply
Co., J. H. Wilber Mininc Machinery, The Teller Lumber Co., A.L. Davis Building Materials and others. Many of
the invoices are for charges made by the city of Cripple Creek. 1897-1920. Est. $125-250
2040. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek related. The various invoices to and
from the Isabella Mines Company, are both on company billhead, and merchants’ billhead. Among some of the 21
pieces are morel Hardware Co., whose logo features a picture of a saw, Barnes Machine & Tool Co., and mining
engineer, Horace F. Lunt, who examined mine property. Very Fine. 8 x 7”. Est.-$75-150

2041.     Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek related. Lot of 17 billheads which
document the Isabella Mines Co. mining equipment purchases from local suppliers, such as H.C. Harris,
Stearns-Roger Mfg. Co., and others. Each approx. 7 x 8”. Est.-$50-100

2042. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Cripple Creek related. Lot of 59 billheads which
reflect the Isabella Mines Co. purchases from various merchants, such as May Clothing Store, W.D. Armstrong
Stationary, and documentation of insurance purchase from Kilpatrick & Hanley Dr. Fire and Plate Glass Insurance.
Each approx. 7 x 8”. Very fine. Est.-$150-300

2043.       Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads Explosives manufacturing company letterhead.
The letter is addressed to the Union GMC in regards to their product and convenient location. Fancy writing in
masthead, Cerberite Powder Mfg. Co., with trademarked three-headed beast. 1903. 11 x 8.5”. Very fine. Est.
$25-50

2044.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Fancy and/or colorful letterheads to Cripple
Creek: Lot of 6 Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co. with colored illustration of corporation in masthead; Colonial
Electric Co. b/w illustration of cherub holding illuminated bulbs; Barnes-Crosby Co. (engraving co.), featuring
company logo among stones. Very fine. 10.5 x 8”. Est. $ 15-25

2045.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Fancy Letterhead/advertisement to First
National Bank of Cripple Creek from Publicity Dept. of the Chicago Engraving Co. Colorful/fancy illustration
of female allegorical figure, with flowing drapery, and line illustrations throughout. Very fine. 11 x 8”. Est.
$25-50

2046. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Fancy pictorial billheads for tobacco company,
Lot of two identical. Crump Brothers, Importers and Packers of Leaf Tobacco in Chicago. Very fancy
and colorful billheads, with fancy masthead in red and browns, and at left color vignette of tied tobacco leaves.
Both to First National Bank in Cripple Creek, dated 1901. Typed letters. Extremely fine. Est. $25-50

2047. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. From Cripple Creek, 1897-1902. 13 pcs. This
lot features various businesses, such as A.J. Tolan, Plumbing, Heating, H.W. McGee Plumbing Co., Victor
Mines Supply & Hardware Co., and H.P. Reiton, Stoves Co. Three different A. J. Tolan billheads, each with
a different illustration in their masthead: one features a heating device or radiator, another features an illustration
of a person taking a shower; and the last features a realistic rendering of a bathroom, with a tub, sink and toilet.
Very fine. Est. $75-150

2048. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. From various Cripple Creek clothing
companies. Lot of 27, several from B. J. Medill & Co.: two letterheads and two billheads, 1911; the May
Clothing Company, 1901-1911; and Harry Johnson & Co., 1898-1901. All very fine. Est. $75-150

2049. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. From various Real Estate and Insurance
Companies. Lot of 15. Reynolds & Berbower, 1912; Two letters from H.L. Butler Co., regarding insurance
claims, 1908; and 6 billheads from the Kilpatrick Agency, 1906-1939. All very fine. Est. $50-75
2050. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. From various Cripple Creek printing co.’s,
1898 to 1906. From such companies as Tyson & Stephenson…Fine Commercial Printers, billing the City of
Cripple Creek for $10 for 15 poll tax books, 1898; The Evening Breeze, who’s slogan is “All Kinds of Book and
Job Work on Short Notic,” also billing C.C. for printing a nomination list, 1898; McCrea & Crackbon Printers in
1902 for a baseball poster print job. All are very fine. Est. $50-100

2051. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. From various stationary companies. Lot of 11,
several from W. D. Armstrong, all for purchases made by the City of Cripple Creek, 1906-1919, and F.A.
Colburn Stationer, 1898-1902. All very fine. Est. $50-75

2052. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Hotel and Restaurant Billheads. Lot of 6 from
local proprietors such as The Clinton Restaurant, The New Collins Hotel, and Hotel Imperial. Very fine.
1897-1926. Est. $25-50

2053.        Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Keen Kutter Letter/Billheads for Morrell
Hardware Co. (2), and two checks. 1897-1918. 3 x 7.5” to 10.5 x 8”. Important cigar & tobacco hardware
merchant. Very fine. Est. $50-100

2054.          Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Letter on Cripple Creek Letterhead, 1897.
The letter details problems regarding completion of a tunnel, as per contract signed by Mr. Walker and Mr. J. M.
Downing. The letter promises incompletion if the situation doesn’t change. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2055.     No Lot

2056. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Letters, Billheads, and Receipts from various
businesses in Cripple Creek, circa 1920. Lot of 108 pieces. Many are addressed to, and/or signed by A.E.
Carlton, president of FNB or Cripple Creek, and many are purchases by the First National Bank, with receipts
from businesses such as City Scavenger Service, The McGee Floral Co., J.M. Mercantile Co. Other
businesses featured in this lot are Mack’s Service Station, receipt for Water Rate in Cripple Creek, Purity
Steam Bakery, and the Cripple Creek Water Co. among many others! Very fine. Est. $250-300

2057. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Liquor and syrup company fancy letterheads
(three for liquor dealers, one for a syrup company). All are addressed to First National Bank in Cripple Creek.
The first in this group is very fancy and colorful letterhead for Golden Ribbon Beverage Assn., at top, below
title block, is a vignette of their workings, including the building for the Bottling Dept and the Ice House and
Stables, “Home of Golden Ribbon” at top. Blue border, large bottle of Golden Ribbon at left, “America’s
Greatest Manufacturers Non-Alcoholic Beverages” and “The Originators of Non-Intoxicants That Taste Like
Beer” also printed on letterhead. Datelined Omaha, 1916, two punch holes at top. Scudder Syrup Co., Syrup
Refiners, at left are four different size containers of their syrup in blue, yellow, black and brown and at right are
two bottles of their syrup in red, blue, yellow and black. Datelined Chicago, 1908. Edward Block Distilling
and Distributing Co., Distributors of W.H. McBrayer’s “Cedar Brook” Hand Made Sour Mash Whiskey,
Kansas City, MO, dated 1914, colorful letterhead with gilt, red, green and black print, at left is a globe with a
bottle of Cedar Brook, in green underprint is a picture of the distillery, and on the back is a full-page
advertisement for Cedar Brook. Another very colorful letterhead with a picture of Yellowstone Bourbon
Whiskey on Taylor & Williams billhead, Distillers, Yellowstone, Rich Hill, Honey Dew and Big Horn
Whiskeys, datelined Louisville, 1911, 8 1/2 x 7 1/4”. Extremely fine group. Est. $100-150

2058. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Liquor dealer fancy letterheads and billheads.
Most of the pieces in this lot were sent to First National Bank in Cripple Creek. One from Bonnie Bros.,
Distillers, Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, in Louisville, KY, dated 1900, wonderful vignette of the distillery and at
left in blue, white and gilt is their logo; The North Vernon Distilling Company, Kentucky and Tennessee
Whiskey in Louisville, dated 1914, vignette below title block on the warehouse with “Distillery Daily Capacity
1046 Gallons” at left and “Distillery Warehouse Capacity 34000 Barrels” at right, two holes at top of vignette;
two pieces (8 1/2 x 7 1/4”) for Jas. Thompson & Bros, Distillers and Whisky Merchants in Louisville, dated
1914, fancy masthead in green; Bernheim Distilling Co., Kentucky Whiskies, Lousiville, dated ’08, great
vignette at left of an acorn with a picture of the company’s building in it, with the words “Tall Oaks From Little
Acorns Grow” across the top of the acorn; Burnam, Bennett & Co., Distillers of Fine Hand Made Sour Mash
Whiskey, Singled and Doubled Over Open Fire in Copper Stills, blue print, at left is a vignette of the Warwick
Distillery, datelined Silver Creek, Madison County, 1901, to E.C. Newcombe, Cashier, Cripple Creek; D. Sachs
& Sons, Distillers, Louisville, dated 1913, at left is a trademark symbol in red and black with a picture of a man
at center, 8
1/2 x 5 1/2; The Levy & Lewin Mercantile Co., Re-Distillers, Importers and Wholesale Dealers in Liquors,
Wines and Cigars, datelined Denver, 1900, vignette at left of a very large building which houses their business;
Edward Block Distilling and Distributing Co., Distributors of W.H. McBrayer’s “Cedar Brook” Hand Made
Sour Mash Whiskey, Kansas City, MO, dated 1913, colorful letterhead with gilt, red, green and black print, at
left is a globe with a bottle of Cedar Brook, in green underprint is a picture of the distillery, and on the back is a
full-page advertisement for Cedar Brook; S. Hirsch Distilling Co., Distillers Importers and Wholesale Liquor
Dealers, Kansas City, dated 1913, vignette at top left of gold medals awarded them for their products; another
very colorful letterhead with a picture of Yellowstone Bourbon Whiskey on Taylor & Williams billhead,
Distillers, Yellowstone, Rich Hill, Honey Dew and Big Horn Whiskeys, datelined Louisville, 1911, 8 1/2 x 7
1/4”; Crystal Spring Distillery Co., Distillers of Fine Whiskies in Cincinnati, dated 1901, great vignette at left
of their properties, 8 1/2 x 7 1/4”; F. Madlener, Wholesale Wines & Liquors, at right “Fig = Rye”, datelined
Chicago, 1901, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2”. Extremely fine group. Est. $100-150

2059. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Livery Billheads. Lot of 33 pieces, 1897-1927.
A few have illustrations in the masthead, such as The Village Shoeing Shop, which features a man in a two
seater horse drawn carriage; another is an illustration of busy storefront. All are very fine. Est. $75-150

2060. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Livery and other Billheads. Fancy Pictorial
Billheads from Cripple Creek. Lot of 7 pieces. Pike’s Peak Produce Co. billhead features full color masthead
with green litho bull’s head on red “Pratts Food” advertisement, 1908; the Hale Patent Fire Harness with red
litho underprint of fire scenario, and illustration of product (harness) at left, 1896. All very fine. Est. $50-100.

2061. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 15 billheads from various Cripple Creek
Furniture Dealers. Several from M. Brown, dating from 1897-98; Weiner Furniture Co., 1919/20; The wonder
Furniture Co., 1898; and several from D. F. Blackmer Furniture & Carpet Co., 1909-1913. All are very fine.
Est. $50-75

2062. Teller Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 20 billheads from such companies as the
Bruington-Armstrong Fuel Co, 1920; The Pike’s Peak Produce Co., 1909; Charles Dutt Dr. in coal, wood, hay
and grain, 1911/1913; and Hunt Feed & Coal Co., 1901-1911. All are very fine. Est. $50-100

2063. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 33 pieces. This lot consists of billheads,
receipts, letterheads, covers and three Guarantee Bonds from The United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company,
dates ranging from about 1897 to about 1918. Highlights include a Certificate of Assay from Scofield and
Brooks in Victor with a gold value of $96.00 and a colorful letterhead for the 1902 Fourth of July celebration.
This lot includes several pieces from the City of Cripple Creek Drayage; City Scavenger Dr.; W.D. Armstrong,
Stationery and Jewelry; Fehringer & Black, Leading Prescription Druggists; Wm. Ardell, Harness, Saddles,
Whips, Spur, Carriage Trimmings; several Andrew Nielsen, General Blacksmithing billheads and more. Also, a
small booklet entitled “Looking Ahead at Cripple Creek, America’s Richest Gold Camp” copyright 1949
Fred W. Miller and A. B. Kamp, 24 pp, compliments of Champion Mines Company, with a small fold out map
at the back with color showing the locations of mines, production record and owners of the mines. Est.
$100-200

2064. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 42 Cripple Creek and Victor Grocers’
billheads. Coppage & Dewar, Victor Market for 1 case of soda to the Fire Dept., 1939; two bills and a letter
from the Busy Corner Grocery for grocery bill for mother and 3 starving children to be taken care of by the Red
Cross, 1927/8; and 7 billheads from Wm. R. Frazier for purchases made by the City of Cripple Creek, 1919-14.
Very fine. Est. $100-200
2065. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 46 billheads and letterheads. Two
pieces briefly track the correspondence between Grace B. Smith, and The Corwn Hill Cemetery Association
regarding the transfer of stock shares, 1940; another is an order form for $21.10 worth of candy from Baur’s
Confectionery Co., 1936. Billheads from such companies as The Island Shoe & Clothing Co., 1939; three
billheads from the Cripple Creek Novelty Works, 1910, 1911; and the Merchants Transfer Line, for the hauling
and setting up of a steel vault for the City of Cripple Creek, 1898. All are very fine. Est. $100-200

2066. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Lot of 7 Jewelry Store billheads. W. S. Charles,
1918; Louis L. Cohn, successor to Cohn Bros., 1911; and five from Rudman & Gottberg, dating from 1899-1910.
Four of the billheads have listed a different occupation, but always having to do with jewelry. One notes a specialty
in Jewelry and optometry and another promotes Watches, Jewelry and Diamonds. Very curious. Fine. Est.
$25-50

2067. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Printer’s Letterheads. Two fabulous pieces.
Williamson-Haffner Co. (Denver, 1908) in gold, green, yellow and red, featuring two nude figures holding up the
company name; J. Lehren Krauss & Sons (Brooklyn, NY, 1910) which features in its masthead the company title,
flanked by an illustration of a ship and bank front. Both are very fine. 11 x 8.5” and 11 x 8”. Est. $50-75

2068. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Small Town Businesses in Colorado, lot of five
letterheads. Two pieces from Holly Sugar Corporation, Swink, Colorado, both dated 1929, small Holly logo in
red and green on one, both sent to Colorado Trading & Transfer Co. in Victor; Millard & Hallett, Funeral
Directors, Undertakers and Embalmers in Pueblo, 189x, letter written in pencil to First National Bank in Cripple
Creek, in dark yellow underprint is a picture of a horse-drawn wagon with a casket on back; Fritsche and Smith,
Coal, Ice and Feed, on dateline Victor is crossed out and Midland is written below in pencil, dated 1907, letter
written in pencil to Portland GM Co; 6 x 7” piece datelined Anaconda, Colorado, dated 1895, addressed to
“Thurlow, Hutton & Williams”, on lined paper. All very fine. Est. $50-75

2069. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Utility Company Invoices. Lot of 25 pieces from
1898-1916. Colorado Telephone Co., Fremont Electric Light & Power Co., Gold Belt Consol. Electric Co., several
from Colorado Light & Power, and other. Very fine. Est. $75-150

2070. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. Wallpaper & plumbing companies. Lot of 11
pieces. Pike’s Peak Wall Paper Co., 1909-39; The Eclipse Decorating Company, 1906; George Worrall & Co.,
plumbers, 1898-1906; and Sam Schoenwald, 1911. All very fine. Est. $25-50

2071. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billheads and Letterheads. W. & H. Walker Soap & Candle. Typewritten
letter to the Union Mining Co., Altman, Colo. dated 1902, on company letterhead to the Union Gold Mining Co.
enclosed with a free sample of Walker’s Stearic Mining Candles which they are touting as the best. This is one
of the most ornate and eye catching letterheads we have seen. A vignette of the Walker soap and candle works
is centered over the colorful masthead which is flanked on both sides by their trademark - a large proud looking
bird with crimson head, neck and wings and black body and tail. A gold band and blue pinstripe borders the
letterhead and the entire page. A very elegant example of turn of the century stationery. Second page is an
order form for additional candles and a return addressed envelope. Est. $25-50

2072. Teller. Cripple Creek. Billiards. Fancy Billiards Company Billhead. Sent to First National Bank
in Cripple Creek, from Merle & Heaney Manufacturing Co., Manufacturers of and Dealers In Saloon Store and
Office Fixtures, Billiards and Pool Tables & Billiards Supplies. Datelined Chicago, 1901. Fancy masthead
which incorporates vignettes of two different building with Merle & Heaney’s names on the sides. 8 1/2 x 7
1/4”. Extremely fine. Est. $25-50
2073. Teller. Cripple Creek. Black Diamond GMC stock certificates and title abstract. The company was
incorporated in Colorado. One certificate is issued to Chas. L. Arzeno for 500 shares in 1894. Cancelled.
Signed by President J. R. McKinnie and Secretary Frank G. Peck. The other is issued to J. J. Muth for 2000
shares in 1893. 7 x 9”. Title abstract dates from 1896-98. 8.5 x 17”. All are very fine. See story below.
Est. $200-400

2074. Teller. Cripple Creek. Black Diamond GMC. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to J. R. McKinnie
trustee for 300,000 shares, cert #50, in 1893. Signed by J. R. McKinnie president and Frank G. Peck
secretary. Masthead with company name. Black border with gray background. Certificated is mounted
within gray matting. Cancelled by black pen across certificate. 5 X 7. Located on Battle Mountain. James
Renwick McKinnie had fought with the Union Army in the Civil War. Afterwards, he hunted buffalo and
mined in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. He taught school, married another schoolteacher, took up
farming in Kansas until the grasshopper and drought wiped him out. In 1890, he loaded his wife and six
children into a covered wagon and relocated to Colorado Springs. He hauled supplies to Cripple Creek and
staked some claims. Within ten years he was financially involved in twenty-one mining companies and was a
millionaire by the age of 53. Frank G. Peck was a Colorado Springs cigar store owner. He also staked some
claims and became a millionaire by age 37. Frank Peck and his brother Harry owned the Woods Investment
Company. In 1893, they bought J. R. McKinnie’s Mount Rosa Placer claim and laid out a townsite on it. They
called it Victor after Victor C. Adams, the original homesteader of the adjacent Lawrence township. The lots
sold so well they built the Victor Hotel. While grading for the hotel, they struck a gold vein which they traced
to the Gold Coin mine and of course bought it. This mine earned them $50,000 a month. In gratitude, they
built a beautiful brick shaft house with stained glass windows. (Levine, p. 18-21; Sprague, 1953) Very fine. A
founder’s share certificate. Est. $200-300

2075. Teller. Cripple Creek. Black Diamond GMC. Issued to H. E. Woods, Trustee for twenty five
thousand shares in 1893. Signed by Woods on the back. Signed by J.R. McKinnie as president, and Frank
G. Peck as secretary. Cancelled, with “cancelled” written across issuee. Located on Tenderfoot Hill of Battle
Mountain. See write-ups on James Renwick McKinnie and Frank G. Peck at the head of the Cripple Creek
section. Black border. Very Fine. 6 x 9” Est.100-200

2076. Teller. Cripple Creek. Black Diamond Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Certificate
number 281 issued to Warren Woods for 500 shares in 1894. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by
President J. R. McKinnie (see biographical sketch on McKinnie at beginning of Cripple Creek section) and
Secretary Frank Peck. Black border with gray underprint. 7 x 9. Printer not noted. James McKinnie and
Frank Peck purchased the Black Diamond claim from Bill Fernay in 1892 for $500. Over the next two years
they made $70,000 profit from the mine’s 100 ft shaft. These profits enabled them to buy into the Portland
mine, from which they received regular quarterly payments. (Levine, p. 18) Also see biographical sketch of
Woods family at beginning of Cripple Creek section). Stub glued at 1 inch into certificate at left edge. Very
fine. Est. $100-200

2077. Teller. Cripple Creek. Black Jack GMC. Title Work for the Black Jack Lode, including about
100pp. of maps, reports and documents. See similar lot below for image. Est. $50-100.

2078. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bobtail, Alpha and Omega, Christie, the M.D. Lode. Title Abstracts for
these and other claims. Contains approximately 100 pages of detailed title reports on several miming properties,
dating from 1892-1916. Very fine. Est. $50-100.

2079. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bonanza Chief/Queen Lode title abstracts and lease. Lot of 6 pcs. The
lease, 1896, details an agreement between the Bonanza Chief Lode and John McKenzie under a six month term.
The abstracts date from 1891-99. 8 x 16”. Very fine. Est. $50-100

2080. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bonanza King Lode title abstracts, ranging in date from 1891-94. 2 pcs. 16
x 8/ 16 x 16. Some tearing where larger abstract was folded into fourths. Very fine. The Bonanza King
GMMC was incorporated in 1894, owning 2 claims. They did not begin work until 1900, and were probably
bought by the Hoosier or a successor. See similar lots in Titles and Abstracts Section. Est. $ 25-50
2081. Teller. Cripple Creek. Book. Bright Yellow Gold, by Horace W. Bennett. No dust jacket or
protective sleeve. Copyright 1935 by Horace W. Bennett. Published by John c. Winston Co. 223 pp. Full
color picture facing title page of people worshiping a golden calf, and one facing last page of story’s text of a
rainbow and mountain scene. Loosely held within the book is part of the original dust jacket, which contains a
short biography of the author, and short summary of the book. The summary tells of the book’s focus on “the
brilliant social life of the west…the daring, vivid personalities…who courageously faced the dangers of a
wilderness to create an empire.” The author, a successful real estate businessman, played a large part in the
development of Denver and the exploitation of the Cripple Creek Mining District. Inscription on first blank
page behind cover. Very fine condition. Est. $50-75.
2082. Teller. Cripple Creek. Book. Three volumes on Cripple Creek. Money Mountain: The Story of
Cripple Creek Gold, by Marshall Sprague. Hardcover with plastic-sleeve-protected color dustjacket.
Dustjacket is chipped and creased, particularly along bottom edge. Interior in extremely good condition.
Signed 10th Printing. Copyright 1953 by Marshall Sprague. Published by Little, Brown & Co., Boston. 342
pp including index, 6 x 9”. Illustrated with black and white photos. The City of God, The City of Gold: An
Historical Sketch of the Cripple Creek Gold Mining District; of Victor, “City of Mines,” and of Saint Victor
Church, on the occasion of its Golden Jubilee, by Omer Vincent Foxhoven et al. Soft bound cover with
debossed gold (to look like gold in fissures). Several green marks on front. Illustrated with black and white
photos. Glossy pages, very good condition. Copyright June 1952, by Foxhoven. Approximately 50 pp., 6 x
9”. The Golden Lure, by Philip Hart. No dustjacket, very worn, ex-libris, with tape repairs on spine and in
interior. Pencil and pen marks in interior. Published by the Saalfield Publishing Company. 256 pp, 5 1/2 x 8.
This book is in poor to fair condition. Est. $50-75

2082A. Teller. Cripple Creek. Book. Two copies of Cripple Creek: City of Influence, An Excursion into the
Historic Heart of Colorado’s Greatest Gold Camp, by Brian Levine. Photography by Joe Vanderwalker.
Softcover, 11 x 9. Published by the Historic Preservation Dept. Copy 1994 by the City of Cripple Creek. 149 pp,
many illustrations. Both books are in near mint condition. Est. $25-35.

2083. Teller. Cripple Creek. Book. Midas of the Rockies: The Story of Stratton and Cripple Creek, by
Frank Waters. Signed First Edition. Hardcover, no dust jacket, with plastic sleeve. Copyright 1937 by
Waters, published by Covici Friede Publishers. 302 pp, illustrated, 6 x 9”. Edges of cover show wear and are
bent a bit, otherwise very good condition. Est. $50-100.

2084. Teller. Cripple Creek. Book. Money Mountain: The Story of Cripple Creek Gold, by Marshall
Sprague. Hardcover with dust jacket (protected by plastic sleeve). Dust jacket shows minor wear, several
large chips. Signed First Edition. Copyright 1953 by Sprague, published by Little, Brown & Co. 342 pp
including index, illustrated, 6 x 9”. Bottom of spine has slight damage. Overall condition very good. See lot
2082 for picture of front cover of this book. Est. $50-75.

2085. Teller. Cripple Creek. Boston & Battle Mountain MC. Incorporated in Maine in 1895. Issued to
Alphicus W. Rice for 500 shares, cert #685, in 1897. Signed by president Morrill Smith and Chas. Lawrence.
Vignette at upper left of miners underground with smaller vignettes at each corner of miners. Black border with
green background design and gilt seal. Uncancelled. 8 x 10. Battle Mountain is located within the Cripple
Creek district. Perhaps this is where the company had its operations. Very fine. Est. $50-150

2086. Teller. Cripple Creek. Brunson, James M. Resignation letter as Cripple Creek’s city attorney,
accepting the position of Deputy Attorney General of Colorado. 1908. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2087. Teller. Cripple Creek. Buckeye, Cyclone, etc. Lot of six title abstracts from Cripple Creek, including
Cyclone, Buckeye, and Cripple Creek Lodes, just to name a few.   Abstracts date from 1891 to 1905. All are
very fine, with some wearing at the folds. 8 x 16”. Est. $50-100

2088. Teller. Cripple Creek. Buckhorn Gold Mining Co. Lot of 2 pcs. Incorporated in West Virginia in
1900; originally incorporated 1892. Issued to Henry P. Boal for 1,000 shares in 1901. Certificate number
4543. Datelined Colorado Springs, CO. Signed by President William A. Otis and D. D. Titus(?).
Uncancelled. Vignette top left of elks head. Green border and seal. 8 x 11. Printer not noted. Includes
abstract of Title: handwritten notes on deed recordations, grantor, grantee, etc. The company owned 7 claims
including the Whippoorwill, Last Chance, Cheyenne, Combination Number 2, Jeanette, Mule and the Grass, in
all totaling about 55 acres. These properties were located near Bull Cliff, north of the town of Goldfield. (Hills,
p. 96). Extremely fine. Est. $100-300
2089. Teller. Cripple Creek. Buffalo & Cripple Creek Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in 1897.
Certificate # 81 issued to Geo. H. Wooley for 10 shares in 1897. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by
President F. J. Oakes, no other signatures. Cancelled by writing across face. Simple black border on vanilla
paper. 8 x 9. The company owned three lots totaling 30 acres in school section 36; the Winner lode claim
containing 7 acres and the Winner tunnel site. Development included a first class plant of machinery, fine
office and living rooms for the general manager and buildings containing the boiler, engine and compressor
located at the portal to Newell tunnel. A complete complement of underground machinery and tools was also in
use. The Newell tunnel was located in the NW corner of one of the school lots on Grouse Mountain and crossed
a 27 ft vein about 1000 ft from the mouth. About 600 ft of drifting along this vein had been completed by 1900
(Hills, p. 94). Very fine. Est. $75-150

2090. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bull Hill and Straub Mountain Gold Mining and Milling Co.
Incorporated in Colorado in 1896. Issued to J. W. Willis for 2,000 shares in 1899. Certificate number 346.
Datelined Cripple Creek. Signed by Vice-President W. L. Hartman and Secretary Gardner M. Greene.
Uncancelled. Vignette of Bull Hill and under seal in gold, three miners inspecting an ore sample. No border,
gold underprint. 7-1/2 x 10. Printer - Pueblo Litho & Prt’g Co. Pueblo, Colo. Bull Hill is in the center of the
district and Straub mountain is at its southern margin. Extremely fine. Est. $75-150

2091. Teller. Cripple Creek. Bull Hill claim group land survey. 9pp. surveying claims, such as the
Mollie McGuire lode, Jack Rabbit and the Favorite. Some wrinkling and folds, but very fine. The Bull Hill
group became part of the Bull Hill GM&TC in 1895. Probably later became part of the Isabella. [Hills] Est.
$50-100

2092. Teller. Cripple Creek. James F. Burns & Portland Co Correspondence, 1905. Addressed to
James F. Burns, regarding his right to inspect the books of the Portland GMC $25-50


2093. Teller. Cripple Creek. James F. Burns Autograph Piece and Associated Piece. Check signed by
J.F. Burns, 1910; and billhead for the Out West Printing & Stationary Co., addressed to Burns, 1905. Very fine.
Est. $100-200.

2094. Teller. Cripple Creek. James F. Burns Correspondence & Invoices, 1911. Lot of 12 pieces.
Letter on James Burns Mines letterhead regarding Inspiration Copper Mines and its production; many personal
billhead invoices, including billheads from the Auditorium Pharmacy Co., with charges made by burns for
household items, grooceries, etc. Very fine. Est. $200-400

2095. Teller. Cripple Creek. James F. Burns Letter regarding the development of the Leadville/Aspen
Mining District. The letter is addressed to Burns, a prominent C.C. mine owner. 1911. Est. $25-50.

2096. Teller. Cripple Creek. James F. Burns Xmas List for 1915. Includes the C.C. Fire Department,
Police Department and local theatre group. Very fine. Est. $25-50.

2097. Teller. Cripple Creek. Burns, J. W. Correspondence. This is not James F. Burns, owner of the
Portland mine, although they may be related. This lot of correspondence and documents outlines an accident in
which a Pikes Peak Cottage City truck “owned by your company but driven by Mr. Kent [although this letter
says it was a Mr. Kent driving the truck, the Memorandum discussed next identifies the man as Mr. Kirk] ran
into the son of W. J. (sic) Burns badly injuring him and necessitating considerable expense for hospital and
doctors.” (Letter dated October 17, 1928 on Strachan and Horn, Attorneys At Law letterhead.) A
memorandum gives more details of the accident: “… a small boy ran out onto Cucharras from south or left side
of street directly in front of truck. Boy was Sonny Burns, age 5/7 years, son of J. W. . Fender hit boy and
knocked him between the wheels, but the wheels did not run over him.” And, “Dr. Evans found the right ear
torn loose from side of head… There were no other injuries of consequence.” This Memorandum also says, “At
time of accident, Kirk saw J. W. Burns… and it was agreed between J. W. Burns and Kirk, that each should pay
one half cost of doctor, hospital and medical bill.” Now enter a Mr. J. L. McGraw [unable to determine his
relationship to the others in this case], he contacts the Burns’ residence and speaks with Mrs. Burns, offers to pay
the money for Mr. Kirk, but she refuses to accept “claiming serious
injuries to her nerves because of the injury to the boy.” Now Dr. Evans from Crestone Heights Sanitarium,
where the boy stayed and was treated for his injuries, ends up in the middle because he accepted money from
McGraw to pay part of the bill and Mr. Burns reportedly “feels that I double crossed him in accepting money
from you. He told Mr. Gibson the services were worth ten thousand dollars, but he could not give us a red cent
because we accepted money from you. He said that I was not a law abiding (sic) citizen in reporting it to the
police.” In the end, there is a receipt signed for $500 from Pikes Peak Cottage City “in full settlement of all
claims and demands that I have… against (them), and in full satisfaction of judgment entered in the District
Court of El Paso County, Colorado… entitled Walter Burns, Jr…” This lot also includes a list of stockholders
of the Pikes Peak Cottage City Corporation and an Annual Report. Est. $100-200.


2098. Teller. Cripple Creek. Caledonia Mine, various papers for. Opinion on titles for the claim, dated
1937. This paper examines the actual title to the mining claim, including its survey, abstract, and whether or not
the claim overlaps or is in conflict with another claim, which was determined to not be the case. The abstract of
title dates from 1892 to 1937. A report, by Harry C. Nelson, mining engineer, is dated 1934, and reports on the
claim’s location, district history, production, development, etc. The deed of trust is dated 1937, to which
attached is a letter addressing the property debt, and possible foreclosure. Total of 4 pieces. All are very fine.
The Caledonia held three claims, were incorporated in 1894, with no production through 1900. [Hills] Est.
$50-100

2099. Teller. Cripple Creek. Candy Companies, two pictorial letterheads for. Both sent to First
National Bank in Cripple Creek. The first is for StartUp Candy Co. which has a very fancy and colorful
masthead with a picture of their property at the center and is surrounded by illustrations of their products, such as
Magnolia’s Breath Perfume and Buy-Roz Gum. Datelined Provo, Utah, 1914, signed “Sweetly Thine”. The
second in this lot is for Beech-Nut Packing Company, trademark logo in red and green at top, at top left is a
vignette of the river-front property. Datelined Canajoharie, NY, 9/11/15, shorthand markings in pencil at
bottom, also a colorful stamp for the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco in 1915 of the
Court of Four Season. Extremely fine. Est. $25-50.

2100. Teller. Cripple Creek. Canton Gold M&M Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to Ellwood T.
Bender for 2000 shares, cert #7, in 1900. Signed by Theodore S. Bender president and Harry C. Bender
secretary. Vignette at upper left of miners underground with smaller vignettes at each corner of miners. Black
border with gilt seal and gold background design. Datelined Canton, Ohio. 1 dollar revenue affixed at upper
right corner. Uncancelled. 8 X 11. Printer - W. H. Kistler. Includes a prospectus outlining the wealthy
mining companies of the Cripple Creek district and how they plan to follow in their foot steps. The two page
prospectus claims that the company owns the Diamond claim, and others, that assays 12-60% copper, $3-10/ton
gold, giving $50-200/ton of ore. No other information was found within our library concerning this company.
Very fine. Est. $25-75

2101. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carbonate Hill Gold Mining & Milling Co. Incorporated in Colorado.
Issued to W, Clark for 1000 shares, cert#543, in 1900. Signed by W. Davis president and S. Davis secretary.
Vignette of treeless hill with mining camp and portal near base. Gold border, seal and underprint.
Uncancelled. 6 X 9. Printer - Gowdy-Simmons Co, Colorado Springs. Folds. They owned the New York
and Hustler lodes on Copper Mountain. They had $25 in cash and no production through 1900. Penny stock.
Very fine. Est. $75-150

2102. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carbonate Hill Gold Mining & Milling Co. Incorporated in Colorado.
Issued to Wm. Clark for 5000 shares, cert #146, in 1896. Signed by Wm. Clark president and C. H. Ferrarri
secretary. Vignette of spread winged eagle. Red-brown border and background design. Uncancelled. 8 X
11. Green staining along top edge. See lot above for the story. Fine. Est. $75-150

2103. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carleton, A. E. Cripple Creek Correspondence. 1894-1934. Includes
letters from attorneys to A.E. Carlton, banking letters, etc. About 30 pieces total. Very fine. Est. $200-500.
2104. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carleton, A. E. Three documents. Two receipts addressed to Mrs. Carlton
written on the back for the Roosevelt Tunnel mucking shift daily report, regarding payment to Mr. Mann, 1916,
4.5 x 8”/4.5 x 7”; a letter addressed to A.E. Carlton, of First National Bank, C.C. on Wood Drill Works
letterhead regarding a catalog purchase by Mr. Carlton, 1908, 10.75” x 8”. All very fine. Est. $10-25

2105. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carleton, A. E. Various Billheads/Letterheads from A.E. Carlton, including
the Cripple Creek Club Association, Cripple Creek Novelty Works, D.F. Blackmer Furniture & Carpet Co., and
many others. 106 pieces total. All in very fine condition, ranging in size from 3 x 5” to 10.5 x 8”. Dated
c.1913. Est. $200-500

2106. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carleton, A. E. Various Correspondence with A.E. Carlton, regarding Dr.
Jackpot Consol. MC. 4 letterheads/stockholders’ meeting pamphlet. 8 x 5” to 10.5 x 8”. 1901-12. All very
fine. Est. $100-150

2107. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carlton Autographs. Lot of 5 pcs. Signed checks by A. E. Carlton of
Cripple Creek fame. 1896-1910. Very fine. Est. $50-100

2108. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carlton Drainage Tunnel Dedication 1939 Pamphlet. Held by the Cripple
Creek-Victor Kiwanis Club. Photographs of A. E. Carlton and brother Leslie on first page. Cover features
illustration of ore car and tracks leading to Carlton Tunnel. Very fine. Est. $25-50.

2109. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carlton, A. E. Autographs. Two documents, one directed to Mr. Carlton
from Abram Rapp, and is regarding Mr. Rapp’s re-election as a board member of some mining co. The other
document seems to be a tally of expenses presumably for Mr. Carlton. Name at the top of the document. 9.5 x
8”/10.5 x 8”. Both are very fine, the latter document only slightly stained at the right edge. Est. $50-75

2110.   No Lot.

2111. Teller. Cripple Creek. Carrie S. GMC. Incorporated in Iowa. Issued to Partridge & Stores for
1000 shares, cert #1761, in 1900. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by J. R. Burkholder president and A. C.
Wagy secretary. Vignette of miners working underground. Gold border and seal. Two 10 cent revenue
stamps affixed at rear. Cancelled by rubber stamp on certificate. 8 X 11. The company owned the Pactolus,
Pactolus 2, 3, 4 & 5, the Midas #2, James River, Old Dominion #1 & 2, and the Liberty on Carbonate Hill
(Bogy, p. 17). Paper attached at left edge where stub was glued when cancelled. Fine. Est. $25-75


2112. Teller. Cripple Creek. Catch Park Drainage Tunnel. Report on construction and building
specifications, such as where the contractor is to begin his work in relation to where the tunnel ends at
completion, what the dimensions are to be and the rate of progress, etc. c.1908. Document was never signed.
13 x 8.5”. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2113.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Celestine Gold Mining Co. Lot of 2 pcs. Incorporated in Colorado in
1900. Issued to Miller & Young, agents for 1,000 shares in 1900. Certificate number 897. Dateline Colorado
Springs, Colo. Signed by President W. R. Foley and Secretary S. J. Mattocks. Uncancelled. Gold border,
underprint and seal. 7 x 11. Printer - Gowdy-Simmons Co., Colo. Springs, Colo. Includes Abstract of Title.
The company’s offices were in Colorado Springs and their property was located in and near the town of Cripple
Creek, in all about 75 acres on Gold Hill. (Hills, p. 108). Minor stains at left lower corner. Very fine. Est.
$125-250
2114.       Teller. Cripple Creek. Champion Mines Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to George H.
Lamotte for 100 shares, cert #12823, in 1956. Signed by Ch Boyle president and D. F. McDermott secretary.
Green border. Uncancelled. 8 X 11. Printer - Goes. Owned the Morning Star and Last Chance mines and
leases the Flying Cloud mine from Golden Cycle Corp. The company was said to be inactive by 1942.
However, this certificated was issued 1956, so they must have come back on line sometime. (Mines Handbook,
1946, p.78) Chip missing from top edge. Fine. Est. $25-50

2115. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Lot of Seven Colorado Mining Company Checks. Cresson
Consolidated Gold M. & M. Co., payroll check, First National Bank, 1958; Golden Cycle Corporation, Carlton
Mill payroll check, First National Bank, 1950; Little Giant GM&MC, Lawson, Colo., Interstate Trust Co., 1919;
Golden Cycle Corp., Cripple Creek Mining Operations payroll check, First National Bank, 1960; Golden Cycle
Mining Company, Mill Department payroll check, Bank of Victor, 1913; Yellow Bird GMC, First National
Bank, 1916; The Colorado-Wyoming Chemical Co., First National Bank, 1902. All very fine. Est. $25-50

2116. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Bi-Metallic Bank Check for Advancement of Funds from City of
Cripple Creek. This transaction is a check from the Treasurer of the City of Cripple Creek for $400,
“Advanced to Peter Earles, City Marshall to secure J.K. Hurd.” This check is attached beneath a check drawn
on the Bi-Metallic Bank paid to the City Treasurer for $400. Both are dated 1897. Glued together at left. Est.
$25-50

2117. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Checks for Fire Dept. and Police Dept. Expenses, approx. 70 pcs.
Treasurer of the Town of (only a few of these in this lot), and City of Cripple Creek checks, mostly for Fire
Dept. and Police Dept. salaries, detectives, patrolmen, and other expenses like supplies, a harness, etc.
1896-1904. At left is a vignette of a robed woman leaning against a shield of the Colorado State Seal. Very
fine. Est. $75-15

2118. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. City of Cripple Creek Checks On Which Payment Was Refused,
8 pcs. Treasurer of the City of Cripple Creek checks, on reverse is stamped “…and payment refused for want
of funds. Interest at 8 Per Annum Until Paid.” One 1904 check, the rest 1898. Vignette at left of robed
woman leaning against shield of Colorado State Seal. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2119. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Colorado Territorial Checks. Denver Light and Gas, Colorado
MC, and Warren Hussey & Co. are a few of the 6 checks in this lot. They range in date from 1861 to 1872.
All are very fine, one with fancy vignettes in corners. 2.5 x 6.5” to 3 x 8”. Est. $150-300

2120. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Cripple Creek Mines Check Collection. Lot of 28 pcs. 2 Isabella
Mines Co., Colorado Springs; Summit &MC, Colorado Springs; Black Diamond GMC, Victor; Gold Bond
Homestead No. 102, Cripple Creek; Cresson Cons. GM&MC, Cripple Creek; United Gold Mines Co, Cripple
Creek; Mines Inc, Cripple Creek; Free Coinage GMC, Denver; 2 Cripple Creek Sampling & Ore Co, Cripple
Creek; 2 Adit MC, Denver; 2 New Gold Dollar MC, Cripple Creek; Carlton Tunnel Operation of Golden Cycle,
Cripple Creek; Standard M&SmC, Colorado Springs; Allied GMC, Boulder; Mary McKinney MC, Colorado
Springs; 2 Ni Wot MC, Denver; Portland GMC, Colorado Springs; Ralston Springs Coal Mine, Golden; Golden
Cycle Corp, Cripple Creek; Orphan Bell M&MC, Colorado Springs; Elkton Co, Cripple Creek; Dew Drop
Mines, Denver; United States Reduction Co, Boulder. Very fine. Est. $75-150

2121. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. First National Bank Checks etc, Lot of about 50 pcs. Different
styles of checks and a couple of related billheads. Condition ranges from poor to very fine, generally fair. A
few checks for the Portland GMC. Five unissued checks, plain. Three unissued receipts with vignette of
robed woman with shield at left. Dates range from about 1903 to 1924. Est. $50-100

2122. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. First National Bank Checks with Orange Revenues, 12 pieces.
All have the RNX revenue stamps in orange. Checks have stains and wear. Listed in at $20 each. Est. $50-75
2123. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. First National Bank Deposit Slips and Checks, Over 50 pcs.
This lot has condition problems, Green, pink and yellow deposit slips, two different styles of checks. Water
damage, tears, generally dirty. From about 1903 to about 1916. Est. $25-50

2124. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. First National Bank Document Collection. This collection
consists of checks, a few cashier’s checks, and certificates of deposits. About thirteen different styles of checks,
ranging from a modern style 1951 check to a very fancy check with a vignette of a ship at the top (this one has
“Original, Duplicate Unpaid” across face and a large triangle cut out through signatures, no bank name on it).
Some of the businesses are Mt. Pisgah Lodge, A.F. & A.M., No. 96, Mines Incorporated, The E.F. Eaton
Lumber Co., Mrs. E.A. Moser, Groceries and Meats, The Eclipse Decorating Co. and more. Dates range from
about 1895 to 1959. Fine to very fine group. Est. $50-150

2125. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. First National Bank. Lot of 2 revenue checks. One issued to J.
E. Keating & Co. for $10 in 1898, and signed by Chas. B. Burch. The other is issued to A. J. Williams for $100
in 1901 and Signed by H.R. O’Byrne. RN-X imprinted stamp in the center of the check. Both are in very fine
condition, with only a slight crease at the left edge on one, and three very slight bleached spots at the bottom
edge of the other. 3 x 7”. Not listed in Castenholz. Est.-$25-75

2126. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Forty City of and Four Town of Cripple Creek Checks, dated
1896 to 1906. The Town of Cripple Creek checks are pink, the others are yellow. At left is a vignette of a
robed woman holding a staff with the state seal of Colorado shield to her right. 8 x 3 1/2”. The Town checks
are signed by G.W. Jones, Pro Tem Mayor. Most of the City checks are signed by Geoge Pearce, Mayor. All
checks are marked paid in some manner. Very fine. Est. $75-150

2127. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Lot of 14 Miscellaneous Cripple Creek Checks. Treasurer of the
City of Cripple Creek, 1899, yellow with vignette at left of robed woman leaning against a shield of the State
Seal of Colorado; six checks of The Bi-Metallic Bank, dated 1899, one with red, adhesive revenue stamp; three
other checks of The Bi-Metallic Bank, dated 1897, signed by City Treasurer, A.G. Burton; two unissued checks,
First National Bank, “Fraternal Order of Eagles” at left, 190x, yellow paper; Denver, Colorado National Bank,
“The Hendrie & Bolthoff Mfg. Co.” at left edge, red, adhesive documentary stamp at top left, 1899, rubber
stamp of Bi-Metallic Bank; Cripple Creek Mineral Land and Development Co., receipt, unissued, undated; City
of Cripple Creek, Dr., billhead, 1903, blue paper. Very fine. Est. $25-50.

2128. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Lot of Nine Cripple Creek State Bank Checks. Four unissued
checks, three on one page and one single, “Teller and Park County Fair Association” in red at left edge, 191x;
one with fancy CCSB logo at left, 1910; one for General Fund of Fraternal Order of Eagles, 1914, on yellow
paper; prize voucher for Teller and Park County Fair Association, payable at the Cripple Creek State Bank,
1920; two in blue print, “promise to pay” notes, both damaged by water, rough edges. Overall fine to very fine.
Est. $10-20

2129. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Lot of Six Checks and Internal Bank Documentation on
Worthless Notes. All for Cripple Creek State Bank. Bank documented such things as: “This note is
worthless. B.R. Dell died near Guffey some time ago. H.D.M. 6-22-16” and “Joe Finley died in Canon City in
1913. The only thing we got out of the affair was an elk head which was his property and now hangs in the
bank lobby. This note is worthless.” The papers all show water damage, especially to top edge of checks. This
is an interesting lot! Est. $100-200

2130. Teller. Cripple Creek. Checks. Miscellaneous Cripple Creek Bank Check Collection. 17 pieces,
all but three are First National Bank of Cripple Creek checks of varying styles. The other three checks are a
Cripple Creek State Bank check and two Treasurer of the City of Cripple Creek checks. Businesses on the
checks include: New Gold Dollar Mining Co. (1940), Cripple Creek Hardware (1896), A.E. Carlton, Contractor
(1910), J.G. Kite, The Beaumont (1902 - poor condition), Fraternal Order of Eagles (two unissued checks, xf).
Circa 1899 -1940. Generally very fine. Est. $50-100
2131. Teller. Cripple Creek. Christmas GMC. Incorporated in Colorado 1895. Issued to H. B. Babcock
for 500 shares, cert #338, in 1895. Signed by J. E. Bergeron president and J. D. Sampson secretary. Vignette
at top center of mill along stream’s edge in valley. Vignettes at either side of miners underground. Green
border with gilt seal. Datelined Norway, Mich. Uncancelled. 8 X 11. The Vindicator Cons. GMC, as of 1916,
owned 95% of the stock of the Christmas GMC. Not clear where the actual locality of the properties for this
company are located. (Mines Handbook, 1916, p.1196) Folds. Very fine. Est. $50-150

2132. Teller. Cripple Creek. Chromolitho Postcard, & general Colorado Collector Card. Chromo card
postmarked Colorado Springs, 1906 with green 1 cent Ben Frankling U.S. postage stamp affixed. Picture of the
Elkton Gold Mine, Cripple Creek district. Shows mill buildings, dumps and prospects on hill in background.
Collector Card by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Co of NY. Has brief historical sketch on back, on front, picture of
Mountain of the Holy Cross, Cliff Dwellings, Garden of the Gods and Pike’s Peak Extremely fine. Est. $20-40

2133.    Teller. Cripple Creek. Cigar Stand Token. CRIPPLE CREEK / (round border of beads) / CIGAR
STAND // GF / 12 1/2 / CTS. / IT. Hole at center. Rd., b/b, 28mm. Est. $10-30

2134.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Cigar box labels from the Branch Saloon, c.1890, framed, encased in
large, ornate oak frame. Professionally matted recently. The labels measure 6.5 x 13”. One is the famous
“Welcome Nugget” label, and the other the “El Minero”, featuring underground mining scene. In excellent
condition. Est. $250-500.

2135. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cigar Store Indian. This classic western cigar store Indian was in the
showcase of the Branch Saloon in Cripple Creek that carried all of their retail stock of cigars. 24” long, 12”
high and 8” deep. Hand painted plaster of Paris, c.1895. Heavily stained from tobacco. No makers name.
Provenance: Jones Collection. Est. $500-1500.

2136. Teller. Cripple Creek. Citizens Bank Letterhead. Datelined Jul. 24, 1919, the letter is regarding a
principal payment on a note, addressed to M.E. Dukes. Very fine. 10.5 x 8”. Est. $25-50

2137. Teller. Cripple Creek. City Bank Letter, Resource Services Flyer, and Checks. The letter is
addressed to the Findley Consol. MC, regarding interest payment. All are very fine. 3 x 8” to 10.5 x 8”.
1908-1918. Est. $25-50

2138. Teller. Cripple Creek. City of Cripple Creek City Officers Salary List. 14 x 8.5 list of the various
salaries of City Officers for Nov., 1898, varying from $40 to $125 for the Mayor. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2139. Teller. Cripple Creek. City of Cripple Creek Documents. Lot of 14 pieces, including 3 payroll
records, County Assessor’s statement for the value of C.C. in 1909 ($1,102,970.00), and other papers. All in
very fine condition. 1900-c.1920. Est. $50-100

2140. Teller. Cripple Creek. City of Cripple Creek Police Dept. Salary List. Two different billheads
noting the salary distribution for the Cripple Creek Police Dept, 1898. 7 x 8.5”. Est. $25-50

2141. Teller. Cripple Creek. City of Cripple Creek. City License. Unissued business license number
979. Datelined Cripple Creek 19__. Nice double vignette of miners working underground with picture in
pillar of man in cage being hoisted to the surface. Gold border on white paper. 7 x 10-1/2. Printer - Denver
Litho. A business license form from the city of Cripple Creek used after the formation of Teller County in
March of 1899. Stain near dateline. Very fine. Est. $25-50
2142. Teller. Cripple Creek. Town of Cripple Creek. Town License. Unissued business license number
322. Datelined Cripple Creek 189__. Vignette of elk’s head. Black border and print on white paper. 8-1/2 x
11. Printer - Times Cripple Creek, Co. This business license was required by business operating in Cripple
Creek prior to the formation of the new County of Teller in March of 1899. “County of El Paso, State of
Colorado” is printed below the masthead. Est. $25-50

2143. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Armstrong Jewelers. Five items from W.D. Armstrong,
Cripple Creek. A.) Small gray jewelry box, “W.D. Armstrong / Jeweler / & Stationery / Cripple Creek, Colo.”
B.) Artificial gold nugget ring with “Cripple Creek” on inside band. “Nugget” is 0.6” long, 0.4” wide (in box
above). C.) Eye-glasses (one lens is cracked) in leather case with gilt lettering, “W.D. Armstrong / Jewelers &
Stationers / Cripple Creek, Colo.” 4.2” long, 1.8” wide. D.) Small leather change purse, silk lined. No
markings. Carries box with ring in it. E.) W.D. Armstrong billhead, dated 1910, order for rubber erasers,
rulers, pencils, stamp pads etc. Very fine. Est. $50-150.

2144. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Cripple Creek Brass Ashtray. “Classic Car Club of America
- Cripple Creek Tour, 1963” with picture of old car. 5 1/4” diam. Est. $20-30.

2145. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Cripple Creek Ephemera. 1) Blinky’s souvenir miniature
circus flag, featuring polar bear in circus wagon; C.C./Victor souvenir flag, black and white; 2 souvenir miners
statues, brass and plaster; miner’s mule stereo; Victor drug store game; Cripple Creek shell; Pike’s Peak sterling
souvenir spoon, c.1900; Cripple Creek Museum opening crucible, 1953; Carleton’s desk note box. Est.
$100-200.

2146. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Cripple Creek High school 1940 Football Megaphone.
Schedule printed on the megaphone, red with black writing. “C.C.” painted on it. Sealright Sport Megaphone
by Sealright Co., Fulton NY USA. A few creases, fine. 10 1/2 x 4”. Est. $25-50.

2147. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Cripple Creek related. Mini anvil that appears to be a wax
sealer; mini hammer head; and small horseshoe that has “Good Luck for Us All” embossed on it. 1-2”/ea. Est.
$25-50.

2148. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Cripple Creek Yardsticks. All 8 are printed with merchant
names, c.1895-1925. Est. $50-100.

2149. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Folding Button Hook, c1895-1900. “Ellis Rosenburg /
Cripple Creek & Victor // Florsheim Shoe / For the Man Who Cares.” 4.25” long, hinge at center. VF. Est.
$25-50.

2150. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Lot of Four Items. Bottle opener / ice pick, “Miners Ice &
Fuel Co. / Phone 398 // same. 8” long, 1.75” wide at largest end. Wood on wire spindle for “The Boston
Department Store / 212-14 East Bennett / Cripple Creek / Colo.”, reportedly a school book carrier. 4”. Small
red whistle for “Blue Front Grocery. Writing in poor condition - not very legible at this point. 2”. Small
medal-type piece for “Poll-Parrot Solid Leather Shoes” with a picture of a parrot. Enamel (?), convex 0.7”
piece on wm fob, top broken. Est. $50-75.

2151.     Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Elf Miner with Ore Car Full of Gold Plywood Cut-Out.
Hand painted “elf” miner on half inch wood backing. The cut out is very cute is reported to be a featured
photograph in the Guide to Cripple Creek written by Trammer. This was used for celebrations and holidays in
the town of Cripple Creek for years. A couple of rough spots on painting, but very minor. This is an adorable
Cripple Creek collectible. It would look great as a lawn prop or for the kids. 48 x 48” Est. $50-150

2152. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Simulated “Gold Nugget” Ladies Hat Pin. Patented with the
US Patent office in 1904 for Bennett’s Jewelry Store, Cripple Creek, Colo. The pin looks remarkably like a
“nugget” or piece of crystalline gold. May have been sold by the Crystal Peak Gem Co., also in this sale. A
cute little keepsake, in great condition. 6.5 x .5. Est. $50-100.
2153. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Souvinier Silver Plate Trophy Cup. 2.25 inches diameter x
4.5 inches tall. Inscribed “Cripple Creek/Colo”. Two Handles. Very Fine. Est.-$25-50

2154. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Toy Gyroscope in original box, with instructions. Circa 1935.
Box is 2.5”cube. Very fine. Est. $25-75.

2155. Teller. Cripple Creek. Collectibles. Two small, collectable table top souvenir trays. (For
candy?) One is 4 x 6” with hand painted blue columbine and “Cripple Creek” in gilt. (TK, Vienna, Austria) on
back. Ceramic, ornate edges, no chips. The other is copper plate on raised white metal with picture of the
National Hotel and Teller Co. Courthouse. Fancy, ornate. Copper plate worn off about half of the tray. May
have had light gold plate. Both near mint. Est. $100-200.

2156. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colonial Dames GMC. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to G. Wm.
Doerzbach for 1000 shares, cert #507, in 1899. Signed by Walter A. Stebbins vice president and Ben A.
Metcalf treasurer. Vignette of the head of a colonial woman. Gold underprint. Uncancelled. 6 X 9. Printer
- John Polhemus Ptg. Owned the Grace Darling claim on the north slope of Bull Hill, the Dames group
containing: Ida Lee, Talisman, Silver Lake, Rocks Nest, Ida May on Raven Hill, and the Speeler on south slope
of Battle Mountain. The shafts were 250’, 50’ and 35’. Very fine. Est. $100-200.

2157. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado City & Manitou M&M Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to
M. S. M. Robinson for 117,915 shares, cert #1095, in 1905. Signed by W. J. Ghiner vice president and J. P.
Jackson secretary. Vignette of miners working underground. Green border and seal. Uncancelled. 7 X 10.
Printer - Out West Ptg, Colorado Springs. Owns the Iron King, Ella, Red Rock, Genoa and Frank Lee covering
39 acres on Tenderfoot Hill and Little Allie, Two Earls, Good Luck and Tom Patterson covering 10 acres on
Bull Hill all in the Cripple Creek District. No production numbers known. (Horn &McMahan, 1899, p. 20)
Folds. Very fine. Est. $50-100

2158. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Gold Camp MC. Incorporated in Wyoming 1906. Issued to
Lucinda Manchester for 5000 shares, cert #275, in 1906. Signed by W. C. Stark president and M. L. Richardson
asst secretary. Black print. Uncancelled. 7 X 8. Folds. The company owned property on Raven Hill and
elsewhere. No production known and no liabilities. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2159. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Gold Consol. Group of Title Abstracts and Other Documents
Pertaining to the Colorado Gold Consolidated, Inc. The properties included those once owned by the C.O.D.
MC (Wm. Bennett); Keystone M&M, Vindicator Consol. Includes seven title reports, about 100 pp,
c1891-1930 by the Colorado Map, Abstract & Title Co., See similar lots in Titles and Abstracts. Est. $75-100

2160. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Leasing, M&MC. Incorporated in Arizona. Issued to S.H.
Galbraith for 25,000 shares in 1904. Signed by president W. Gates and secretary Charles S. Tyler. And signed
by both on the back as well. Certificate consists of black print, with no vignette, but floral and scroll design in
the masthead. Black border with gild seal. Uncancelled. Some condition problems with two rip repairs at the
bottom and top edges. Piece torn away at top edge. See biography of W. Gates. 9 x 12”. Fine. Est. $50-75

2161. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Magazine. Vol. I, Denver, Colo., April, 1893. First publication
of the Colorado Historical Society. No cover or cover page. Cover page is supplied by a typed copy. Many
of the articles are accompanied by photos, with a particularly important article on Cripple Creek. “When I saw
the suffering of innocent misguided prospectors in the San Juan, I promised I would never knowingly persuade a
man to invest, or even to visit a mining camp that was not a mining camp. I came to Cripple Creek a
skeptic…,” wrote Cy Warman in 1893. The article is 9 pp. long, and is a rare insight into the early days of
Cripple Creek. Est. $75-150

2162. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Magazines. Six Colorado mining related magazines. 4 different
issues of Colorado Magazine, 1932-35; Mining Science, 1913; Mines & Minerals, 1900. Some articles on
Colorado history. VF. Est. $50-75

Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Midland Rail Road. See entry under Railroad Section.
2163. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado Pamphlets. A) Manitou, 1893, 40 pp. Three illustrations on
cover demonstrating town happenings. Worn green cover. B) The Scrap Book, 1st edition, 1935, Denver,
64.pp. Fancy cover, with deco design at binding. C) Zebulon Pike’s Damned Rascals, by Donald Jackson,
1979, 49 pp. Red cover, with crude illustration of mountain range. Est. $25-50

2164. Teller. Cripple Creek. Colorado. My Home in the Rockies and Sweet Little Baby of Mine sheet
music by William Lehr. Arrangement is in very fine condition, with a color illustration o f a cabin set near a
stream in the Rockies ,and illustration of a baby encircled by a pink ribbon featured on the covers. 9 x 12”.
Est.-$15-30

2165. Teller. Cripple Creek. Columbine Victor Deep Mining & Tunnel Co. 1899. Bill of sale. Signed
by Wm. H. Patten, President of the Marvin Electric Drill Co. This company was incorporated in 1894 and
mostly owned by the Woods family. They had significant holdings of at least 20 claims and controlled the
property of the Columbine GMC. They drove a 4,000 tunnel through Squaw Mountain (Hills) Very fine. Est.
$25-50

2166. Teller. Cripple Creek. Columbus Mines Co. stock certificate and title abstract. This company was
incorporated in Arizona in 1911. Certificate was issued to S.L. Canter for 2000 shares in 1917. Uncancelled.
Signed by James Doyle as president. 8.5 x 10”. Abstract dates from 1893-1904 8.5 x 17. Very fine. See
write-up on Doyle at beginning of Cripple Creek section. Est. $100-300

2167. Teller. Cripple Creek. Consolidated Nevada MC. Incorporated in Wyoming in 1901. Issued to
C.W. Curie for 1000 shares in 1902. Uncancelled. Signed by president J.K Miller and secretary E.S. Bach.
No vignette or border, but has a fancy masthead. Black print on vanilla paper. Also known as the Mitchell
Lode, next to the April Fool Claim. 6 ¼ x 9 ¼”. Est. $50-150

2168. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cresson Cons GM&MC. Incorporated in Colorado 1894. Issued to Mary
E. Foster for 100 shares, cert #1341, in 1896. Signed by J. H. Waters president and Wm. M. Knupp secretary.
Vignette at upper left of antlered elk. Brown border. Cancelled by hole punches across bottom of certificate.
9 X 12. Printer - John A. Lowell & Co, Boston. Tears on every edge. Staining prevalent. Will papers of
Mary Foster attached. Owned the Mary L., Sadie Bell, Draper, Friar Tuck, Robin Hood, and Trilby mines
covering 49 patented acres on Raven Hill in the Cripple Creek district. The property was considered worthless
until November 25, 1914, when a remarkable discovery was made of a pear shaped vug of calaverite (gold
telluride) 14’ wide, 23’ long and 1265’ below the surface. The value of the gold in the vug produced was
estimated at $1.2 million by 1914 gold price of $20/oz. At today’s gold price of approximately $270/oz, the vug
would have been worth about $162 million! Sprague (1953) reported 1400 sacks of crystals from the walls of
the vug. By May, 1915, the vug was still producing, as two carloads of first-grade sacked ore and two carloads
of second-grade loose ore were shipped to the Golden Cycle mil at Colorado City. In July, 1916, the Cresson
Co was bought by A. E. Carlton and associates for a reported $4.2 million. (Mines Handbook, 1931) Poor
condition. Rare. Est. $75-150

2169. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cresson Cons GM&MC. Incorporated in Colorado 1894. Issued to
Hayden, Stone & Co. for 100 shares, cert #27398, in 1921. Signed by H. Bates president and J. Underwood
secretary. Green border. Cancelled by hole punches. 9 X 12. Printer - Western Bank Note, Co, Chicago.
Right edge worn. See above lot for the story. Fine. Est. $25-50

2170. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cresson Consol. GM&MC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Issued to
James H. Post for one hundred shares in 1916. Signed by president Daniel Thatcher and secretary Adolph J.
Zang. Cancelled. Green border. Fine, hole punches indicating cancellation at right and left. The company
owned four claims which saw only limited activity. The property was considered worthless until November 25,
1914, when a remarkable discovery was made of a pear shaped vug of calaverite (gold telluride) 14’ wide, 23’
long and 1265’ below the surface. The value of the gold in the vug produced was estimated at $1.2 million by
1914 gold price of $20/oz. At today’s gold price of approximately $270/oz, the vug would have been worth
about $162 million! Sprague (1953) reported 1400 sacks of crystals from the walls of the vug. By May, 1915,
the vug was still producing, as two carloads of first-grade sacked ore and two carloads of second-grade loose ore
were shipped to the Golden Cycle mil at Colorado City. In July, 1916, the Cresson Co was bought by A. E.
Carlton and associates for a reported $4.2 million. (Mines Handbook, 1931) 9 x 12”. Est.-$50-100
2171. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek & Alaska Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Territory of
New Mexico. Issued to E. O. Douglass for 2,500 shares in 1898. Certificate number 21. Datelined Cripple
Creek, Colo. Signed by President R. F. Ferguson and Secretary W. Barlow. Uncancelled. Vignette of griffin
with paw on globe. Black border with gold underprint. 5 brown 10-cent documentary stamps at top right. 8 x
10. Printer not noted. Est. $75-150

2172. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Banks & Checks. Many checks from the Treasurer of the
City of Cripple Creek, 1898/7; list of 6% funding bonds from 1916 on FIB Cripple Creek letterhead; letter on
Cripple Creek State Bank letterhead regarding the rent of the local opera house, 1916. All very fine. Lot 32
pieces. Est. $100-200

2173. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Banks No RN’s. Lot of 17 pcs. 12 First NB, Cripple Creek;
City of Cripple Creek, 1920; City of Goldfield, 1919; Rocky Mountain NB, 1906; Teller & Park County Fair
Association, Cripple Creek, 1920; Cripple Creek State Bank, unused. Very fine. Est. $100-200

2174. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Broadside, c.1906. This notice was administered by the
board of health, apparently due to excessive spitting on the streets of Cripple Creek! “No person shall
expectorate (spit) upon any sidewalk…or public place. Anyone found breaking this ordinance would be fined.
Very cool piece of history, and in excellent condition. 5.25 x 9. Est. $100-300

2175. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek City Land & Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1897.
Issued to Lucia A. J. Sawin for 50 shares in 1899. Certificate number 412. Signed by President Wm. F. Burns
and Treasurer True W. Rollins. Uncancelled. Three vignettes: top center of mill buildings in rugged canyon
with river and steam train; top left of 3 miners inspecting ore sample; top right of miners working underground.
Green border and underprint with green and gold seal. 8 x 10. Printer - Goes. Est. $75-150

2176. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Club Association. Annual Report, for the year 1906 for the
Association. 2 pp, lists Board of Directors, Statement of Conditions, Fixed Charges and Expenses,
Departments: Café, Cigars, Cards, Bowling, Billiards and Pool, Membership. On front there is a discoloration
from where a piece of paper was laying across this one. Est. $20-40

2177. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek District Mine Owners’ and Operators’ Association. Two
letters dated April and November, 1904 from the association to mine owners’ requesting they implement a
practice whereby all leasees be required to have a “Recommendation Card” issued by the Association. The
card, undoubtedly would be issued only to those individuals who agreed to follow the rules and regulations of
the Association. This group was organized to police the mines and try to counter the rampant and costly practice
of high-grading that was common in the district (see historical sketch about the organization of Teller County).
Est. $50-100

2178. Teller. Cripple Creek. The Retail Creditmen’s Association. Datelined Cripple Creek, 1903. A
letter from the Association to mine owners of the Cripple Creek District requesting they implement a practice
of requiring a bond of all leasers to the end that all debts incurred by the leasers be paid. Merchants were facing
severe losses owing to unpaid debts for goods, groceries, mining supplies and so on. It was common practice in
the District for purchases by leasers to be made on credit, with payment due in 30 days. However, many
individuals to whom credit had been extended failed to pay their debts, either because they had not been
compensated for their labors or they had failed to find anticipated ore in paying quantities. The practice caused
problems for the vendor who, in turn, had to pay his suppliers and so on. By instituting the requirement of a
bond, it was felt their losses would be minimized, thus improving the welfare and vital business interests of the
District. Est. $50-100
2179. Teller. Cripple Creek. A resolution presented to the Cripple Creek District Mine Owners’ and
Operators’ Association from the Minister’s Association of the Cripple Creek District. The Ministers were
lobbying for the Association to shut down operations on Sundays “in order that the mine and mill workers may
have rest from toil, and opportunity and strength for attendance upon the various Sunday services of the
churches, and for attention to the higher moral and spiritual interests of life and character”. The Minister’s
Association may have been moved to this action by the reflections in their collection plates of the thinning of
their flocks. Est. $50-100

2180. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Fire & Police Related Documents. Lot of 10 letterheads
and billheads from the C.C. local law enforcement. Interesting report of the Chief of Police for December,
1927, “Investigated report of insane woman…called to Milt Kings to stop rough house…This was probably the
first time that no arrests were recorded either in the city or county, all during holidays.” 1897-1928. Very fine.
Est. $100-200

2181. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Gold Exploration Co. Incorporated in Colorado.
Certificate number 109 issued to Hugh R. Haussler for 200 shares in 1934. Signed by President John W.
McGee and Secretary Richard C. Swank. Uncancelled. Vignette of mining scene with mill buildings,
headframe, tracks on trestles, ore cars, miners and waste dumps. Black border with gold underprint and seal. 8
x 11. Printer - Goes. This was one of the companies owned by the Woods family (Levine, pp. 20-22). The
company owned 160 acres of the Lawrence townsite on the south side of Victor. The property was primarily
real estate intended for town lots, however, one claim on the property had four shafts ranging from 50 to 350 in
depth. Samples from the property yielded rich assays, but production is unknown. (Hills, p. 145) Est. $50-150

2182. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Gold Milling Co. Lot of 2 certificates. Incorporated in
Colorado. Unissued, unsigned, and uncancelled. Vignette of the Gold & Globe Mill. Gold leaf border and
black print. Very fine condition. 9 x 12”. Est.-$20-40

2183. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Gold Milling Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Unissued,
189x, cert #360. Vignette of mill set in woods with several workers walking about. Under vignette is Gold and
Globe Mine. Gold border, seal and background design. 10 X 12. No information found within our library
concerning this company. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2184. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Imprinted Revenue RN Checks. Lot of 3 pcs. First NB,
Cripple Creek, 1899; Vindicator Con. GMC, Denver, 1899, vignette of mill site; First NB, Cripple Creek, 1901.
Very fine. Est. $25-50

2185. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Insurance Licenses, 1915-1921. Lot of 15. Most have
issued year in underprint. The borders vary in color and design, from blue to black line. Very fine. Est.
$50-150

2186. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek M&MC Ltd. Issued to George H. Crosbie for 1000 shares,
cert #2162, in 1936. Rubber stamp signatures. Blue border and background. Uncancelled. 9 X 12. No
information found within our library concerning this company. Very fine. Est. $50-150

2187. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Medical Related Documents. Lot of 11 papers from such
businesses as the Fairley Bros. & Lampman, Funeral Directors, Pike’s Peak Hospital (ambulance charge, $3!),
and Dr. J.C. Seymore among many others. Very fine. 1898-1918. Est. $75-150
2188. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Mine Engineers & Mineral Surveyors Documents.
Surveys performed at Jay Bird, Magdalene, Empire. Pinkerton and many others. Lot of 6 pieces. Very fine.
Est. $25-50.

2189. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Mines Photo Reproductions. 8 prints, c.1920, made from
original negatives, c.1901. Two photos of the Stratton Mines, one of the Logan shaft, and the other a bird’s eye
view of district, 4.5 x 5.5; distant view of the Portland Mines operations 5 x 7; bird’s eye view of Goldfield,
Colo.: Electric Power Plant, Golden Cycle Mine, Vindicator Mine, school house, 4.25 x 4.5; Portland Mines, 1 &
2, and Florence and Cripple Creek RR, 4.25 x 4.5; another distant view of Portland Mines operations on snowy
hillside, 5.25 x 7.25, and bird’s eye view of part of Goldfield Colo., and Bull Hill, 4.25 x 5.25; bird’s eye view of
Independence, Colo., and mines, 5.25 x 7.25. Est. $100-200.

2190. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Newspaper Billheads. Lot of 22 pieces from 1897-1955
from such papers as The Sunday Herald, The Star Publishing Co. and the Cripple Creek Times. All very fine.
Est. $75-150

2191. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripplecreek Post Office. Hand written letter on post office letterhead.
Cripple Creek is one word on letterhead. The letter is from D. M. Sullivan regarding some distasteful behavior
by a friend, John Holmberg. Sullivan writes, “. . .I will tell him of several little items of past political history,
and also what he may expect from a policy of rewarding his enemies. You may depend upon it that John will not
forget the interview when I see him.” On 8 x 10-1/2 lined white paper. Est. $20-40

2192. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Sewer Co. Incorporated in Wyoming. First Mortgage
Bond, cert #34, issued 1909. Signed by Charles A. Bradley president and Russell K. Stewart secretary. 14
coupons cashed in of original 30. Fancy masthead. Green border and print. 11 X 14. Minor wear to folds.
This company probably operated a town sewer system for Cripple Creek. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2193. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Sewerage Company, Incorporated in Colorado. Certificate
# 16 issued to J. L. Lindsay Trustee for 40 shares in 1898. Datelined Cripple Creek. Signed by President
William Geddis and Secretary J. L. Lindsay. Uncancelled. Vignette of the Great Seal of Colorado with eagles
and miners in background. Black border with gold seal and safety print. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. Folds,
checking at bottom edge, stain upper right corner, very fine. Teller. Est. $50-100

2194. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek State Bank original banking book, 1922. Only a few entries
per line. Frank Sifers little bank record book. Bound in leather, 4 x 2.5”. Very fine. Est. $20-40

2195. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek State Bank. Lot of 3 letterheads. Each one has its original
envelope. All are regarding delinquent payments, and each was returned as unclaimed. Very fine. Two were
written on June 21, 1916, and the third was dated June 22, 1916. 10.5 x 8”. Est. $20-40

2196. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Town License to Operate Business. Unissued. Vignette of
Elk’s head with fancy masthead. Black border. 9 X 12. Printer - Times Cripple Creek. Extremely fine. Est.
$15-30

2197. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek Trip on the Historic Ute Indian Trail Route c. 1910. A 10
page pamphlet, 3 X 3, of the tourist train ride from Colorado Springs to Cripple Creek through the Rocky
Mountains. There are 10 pages of lithographs and photo reproductions. The tour was operated by the Midland
Terminal Railroad, c. 1900. The tour also offers the option of visiting a gold mine in Cripple Creek for an extra
$1. The mine tour would take people to the 1000+ ft level. Very fine. Est. $25-50
2198. Teller. Cripple Creek. Cripple Creek, Victor and Colorado Springs Stage Co. certificate and
related documents. Lot of 13. The company was incorporated in Colorado. The certificate is issued to Rudy
Borgeson for 24 shares in 1935. Cancelled. Signed by Rudy Borgeson as president. It is unusual because it
seems to have been typed by hand, including the border, which consists of a series of asterisks. 8.5 x 11”. The
rest of the lot consists of an unaddressed letterhead, 11 x 8.5”, 10 stage passes, 6 x 3”, and a billhead, 1927, 8.5 x
5.5”. The stage was an auto stage, later called a bus. The original auto stages were open topped cars that
seated 6-10 passengers, plus the driver. All are very fine. Est. $50-100.

2199. Teller. Cripple Creek. Crystal Peak Gem Company. Incorporated in Wyoming in 1912.
Certificate # 20 issued to Agnes Winzell for 1000 shares in 1912. Datelined Cripple Creek. Signed by
President Anna M. Saunders and Secretary A. B. Whitmore. Uncancelled. Vignette of man and woman with
platform tent, covered wagon pine forest with log cabins and snow capped mountains in background. Small
vignette in each corner of border of mining scenes. Gold border, safety print and seal. 8 x 10. Printer not
noted. This company sold gems in a shop in Cripple Creek. It was unheard of for a gem business to be an
incorporated company, and this was run by a woman in a man’s mining camp. She undoubtedly made a portion
of her trade to the wives of wealthy mine owners. Very fine. Est. $150-250

2200.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Curtis Mine Lock Box. Cash box with gilt trim, c.1900. “Curtis Mine”
written on front panel, and “G.P.&E. Co.” written on side panel. Reportedly Cripple Creek. We could find no
information on the mine or the company. 10” x 14” x 6”. Est. $50-100.

2201.     Teller. Cripple Creek. Daisy, Dinky and Dolphna Lodes. Lot of four title abstracts dating from
1893 to 1901. All are very fine, with some wearing at the folds. 8 x 16”. Est. $25-50

2202. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante Gold Mining Company Book Records and Stock Certificate,
entries from 1895-1926. The company was incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Most of the entries record the
“Minutes of a Meeting of the Directors. Other things contained in the book are letters to stockholders, and
company receipts. Black and burgundy cover. The certificate (#5364) was issued to A.J. Bennitt for 5000
shares in 1924. Signed by vice-president W. Arthur Perkins and secretary A.D. Aitken. Cancelled. No
vignette, but fancy masthead. Gilt border, seal and underprint. Has a small rip in upper left corner, near the
edge. The cover of the book is quite damaged, but internally very fine. Est. $125-250

2203. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante GMC. Incorporated in Colorado 1895. Issued to N. Leipheimer for
1000 shares, cert #5226, in 1916. Signed by Walter Perkins vice president and A. D. Aitken secretary. Fancy
masthead. Gold border, seal and underprint. Uncancelled. 7 X 10. Printer - Gowdy-Simmons, Colorado
Springs. Very fine. The Dante is on the southwestern slope of Bull Hill. They had three shafts and leased the
property. About 250 tons per month production with $50,000 gross through 1900. Through 1913, production
numbers jumped to $900,000. A penny stock nonetheless. Est. $75-150

2204. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Letter dated
1899 requesting reissue of Certificate number 352 for 500 shares issued to Mrs. W. W. Blackman in 1898. The
original was destroyed in a fire that consumed her home. Signed by Mrs. Blackman, witness J. A. Sill and
notarized by Chas. F. Dodge in 1899. The Dante Gold Mining Company’s office was located in Colorado
Springs and its property, the Dante claim was located on Bull Hill. It was developed by one 450 ft shaft and
several others from 150 to 250 ft deep. At the time of Hills report, most work was being done on the fourth
level where a good stope of ore about 120 ft in length was being exploited. No dividends had ever been
declared by the company by 1900. (Hills, p. 151) Est. $25-50

2205.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Issued to Verner Z. Reed
for 1,000 shares in 1918. Certificate number 5279. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by Vice-President
W. Arthur Perkins and Secretary A. D. Aitken. Uncancelled. Gold border, underprint and seal. 7 x 11.
Printer - Gowdy-Simmons Co., Colorado Springs. The Dante Gold Mining Company’s office was located in
Colorado Springs and its property, the Dante claim was located on Bull Hill. It was developed by one 450 ft
shaft and several others from 150 to 250 ft deep. At the time of Hills report, most work was being done on the
fourth level where a good stope of ore about 120 ft in length was being exploited. No dividends had ever been
declared by the company by 1900. (Hills, p. 151) Est. $50-150
2206.      Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Issued to Grace G. Reed
for 100 shares in 1908. Certificate number 4688. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed by President L. L.
Aitken and Secretary O. H. Shoup. Uncancelled. Gold border, underprint and seal. 7 x 11. Printer -
Gowdy-Simmons Co., Colorado Springs. . The Dante Gold Mining Company’s office was located in Colorado
Springs and its property, the Dante claim was located on Bull Hill. It was developed by one 450 ft shaft and
several others from 150 to 250 ft deep. At the time of Hills report, most work was being done on the fourth
level where a good stope of ore about 120 ft in length was being exploited. No dividends had ever been
declared by the company by 1900. (Hills, p. 151) Est. $50-150

2207. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante GMC. Incorporated in Colorado in 1895. Check issued to A. D.
Aitken for $15.00 in 1923, drawn on the Exchange National Bank, Colorado Springs. Check number 1708.
Signed by A. D. Aitken, Treasurer. Cancelled. 3 x 9. Printer - ABN. The Aitkens, A. D. and L. L. had been
associated with this company since at least 1900. The Dante Gold Mining Company’s office was located in
Colorado Springs and its property, the Dante claim was located on Bull Hill. It was developed by one 450 ft
shaft and several others from 150 to 250 ft deep. At the time of Hills report, most work was being done on the
fourth level where a good stope of ore about 120 ft in length was being exploited. No dividends had ever been
declared by the company by 1900. (Hills, p. 151) Est. $50-100

2208. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dante Exploration Co. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to E. W. L. Lehne
for 2,000 shares in 1954. Certificate number 1684. Signed by President F. W. Ferguson and Secretary J. A.
Welch. Uncancelled. Black border, green underprint and seal. 8-1/2 x 11. Printer - Goes. This company
may be related to the Dante Gold Mining Co., however, this doesn’t seem very likely since that company sold its
mine to the Cresson Consolidated Gold Mining & Milling Co. in 1927 (Mines Handbook, 1931, p. 738). The
company is not mentioned in 1946 through 1963 volumes of the Mines Register. St. $50-100

2209. Teller. Cripple Creek. Deadshot Gold Mining Company. Incorporated in Colorado in 1899.
Issued to H. H. Barbee for 1,000 shares in 1899. Certificate number 86. Datelined Colorado Springs. Signed
by President Wm. Shemwell and Secretary A. F. Woodward. Uncancelled. Vignette of four miners working
underground. Gold border and seal on white paper. 8 x 10. Printer not noted. William Shemwell was one of
the original discoverers of the Elkton Mine; H. H. Barbee was the father of Mabel Barbee Lee, author of
Cripple Creek Days, and may have been related to John Barbee who located the El Paso with witching sticks.
The Dead Shot (printed on certificate as one word, but corporate seal and references show two words) company
office was located in Colorado Springs and its properties, comprising 13 acres on two claims, were located south
of the town of Cripple Creek in Squaw Gulch. Their Dead Shot claim was developed by a 400 ft shaft with
whim. (Hills, p. 152) Est. $75-150

2210. Teller. Cripple Creek. Deadshot Gold Mining Co. Typewritten letter to the First National Bank,
Cripple Creek authorizing payment to Tutt & Penrose for the deed on the Deadshot lode. Signed by Peter and
Patrick O’Connor. Includes envelope with masthead: Tutt & Penrose, brokers of real estate, mines and stocks,
insurance loans and investments. See historical sketch above. Est. $25-50

2211. Teller. Cripple Creek. Deadshot Gold Mining Co. Abstract of Title. Handwritten notes on deed
recordations, grantor, grantee, etc. See historical sketch above. Est. $25-50

2212. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dew Drop Claim. Deed, Title Abstract and Land Patent for the Dew Drop
Mining Claim, 1892-97. Deed is unsigned, but cover says, “Signed by J. J. Weicher at the request of D. D.
Findley…” All are very fine. Est. $50-100

2213. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dig=Gold Mining Co. Incorporated in Colorado in 1916. Certificate # 631
issued to Charles S. Jamison for 1,000 shares in 1918. Datelined Denver. Signed by President M. B. Burke
and Jos. Rhodes. Uncancelled. Vignette at left of 2 miners working underground by candle light; bottom
center in gold of mountain stream. Gold border, safety print and seal. 8 x 11. Printer - Goes. Owned the
Alpha and Omega mines. Ore occurred in a vein, 5 ft wide at a depth of 200 ft. Developed by a 400 ft shaft on
line between the two claims and drained by the Roosevelt tunnel. Very fine. Est. $50-100
2214. Teller. Cripple Creek. District Hospital Assoc. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to The Bank of
Victor for 250 shares, cert #17, in 1915. Ewing Snyder president and Frank L. Imale secretary. Vignette of
Colorado State Seal. Green border and seal. On 5 cent and one 10 cent revenue stamp affixed at seal.
Uncancelled. 8 X 11. Victor is a town in the Cripple Creek district. This company was probably organized to
provide medical services in the mining district. Slight stain at bottom edge. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2215.      Teller. District Hospital Association. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to The Golden Cycle
Mining and Reduction Co. for 500 shares in 1915. Certificate number 10. Signed by President Irving T.
Snyder and Secretary Frank L Smale. Uncancelled. Vignette of the seal of the state of Colorado, top center.
Green border, underprint and seal. Red 25 cent documentary stamp over seal. 8 x 10. Printer not noted.
Includes linen envelope in which certificate was filed. Frank L. Smale reportedly was superintendent of the
Portland Gold Mining Company at the time this certificate was issued. (Levine, notes with certificate). Very
fine. Est. $50-150

2216. Teller. Cripple Creek. Dolly Varden Group. Title Reports for the Dolly Varden Group,
c1895-1936, prepared by the Colorado Map, Abstract & Title Co. Once owned by the Enterprise M&M Co.
About 30 pp. See similar lots in Titles and Abstracts Section for illustration. Est. $25-50.

Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store Bottles
Drug stores in western America were a staple of local mining camp economy. They were the place people might
meet if a soda fountain were present, or just to mingle. They were one of the first kinds of stores to carry a wide
variety of “confections,” which is a term that sort of means “a little of everything” except hardware and
groceries. Today the large chains have usurped the classic American drug store. They are a dying breed.
         Many merchants chose to emboss bottles carrying their products with their drug store name and
location. Today these are valuable relics of western mining camp economy collected by a wide spectrum of
collectors. Often they are the sole remaining three dimensional artifact from a town or ghost town. There are a
variety of Cripple Creek bottles in this section, as well as a variety of Victor drug store bottles in the Victor
section.
         In the Cripple Creek 1894 directory there were four different drug stores listed. All were located on the
main street, Bennett. The City Pharmacy was run by Hereford & Kearns; Cripple Creek Drug Store by Dr. C.
Ver Bryck; the Palace Pharmacy by R. P. Davis & Co.; and Pearce’s Pharmacy. Three of the four were probably
within 100 feet of each other, though on different sides of the street. There was also a drug store in the
neighboring mining camp of Altman (W. Leavenworth,) but none in Victor. By 1912 there were five drug stores
in Cripple Creek and another four in Victor and one in Goldfield. The Cripple Creek stores were Engle & Davis,
H. Heider, Lewis & Co., Palace Pharmacy, W. Shockey. In Goldfield was The Palace Drug Co. (Corbin Bros.),
and in Victor were the Davis Drug Store, J. Rose, B. Schoen, and the Victor Pharmacy (L. Finkle.)

2217. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Central Drug Co. letterhead. Reads “Dispensers of High Class
Drugs/ Cripple Creek and Victor” in heading. Letter is dated Jan. 30, 1908, and addressed to Jas.
DeLongchamps, cashier of the First National Bank of Cripple Creek. The letter discusses terms of interest.
Excellent condition, without any tears, only some minor creasing where letter was folded into thirds.
Est.-$10-30.

2218. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Coltman Drug Store, Victor. Original stoppered, drugstore
master bottle, with original label. Circa 1920. The content of the bottle is “Plumbi Acetate” as labeled. 9 in.
tall by 2.5 in. diameter. Very fine condition. Est.-$25-50.

2219. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Cripple Creek Drug Store Documents. Lot of 23 various
receipts from Cripple Creek drug stores, such as City Drug Store, 1897, Central Drug Store/Co., 1898, and the
palace Drug Store among others. Receipts date from 1897-1939. All are in very fine condition. Some folds.
Est. $100-200

2220. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Cripple Creek Pharmacy. Group of 4 graduated glass
measuring containers from a Cripple Creek Drug Store. A) 5 in. tall, 2 oz. B) 6 in. tall, 4 oz. C) 8.5 in. tall,
32 oz. D) 11.5 in. tall, 32 oz. All in mint condition. A & B are engraved. C is embossed. D is silk screened.
Est.-$100-200.
2221.           Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Davis & Swen/ Pharmacists/ Victor, Colo. in slug plate,
and “S.D.” emblem at left. Two identical bottles in design, except one has a slight stain and lip chip. The other
is fairly clean and mint. Both are 2 oz. bottles. Est.-$50-100.

2222.         Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. G. R. Lewis & Co. Two 4 ounce clear bottles the same as
the preceding lot. Clean, mint. Est.-$50-100.

2223.       Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. G. R. Lewis & Co./ Druggists/ Cripple Creek, Colo.
Three sloped shoulder, clear drug bottles. 4, 3, & 1 ounce. W.T. & Co. Generally clean and mint.
Est.-$100-200.

2224. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. G. R. Lewis & Co./ Opposite National Hotel/ Cripple Creek,
Colo. Six clear graduating sizes: 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, & 16 ounces. The 16 ounce bottle is 7.5 in. tall. All mostly
clean and mint. Very nice. Est.-$200-500.

2225. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Heller’s Pharmacy/ Cor. 3rd & Bennett Ave/ Cripple Creek,
Colo. Four ounce clear drug bottle. Stained. Mint. Est.-$25-75

2226. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Jas. E. Smith’s/ Pharmacy/ Victor Colo. J.E.S. emblem at
left. Set of 5 clear drugstore bottles, in graduating sizes from .5 oz to 4 oz. All are near mint condition, except
for minor stains on some. Est.-$100-200.

2227. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Leslie L. McClellan/ Druggist/ Cor. 4th & Victor Ave./
Victor, Colo. One 2 oz. bottle, standing at 4.5 in. tall. Clear, but badly stained, but without chips.
Est.-$25-50.

2228. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Lewis & Engle Drug Co./ Cripple Creek, Colo. Slope
shoulder, 4 ounce clear bottle. 6.5 in. tall. Clean, mint. Est.-$50-100.

2229. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Nyal’s Family Remedies, Palace Pharmacy, Cripple Creek,
Colo. Painted Tin Sign. 10” x 28”, holes along edges, rust. Nyal agency emblem with sphinx at left. Dirty,
many dings, scratches. Circa 1920. Est. $100-200.

2230. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Pharmacists/ Geo. E Simonton & Co./ Victor, Colo. This lot
is without monogram, but “D.P. & Co” embossed in base. Clear, one oz. size, at 3.5 in. tall. Near mint.
Est.-$25-50.

2231. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Pharmacists/ Geo. E. Simonton & Co. (with lines above and
below name)/ Victor, Colo. Mortar and pestle at left, with G.E.S. monogram inside. Set of 3 graduating sizes:
2, 3, & 4 ounce bottles, ranging from 4.5 to 5.5 in. tall. Two of the bottles are slightly purple. All are near
mint and fairly clean. Est.-$100-200.

2232. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Pharmacists/ Geo. E. Simonton & Co. Lot 2. Two clear
bottles, both in near mint condition, in 2 & 4 ounce sizes. Same embossing as the above lot. Est.-$50-100.

2233. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Pharmacists/ Geo. E. Simonton & Co./ Victor, Colo. Two
oz., 4.25 in. tall clear bottle. Emblem at left inside mortar & pestle, but no lines above or below the name. “M
& Co, USA” on bottom. Clean, mint. Est.-$20-50.
2234. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Schoen’s Pharmacy billhead. Datelined July 1, 1929. Details
purchases paid for in cash. Very fine condition, small hole punch at left side. Est.-$15-25.

2235. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Scholtz & McClellan/ Druggists/ Cor. 4th St. & Victor Ave./
Victor Colo. Set of 3 bottles in graduating sizes: 2, 4, 5, ounce, ranging from 4.5 to 5.75 in. tall. Clear, with
slight stains. Near mint condition. Est.-$100-150.

2236. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Scholtz & McClellan/ Prescription Druggists billhead.
Datelined Nov. 1, 1896. Attached to Portland GMC billhead. Details purchase of everyday household items as
purchased by the Company. Very good condition. Small tear at crease where GMC billhead was folded in
half. Est.-$15-30

2237. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Three different clear Victor, Colo. Drugstore Bottles. A) W.
F. Bente & Co./ Pharmacists/ Victor, Colo. 4 oz. B) Davis & Swem/ Pharmacists/ Victor, Colo. 2 oz. C)
Scholtz & McClellan/ Druggists/ Cor. 4th & Victor Ave/ Victor, Colo. 2 oz. All are clean and mint.
Est.-$100-150.

2238. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. Victor Drug Co. 2 different billheads- Nolte and Paquin.
Very fine condition. One billhead has slight discoloration at upper right corner. Est.-$25-50.

2239. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. W. F. Bente & Co./ Citrate/ of/ Magnesia/ Victor, Colo. in
circular slug plate. Aqua bottle, with some roughness on lower ring, below lip where wire bale holding cork
was attached. Rare, possibly unique. Est.-$400-600.

2240. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. W. F. Bente & Co./ Pharmacists/ Victor, Colo. in script. Four
clear bottles, in three different sizes: 4, 2, and two 1 ounce bottles. All have “WT & Co. USA” on base. Clean,
mint. Est.-$100-200.

2241. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. W. F. Bente & Co./ Prescription Druggists/ Victor, Colo. in
slug plate. Amber 2 oz. bottle, with a plain base. 4.75 in. tall. Still stopped with cork. Chip in lip, but
otherwise in very fine condition. Est.-$150-250.

2242. Teller. Cripple Creek. Drug Store. W. J. Daniels, / Prescription Druggist. Letterhead.
Photograph of drugstore front in upper left corner. The letter is addressed to the Downington Investment Co.
The letter discusses Mrs. Lulu J. Bernard’s late rental payments for specified lots. In very fine condition save
for some discoloration around the bottom and right edges. Est.-$20-40.

2243. Teller. Cripple Creek/Victor. N. E. Eads Hardware 1945 calendar. 12 pp. with various pictures of
hunting & fishing scenes in brown print. 9 x 16.5”, with wall hang string at top. Near mint. Est. $25-50.

2244. Teller. Cripple Creek. El Paso & Fremont Abstract Co. Ledger for Victor, Anaconda, Altman,
Gillett, and Arequa, Colorado. The ledger lists transactions of land as recorder in El Paso Co. records. This
book is the early title records of the county, for this title company. 15.5” x 17.5”. Leather binding, and in mint
condition. 250 pp. Est. $500-1000

2245. Teller. Cripple Creek. El Paso Cons Gold MC. Incorporated in Colorado
1893. Issued to H. C. Maloney for 100 shares, cert #395, in 1913. Signed by Allen L.
Ferris president and D. Man secretary. Vignette of miners underground with two miners
double jacking and two miners operating pneumatic drill. Green border and underprint.
Uncancelled. 9 X 12. Printer - Hamilton Bank Note, NY. Owned 70 acres on Beacon
Hill, Cripple Creek. There are 3 shafts reaching 1350’ depth with over 36 miles
(160,000 ft.) of old workings. Prior to 1923, the company was a major producer in the
region. In 1923, the company borrowed $25,000 from the Beacon Hill M&MC to fix up
the mine and mill. They
must have decided not to pay back the debt, because in 1925, the property was foreclosed
on in judgment of the Beacon Hill Co. The mine was finally reopened in 1926, with 4
lessees and El Paso all working the property. Property taken over by New El Paso
Mines after 1926. (Mines Handbook, 1926, p.610-11) Very fine. Est. $25-50

2246. Teller. Cripple Creek. El Paso County Abstract and Title Guaranty Co. Letter from company
secretary to client regarding notes on the Duglid Lode. Dated 1906. Response, handwritten in pencil at bottom
of page. 8-1/2 x 11 on letterhead paper. Est. $25-50

2247. Teller. Cripple Creek. El Paso GM&MC 1894 By Laws. The original typed by laws of the newly
formed El Paso GM&MC which later became El Paso Cons GMC and later yet to the New El Paso GMC. See
lot above. Very fine. Est. $25-50

2248. Teller. Cripple Creek. El Paso MC. Lot of 44 papers and documents surrounding the company
including company annual reports, bulletins, letterheads, newspaper clipping, to stockholder correspondence,
and travel brochure. The travel brochure shows everything from a map and directions, to pictures of the mine at
work and fees for entrance, and is entitled, Gold Empire Mine Trip. Early 1900’s. The El Paso was
incorporated in 1894 and owned four claims and fractions. They had 2 shafts over 300 ft in depth by 1900. It
was a good producer. (Hills) Very fine. 9 x 7” to 11 x 8.5”. Est. $300-500

2249. Teller. Cripple Creek. Elkton. Tornado Gold Mining Co. Undated, handwritten letter on
company letterhead to a cashier at the 1st National Bank of Cripple Creek from W. D. Blackmer requesting the
deposit of the enclosed check to his account. Blackmer is listed in the letterhead as superintendent at Elkton.
W. D. Blackmer was probably a son of Henry Blackmer, a prosperous entrepreneur involved with mining and
railways in Cripple Creek and Colorado (see historical sketch on him under Buckhorn Gold Mining Co.) The
company was incorporated in 1895 and owned about 14 acres in 7 claims on Raven Hill. In 1900 the company
consolidated with the Raven and the Elkton under the name Elkton Consolidated M & M Co. Development
included an 800 ft shaft with levels at about 100 ft intervals and over 1800 ft of drifting. They had a large shaft
house, engines and hoisting plant, compressors for drills, ore bins and full surface equipment. Gross production
to 1900 amounted to about $75,000. (Hills, p. 463). Est. $25-50

2250. Teller. Cripple Creek. Elkton Co. Incorporated in Colorado 1925. Issued to Wm. L. Sweet Jr. for
10,000 shares, cert #1236, in 1936. Signed by Bates president and Underwood secretary. Masthead of
company name. Black border with green print. Cancelled. 7 X 10. Printer - Out West Ptg, Colorado
Springs. Stub glued to left edge and cut later. Mines included the Appie Ellen, Thompson, Raven, Tornado,
Gregory and Ida May located on Raven Hill almost one mile north of Victor. A reorganization of the Elkton
Consolidated Mining and Development Co. The new company had a main shaft of 1636’ with 18 levels. The
ore was gold telluride in fissure veins in or near a breccia-granite contact. Fine. Est. $50-100.

2251.    No lot

2252. Teller. Cripple Creek. Elkton Photo, by A.J. Harlan, 1898. “Some Homes in Elkton, Colo.” 15
people, or possibly four different families in front of their houses for the picture. Little puppy visible on the
fence post, in the center. Mounted on cardstock, with no photographer reference on the reverse. 5 x 8.5. Very
fine. Est. $100-200.

2253. Teller. Cripple Creek. Elkton. Various papers and correspondence relating to the town. Lot of 8:
land patent to Elkton Mining & Milling Co.; newspaper clipping regarding “The Elkton’s Great Ore Chute; letter
datelined Elkton; Midland Terminal RR with Elkton Station noted as destination; 4 title abstracts for Elkton
mines, and related. The land patent marks the purchase of three different mines by Elkton M&M. Very fine.
1892-1904. 8 x 4” to 15 x 10”. Est. $100-200
2254. Teller. Cripple Creek. Empire State Mines Co. Incorporated in Wyoming. Issued to W. T. Doubt
for 1000 shares, cert #202, in 1904. Signed by W. H. Spurgeau president and Henry C. Cassidy secretary.
Vignette of snow capped mountains. Green border and seal. Cancelled by black pen. 7 X 11. Printer - Out
West Ptg, Colorado Springs. Very fine. Patented claim on Big Bull Mountain. No production through 1900.
This certificate was issued the year of the big Western Federation of Miners strike. Est. $50-100

2255. Teller. Cripple Creek. Evans-Grouse Mountain Tunnel Co. Envelope with company letterhead which
has mining scene in green underprint. Handwritten notes on envelope regarding deed and 4 location certificates
that had been, but are no longer, enclosed. c. 1896. Est. $10-20

2256. Teller. Cripple Creek. Excelsior Mining, Milling and Electric Co. Three typewritten letters, dated
May 1918, on company letterhead from W. F. Robinson to colleague F. M. Keeth at Stratton G. C. M. & D. Co.
regarding progress at their Longfellow mine, impeded, it seems, by a resident on site. “I have been wanting for
some time to get rid of the old lady that lives in the shack at the back of the shaft. If I had her out of there I
think O’Flaherty would move up there if we would fix it up a little. He would be nearer to his work.”
“Besides, I understand she has undesirable attachments” It seems they were successful in buying out the “old
lady” but it never was clear what her “attachments” were nor whether they remained attached to her when she
left. Est. $25-50

2257.    No Lot.

2258.    No Lot.

2259. Teller. Cripple Creek. Favorite Lode. Letter and Mining Deed from John K. Miller. The letter is
directed to the bank with an enclosed deed to the land whereupon the Favorite MC claim sits. The story
detailed in the letter speaks of a Wm. L. Clark (of Favorite MC) and his failure to pay Mr. Miller. The letter is
dated Cripple Creek Sept. 1,1893, and signed by John K. Miller, discovere of the lode, and attorney K. R.
Babbitt. Bull Mountain Mine deed assignment and mining deed 1893. 2 pcs. Est. $25-50

2260. Teller. Cripple Creek. Findley GMC. Lot of 16 billheads from such companies as A. E. Johnson, J.
I. Brown (assay work), and Garlock Packing Co. All are discolored, but in good condition otherwise. Most are
attached to Findley invoices. The findley was not a major producer through 1900, but by 1904 had produced
$700,000 (L&R). 6.5 x 8” to 2.5 x 6”. Est. $25-50

2261. Teller. Cripple Creek. Findley GMC. Lot of 8 papers from the Findley GMC & Findley
Consolidated MC. Findley Consol. MC was incorporated in Colorado. Certificate issued to J. Gump for 400
shares in 1905. Cancelled. Signed by president L. G. Carlton as president and E. C. Newcomb as secretary.
L. G. Carlton was the brother of A. E. Carlton, of the Golden Cycle Corp., which L. G. took over after A. E.’s
death. Black print. Very fine, holes punched along bottom. The other certificate, Findley GMC is issued to
Harold Lovett for 1000 shares in 1900. Signed by Geo. E. Findley as president and A. T. Jones as secretary.
Cancelled. Brown border. Very fine, three cancellation stamps across certificate. 8 x 11”. Along with these
certificates are two receipts from W. W. Price, Mining Stocks & Loan, and The Geo. Leyner Engineering Works
Co., three annual reports (1905, 1909, 1910), and a financial report from 1905. All are in very fine condition.
Est. $200-400

2262. Teller. Cripple Creek. Findley Gold MC. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to H. G. Gehm,
Trustee for 1000 shares, cert #3747, in 1902. Signed by vice president and W. K. Dudley asst secretary. Fancy
masthead. Brown border, print and seal. Mines located at Cripple Creek, El Paso, Colorado. Uncancelled. 7
X 10. Printer - Gowdy-Simmons Ptg, Colorado Springs. Stain along left edge. Located on Bull Hill where
two shafts were sunk to depths of 600’ and 415’ with several drifts. (Hills, 1900). Est. $50-100.

2263. Teller. Cripple Creek. First National Bank of Colorado Springs letterhead. Addressed to J. M.
Parker, Esq., president of the FNB, Cripple Creek, and signed by J. A. Hayes, cashier, regarding money in
Haye’s possession. 1896. Very fine. Est. $15-30
2264. Teller. Cripple Creek. First National Bank. Correspondence relating to the bank. Lot of 8 papers,
addressed to FNB on FNB and other companies’ letterheads, such as O.B. McClintock Co., Moneyweight Scale
Co. and the International Cyclopedia. Date from 1901-1928. Very fine. Est. $50-100

2266. Teller. Cripple Creek. First National Bank. Resource services flyers. Lot of 4. Each flyer, on the
front, lists the bank’s chairs and officers. The back details resources and liabilities. One is written on in pencil.
Very fine. 5.5 x 7”. Est. $50-100

2267. Teller. Cripple Creek. Fortune Gold Mining and Milling Co. Incorporated in Maine in 1896. Issued
to Lester A. Small for 5,000 shares in 1897. Certificate number 21. Datelined Boston, Mass. Signed by President
Fred L. Walker and Treasurer Francis H. Appleton. Uncancelled. Seven vignettes; top left of 5 miners working
underground & one calling to surface for ore bucket to be hoisted; in border at corners, a miner wielding a pick,
same or mirror images; at sides mirror images of a miner holding an ore specimen and pick handle. Black border
with gold underprint and seal. 8 x 10. Printer - Goes. Appleton may be the same or related to F. S. Appleton, a
local hotel manager who was involved in an incident in 1891. It seems he and Pegleg Ricketts had been arguing over
which of the two had the meanest wife. Ricketts attacked Appleton with a buggy whip and it took two other men to
pull him off. The Colorado Springs Gazette reported the incident stating Appleton “hovered between life and
death” for several days. “Hovering”, it later appeared, was the Gazette’s polite way of saying Appleton refused to
sober up. “Forty-rod, not buggy-whipping, was his main trouble.”( Sprague, p. 97). Est. $75-150

2268. Teller. Cripple Creek. Fortune Gold Mining and Milling Co., Inc. Incorporated in Colorado in
1934. Certificate number 3 issued to J. F. Underwood for one share in 1934. Datelined Colorado Springs.
Signed by President J. W. Ady and Secretary E. T. Edgerly. Uncancelled. Three vignettes: top center of
distant hills with “diggings” below and road leading to town at top; top left of 3 miners working underground
loading two ore cars; top right 3 miners underground drilling, swinging pick, loading ore car. Gold border,
underprint and seal. 8-1/2 x 11. Printer - Goes; Out West Prt’g. & Staty. Co., Colo. Springs. Low numbered
certificates for one share were commonly provided as honoraria to corporate officers or financiers who were
instrumental in the launching of new companies. This may have been a reorganization of the above company,
however, we have been unable to find any reference to either. Est. $50-150

2269.     No Lot.

2270. Teller. Cripple Creek. Free Coinage Gold MC. Incorporated in Colorado. Issued to L. M.
Pritchard for 1000 shares, cert #199, in 1893. Signed by S. J. Altman president and H. W. Barry secretary.
Vignette of spread winged eagle atop crag with train and capitol building to left and harbor to right. Black
border and green background. Uncancelled. 8 X 11. Lower left corner is missing by cut. Mines included the
Pinto, Rising Sun, Bison No 2, and the Pueblo, all situated on Bull Hill. By 1900, the main working shaft was
550’ deep, with about 5000’ of drifts and crosscuts. Samuel J. Altman owned a sawmill in Squaw Gulch, a
couple of miles from Cripple Creek. A few years after this certificate was issued, the company was sold to Sam
Strong, who was later shot to death in the Newport bar at Cripple Creek. The town of Altman was established
in 1893 in a saddle between Bull Hill and Bull Cliff at an elevation of 11,146’ and was advertised as the highest
incorporated town in the world. The post office closed in 1911 and today, the town no longer exists. Horace
W. Barry was an early Cripple Creek prospector who located dozens of claims. Barry founded the village in
1891, which bore his name in Squaw Gulch, just east of Mound City. A peak population of a few hundred was
reached in 1893 when the mines were going full blast. Barry liked to boast that his town was the cultural center
of the district, the Squaw Gulch Amusement Club being the nucleus. Among its residents was the immortal
Judge M. B. Gerry who, in 1883 at the trial of Alfred Packer for cannibalism, is reported to have said before
pronouncing sentence, “They was seven Democrats in Hinsdale County and you ate five of them…” Today
nothing remains of the town of Barry. (Fietz, 1974; Hills, 1900)A very unusual certificate with signatures of
two men who had towns named for them. Est. $200-400

				
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